Docstoc

Press

Document Sample
Press Powered By Docstoc
					Press Release
UNITED NATIONS Department of Public Information · News Coverage Service · New York GA/9837 30 November 2000 Fifty-fifth General Assembly Plenary 77th Meeting (PM) GENERAL ASSEMBLY, OPENING MIDDLE EAST DEBATE, RECEIVES TEXTS ON GOLAN HEIGHTS, ADMINISTRATION OF JERUSALEM Recent Violence Deplored, Resumption of Negotiations Urged; Speakers Challenge Israeli Settlement Policies, Occupation of Arab Territories As it began debate on the situation in the Middle East, the General Assembly this afternoon received two draft resolutions -– one demanding, among other provisions, Israeli withdrawal from the occupied Syrian Golan, and the other declaring null and void Israel's decision to impose its laws, jurisdiction and administration on the Holy City of Jerusalem. By the terms of the draft on Jerusalem, the Assembly would deplore the transfer by some States of their diplomatic missions to Jerusalem, in violation of Security Council resolution 478 (1980), and call once more upon those States to abide by the provision of the relevant United Nations resolution. Under the draft on the Syrian Golan, the Assembly would declare that Israel's decision of 14 December 1981 to impose its laws, jurisdiction and administration on the occupied Syrian Golan was null and void. The Assembly would call upon Israel to resume the talks on the Syrian and Lebanese tracks, and to respect the commitments and undertakings reached during previous talks. Introducing the draft resolutions, the representative of Egypt said he deeply regretted the halting of the Syrian-Israe negotiations. A settlement must give Syria all its occupied territories and a return to the borders before 1967. Israel must demonstrate a commitment to negotiate honestly for peace, without attempting to use one track against the other.

The representative of Syria said Israel had occupied the Syrian Golan since 1967. The occupation exacerbated tension causing new cycles of violence, which Israel used as obstacles to peace. While committed to peace, Syria was determined not to yield any part of the occupied Syrian Golan; the United Nations should adopt firm measures to make Israel respect international law and implement United Nations resolutions. The representative of Saudi Arabia said that 10 years after the Madrid Conference, stability looked far from possible, and peace remained just a hope, because of Israeli action. Saudi Arabia had condemned the wanton attacks in East Jerusalem and the occupied territories, and wished to reaffirm the Arab nature of Jerusalem. The representative of France, speaking for the European Union, said the drama between the Israelis and the Palestinians could not be fully dissociated from the absence of any settlement on the Lebanese and Syrian tracks of the peace process. In southern Lebanon, a new chapter had been opened by the Israeli withdrawal. However, the serious incidents that had taken place at the Israeli-Lebanese border since the beginning of October showed how fragile the situation remained. Also addressing the Assembly this afternoon were the representatives of Belarus, Senegal, Yemen, Cyprus, Brunei Darussalam, Australia, Jordan, Cuba, Burkina Faso, Malaysia, Argentina, India, and Armenia. As the meeting began, the Assembly took note of the fact that Mauritania had made the necessary payment to reduce its arrears below the amount specified in Article 19 of the Charter. The Assembly meets again at 10 a.m. tomorrow (1 December), to continue its consideration of the situation in the Middle East.

Assembly Work Programme The General Assembly met this afternoon to consider the situation in the Middle East. The Assembly had before it a report of the Secretary-General (document A/55/538) on the situation in the Middle East, submitted following Assembly resolutions 54/37 and 54/38 of 1 December 1999. [In resolution 54/37, which deals with the transfer by some States of their diplomatic missions to Jerusalem in violation of Security Council resolution 478, the Assembly called once more upon those States to abide by the provisions of the relevant United Nations resolutions. In resolution 54/38, which deals with Israeli policies in the Syrian territory occupied by Israel since 1967, the

Assembly demanded once more that Israel withdraw from all the occupied Syrian Golan in implementation of the relevant Council resolutions.] The Secretary-General, on 7 August 2000, addressed notes verbale to the Permanent Representative of Israel and to the Permanent Representatives of other Member States requesting them to inform him of any steps their Governments had taken or envisaged taking concerning implementation of the relevant provisions of those resolutions. As of 26 October 2000, replies had been received from Denmark, Israel, Namibia and Qatar. In a note verbale, the representative of Israel said the resolutions were not only unbalanced, but were an undue interference in matters which lay at the very core of the bilateral negotiations between Israel and her neighbours. He said the one-sided approach threatened to prejudge the outcome of negotiations, and to undermine the prospects of achieving a just and lasting peace settlement based upon directly negotiated and mutually agreed solutions. Also before the Assembly this afternoon was also a report of the Secretary-General on The situation in the Middle East and the Question of Palestine (document A/55/639-S/2000/1113) transmitting a reply from the Security Council dated 29 September to a letter of the SecretaryGeneral and notes verbale from the representative of Israel and from the Permanent Observer for Palestine. The Security Council states that its members welcomed the participation of the Israelis and Palestinians in the final status negotiations held at Camp David in July. They strongly condemned all acts of terrorism and violence in the region, and urged all parties to fully respect the commitments they assumed under existing agreements and to refrain from any activities that might jeopardize the success of the talks and aggravate the political and economic situation in the Palestinian territories. In his note verbale of 11 September, the representative of Israel states that his delegation voted against Assembly resolution 54/42 of 1 December 1999, viewing it not only as unbalanced, but also as an undue interference in matters which lie at the very core of bilateral negotiations currently under way between Israel and the Palestinians. The onesided approach reflected in this and other Assembly resolutions threatened to prejudge the outcome of the process, impede the progress of Israeli and Palestinian negotiators and undermine the prospects of achieving a just and lasting peace settlement. A comprehensive solution to the conflicts in the Middle East could only be based upon directly negotiated and mutually agreed solutions.

The Israeli representative expressed the hope that the Assembly, respecting negotiations currently under way, will offer its unwavering and impartial support for the peace process. In his note verbale of 7 November, the Permanent Observer of Palestine states that Assembly resolution 54/42 should serve as an acceptable basis for all parties to work on important issues of the peace process. Despite the agreement on the Sharm el-Sheikh Memorandum of 4 September 1999, Israel failed once again to implement most of the overdue provisions and commitments agreed upon -- including the third redeployment of its occupying forces, the release of Palestinian prisoners and the return of Palestinian displaced persons -- and also fai


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:3
posted:11/25/2009
language:English
pages:4