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					Unit 1

PLANNING AND CONDUCTING A SUCCESSFUL HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM
Objectives
      To have an understanding of various methods to assess needs in the community, including collecting and compiling information from surveys To recognise the importance of written goals and objectives that can be measured To describe a well organised planning schedule including developing the program, budgeting and a marketing strategy To demonstrate the ability to prepare advertisements, including some directed to a target audience To show ability to select and evaluate recipes suitable for the program To recognise the importance of follow-up programs to capitalise on contacts made

KEY POINTS
 Every program that is conducted by the church whether it is a vegetarian cooking program, or any other program, requires effective planning, implementation and evaluation.  The planning model below has several interconnected steps that are essential components for an effective, successful program.  This is a cyclic process, which can be used for all types of program development. Plan the work and work the plan.

1. Assess the situation 5. Evaluate the program

2. Determine objectives

4. Implement the program

3. Select a plan

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SAMPLE PLANNING OUTLINE1:
1. Assess the needs in your community or church. You can then plan a program focus; this will determine the type of program and the target group. (Also consider the resources and capabilities of the church to conduct a program. Do you have trained personnel, facilities, money, time and equipment? Only plan those programs that can be done well.) There are felt needs (what people think they need and is important to them) and real needs (actual needs). It is necessary to satisfy felt needs before you can have an impact on the real needs. However you cannot respond to all the needs in the community, so be selective and conduct only quality programs that meet specific needs. Surveys are one way to determine the felt needs in your community. There are various types of surveys and different ways to conduct them. All surveys will gather information but the quality and the usefulness will depend on how it is done. The following are some ways to collect information: 1. Ask key individuals their understanding of the needs in the community, e.g. doctors, mayor or shire president, newspaper editors, school principals etc. 2. Personal interviews in shopping centres or malls. 3. Questionnaires that are sent and returned by mail. 4. Door to door interviews. Development of the survey questionnaire The questionnaire should be well designed in order to obtain unbiased and accurate information. When designing a questionnaire for your community use the sample survey (at the end of this unit) as a guide, and note the following suggestions. a. Design – If you know of an expert in questionnaire design, seek their advice. b. Implementation – The method of administration will determine the design, format and length of the questionnaire. c. Length – Keep the questionnaire as short and simple as possible, sufficient for your purpose. d. Sequence of questions – Have easy, interesting questions first, more difficult, sensitive ones last. Demographic questions (age, gender, ethnicity, etc.) are best at the end. e. Writing the questions – Keep the language simple, unambiguous, one thought per question. Be consistent in wording and form, avoid jargon or

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abbreviations. Open ended (free response) questions are more difficult and time consuming for people to answer and also more difficult to analyse. e.g. What programs do you think the community needs? Closed (fixed alternatives) are often easier to answer and analyse. e.g. Please tick the programs you think are needed in this community. Vegetarian Cooking and Nutrition Program Child Nutrition Program More Value for your Food Dollar Stress Management f. Format of questions – Ask the questions in an easy to understand format. g. Introduction, explanatory note – should explain the purpose of the survey and give instructions on how to complete it. Assurances of confidentiality should be given. h. Pre-test the questionnaire in the following manner - *Have a draft reviewed by peers. *Survey a representative sub group (small group) of the community group. *Incorporate changes and test again if necessary. Conducting the survey Train interviewers. Have standardised procedures and provide detailed instructions. The selection group or sample to be surveyed should be unbiased. e.g. If a doorto-door survey is conducted on a Sunday afternoon the sample is likely to be biased because you will only interview those who are home on that afternoon. Go back at another time until you have surveyed all the people on your list. Methods of selection a. Total group b. Systematic sample (e.g. every 5th home on the street). c. Stratified random sample. Choose a group of people by some characteristic (age, social class, job) then choose the number of people from this group to be surveyed, can be every 5th name on the list.

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Response rates – 100% is the ideal, but 60% - 80% is good. Analysis of results 1. Tabulate and analyse the results as soon as possible. If an expert is available, ask their advise on analysing the results. 2. Prepare a report and summary of the results. 3. Use the results to help plan, develop and conduct programs to meet community needs. 2. Set goals and objectives. Goals are general aims - they give overall direction. Objectives are statements about targets you want to achieve. (For instance: I want the class participants to understand that a diet low in fat, particularly solid fat, will reduce their risk of heart disease.) It gives overall direction for your program. Well-written objectives are SMART. Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Time based - precise, only one aspect per objective. - enables evaluation of program effectiveness. - realistic. - relates to the purpose of the program. - a date or time period is specified 1.

Specific objectives At the end of the program the class participants will be able to: a. Identify foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt. b. Identify foods that are low in fat, sugar and salt. c. Modify recipes to reduce the fat, sugar and salt content. d. Increase the number of vegetarian dishes they serve each week. e. List the advantages of the vegetarian diet. f. List the dietary factors contributing to heart disease and cancer in Australia. 3. Select a plan and develop the program. Develop alternative plans and strategies. From the various strategies, select the most appropriate plan of action, methods and procedures to accomplish your objectives using the resources available. Various program formats and titles were considered and it was decided to conduct a four week cooking series. This will be advertised as “Cooking for Health”. Emphasis will be placed on tasty recipes that are low in fat, salt and sugar and high in fibre.

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Outline a schedule, choose the personnel and resources. Choose what, by whom, how, when and where action is required. The aim of nutrition education is to help people improve their eating patterns. A wellorganised program will make the most impact. Find as many people to help as possible. a. Meet with your team (don‟t take the whole load yourself!). Form a planning committee, including the Pastor, health secretary and other interested people. b. Decide on the type of program and how many sessions you need. c. Make a budget (estimate cost of food, advertising, handouts and any other expenses you need to meet to conduct the program). d. Decide on a venue - take into account accessibility, safety, security and its appropriateness to the program. e. Decide on a marketing strategy. f. Do the advertising in plenty of time. (This is one area where many programs fall down, you need to start advertising 3 weeks prior to the commencement of the program, not 1 week before). g. Allocate various tasks. h. Choose recipes. i. j. Choose talks. Select appropriate personnel as speakers, demonstrators etc.

The committee selects the dates, time and place for the program. Topics, recipes and resources are selected, advertising materials are developed. The workload is divided and responsibility delegated, e.g. Joanne Program coordinator (responsible for the overall running of the program) Advertising coordinator (places advertisements and articles in local paper, arranges for posters to be placed in shop windows, leaflets to be letter boxed etc.) Cooking demonstrator coordinator (demonstrates selected recipes and assists during recipe demonstration.)

Mandy

June

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Bill Health talks and handouts coordinator (orders leaflets, brochures, information to be handed out each night.) Kitchen crew coordinator (helps with preparation beforehand and cleans up afterwards) Receptionist, display coordinator (meets participants as they arrive to register, is cheerful and helpful in every way) Buyer (buys the necessary food for demonstrating and tasting) Audio visual equipment and set-up coordinator (Makes sure that the hall is set up with chairs and tables and everything is ready and on time each night. Have the necessary equipment available)

Sue

Tony

Estelle Maureen

4. Implement the program. This is the plan of action. Careful monitoring is required to maintain momentum. Some changes in the program may be necessary as you proceed. Employ a mix of strategies and techniques that will facilitate the learning process. eg. Presentations, demonstrations, explanations, discussion, case studies, experimental learning, group work etc. The program commences on May 3 at 7.00 pm. The program coordinator will remind persons of responsibilities. The committee meets prior to and after each program to plan, evaluate and modify components of the program if necessary. Welcome Recipe demonstration Questions and answers Break, optional Talk, lecture and/or video Serving samples 5 minutes 45 minutes 10 minutes 10 minutes 20 - 30 minutes 20 minutes

5. Evaluate the program. The achievements are assessed. Which objectives have been met? Which not? Why not? Were the resources sufficient? What can we learn from this program for next time? Are there other methods of presentation that could be implemented? As well as evaluating by the committee at each stage of implementation, on the last evening the participants will complete an evaluation sheet (sample at the end of this unit). Analysis of this sheet will reveal whether expectations of the participants were met.

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ADVERTISING GUIDELINES1
  Advertising must be directed at a target audience. Well-prepared advertising can increase the effectiveness of the program.

When planning the advertising for a community program consider the following questions. 1. What is my product? a. Information about a healthy lifestyle, which will increase the quality of life and life expectancy. b. Tasty nutritious vegetarian recipes 2. What or who is my target market? a. Age group? b. Education? c. Social-economic factors? d. Background nutrition knowledge? e. Interest in nutrition? 3. Do I understand my target market? 4. What are the “switches” that turn my target market on? a. The promise of long life? b. Information on healthful eating? c. Information on lowering high blood cholesterol levels? d. Information on feeding children? e. Lower cost recipes? 5. Which of the two approaches will I use to press those switches that turn my market on: a. Rational – give the facts. b. Emotional – show pictures of healthy happy children and adults enjoying the good life. 6. Which media will I use to reach my target market? a. Print – local news papers, letter-boxing, posters in shop windows, flyers for church members and friends to give out to contacts and people who are interested. b. Radio – interviews, spot advertisements. (Taking some food samples can often help.)

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c. Television – interviews and advertisements. (This can be very expensive, check out the cost first.) 7. Advertising checklist. Am I using the right medium? Is the “copy” written in such a way that is easily understood? Does the final promotion look or sound professional? Could I possibly look or sound like a “backyard quack”? Is the title of the meeting clear? Is the venue clear? Is the commencement date of the program indicated? Including the phone number and name of the person who will take the bookings? Is the total cost of the program indicated? Have I used a four colour print job when a single colour would have been as effective?

SELECTING AND EVALUATING RECIPES1 KEY POINTS:
 Recipes selected for cooking demonstrations must meet the standards set by the Adventist Health Department  Ideally recipes should complement the topic presented, tailored to the needs of the people attending, as well as taste and look good

INTRODUCTION
The importance of selecting high-quality healthful recipes cannot be over emphasised. Recipes containing large quantities of fat, sugar, refined foods, cholesterol and calories are not acceptable. Determine that all recipes and information used in vegetarian cooking classes reflect the true health principles, and assist participants to attain a measure of health, giving them increased well being and vitality.

STEPS IN RECIPE SELECTION
1. Consider the audience, environment and season. (eg. Church group vs non-SDA‟s, ethnicity, income and educational level, age span, understanding of the vegetarian diet, availability of ingredients. 2. Review recipes for overall health appropriateness. 3. Select to complement the topic. 8

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4. Have new or personal recipes tested by committee 5. Tasters should include 3 or 4 non-vegetarians. 6. Only recipes judged as good or excellent should be adopted. 7. Never demonstrate an untried recipe! DOES THE RECIPE: 1. Complement the nutritional topic? 2. Harmonise with the overall health standards? 3. Taste good/ delicious? 4. Look appetising and attractive? 5. Meet the needs of the audience? 6. Use standard measurements? 7. Handout includes suggestions for serving and perhaps a sample menu? 8. Is the recipe practical? 9. How long does it take to prepare? 10. Is the cost of the ingredients reasonable? 11. Is expensive modern equipment necessary to prepare this recipe? 12. Are the ingredients easily obtained locally? Factors for success 1. Start with recipes that are familiar, using healthier ingredients and low-fat cooking methods. 2. Ethnic foods are often favourites, stir-fry, Middle Eastern dishes, Mediterranean recipes, grains and legumes. 3. Fruit dishes are more popular desserts than „no sugar‟ desserts. 4. Vegetable dishes are popular if they taste good and should be emphasised more. 5. Vegetable based soups are well liked. 6. Recipes need to be quick and easy, not too many ingredients or cooking steps and using as much fresh produce as possible. 7. Don‟t try and copy a meat dish – vegetarian and flesh products are two different things!

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8. Include one Sanitarium Vegetable Protein product in the variety of demonstrations planned for each cooking class, (one session) but do not exceed that. Teach them how to use the vegetable protein products, as in the ratio of vegetable protein to the rest of the ingredients. (1/6th to 1) 9. Each class include one recipe using legumes, can be a soup, pasta sauce, a salad, dip or spread. 10. Plan a salad recipe for as part of the variety in each class. 11. Suggested number of recipes for each class, three to four in total. 12. Introduce new flavours gradually.

RECIPE PREPARATION1
Ensure recipes are typed exactly as they will be demonstrated. People want to be able to prepare the recipe at home for their families. Tell the participants in class if there are alternative ingredients or ways to make the recipe, also include whether the recipe is suitable for freezing and how long it will keep in the refrigerator. 1. Define ingredients precisely. Example: 225g can of whole corn kernels, not a small can of corn. Either dried or fresh breadcrumbs, not breadcrumbs. 2. Identify quantities clearly. Example: ½ cup, ¼ cup, not about ½ cup or a heaped cup. ¼ teaspoon, not a sprinkle or bit of this. 3. Present method of preparation clearly, step by step. 4. When naming dessert recipes use correct terms. Example: “no added sugar” not “sugarless”. (fruit contains sugar) 5. When naming savoury dishes avoid the use of meat terms. Example: “vegetarian cutlets” not “gluten steaks”, “stuffed vegetarian roast” not “mock lamb”, (in general, use straight gluten recipes sparingly, not a lot of appeal to nonvegetarians.) 6. Specify clearly how to reconstitute TVP mince (Vitaburger) before using in a recipe. Example: soak in equal quantity of boiling water for 5 minutes, if excess water remains, drain off. 7. Specify clearly whether macaroni, legume, grain, etc. has to be cooked before using in a recipe. Example: ½ cup cooked brown rice. 8. Indicate oven temperature and approximate cooking time. Not hot or moderate oven. 9. Give size and type of preferred cooking dish best cooked in. 10

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REMEMBER : People attend vegetarian cooking classes to learn how to replace some, if not all their flesh dishes with vegetarian style dishes. The reasons for doing so are many. However the benefits are minimised if they put on weight or find their blood cholesterol levels increased as a result of changing to a vegetarian diet. One of the chief advantages of changing from a flesh diet to the vegetarian diet is the lower saturated fat and cholesterol content of such a lifestyle. Yet often the advantage is spoilt by using recipes that are loaded with eggs, cheese, sour cream, cream cheese and yellow cheese, (matured cheese) whipping cream and refined flours. Eliminate from such recipes, some of the factors that contribute to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity and other diseases. Recipes can be delicious, healthful and attractive without compromise. ASK THESE QUESTIONS: a. Does the recipe use high cholesterol foods unnecessarily? Could they be omitted, reduced or substituted? b. Could the fat content be reduced? c. Does the recipe use excessive sugar? d. Is the recipe too high in calories and if so would it contribute to a weigh problem for some people? e. Does the recipe contain any questionable ingredients i.e. hot spices like chillies or cayenne, black or white pepper? f. Does the recipe contain quantities of refined flour? Are we teaching the value of whole grains?

RECIPE MODIFICATION1
a. Use So Good Regular or Lite instead of milk, if using milk choose skim milk or fat reduced milk. b. If sour cream is an ingredient in your recipe, substitute with yoghurt if possible, or at least use fat reduced sour cream and reduce other fats in the recipe. c. If eggs are used use only ½ or less per serving. Investigate binders such as chick pea flour (Besan meal) soy flour or gluten flour. d. Cottage cheese can often replace yellow cheese, use low-fat types. Use lowfat soft cheeses sparingly.

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e. Dried fruits, apple juice can sometimes be used for sweetening in place of sugar. Most times sugar can be reduced in a recipe without the loss of flavour or texture. f. Limit frying. Use oven baking methods wherever possible. g. Use soft margarines, the main ingredient of which is liquid seed oil, in place of butter or other hard fats. h. Seasonings, use sparingly: cloves, nutmeg, mild curry powders and pastes. Delete: chilli powder, peppers (black, white, cayenne), mace, mustard and horseradish. i. j. For desserts limit all sugar, including honey to 2 teaspoons or less per serving. Emphasise fresh fruits and low calorie desserts.

k. Avoid using recipes for quick breads and cakes requiring soda. Use baking powder sparingly. l. Delete all raw eggs from uncooked recipes like salad dressings and sorbets.

In planning recipes remember that “plain food prepared in a simple manner is the most healthful”.

FOLLOW-UP STRATEGIES1
You should have a plan for what happens after your program - what courses are you going to offer next? Your church should also have ongoing programs to capitalise on your contacts. Programs ideally should cover a variety of subjects. Keep in contact with people who have attended. Let them know you would like to keep in contact, then tell them your plans, eg news letter, future program flyers etc. Make a list of the people who are interested and happy to be contacted. Make sure that you keep within privacy laws and maintain strict confidentiality with any details that they may supply.

REFERENCES:
1. Butler T, Butler D, Stanton H;
VEGETARIAN COOKING DEMONSTRATOR‟S MANUAL – 2nd EDITION

Adventist Health Department & Sanitarium Nutrition Education Service. 1995:B1-B31,C5-C10

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PLANNING AND CONDUCTING A SUCCESSFUL HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM COMMUNITY SURVEY
The Seventh-day Adventist Church in ………… is interested in providing programs on health related topics, including cooking demonstrations. We were wondering which programs would interest you most. Yes No 1. Are you interested in attending a program that promotes healthy eating and living principles? 2. If yes, which topics are of interest to you? Cooking and Nutrition Programs (please indicate with a tick ) * Vegetarian cooking and nutrition classes * Quick meals and children‟s lunches * Menu planning made easy * Programs of your choice





  

……………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………
Disease prevention programs * Women‟s health  * Weight Management * The lifestyle connection in reducing your risk of disease * Programs of your choice

 

………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………
3. Which day of the week would be most convenient for you to attend? Sunday -

 Monday -  Tuesday -  Wednesday - Thursday -  
Evening -

4. What time of the day would suit you best? Afternoon -



Would you like a personal invitation? Name……………………………………………………………………………………… Address…………………………………………………………………………………… Phone No…………………………………………………………………………………. Email……………………………………………………………………………………….

A community service sponsored by your local Seventh-day Adventist Church

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Sample Advertisements

CREATIVE VEGETARIAN COOKING & NUTRITION CLASSES Not sure how to increase the plant food content of your diet? Maybe you have already started to eat less meat – but you are wondering what to do next? These classes will show you how easy it is to prepare nutritionally balanced, low cost, delicious vegetarian meals that the whole family will enjoy! Join a 4-week course commencing: Tuesday night 1 August, 7.00 pm to 9.00 pm and the following 3 Tuesday nights Each night you will enjoy an hour of food demonstrations, sampling of all food demonstrated, and a nutrition feature covering topics such as: Vegetarian Eating - How to Get Started; Iron - Can I Get Enough? Osteoporosis - How to Prevent it. Presenter, ……………………………………………….. Cost $40.00 per person, all-inclusive. (4-week course) (Concession, $60.00 for 2 people from 1 family) Venue: …………………………………………………… Bookings essential, ring ………………………………..

VEGETARIAN NUTRITION - AN EASY WAY TO COOK Like a healthful diet that’s easy to maintain? Come and enjoy a four session series that will demonstrate how easy and healthful it is to have a balanced vegetarian diet. Program includes samples to taste, handouts, healthy ideas, nutritional information, visual displays and food demonstrations. Dates: Time: Cost: Venue: ……, ……, ……., ……… ……… (approximately 2 hours) $ per session …………………….., (Street address)

Bookings essential - Please phone: ………………… or ……………….

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Creative Vegetarian Cooking and Nutrition Classes Featuring: Menu Planning made Easy! These classes will assist you with the art of meal planning and how to stay within your budget. Topics Covered Planning a balanced menu for your family. More value for your food dollar. Ideas for lunches, outdoor eating and barbecues. Healthy entertaining, quick and easy. Each class has 1 hour of cooking demonstrations. Recipes are of a variety - soups, savoury dishes, sweets, salads and spreads. They are quick and easy as well as nutritious and low in fat. Food demonstrated will be served for tasting at the end of each class. Bring your appetite! Four Week Course Commences: Tuesday evening September 3, and the following 3 Tuesday evenings, 7.00 pm to 9.00 pm. Cost: $40.00 per person. (two people from one family $60.00 total cost) Place…………………………………………………………………………………….. Class Bookings………………………………………………………………………..

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SAMPLE CLASS REGISTER or ATTENDANCE SHEETS Dates:………………………………………… Name
Phone
Wk 1 Wk 2 Wk 3 Wk 4 Total Paid

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Name Contact Phone No. (Date)  $                                     (Date)  $ (Date)  $ (Date)  $                                       Total Paid $

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EVALUATION FORM

How did you find out about the program? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

Did the program meet your expectations? In what way?

  

Yes ___________________________________________________ No ___________________________________________________ Partly ________________________________________________

What aspect of the program did you enjoy the most? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

Rate the following aspects of the program on a scale of 1-5.
Mark the appropriate number on each line by placing a circle around it.
Poor Excellent

Recipes Nutritional Information Handout material Taste of food Demonstrations Health lectures Helpfulness of staff

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4 4 4

5 5 5 5 5 5 5

Have you tried any of the recipes at home?

 

No Yes How many have you tried? ______________

What recipes did you enjoy the most? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

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EVALUATION FORM

Would you like to be informed of future programs?

 

No Yes Name: ________________________

Phone No.: ________________________ Preferred Day of Program Sunday -

 Monday -  Tuesday -  Wednesday - Thursday - 

Preferred Time of Program

Daytime



Evening

Check the type of programs you would be like to be informed about in the future

 Nutrition cooking classes  Managing life's crises  Maintaining a healthy weight  Improving Family Life  Improving Fitness  Handling stress  Help to quit smoking  Financial Management seminar  Improving your spiritual life  Other (Please state) ________________________
This information will only be used to inform you of future programs and not distributed to any other entity. If you have given us this information in the past, do you want your name to remain on our listings? Yes / No (Circle One)

Thank you for answering these questions

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