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					Funerals A deceased person has no rights under the legislation. As such, keeping and providing access to a funeral register presents no problems, at least from a legislative perspective. However there is one issue that needs to be addressed: the collection and use of information relating to family and friends of the deceased person. If and when such information is collected and used, these people need to be given a statement that addresses the various points that are raised below. With respect to the marriage and baptism registers, the majority of issues can be resolved when the Minister and the couple (either seeking to be married or have their child baptised) first meet. At the meeting the Minister would state (either verbally or by a statement on a form) what personal information needs to be collected, how it will be used and where it will be stored. Statements concerning "how it will be used" would include: Marriages
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To allow the minister to contact and or send information to the couple as required. To fill out the relevant forms required by law. To complete and maintain the marriage register as required by law. To assist in staging the ceremony There may be some other pastoral reasons, for example: place the name of the couple in the Congregation's newssheet acknowledging the couple's impending wedding; allow the Congregation to acknowledge the couples wedding anniversary (i.e. by sending a card). As these examples are pastoral and not operational in their intent, the couple should be given the option of "opting out" of having their personal information used in this way.

Baptisms
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To allow the minister / elder to contact and or send information as required to the couple of the child being baptised (or to the person directly if the baptism is an adult baptism). To fill out the relevant certificates so they can be presented during the baptism ceremony. To complete and maintain a baptism register. To assist in staging the service. There may be some other pastoral reasons, for example: place the name of the child's name in the Congregation's newssheet acknowledging the impending baptism; to conduct follow up visits by the elder; allow the Congregation to acknowledge the anniversary of the baptism (i.e. by sending a card). As these examples are pastoral and not operational in their intent, the couple should be given the option of "opting out" of having their personal information used in this way (particularly with respect to the last two examples).

Statements concerning "where it will be stored" would cover the following:

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How the information is stored (i.e. hardcopy forms are locked in the Churches filing cabinet, electronic information is kept on a computer that has prescribed security permissions) How long the information will be kept. For example, registers will be kept indefinitely or information kept on attendants to assist the staging of the service will be destroyed following the service (i.e. within two weeks). Who other than the Minister will have access to the information.

If it is customary to send a package of information to the couple first, the information relating to the collection, use and storage of a couple's personal information would be included in the package. With respect to future enquires from relatives etc wanting access to the baptism and marriage registers, a general statement asking the couple to give permission for relatives and other members of the public to access the register should suffice. Since a deceased person has no rights over their personal information, no consent from living relatives needs to be obtained. Where a couple does not give consent, there should be some notation made on the register to this effect


				
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posted:11/27/2009
language:English
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