CPD Support Pack

Document Sample
CPD Support Pack Powered By Docstoc
					Marketing
Marketing assistance and advice is available from Research and Business Services, email: business@liv.ac.uk

PLANNING
Before beginning to think about the variety of communications tools available to effectively promote your CPD course/programme you need to carry out a certain amount of planning. Researching and testing your ideas comprises a significant proportion of the time required to set up and run a CPD course. It is, therefore, well worth investing time and effort in the early stages.

Planning Checklist:
 establish whether there is a demand for the type of course you are looking to deliver, and the nature of potential participants’ needs. This will allow you to tailor your course to the needs of the participants, therefore offering added value and customer satisfaction. carry out an internal audit to establish whether or not the necessary equipment, expertise and administrative support exists in-house to successfully deliver the course. know your competition!! Carry out competitor analysis by obtaining course details for similar courses from other institutions. Competition from two identical courses with identical offerings is expensive and counter-productive. Check:            Is anyone running a similar course? If yes, many or few? How popular is their course? Is there a charge? Who is their target audience? How, where do they promote their course? How, when and where do they deliver their course? What do they do particularly well/badly?





discuss existing courses and your own ideas with recent and/or potential course participants. discuss existing courses and your own ideas with participants’ line managers or training officers. use all available means to add to your knowledge about the sector. Are there any specialist journals covering the sector which may add to your background knowledge? Liverpool's Central Library is a good source of information. develop and maintain contact with the regional groups (in most instances) of the professional bodies which represent potential course participants. These contacts are useful for information (initially and on an ongoing basis) and for promotion.



Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

1



audit the external market too, to examine the wider social, political, technological, economic and environmental issues which may also impact on the successful establishment/delivery of your course. the SWOT analysis is a useful marketing tool to summarise the key internal and external issues which will impact on your marketing problems and decisions: Internal Issues What are the University's/departments STRENGTHS and WEAKNESSES in delivering such a course What external OPPORTUNITIES and THREATS exist



External issues

MARKETING RESEARCH
Marketing research is the systematic design, collection, interpretation and reporting of information to help you solve specific marketing problems or to take advantage of marketing opportunities. Researching the market and having continual dialogue with customers present and potential is common sense. It is essential to regularly gather information in a systematic way to fully understand the dynamics of your potential market place and increase your ability to make decisions.

Secondary Research
Secondary research is information that is already printed. It is less costly and quicker to gather than primary research and is useful for generating ideas and screening. However, the secondary information is very general, is accessible to everyone and can sometimes be inaccurate or out dated. Secondary research is often used to:      identify market trends understand issues quantify market potential and growth identify potential customers/participants evaluate competitors

Sources of secondary research include:       published market research reports (Mintel, Compass) trade journals/associations/directories press reports competitor literature census Chamber of Commerce

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

2

Primary Research
Primary research, on the other hand, involves more expensive ad hoc research that is especially commissioned to fill in any knowledge gaps. Primary research techniques include: Pros Flexible Quick Cheap Can combine with fax/email Targets a large sample at low cost No interviewer influence exists Useful evaluation stage Interaction stimulates ideas Useful when testing out Can observe product/ service being used Very flexible Can interview at length Can show sample/literature etc Cons Limited length Problem of respondent availability Cannot show any paper work such as course literature Low response rates Slow Low complexity

Telephone Interviews

Postal Questionnaires

Focus Groups

Sample are not representative Not a realistic environment Strong personalities can dominate Expensive Time consuming Interviewer influence

Face to Face Interviews

In order to gain the most from marketing research use a combination of methods to gain the information you need. A combination is most likely to give the most comprehensive and cost effective flow of information.

Sampling
In large markets, e.g. training and professional development, it would be far too costly and time consuming to attempt to investigate the whole market place. Therefore take a sample, which can be defined as ‘a limited number of clients/prospects to represent the characteristics of the whole market’. However there are a few key points to consider:      make sure the sample is ‘random’ make sure respondents are decision makers or influencers include prospects as well as customers avoid bias the sample size should tally with market scale and resources

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

3

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
‘Communications’ isn’t the same as ‘marketing’ – it is part of the total marketing package! There are many communications techniques available to help communicate with your chosen audience. As a general rule, the more widespread your target market the greater the number of techniques will be required to carry the message. The tools available for marketing communications can be categorised into ‘personal’ and ‘impersonal’ methods. The principal difference between the two lies in their cost, their potential for personalising the message, the size of the audience they are able to reach and the complexity of the message which can be communicated.

Personal Methods Personal selling Telephone selling Exhibitions/events

Impersonal Methods Advertising Direct mail Publicity/public relations (PR) Leaflets and brochures Catalogues Sales promotion Sponsorship Technology (internet/fax/mobile)

To gain the most effective use of marketing communications, you must choose the optimum combination of methods to meet your marketing objectives available within your budget.

Your choice of communications mix depends on:      complexity or otherwise of the product/service competitor activity size and complexity of your market type of message to be conveyed budget available

PLANNING A COMMUNICATIONS CAMPAIGN
A communications campaign has four main aims: 1. 2. 3. 4. To raise awareness To arouse interest (in your course) To create a desire (for its benefits) To promote action (i.e. enquiries/enrolments)

The key to planning a good campaign is - getting the right message to the right people at the right time.

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

4

To achieve this you need to:  identify your target audience – always try and break down your market into target sectors. The more targeted your activity is to a particular audience the more effective it is likely to be. determine clear and appropriate objectives - SMART where possible (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timebound) An example of such an objective: ‘To generate 30 enquiries for your course within the next 3 weeks’      decide on the promotional message, considering such issues as content, format, structure and credibility of the sources of information select the method(s) of communication and media – the most effective campaigns integrate a variety of methods determine the intensity and time-frame for the campaign calculate the budget based upon the cost of the tasks required to meet the objectives - including media costs for advertising, and design, printing and postage costs establish control mechanisms to measure the effectiveness of the campaign



USE OF THE UNIVERSITY'S CORPORATE IDENTITY
The University's overall corporate branding has been designed to convey a wellestablished university, with pride in the past and a confident approach to the future. It should appear on all forms of communication.

Corporate Emblem
The corporate emblem consists of two elements - the coat of arms and the name style THEY MUST ALWAYS BE USED TOGETHER! There are three versions of the emblem that can be produced in a variety of styles, colours and with preferred backgrounds. Always use master copies of the emblem and never try to recreate it, adjust its proportions or attempt to reset the namestyle. Each version of the emblem has a minimum size dependent upon its colour style and to ensure a clear corporate message it is surrounded by its own area of clear space. No elements such as text or images should encroach upon this area.

Pantone Colours
Pantone colours to match the ‘four-colour process’ emblem are: Blue PMS 288, Red PMS 200, Yellow PMS 123

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

5

Corporate Typefaces (Fonts)
The primary corporate typeface, i.e. that which is used for the majority of text applications and emblem name style, is New Baskerville. If New Baskerville is not readily available and the material is only to be circulated within the University, then Times New Roman can be used as a substitute. Gill Sans is the secondary corporate typeface. This has been chosen to complement the primary typeface and is used for such things as headings, captions and diagrammatic text. No other typeface should be used as a substitute. Further information about use of the crest and the University’s corporate identity can be obtained from Corporate Communications, extension 46929.

PROMOTIONAL LITERATURE
Effective promotion is vital in the service sector. Amateurish publicity material acts as a double negative for potential customers. A badly written, poor quality leaflet promoting a course is likely to head into the bin. Potential participants have nothing else on which to base a decision. Factors to consider include:      tailor the message to the target audience avoid University jargon and acronyms unless they are widely understood externally don’t just list the features of the course, highlight the benefits (benefits sell, features do not!) put one of the key selling point(s) of the course in the first line of copy. It’s the best way to hook readers and keep them reading. remember the 'Readers Z'. The principle of 'reading gravity' holds that on any page where there is writing or printing, the starting point is the upper left corner, from which the eye scans across and down diagonally until reaching a terminal area at the bottom right corner. Twice as many readers will readily understand text in this layout.

Readers eye starts here, good place for a headline or logo

Readers eye moves to here, prominent position for key message, photograph etc

3 key site as eye moves down towards the bottom of page

rd

Eye finishes scanning the page here, ideal for contact/further information details

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

6



don’t write above the comprehension level of your audience. Use simple language as much as possible. No one likes to struggle through long-winded, pompous copy regardless of how highly educated they are. eliminate all technical terms or industry jargon unless you are sure the words will be completely clear to your audience communicators should be trustworthy and likeable images and ‘word of mouth’ testimonials can be more powerful than just your written text never use a picture, table, graph or chart without a caption. Captions have extremely high readership! avoid using capitals for body text and headlines, as it makes them significantly less legible than if set in lower case paragraphs with a ragged setting should be used rather than justified if comprehensibility is to be maintained. Almost twice as many readers understand ragged right text and it is easier on the eye. printing text in white on black or coloured backgrounds makes it difficult for readers to understand body text set all in capitals or italics is difficult to read the darker your headline the higher the comprehension level text in black/dark blue is easier to comprehend than either muted or high intensity colours use plenty of white space in your literature!

     

    

DEALING WITH EXTERNAL PRINTERS AND DESIGNERS Checklist of things to consider:
 do you want you literature to be printed in full colour, two colour or in mono (black and white)? When working with designers and printers try and choose colours which can be created from 4 colour process. Avoid ‘special’ colours as they can be very costly, both for initial printing and later reproduction. what weight of paper do you want to use? - Standard weights for a leaflet are between 90 - 135 gsm (grammes). there are a choice of paper finishes such as matt, satin, silk and gloss If you are want people to write on your literature, e.g. for a reply mechanism, or you

 

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

7

expect to overprint on it via a computer printer or photocopier for a flyer or certificate, then check with the printing firm that the surface of the paper is suitable for taking the ink effectively. Ask for some samples of the paper to try out first.   what size is your literature going to be and how many pages? Will it be landscape or portrait? Standard sizes are A4, A5, A6. try and include photographs or images – images speak a thousand words, however they do increase the costs. Printers charge approximately £20-£25 (in 2001) per scan for including photographs in a design. The use of coloured photographs will mean your literature will automatically become a 4 colour printing job! if including photographs provide original photographs or transparencies if you are scanning your own images printers will expect them to be at least 300 dpi for effective printing is your literature going to be folded or stitched (stapled) - remember stitched literature tends to be more costly what quantities do you require? – The larger the print-run the more cost effective it becomes. Your first print-run of a particular piece of literature will be more expensive than any future re-runs, due to the printers set-up cost in making plates and films. for smaller print runs consider more cost-effective digital printing (available at the University print room) Remember - External design agencies can be very expensive. Depending on your budget it is often worth contacting printing companies who will very often have their own internal graphic designer who can carry the work out for you at a more competitive price. always put your design and printing requirements in writing, in the form of a short brief and ask for a quotation for the cost of the work before it is carried out designers will often provide visuals/sketches of their ideas cost free, especially if they are in competition with other organisations for the work, to give you some initial thoughts on their designs before you decide to commission them to do the job.

   

 

 

ADVERTISING AND DIRECT MAIL
Advertising is a paid form of communication, transmitted to a target audience through a mass medium such as radio, TV, newspapers, journals and magazines. It is a very flexible promotional form of communication and can be extremely cost-efficient. It can reach a vast number of people at a low cost per person, and is a good way of raising the potential participants’ awareness levels of a course. However, although this may be the case, the overall expense of placing an advert can be extremely high, often limiting its use. Advertising also rarely provides rapid feedback and is difficult to measure. And people often remember much less of the context of a printed advert (e.g. in a magazine or newspaper) than that contained in other forms of communication, e.g. direct mail. Another form of advertising that delivers targeted, individually addressed communications to customers and prospects is direct mail. This has traditionally been

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

8

carried out through the postal system although with technological advances delivery by email is also becoming popular.

Strengths of Direct Mail
  Personalization - personal communications are always most effective Targeting - Information gained about individuals/companies through your marketing research, can be used to select those for whom your message will be most relevant. This reduces the annoyance factor by not mailing people who would not find the message of interest. And it saves money by reducing mailing quantities. Retention - research shows that messages delivered by mail are retained longer than other forms of advertising Acceptability - research shows that direct mail is welcomed by a high percentage of consumers and business people - providing it is relevant and interesting Impact - no other advertising medium can deliver a message with more impact advertisers have experienced spontaneous recall of 60% and 70%, several months after a mailing has been received Relevance - because you can vary your message according to specific target markets and information needs, direct mail is much more relevant and personal

  



Weaknesses of Direct Mail
 Costly - despite cost-efficiency of direct mail it can be expensive to produce. However the much tighter targeting capabilities can reduce most of the average wastage, and thus deliver a cost per reply which can be lower than other forms of mass advertising. Image - many people still associate direct mail with 'junk mail'. Junk mail is badly targeted direct mail that many people still receive. We must therefore ensure we reduce badly targeted mailings and thus keep annoyance and costs to a minimum.



Hints and Tips
 list quality - how well have you targeted your mailing? N.B. External mailing lists can be bought or rented from a large number of list brokers - on average lists cost £100-£150 per thousand records. A good list broker will allow you to select your list of records by using a number of factors including: Nth name (random sample of names), geographical area, postcode areas, job title, industry sector, no. of employees, company size   make sure your offer/message is of interest and relevant to your recipient TODAY! try and present your message in a creative way

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

9



make it as easy as possible for your recipients to reply. Have you given them every possible method of responding - post, telephone, fax, email, internet - a free phone number or postage paid envelope often works well? using the telephone to follow up your mailing 3-4 days after you have mailed it out can also help to increase the level of your responses always enclose a covering letter with your mailing inserts / flyers placed in external sector publications, newspapers, business magazines etc is another way of targeting your direct mail, e.g. Chamber of Commerce mailings

  

Every one of the above factors will have an influence on the number of replies your mailings attract.

PUBLIC RELATIONS (PR)
PR can be a very effective and inexpensive communications tool. For detailed advice and guidance contact the University’s Press Office (Ext 42247 or via http://www.liv.ac.uk/pro/ ) Advertising is more expensive but at least you have absolute control over the message. PR is far cheaper but often dependent on the editor or a third party’s interpretation of the facts and your conversation. Media editorial coverage (press, radio TV) is perceived as more credible than advertising Building and maintaining relationships with local press and specialist journal contacts can produce a lot of coverage and some unexpected dividends. Everyone in the Department should be aware of their function and value in PR activities. The effectiveness of editorial coverage can be greatly reduced if enquiries are met by unenthusiastic or unco-operative responses. Never delay replying to or returning the call of journalists.

Tips for writing a press release:
 a story should always answer the following questions:      Who is it about? What is it about? Where did/is it happening? When did/is it happening? - always try and write in the future tense Why did/is it happening?

The ‘what’ characteristic is the most important to grab the attention of the media.   always try and have a catchy headline make sure the first line of copy doesn’t repeat the headline, this is a common error that annoys readers

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

10

     

when writing a press release the first paragraph is always the most important. Editors cut stories from the bottom paragraph upwards tailor your press release to your target audience always include at the end of your story ‘For further information please contact……’ giving full contact details print on coloured paper so it stands out – a typical newsroom may get 60-70 press releases a day a photograph makes a story send a run of the mill story on a Friday for a Monday paper

WEB-BASED MARKETING
There is detailed guidance on developing a departmental website at http://www.liv.ac.uk/webteam/

CONCLUSION
Marketing is a huge topic that could take up a whole support pack on its own. This chapter is an attempt to highlight some of the practical applications of a range of marketing tools/techniques available to assist you in developing your CPD courses. For more detailed/strategic information please see the attached list of recommended reading.

Chapter 9- CPD Support Pack Revised 02/04

Page

11


				
DOCUMENT INFO