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London-Councils-Housing-Directors---London-Plan-consultation

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					London Councils Housing Directors
Thames Gateway
Report by: Date: Contact Officer: Telephone: Summary: Chloe Fletcher 26 January 2007 James Gleeson 020 7934 9810 Email: James.gleeson@londoncouncils.gov.uk Job title:

Item no:

5

Head of Affordable Housing and Investment

In November DCLG and other members of the Thames Gateway Strategic Partnership published an Interim Plan for the Gateway. This sets out progress so far and an initial framework for strategic development in the area. The main change is an increase of 40,000 in the total number of homes expected to be delivered in the Gateway up to 2016, resulting in an expected total of 160,000 new homes. This increase is entirely accounted for by higher housing capacity in the London part of the Gateway. Directors are asked to: 1. Note:  The distribution of expected housing provision in the London Thames Gateway, including details of phasing given in the Appendix;  Following the results of the 2004 Mayor‟s Housing Capacity Study, the target of new homes in the Gateway has increased by 40,000 to 160,000. 100,000 of these new homes are in the London part of the Gateway (para 3.2 – 3.3);  The rate of housing construction in the Gateway has so far been well below that required to meet the Government‟s targets. Between 2001 and 2006 24,000 homes were completed (a rate of 4,800 a year), leaving 136,000 to be built in the remaining ten years (a rate of 13,600 a year, three times as high) (para 4.1).  The Interim Plan proposes to establish “a task group to advise TGSP on how best to accelerate completions across the Gateway”. London Councils will lobby to ensure the inclusion of boroughs on the task group. (para 4.3).  Only a quarter of the new homes that have been built in the Gateway so far have been affordable housing, compared to a target of 35% over the 2001-2016 period. The Interim Plan commits DCLG to working with „delivery partners‟ on a Gateway-wide affordable housing delivery plan once the outcome of the Spending Review is known (para 4.4 – 4.6). 2. Comment on how non-Gateway boroughs can influence the quantity and quality of housing being built in the Gateway to meet London's needs.

Recommendations:

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1 1.1

INTRODUCTION This report sets out the contents of the Government‟s Thames Gateway Interim Plan, which was published in November. The Interim Plan sums up progress so far in the Gateway and makes an initial attempt to draw together the various initiatives going on in the Gateway and co-ordinating future investment decisions. A final and more significant Thames Gateway Plan will be published when funding levels are known after the 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review. BACKGROUND The Thames Gateway was identified in the 2003 Sustainable Communities Plan as one of four key „growth areas‟ in the wider South East. The Gateway, which stretches for 40 miles East from London Docklands to Southend and Sheerness, comprises 10,000 hectares of land in Greater London, East England and the South East. The Gateway includes parts of the London boroughs of Barking and Dagenham, Bexley, Greenwich, Hackney, Havering, Lewisham, Newham and Tower Hamlets. The Communities Plan envisaged 120,000 new homes being built in the Gateway between 2001 and 2016, at least 35% of which should be „affordable‟ housing for rent or sale.

2 2.1

3 3.1

INTERIM PLAN FOR THE THAMES GATEWAY A new „Interim Plan‟ for the Thames Gateway was launched in November 2006 by the Secretary of State for Communities, Ruth Kelly. The Interim Plan, published by DCLG but endorsed by the Thames Gateway Strategic Partnership (TGSP), is intended to “lay down the foundations to create the conditions” for 180,000 new jobs and 160,000 new homes (an increase of 40,000 from the previous forecast of 120,000) between 2001 and 2016. The extra 40,000 homes are all in Greater London and comprise the proportion of the extra capacity identified in the Mayor‟s Housing Capacity Study that lies in the „Gateway‟ area. This extra 40,000 brings the total forecast provision in the London part of the Gateway to 100,000, nearly two-thirds of the Thames Gateway total. The distribution of the 100,000 homes expected to be provided in the London part of the Gateway between 2001 and 2016 between the key locations is set out in the table below. Potential homes to 2016 13,000 9,950 7,200 9,200 16,700 15,900 5,900 10,000 11,200 950 100,000

3.2

3.3

Area Isle of Dogs Deptford and Lewisham Greenwich Peninsula Stratford and Olympic Park Lower Lea Royal Docks Barking Town Centre London Riverside Woolwich, Thamesmead, Belvedere & Erith Other Developments Total

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3.4

Published alongside the Interim Plan was the Thames Gateway „Development Prospectus‟, which contained details of progress so far and phasing of future work on individual sites in each of these areas. This information is summarised in a table in Appendix 1 to this report. A final Thames Gateway Plan will be published after the results of the 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review are known in Summer 2007, and is expected to contain more detailed commitments on the level and distribution of funding for housing and supporting infrastructure. The Government has also appointed Judith Armitt as Thames Gateway Chief Executive, with responsibility for providing strategic leadership and ensuring joint working among government departments. Armitt will lead the work of the Government‟s Thames Gateway Strategy and Delivery Units. Appendix 2 to this report contains a chart summarising the key strategic and delivery bodies for the London part of the Thames Gateway. The equivalent structure for the parts of the Thames Gateway within the East and South East England regions would be similar in broad terms but different in the details of the particular bodies. PROGRESS SO FAR According to the Interim Plan, the rate of housing construction in the Gateway has so far been well below that required to meet the Government‟s targets. Between 2001 and 2006 24,000 homes were completed (a rate of 4,800 a year), which leaves 136,000 to be built in the remaining ten years (a rate of 13,600 a year, three times as high) if the 160,000 target is to be met. The Interim Plan acknowledges that Government needs to do more to ensure that the infrastructure is delivered in a timely manner, although there is no commitment ahead of the Spending Review to fill an infrastructure gap which is estimated by some to be around £8 billion for the Gateway as a whole. The Interim Plan proposes to establish “a task group to advise TGSP on how best to accelerate completions across the Gateway”. Likely key members will include the GLA, LDA, English Partnerships, the Housing Corporation and „other delivery partners‟, though there is no specific mention of local authorities. London Councils will lobby to ensure the inclusion of boroughs on the task group. Affordable housing Of the 24,000 homes that have been built in the Gateway so far, only a quarter have been affordable housing, compared to the expected figure of 35% over the 2001-2016 period set out in the Sustainable Communities Plan (logically this figure should now probably be higher than 35% because of the extra capacity from London, which has an overall 50% target). No information is available on the breakdown of current provision between social rented and intermediate provision. The Interim Plan recognises a “very strong case for increasing investment in affordable housing in London and the rest of the Gateway”. When the outcome of the Spending Review is known, the Interim Report commits DCLG to working with „delivery partners‟ on a Gateway-wide affordable housing delivery plan. The Interim Plan states that "We need to make changes in how we dispose of publicly owned land for housing and the way we procure affordable housing for rent and for sale".

3.5

3.6

3.7

4 4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

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This appears to mean disposing of public land in smaller parcels to encourage competition (but with clear design guidance in development frameworks) and larger RSLs leading mixed tenure developments instead of private developers. 4.7 The Interim Plan does not contain any new policies on the allocation of affordable housing in the Gateway, but states that “Communities & Local Government will be inviting the members of TGSP to work together to develop policies guiding the allocation of new social housing. This process will take account of advice from the East of England Regional Assembly, the South East Regional Assembly and the Mayor of London in establishing funding priorities for each Region”. Ensuring high standards of design The Interim Plan acknowledges that many of the homes built in the Gateway so far have been poorly designed. It commits the TGSP to developing a „Thames Gateway Design Pact‟ that local authorities will be invited to sign up to and that will “set out exactly what they commit to doing to ensure that all new development is in line with the character of the area and is of high quality”. EQUALITIES IMPLICATIONS The communities currently living in the Gateway are both relatively diverse (compared to the rest of the country but not to the rest of London) and relatively deprived in terms of worklessness and social exclusion. Successful development of the Gateway in line with the Government‟s vision would greatly increase economic opportunities in the Gateway, improve the quality of the environment and increase access to services and amenities. Housing development in the Gateway should also help those in housing need (disproportionately members of equalities groups) in other parts of London and the wider South East who could move to take advantage of new provision. However, uncoordinated or mismanaged development in the Gateway could also result in undesirable places to live and have knock-on effects in terms of social exclusion and cohesion.

4.8

5 5.1

5.2

5.3

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Appendix 2
Summary of key areas in London Thames Gateway, capacity for homes to 2016 and expected rate of progress Potential Comments on phasing (generally including expected housing provision by 2012 and eventual total homes provision post-2016) Area to 2016 Location Number of units Timetable . Current rate of residential development Isle of Dogs 13,000 suggests majority of homes in pipeline could be delivered by 2011 Convoys Wharf, Deptford Silwood Estate, Deptford Pepys Estate, Deptford Deptford Station Deal‟s Gateway, Deptford Catford Greyhound Track: Seager Distillery, Deptford Lewisham Town Centre Thurston Road, Lewisham:, Venson Site, Lewisham MDL sites Millennium Village: 7,200 Lovells, Granite & Pipers Wharf: New Heart for East Greenwich: Stratford City: Stratford: Olympic Park: Capacity for 500-600 units Capacity for 700 homes Eventual total of 5,100 Eventual total of 6,300 Capacity for 3,500 Eventual total of 216 250 homes 100 homes 700 homes 600 homes 220 homes 1,000 homes 290 homes 202 homes 10,000 homes by 2021, Eventual total of 2,950 Planning to be determined First 2 of 4 phases complete Due for completion in 2007 Due to complete in 2008 Completion 2009 2006-12 Planning to be determined 2008-16 Planning to be determined Planning to be determined construction start 2007 700 homes completed, total completion 2013 Planning to be determined Planning to be determined 1,000 homes by 2012 Completion of first phase due 2007 2,200 homes in 2013, remainder estimated at 600 per year (=4,000 by 2016) 2,000 homes by 2012 3,000 homes by 2012 500 homes by 2012

Deptford and Lewisham

9,950

Greenwich Peninsula

Stratford and Olympic Park

9,200

Lower Lea

16,700

Canning Town Bromley-by-Bow and Three Mills West Ham

Eventual total of 8,500 Eventual total of 3,550 Eventual total of 2,750

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Area

Summary of key areas in London Thames Gateway, capacity for homes to 2016 and expected rate of progress Potential Comments on phasing (generally including expected housing provision by 2012 and eventual total homes provision post-2016) to 2016 Location Number of units Timetable Leaside & Thameside West Eventual total of 9,600 5,300 homes by 2012 North Side Royal Victoria Dock Landmark Site Silvertown Quays Minoco Wharf Barrier Park East Gallions Park Albert Basin Eventual total of 1,275 Capacity for 800 Capacity for 5,000 units Capacity for 2,500-3,000 Capacity for 900 units Capacity for 230 homes Capacity for 2,500 Eventual total of 8,500 450 homes completed, Planning application to be submitted Work due to commence in 2007 Planning application submitted Planning application to be submitted LDA seeking development partners First phase completed, further phases under construction and being planned Over 500 homes currently being delivered with some major sites about to come to market. 4,500 homes by 2012 1,100 homes by 2012 1,850 homes by 2012 1,700 homes by 2012 Outline planning permission recently granted, marketing of sites to begin Summer 2007 Completion 2007 Consent in 2006, completion 2016 Planning to be determined, completion 2011 Planning consent in 2006, completion 2016.

Royal Docks

15,900

Barking Town Centre

5,900

London Riverside

10,000

East Beckton South Dagenham & Rainham Rainham Village & Rainham West Barking Riverside

Eventual total of 3,900 Eventual total of 6,500 Eventual total of 2,500 Eventual total of 10,800

Woolwich, Thamesmead, Belvedere & Erith

11,200

Woolwich: Royal Arsenal:, The Warren, Woolwich Town Centre: Love Lane, Woolwich Town Centre: Tamesis Point:

1,250 homes 2,500 homes 61,000 homes 2,000 homes.

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Area

Summary of key areas in London Thames Gateway, capacity for homes to 2016 and expected rate of progress Potential Comments on phasing (generally including expected housing provision by 2012 and eventual total homes provision post-2016) to 2016 Location Number of units Timetable Sundry small schemes Thamesmead, Belvedere & Erith: Imperial Park, Belvedere: 400 homes Planning to be determined Tavy Bridge, Thamesmead: 827 homes Completion 2014 Erith Western Gateway: 500 homes Site to market 2007 Erith Quarry 1,000 homes 2006-20 Crayford Sites: 700 homes 2009-2012 Erith High Street: 106 homes due to complete 2008 950 Total 100,000

Other Developments

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Appendix 2

Governance structure of the London Thames Gateway
Judith Armitt, Thames Gateway Chief Executive

Thames Gateway Delivery Unit

Thames Gateway Strategy Unit

Central Government

Communities England (HC +EP) London Thames Gateway Development Corporation LDA TfL GLA Boroughs

Mayor of London

Local government

Thames Gateway London Partnership

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