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					AUDIENCE MATRIX
Document Version: 1.0 Document Date: 6/03/09

Target Audience

How Many

Description

Key Attributes

Priority

Web Savvy

Seeking: What they are looking for

Tasks: What we want them to do

NTEN Members

Over 6,000

People who pay (or whose orgs pay) to receive the benefits of NTEN Membership. And proud we are of all of them.

Generally expect something from Very High us. Likely to learn their way around our website. Most likely to have to traverse our multiple websites at some point.

Pretty darn Information about Member high benefits. List of upcoming webinars. New research. Wisdom from our blog.

Renew membership. Attend programs. Recommend us to their colleagues. Network with colleagues and assist newbies. Update their membership (and org) records.

Search Traffic

Referred Traffic

Most of our search traffic 11,000/month comes from Google, and while the biggest percentage is some variation on “NTEN”, 80% of the traffic comes from other keywords, including “webinars”, “facebook”, and recently “beyonce”. Visitors captured by a link 10,000/month on another site, from social media mainstays (StumbleUpon, Twitter, Facebook) to blogs (particularly one Beth Kanter).

Looking for something specific that we may or may not have. Likely little to no knowledge of who we are and what we do.

Medium

Unknown

Some nugget of specific information, from fundraising on Facebook to data on IT salaries. It's a long, long tail.

Signup for newsletter. Download reports. Sign up for a webinar. Subscribe to the blog. Learn more about us. Eventually, join.

Interested in something specific, with some reason to believe we may be able to provide it. May have heard of us before.

High

Unknown

Something made them click a link to our site – generally, a blog post, a research item, or an event/webinar.

Easily access whatever content they were looking for. Signup for newsletter. Download reports. Subscribe to the blog. Learn more about us. Eventually, join.

Direct Traffic

9,000/month Generally people who type “Nten.org” into their browser, but also folks brought in from our direct messaging.

May be interested in something specific (from an e-mail they received). May also be checking in to see what we're up to.

Very High

Unknown

Either information about us (those who type nten.org into the browser) or something very specific in an e-mail we (or a partner) sent out – generally a webinar, a report, or a survey.

Easily access whatever content they were looking for. Read about the benefits of membership. Join.

New Visitors

Returning Visitors

People who have never 18,000/month been on our site before. They bounce harder (65%) and stay less time on site (1:40) than returning visitors. Less likely to come in through our home page; much more likely to come in through some random URL they found in a Google They came, they saw, they 12,000/month came back. Once they know us, they tend to stick around more (53% bounce rate) and stay longer (3:00+)

Likely don't know what we're all about. May have been referred by a colleague or another site – or one of our e-mails – but most likely coming from a search engine.

High

Unknown

Hard to say. They likely came from a web search on “facebook fundraising”, “it salary” or any of thousands of less common terms. We have such a wide variety of resources and articles, our appeal seems very wide, even if we don't have exactly what they're looking for. NPTech resources. They found something they liked the first time, and turn to our site with future questions. Often frustrated that they can't find (easily) it on our current site.

Stay. Engage. (I think part of this is making sure that they see ALL the content we have on the topic they wer referred about.) View at least a couple of pages on the site. Sign up for the newsletter. Subscribe to the blog. Sign up for something.

Probably looking for something. Likely to have to traverse our multiple sites at some point (if only to sign up for a webinar). May labor under the impression that we're awesome.

Very High Likely pretty good

Stay longer. Engage more. Join the community. Learn more about our resources and spread the word to their friends and colleagues. Register for an official NTEN account and get on our lists (even if they don't join). Share their knowledge with the community. Support our research. Download reports. Take webinars. Contribute to newsletter and as webinar/NTC presenters.

IT Staff

LG

CIOs. IT Directors. Tech savvy. Most likely to hate Programmers. In spite of our website. Hard to get them to our need to train more IT take any action.. folks as leaders, we probably have the fewest resources available to the most hardcore techie group in our audience.

High

High

First and foremost, a community. Data to support their budget requests. Research to guide their tech recommendations. Support for their opinions. Occasionally, online trainings (though this is the group most likely to teach itself).

Executive Directors

LG

Generally from small budget size orgs who don't have the staff to rely on for smart decision making.

Possibly our broadest audience, since they come from different career paths. Some of them are tech savvy and looking for resources, others are not and need to be convinced that technology can help them. Reticent. They consume quietly. Probably the most tech-savvy group after IT staff, since they've had to learn all sorts of new skills for email, newsletters, social networking, etc. They're the most engaged group in our CRM.

Very High

Varies Widely

Resources. Guidance. Training for staff members.

Download reports. Take webinars. Subscribe to the newsletter. Join.

Marketing/Communications Staff

LG

Fundraising/Development Staff

LG

Possibly our largest current group, job-title-wise. As social media becomes more important (and e-mail savvy continues to grow), these folks have found themselves thrust into technology roles they may It's all about the money. Their tech skills are all over the map but trend lower. They have a lot in common with the marketing people.

High

High

Resources. The Next Big Thing. Online Trainings (most likely to take our webinars). Benchmarks & best practices. Community.

Download reports. Take webinars. Convince their EDs to sign their orgs up as members. Contribute to newsletter and as webinar/NTC presenters. Talk to each other in our community.

Program Staff

LG

These folks are generally looking for specific knowledge about running their programs.

Slowly learning how to make money over the Internet. Probably know a bit about e-mail campaigns, but (too) many of them still cling to direct mail – and even then, they don't use technology to make it a less painful process. group to reach, The most difficult because their jobs are so varied, depending on what their orgs actually do. We have some occasional programming of interest (GIS, e-outreach), but they tend to be a low-responding group to our outreach efforts.

High

Unknown

Resources. Research and Data. Download reports. Take Ideas. Online trainings. webinars. Convince their EDs to sign their orgs up as members. Contribute to newsletter and as webinar/NTC presenters. Talk to each other in our community. Resources. Ideas and examples. Talk to each other in our Community. community about their work. Take and present webinars. Write case studies.

Medium

Unknown

Nonprofits

LG

Few resources, but lots of moxie. They want to stretch their budgets as far as possible, and our mission is essentially to help them do just that. Reaching them is difficult, though, because of their low level of techsavviness. Fortunately, their websites are likely to be worse than ours. The vendors have a birdseye view of the landscape and a much bigger picture idea of what tech can do for an organization. They have valuable experience to share, when we can get the nonprofits to listen without feeling pitched to… This group runs the gammut from programmers to designers, from solo folks to bigger agencies. They all want to be positioned as experts though.

Cash-strapped. Mostly likely Very High looking for free or cheap resources – and guidance. Often call us on the assumption that we do consulting work. Few have a big vision picture of what tech can do for them. Instead, they're focused on the operations/efficiencies/make my job easier kind of stuff. Want to work with the rest of our audience. Until last Fall, they had money. High

Not always Resources. Guidance. Training. high Ideas. Community. Peers. Data. Free stuff.

Become members. Engage each other. Contribute to the community through our various channels. Sign up for webinars. Send folks to the NTC (attendees and presenters).

Vendors/For-profits

MD

Usually High Clients. Research and data.

Become members. Get their clients to become members. Become sponsors (General, newsletter, NTC). Present webinars and write for the newsletter.

Consultants

MD

Want to work with the nonprofits in our community. A rich source of newsletter contributors and webinar/NTC presenters.

Medium

High

Clients. Research and data. An outlet to prove how awesome they are.

Become members. Get their clients to become members. Become sponsors (General, newsletter, NTC). Present webinars and write for the newsletter.

Small Orgs

LG

Medium-sized Orgs

LG

Large Orgs

LG

Most nonprofits in the U.S. are small, often with undertrained or over-extended staff. We'd like to get more contributions and input from them – but they often don't have the time to spare. Participants from small orgs tend to be leadership, accidental techies, and Medium-sized orgs share many problems with the small ones, but generally have more resources at their disposal. Participants from medium orgs tend to be the person responsible for tech and the comm folks. orgs turn to us for Large research and training of new staff members. They're a valuable source of contributors, for the newsletter and as webinar presenters. LOTS of comm folks, few leaders or helpdesk type help staff involved. CIOs tend to engage from large orgs, just to see what their staff

Broke. Few resources, tight budgets. Probably idealistic and passionate about their missions.

Very High

Maybe

Resources. Guidance. Training. Ideas. Community. Peers. Data. Free stuff.

Become members. Engage each other. Contribute to the community through our various channels. Sign up for webinars. Send folks to the NTC (attendees and presenters).

Not as broke. More resources, Very High tight budgets. They met with some success in building their orgs, so it's likely they understand the importance of technology to some extent.

Usually

Resources. Training. Ideas. Community. Peers. Data. Free stuff. A chance to share their expertise.

Become members. Engage each other. Contribute to the community through our various channels. Sign up for webinars. Send folks to the NTC (attendees and presenters).

Probably not broke, but being very careful with their money right now. They would not have become successful/large without some level of technological expertise. May have trouble articulating their success in terms smaller orgs would be able to understand/implement.

High

Often

Community. Ideas. Peers. Data. A chance to share their expertise and spread the word about their programs.

Become members. Become sponsors (General, newsletter, NTC). Contribute to the community through our various channels. Send their employees to the NTC and our webinars.

NTC Attendees (and potential attendees)

1500+/year

Some people still look at us primarily as the org that puts on the NTC. Attendees are way up on the list of potential and current Members.

Very engaged, for at least a brief period of time. Wide cross-section of the entire sector. Often idealistic.

Varies Widely

Knowledge. Community. New skills. Networking. Pictures of their co-workers and peers dancing at the After Party.

Sign up for the NTC. Become Members. Contribute their knowledge (as presenters, session designers, session suggesters).

Media

SM

The definition of media is changing, and we've always had a good relationship with bloggers – but we've been getting more attention from folks who define themselves as journalists recently.

Have the potential to help us spread the gospel of NPTech. Huge marketing channels, even if you can't click on newsprint.

High

Who can say?

Info on the latest trends and research in the nonprofit sector. Good quotes from Holly for their pieces on said trends and research.

Spread the word about us.

Job Seekers

1,500/month Our jobs board and RSS feed bring us to the attention of some number of people. But not for long.

Interested in nonprofits and technology. Likely highly trained.

Low

Unknown

Job opportunities in the NPTech sector.

Sign up for the newsletter. Subscribe to our feeds.


				
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posted:11/28/2009
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Description: Audiences