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									           COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS
                          CIS




                THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
                       OF ADDMENIA




A training document for CIS Accreditation Workshop Two “Going for
                          Accreditation”.

   For schools considering entry into the Accreditation Process
                   or approaching Self-Study.




                   Based on the 7th Edition of

      ‘The CIS Guide to School Evaluation and Accreditation’
Compatible with 7.01
  5th November 2004
                                 Table of Contents


Sheet 1         Contents List.


Sheets 2 to 4   An Overview of the CIS Accreditation Process.


Sheet 5 and 6   Guidelines for the Five Step Analysis carried out by all Self-
                Study Committees.

Sheet 7         International School of Addmenia (ISA) Self-Study begins.


Sheets 7 and    Extracts from the International School of Addmenia profile.
8

Sheet 9         ISA Self-Study on Section A (Philosophy and Objectives)
                begins.


Sheets 11 to    Information collected by ISA for Step One of Section A.
25

Sheet 26        Step Two - the Descriptive Profile


Sheets 27 to    Step Three – ratings against the Standards and Indicators
29              plus any Comments.


Sheet 30        Step Four - Statement of Conclusions.


Sheet 31        Additional Exercises on Section B (if time allows).
Sheet 1
            AN OVERVIEW OF THE ACCREDITATION PROCESS

Introduction

The accreditation process has long been recognized in international school
circles as a highly effective means of initiating and maintaining school
improvement and demonstrating adherence to a set of publicly stated
standards. The information contained in this Overview is intended to clarify
the various aspects of the accreditation process, its declared purpose, the
procedures involved in the self-study and team visit components of the
process, and the benefits that accreditation offers to a school.


A.    Purpose of the Accreditation Programme

There are a number of benefits associated with the award of accreditation to a
school, but the main aim of this evaluation programme is to provide an
opportunity to improve the quality of the education offered at the school
through a rigorous process of self-examination followed by an objective
external appraisal by a team of peers. The resulting Visiting Team Report and
the independent actions of the accrediting association(s) attest to the quality of
education at the evaluated school.


B.    Criteria for Evaluation

Each school is evaluated against two basic 'benchmarks', these being:

1.    The School's own Philosophy and Objectives

      Each school is required to have a clear statement of Philosophy and
      Objectives and is evaluated in terms of how successful it is in meeting
      its own stated purposes.

2.    The Standards for Accreditation

      Each school is required to meet a set of written standards in each area
      of its operation. These common standards have been developed and
      endorsed by educational peers representing the accrediting
      organization.

      The Standards are designed to reflect the characteristics of a high
      quality educational experience. However, they do not pre-suppose any
      specific model of excellence nor do they suggest comparing the
      characteristics of one school with those of another. The guiding
      principles of the accreditation programme are that a school will be
      evaluated against prescribed standards but in terms of its own
      Philosophy and Objectives and that the school’s programmes are
      appropriate to its unique demography.
Sheet 2
C.    Outline of the Accreditation Process

The process involves these five essential stages, which are repeated on a
routine ten-year cycle:



1.    The Preliminary/Preparatory Visit

      A school seeking accreditation for the first time hosts a Preliminary
      Visit, usually lasting two to three days and normally involving two
      visitors, from the accrediting association. The purposes of the visit are
      both to clarify the various aspects in the accreditation process and to
      ascertain the school's readiness to undertake the self-study. When the
      school concerned is seeking re-accreditation a similar visit is
      conducted, the main differences being that the school remains in
      accredited status throughout and that the visit is entitled The
      Preparatory Visit in order to highlight this distinction.


2.    The Self-Study

      The self-study, lasting 18 to 24 months, is the most important part of
      the entire evaluation and accreditation process, both in the
      commitment of time and effort involved and in the value to be derived.
      The self-study begins with the Part One Committee collecting and
      analyzing data from the opinion surveys applied to all constituent
      groups in the school community and then generating a school profile.
      In Part Two, the school conducts a searching review of its own
      operations with each self-study committee using the results of the
      recently completed data collection and profile and its own philosophy
      and objectives as the starting point for its work.

      Part Two of the self-study is divided into seven Sections, listed below.
      Each Section covers a major area of the school’s operation, for which
      there are Standards for Accreditation against which the school will rate
      itself. Indicators for each Standard will guide the school in assessing
      its own adherence to the stated Standards.


       A      Philosophy and Objectives
       B      Curriculum
       C      Governance and Management
       D      Staff
       E      Student Support Services
       F      Resources
       G      Student and Community Life

      For each of the Sections A and C-G, an assigned self-study committee
      will collect, assemble and analyse certain requested data, complete a
      descriptive narrative or fact sheet, rate its current practice against the
      Indicators and the Standards for Accreditation, and write a statement of
      conclusions which will include plans for improvement in areas
determined by the school to be weak or deficient with respect to the
standard at hand.

For Section B, the school will assign a number of self-study committees
to look at curriculum from both “horizontal” and “vertical” perspectives.
The number of “horizontal” reports to be completed will be determined
by the school, according to the number of divisions or levels that exist
at the school. Each “vertical” report will cover a single subject area or
discipline through the full grade range of the school. In each of the
many reports required for Section B, the school will use the same steps
as those listed above for Sections A and C-G.



                             Sheet 3
     A truly comprehensive self-study requires a considerable time
     commitment from all members of the school's teaching and
     management staff and also from a representation of parents, Governing
     Body members and students. It is the intention of CIS that the self-
     study should present an honest, broad view of the school and that it
     should not represent the views of any minority group within the school.

     Every staff member should participate in the self-study process through
     completion of a meaningful assignment or assignments, preferably
     reflecting both the individual’s direct area of teaching or other
     responsibility and his/her interest in a more general aspect of the
     school's operation. In forming the subject area committees under
     Section B, it will be important to have representation from each of the
     divisions in which the subject is taught.

3.   The Team Visit

     Following the completion of the self-study, the school is visited by a
     team of suitably qualified administrators and teachers drawn from
     other schools that represent the accrediting association.

     The primary function of the Visiting Team is to assist the school by
     providing an objective assessment of the conclusions of the self-study.
     The Team visits the school for approximately one week to see it in
     action. Team members visit classrooms and other work places, and
     they talk with students, parents, members of the staff and Governing
     Body. They examine all aspects of the school in the light of the self-
     study; the schools own Philosophy and Objectives, and the Standards
     for Accreditation.

     It is worth emphasizing here that during the course of the visit, no
     assessment should be made of individual staff member’s performance,
     nor will critical reference be made to any specific individual in the
     report of the Visiting Team. The job of the Team is to review the quality
     of the educational experiences offered at the school, not to assess the
     qualities of individual teachers.

     The Team will write a detailed report, which will address every part of
     the self-study. For each of the Part Two Sections A and C-G, and the
     many Sections under B, the Team will offer a narrative of its findings
     (“observations”) and a set of commendations and recommendations.
     The Visiting Team Report will be sent to the accrediting agency who will
     forward it to the school as soon as initial analysis has been carried out.

     The Visiting Team will also make an overall recommendation with
     regard to possible accreditation of the school directly to the CIS
     Accreditation Committee. The Team will not inform the school of its
     overall recommendation, which strictly has the status of advice to CIS.

4.   Decision on Accreditation

     The CIS Accreditation Committee will review carefully the Visiting Team
     Report and consider the recommendations of the Visiting Team relative
     to possible accreditation of the school. It will then make a
     recommendation upon which the CIS Board of Directors will act:
The Board decision may be to:

a) Award Accreditation or Re-Accreditation.
b) Award Accreditation or Re-Accreditation with specific qualifications.
c) Postpone Accreditation or Re-Accreditation for some specified
   reason(s).
d) Not award Accreditation or Re-Accreditation.



                             Sheet 4
             GUIDELINES FOR PART TWO OF THE SELF-STUDY


The ‘Five Step Analysis’ of the Areas of a School’s Operation


These general guidelines are to be used in completing each of the Self-Study
Sections.

Copies of these guidelines should be made available to all persons working on
each Section of the Self-Study Report.

All documentation submitted as part of a Self-Study Report must be written in
English (unless the accrediting agency has given specific permission for some
Sections to be written in another language).



STEP ONE: COLLECT AND REVIEW THE INFORMATION

The Self-Study Committee should collect all the information requested, both to
assist it in the rating of Indicators and Standards in Step Three and as
evidence (to be made available to the Visiting Team) to support those ratings:

First, collect and review the Profiles and the analysis of the survey results
generated in Part One of the Self-Study, as well as the current version of the
Philosophy and Objectives.

Secondly, collect and review all the materials requested in the list. Current
documents should be used whenever possible. Items marked with an
asterisk* must be included in the report eventually to be sent to Visiting Team
members. The other items are likely to be too bulky or too expensive to be
duplicated. Therefore, only a brief summary of these items should be
contained in the report to be sent to the Visiting Team, and the complete items
should be available in the Team Meeting Rooms at the school and the hotel for
perusal during the Team Visit week. All material either sent to Team members
or made available during the visit week, should be clearly organized and
labelled.

STEP TWO:            WRITE THE DESCRIPTIVE PROFILE

The Self-Study Committee should produce the Descriptive Profile of the area
by responding succinctly to all the questions shown and by filling out any
forms in cases where they are provided.

Responses to the questions and entries on any forms should be purely factual,
and should not include evaluations or judgments. The Self-Study Committee
has ample opportunities to express its opinions in Steps Three and Four.

Later, once verified, this Descriptive Profile will inform the Visiting Team as it
writes its report. Therefore, its contents must be as current and accurate as
possible, reflecting the situation in the school, as the Visiting Team will find it.
Normally, a Descriptive Profile should occupy just one to two typed pages.
Sheet 5
STEP THREE:         RATE THE SCHOOL AGAINST THE INDICATORS AND
                    THE STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION

The Committee should use the information collected in Step One as a source
of evidence upon which the ratings in this step will be based.

  i. For each Standard, the Self-Study Committee should first consider all
     the Indicators provided and rate the school's own practice against each
     one (W = Widely Implemented; P = Partially Implemented; N = Not
     Implemented). Given that the circumstances of each school are unique,
     the Committee may wish to add one or more of its own Indicators to the
     list and also give a rating against them. The Committee may comment
     on any of its ratings if considered to be appropriate.

  ii. The Self-Study Committee should then examine each Standard for
      Accreditation, and rate the school accordingly (M = Meets the Standard;
      D = Does Not Meet the Standard; E = Exceeds the Standard). The
      Committee's work in rating the school against the Indicators, both those
      provided and any others added, will guide the process of rating the
      Standard. All ratings of "D" or "E" must be accompanied by brief
      comments. The Committee may also comment on any "M" rating.

STEP FOUR: WRITE THE STATEMENT OF CONCLUSIONS

In a series of brief statements, keeping the Standards in mind, the Self-Study
Committee should write its main conclusions for this Section with respect to:

  i. Principal strengths in the area concerned which impact positively upon
     the quality of students’ learning and/or well-being

  ii. Principal factors needing strengthening in order to improve the quality of
      students’ learning and/or well-being

  iii. Proposals for Improvement, which will impact positively upon the quality
       of students’ learning and/or well-being. These proposals will be useful
       to the school as it draws up its Action Plans for inclusion in the First
       Progress Report at a later stage of the accreditation process. The
       Committee should ensure that it includes Proposals for Improvement,
       which address all Standards given a "D" rating in Step Three.


STEP FIVE:          ASSEMBLE, SIGN AND SUBMIT THE SELF-STUDY
                    REPORT

The Self-Study Committee should carefully assemble all the materials collected
and produced during Steps One to Four inclusive, so as to form the Self-Study
Report on the Section concerned.

As evidence of the co-operative action, which is so vital in this process, the
cover page for this Section in the report should carry the name, position and
signature of all the Self-Study Committee members responsible for it. Note: no
one person should be exclusively responsible for evaluating any particular
area of a school's operation.
The Self-Study Committee should submit its report to the Self-Study Steering
Committee.




                                   Sheet 6
                         EXERCISES ON
        THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF ADDMENIA SELF-STUDY

You are now a staff member of the International School of Addmenia and have
volunteered to serve on the Philosophy and Objectives Self-Study Committee.
The school is using the 7th Edition of The CIS Guide to School Evaluation and
Accreditation (often referred to as The Guide) throughout the process.

PRACTICAL NOTE: From this stage on in this booklet, instructions taken
directly from The Guide are shown in standard print. Responses from the
International School of Addmenia are in italics.

It is now September 2004 and ISA is well into its Self-Study period. Work on
Part One was completed in May 2004, and a school profile has been produced.
Some extracts from this are given below (other extracts appear under Section
A itself). The Self-Study Report must be completed by June 2005 in time for a
Team Visit in September 2005.

The school is now concentrating on Part Two Section A: Philosophy and
Objectives. Committee A members have already gathered together relevant
documentation under Step 1. You will be required to continue the process by
moving on to Steps 2, 3 and 4.


         Extracts from the School Profile of the International School of
                                  Addmenia
                                  May 2004
        Director:                        Dr Carol Goldberg
        Head of Primary (K-Grade6):      Kevin Thatcher
        Head of Secondary (Grades 7- Dr George Clinton
        12):
        Business Manager:                Robert Trump
        2003/04 student roll:            450 (250 Primary, 200
                                         Secondary)
        Faculty (full-time):             24 women, 18 men
        Faculty (part-time)              8 women, 2 men
        Nationalities:                   faculty 9; students 20

The establishment of the Independent Republic of Addmenia quickly followed
the break-up of the USSR. The International School of Addmenia was founded
in 1992 due to the initiative of the American, British and Canadian Embassies,
together with a small group of businessmen, in order to provide an English-
medium education for the diplomatic and international business community. For
the first few years of its life, the school remained quite small, but in 1996
several events occurred which resulted in rapid expansion, which continues to
this day.

Attracted by government incentives and pleasant surroundings, several multi-
national, high technology companies settled in the area, including a number of
new companies from Japan and Scandinavia. In 1997, a United Nations
Agency also set up a large research centre in the area causing further expansion
and diversification of the student body.

The school is organized as a non-profit making institution under the continuing
sponsorship of the three founding Embassies. While expatriate staff pay host
country taxes, they receive certain benefits not available to locally hired staff.
This arrangement, however, caused tensions with the host country government,
especially during recent years as the school has grown. As a quid pro quo the
Board agreed to employ Addmenian nationals where possible, with the result
that foreign languages, P.E., art and music are taught mainly by teachers
drawn from the host country. The majority of the support staff is also
Addmenian.

Originally, the majority of the students were American, and the curriculum of the
school has remained largely US oriented. During recent years the proportion of
Americans has declined sharply to about 18% of the current enrolment, with a
corresponding rise in the number of other nationalities represented. No one
national group is dominant in statistical terms. In an attempt to meet the
criticism that the school was still was too American, the School Board, on which
the three supporting Embassies have a majority, appointed a Canadian Director
who joined the school in 2002.

                                    Sheet 7
The school moved to its present location in 1997. The main building is a large
country house set on a mountainside overlooking a lake. As enrolment
increased, temporary classrooms were erected in the grounds to accommodate
additional students and plans are currently being finalized for the construction
of a set of permanent new buildings.

COMPOSITION OF THE STUDENT BODY - 2003/2004

The parents of the majority of the students work in the UN Research Centre, in
embassies or in multi-national corporations. They are generally of executive or
middle managerial status. A growing number of other international students
seek admission as more multi-national companies establish themselves in the
area.

The student body may be defined as consisting of average, healthy children and
young adults as may be found in similar schools the world over. Multi-
lingualism is common, and for many students English is not their mother tongue.
The goal of the vast majority of our students is to attend college or university.

                           Student Roll by Grade
         Grade            Total           Boys              Girls
          KG               30              12                18
           1               28              13                15
           2               31              15                16
           3               35              18                17
           4               40              19                21
           5               44              20                24
           6               42              18                24
           7               31              13                18
           8               30              14                16
           9               28              14                14
          10               37              20                17
          11               38              20                18
          12               36              17                19

              DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENT      NATIONALITIES
           Addmenia          11%           Japan        8%
           Canada            11%           Korea        4%
           Czech Rep.         5%           Sweden       2%
           Eastern Europe     6%           Turkey       3%
           France             2%           UK          15%
           Germany            3%           USA         18%
           Italy              3%           Others       9%
Sheet 8
             S E C T I O N A:    PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR PREPARING THIS SECTION OF THE REPORT
          AT THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF ADDMENIA

     TYPED NAME                     POSITION                  SIGNATURE
Dr Carol Goldberg           Director (Head of School)
S. Busy                     Board of Trustees -
                            member
E. Clapton                  Primary Music Teacher
F. Nightingale              Nurse/Health Advisor
B. Gates                    Head of I.T.
S. Diaghilev                PE & Dance Teacher
G. Fingers                  Grounds & Gardens
                            Staff
M. Meddle                   Parent
I. Knowall                  Grade 11 Student

SECTION A: PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES

Note: Committee A should complete its work very early in the Self-Study
process, given that all other committees must have access to the recently
reviewed School Philosophy and Objectives statement.

Introduction

A central tenet of the accreditation process is that a school must operate with
a clear understanding of its mission relative to the needs of its students. The
School Philosophy is a statement of the beliefs held by the school community
(staff, management, governing body, parents and students) about the
education of young people and the purposes and goals of the school. Everyone
at an effective school should know what the institution stands for, knows what
it seeks to accomplish, and should understand why it teaches in the way it
does.

In an effective school, the Philosophy and Objectives are systematically
developed and reviewed by the broad school community at appropriate
intervals. Action planning is needed to translate the Philosophy and
Objectives into practice, and systematic monitoring of the school’s
effectiveness in doing so should be an essential part of promoting continuous
school improvement.

An effective school's Philosophy and Objectives Statement commonly contains
many of the following ingredients:

     •   Reasons for the school's existence, including the nature of the student
         body it is designed to serve.

     •   The role of the school in the community it serves.

     •   Beliefs about effective educational practices.

     •   The collective vision for the school in providing educational
         opportunities for all students.
•   The intellectual, personal, social, physical and affective characteristics
    to be nurtured in students.

•   The roles and relationships expected of the students, teachers, school
    managers, parents and governing body in the educational process of
    the school.

•   Consistency with the spirit of the United Nation Universal Declaration
    of Human Rights, and a commitment to promote international and
    intercultural experiences for students. These are vital features, given
    that the school has chosen to participate in an international
    accreditation process.
                                Sheet 9
School Objectives should flow from the Philosophy statement, and should be
practical and measurable in nature. They should cover all school operations
in such a way that any one given area can derive its own specific objectives
from the general school-wide list.

STEP ONE: COLLECT AND REVIEW THE INFORMATION

The Self-Study Committee should collect all the information requested, both to
assist it in the rating of Indicators and Standards in Step Three and as
evidence (to be made available to the Visiting Team) to support those ratings:

First, collect and review the Profiles and the analysis of the survey results
generated in Part One of the Self-Study, as well as the current version of the
Philosophy and Objectives.

Secondly, collect and review all the materials requested in the list. Current
documents should be used whenever possible. Items marked with an
asterisk* must be included in the report eventually to be sent to Visiting Team
members. The other items are likely to be too bulky or too expensive to be
duplicated. Therefore, only a brief summary of these items should be
contained in the report to be sent to the Visiting Team, and the complete items
should be available in the Team Meeting Rooms at the school and the hotel for
perusal during the Team Visit week. All material either sent to Team members
or made available during the visit week, should be clearly organised and
labelled.

  1. The school’s Philosophy and Objectives Statement*

  2. All publications (e.g. School Prospectus*) used to inform the community
     and outside organisations about the school, its Philosophy and
     Objectives.

  3. Details of the process by which the school's Philosophy and Objectives
     have been developed and regularly reviewed. Those details should
     include some consideration of the following:

     a) the people who participated and the sectors of the school from which
        they were drawn
     b) how input was sought (meeting agendas on the subject, calendars,
        questionnaires used, etc)
     c) the frequency with which the review process has, and will, take place

  4. Details of the action planning process (who, when, how) which translates
     the Philosophy and Objectives into practice.

  5. Details of the process by which the practical impact of the Philosophy
     and Objectives on school life is monitored (who, when, how). Include the
     results of the latest monitoring.

  6. The school’s Admission Policies* and Procedures*.
                                    Sheet 10

The following information was collected by ISA Committee A as requested in the
above list:

Info Item A1: The ISA Philosophy and Objectives Statement

ISA School Philosophy

The International School of Addmenia (ISA) offers K through 12 instruction and
American college preparatory education fostering an enthusiasm for learning
and the realization of each student’s individual potential. The language of
instruction is English. The school’s policy of admissions is non-discriminatory.

The International School of Addmenia provides an intellectually challenging
programme of studies which aims to:

   •   Provide students with academic skills
   •   Promote analytic understanding and an integrated view of the various
       academic disciplines
   •   Encourage creativity and self-expression
   •   Foster intellectual curiosity and awareness of the richness and variety of
       human experience
   •   Relate physical activity and fitness to a way of life and as a means to a
       positive self-image

The International School of Addmenia emphasizes the importance of mutual
acceptance and understanding, and an awareness of the increasing
interdependence among different peoples of the world. The school offers an
atmosphere of trust and support which aims to:

   •   Maximize the educational and social opportunities of living in Addmenia
   •   Encourage the development of self worth and the ability to take the
       initiative for the well-being of both self and the community
   •   Allow students to continue their studies in a new environment

The International School of Addmenia strives to cultivate and perpetuate such
values as honesty, responsibility, kindness, tolerance and respect for the rights
of others.

Adopted : 21st May 2002
Approving Body: International School of Addmenia School Board
Cross Reference: Policy No. 8.20 Admission of Students
Info Items A2: All publications (e.g. School Prospectus) used to inform
the community and outside organisations about ISA, its Philosophy and
Objectives.

Info Item A2a Sections from the School Brochure

About ISA

The Republic of Addmenia, established after the break-up of the USSR, is
located in a mountainous region in central Asia. It enjoys a temperate climate
and a fast growing economy.

The International School of Addmenia (ISA) was founded in 1992 as a result of
an initiative of the American, British and Canadian Embassies along with a
group of international businessmen. It provides English-medium education
based on a US and international style curriculum to the diplomatic and
international business community based in Addmenia.

Since 1996 ISA has experienced rapid and continued expansion. Current
enrolment now stands at 270 students. The student body comprises 8 different
nationalities. The largest national group is from the United States followed by
United Kingdom and Canadian nationals. Teaching staff come from the United
States, Canada, the United Kingdom, India, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand
and Addmenia itself.

                                     Sheet 11

Message from the Director

Dear ISA Parents,

On behalf of the ISA community I would like to extend a warm welcome to the
International School of Addmenia. We sincerely hope that your time with this
dynamic community will be an enjoyable, fruitful experience and a positive
landmark in your student’s educational experience.

As you browse through the pages of our brochure you will catch a glimpse of the
uniqueness of our international community and experience a flavour of life at our
school.

We encourage you to join in the various extra curricular activities on offer and to
participate in the many and varied community clubs and events.

I look forward to welcoming you personally to our school and assisting you
make your time with us an unforgettable experience.

Yours truly,

P. Regan (Ed D)
January 2001

Mission of the International School of Addmenia

The International School of Addmenia is a college preparatory institution which
primarily serves students from the American, British and Canadian diplomatic
and business communities. It is a dynamic, creative place but also one where a
fundamental awareness of and respect for the rights and freedoms of every
individual in this community and in the world outside are inculcated. To do this
we aim to:

    •   Foster in students the ability to think with precision and clarity and
        respond to other people with sensitivity and open-minded sympathy.
    •   Equip our students with the capacity to improve themselves and to
        produce a more caring environment.
    •   Encourage careful decision-making, a resilience to setbacks and a
        flexibility of approach to change.
    •   Value the uniqueness of each student’s contributions to the School.
    •   Create a willingness to understand, respect and appreciate the unique
        aspects of the host community as well as a curiosity and excitement
        about the richness and dynamism of other cultures as well as the
        individual’s culture.
    •   Teach students to respect, protect and preserve the environment.
    •   Assist students apply rational thought to problems, nurture and use
        their imaginative and intuitive capacities, and examine statements,
        opinions and propositions objectively.
    •   Assist students foster the ability to express ideas and opinions with
        lucidity, precision and flair.
    •   Develop in our students a life-long love of learning.

Facilities

ISA is situated in a beautiful, large country house set on a mountainside with
breathtaking views of a lake. It comprises 12 regular classrooms, a science
laboratory, a multi-purpose hall, music, art, foreign language, design technology
rooms, a well- stocked community library and many outdoor playing areas and
playing fields. The school library and outdoor playing fields are open to all
members of the ISA community.




                                    Sheet 12
Extra Curricular Activities

As part of its holistic philosophy, ISA encourages all students to participate in a
least one activity per semester. Intra and extra mural activities on offer include:
creative writing, international friendship club, drama club, gourmet club,
origami, choir, French Club, American football, soccer, baseball, swimming,
track and field, volleyball, basketball, tennis, rock climbing, ballet, jazz dance,
community service and photography club.

ISA is currently the West & Central Asian regional champion for basketball and
volleyball and many of its students have won recognition for their musical and
sports talents.

In addition to the regular school programme ISA hosts an annual swimming
carnival and Sports carnival. Members of the local business community join in
the organization of the event to make it a fun day for the whole family.

English as a Second Language

Limited individual assistance is available for students who need support with
the English language. The school believes that the best way for a student to
learn English is to be immersed in the classroom with competent English
speakers. ISA teachers have a great deal of experience in working with students
with emerging English.

Special Educational Needs

ISA can cater for students with mild needs who can function without individual
support in the regular classroom environment. ISA has built up a network of
support agencies throughout Central Asia who can help students in need of
greater assistance.

Counselling

ISA has a well-developed counselling service which supports students’
academic, personal and social as well as college counselling needs. Its
comprehensive college library contains brochures from the majority of US
colleges and universities as well as books and software to assist with college
entrance examinations, college applications, career choice and financial aid
applications. The Counselling Department runs various Community Education
courses on topics such as ‘Dealing with Culture Shock’, ‘Returning to the Home
Country’ and ‘Drug Education’.

School Divisions

The school is divided into three discrete sections: the Elementary, Middle and
High Schools. The Elementary School is overseen by the Elementary Principal
and the Middle and High Schools are overseen by the Secondary Principal. Each
section of the school is housed in its own designated area but the three sections
frequently join together for school-wide activities.

Curriculum

The curriculum is primarily based on a US style curriculum. Students have the
opportunity to sit for Advanced Placement (AP) examinations in their final High
School grades but can also sit for the International General Certificate of
Secondary Education (IGCSE) examinations at the end of Grade 10. The school
awards the ISA High School Diploma at the end of Grade 12 to students who
have successfully gained the requisite number of High School credits.




                                  Sheet 13
Info Item A2b: Further Extracts from The ISA School Profile

           International School Addmenia 2004-2005 School Profile

                           Director: Dr C. Goldberg
                   Secondary School Principal : Mr H. Wilson
                  Elementary School Principal: Miss L. Moffat
                         Counsellor: Dr I. Sympatico

The International School of Addmenia, founded in 1992 is a K-12, college
preparatory school which serves primarily the expatriate population temporarily
resident in Addmenia. Most of the students are either children connected with
diplomatic missions or are from families working with multinationals or non
government organizations. The school is divided into three sections, the
Elementary, Middle and High Schools. Enrolment currently stands at 450
students with 11 nationalities represented in the student body. The largest
national group is the American group and this is followed by the British,
Addmenian and Canadian populations. ISA teachers come from the US, the UK,
Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India and Addmenia.

ISA follows an essentially US style curriculum. Students in the 10th Grade can
sit for the International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE)
examinations from the Cambridge Board in the UK, and Juniors and Seniors can
sit for Advanced Placement examinations from the USA. ISA awards a High
School Diploma to students who earn the requisite number of credits.

ISA does not offer a Special Education Programme but it does have some
support available for students with emergent English language skills.

ISA is recognized by the Addmenian government as a school for foreigners and
is a candidate for accreditation with the Council of International Schools (CIS)
and will undergo an accreditation visit in the Fall of 2005. It is also a member in
good standing of the Association of Central Asian International Schools and
enjoys support from the US State Department.

                        Examination Results August 2004

International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE)
(expressed as a percentage of the total number of entries)

Grade       A         B         C          D         E          F          G
ISA % of    32%       26%       16%        20%       1%         3%         2%
total
entries
World-      10%       18%       28%        22%       16%        3%         3%
wide
average

                    Advanced Placement Results Summer 2004
             (expressed as a percentage of the total number of entries)

Grade          5             4             3              2            1
ISA%        of 29%           26%           11%            21%          13%
total
entries
World–wide 20%   24%       20%    18%   18%
average




                       Sheet 14
Universities and Colleges which have accepted ISA students in the past 5 years.

           Boston University                Addmenia         National University of
                                                             Addmenia
           Brown University                 Australia        Monash University
           Duke University                  Belgium          Universiteit van
                                                             Leuven
           Harvard University               Canada           University of Toronto.
           George Mason University                           Ecole Supérieur d’
USA                                         France           Electrique et
                                                             Electronique
           Michigan State University                         University of Paris IV
           Massachusetts Institute of       Germany          Berlin        Business
           Technology                                        School
           University of California,        Japan            Tokyo         Women’s
           Berkley                                           College
           Broward Community                Russia           University of Moscow
           College, Florida                                  II

           Pennsylvania State               Singapore        Singapore
           University                                        Management
                                                             University
           Bath University                  Spain            Universidad
                                                             Complutense (Madrid)
UK         University of Cambridge          Thailand         University of Bangkok
           London School of                 Uzbekistan       National University
           Economics                                         Law School
           Imperial College London
           Napier University
           University of Sheffield
           University of Stirling


Info Item A2c: A School Newsletter Article (March 2004)

                                 CIS Accreditation

After the professionally stimulating and enjoyable visit from Officers of the
Council of International Schools Accreditation Service last month (February
2004), we received the wonderful news that ISA has been granted Candidacy
Status for accreditation. The report left by the Visitors is currently in the library
and can be viewed by members of the community. The Visitors praised the
warm and friendly atmosphere in the school, the dedication of ISA staff, the
obvious focus on high academic standards and the manner in which the host
country and the cultures of the ISA community are used to enrich the curriculum
and support the school philosophy.

Naturally the Visitors left some areas for us to work on. These include: an
expansion of our curriculum documentation, further documentation of some of
our policies and a continuation of our strategic planning process.

The next stage in the process is to start the full self-study or internal process.
This process will take around 18 months to complete, leading to a CIS Team
Visit in Sept 2005.
We will be seeking volunteers to serve on various self-study committees in the
coming weeks. Please spare us some of your valuable time to assist your
school’s development. Watch this space for further news!




                                   Sheet 15
Info Item A2d: Recent School Newsletter Articles

                         The Addmenian Wire April 2004

                                From the Director

A huge thank you to everyone who contributed to our County Fair last Saturday.
We managed to raise a total of US $ 12, 453 for the Addmenian Relief Fund.
This money will be used to build six village schools and two community health
centres in the poorer areas just outside the capital. Any funds left over will be
used for the essential vaccination programme which protects babies from
tuberculosis. We are truly delighted by the response, a clear indication that ISA
really lives up to its philosophy of perpetuating responsibility, kindness, respect
for the rights of others and encouraging students to take the initiative for the
well-being of both self and the community.
We look forward to our next outreach program.

C. Goldberg

                          Calendar of Events for May

May   1st: Public Holiday- May Day
May   3rd: Middle School Parent Teacher Conferences
May   10th: Track and Field Carnival – School grounds
May   15th: 4th Grade Sleep Over
May   20th: Friends of ISA Meeting
May   21st: ISA School Trustees Meeting
May   28th High School Prom
                                   Sports News

Congratulations to the ISA Swim Team and Coach Spitz which came 2nd in the
Central Asia International School’s League. The months of training have paid
off. We will recognize the Team’s efforts at the Sports Honour Breakfast next
month.

The basketball court will be closed to the community from June 1st- 15th while
essential maintenance works are carried out to the surface. Once the repair has
been made, community members are kindly requested to avoid using black-
soled shoes while playing on the court.

Don’t forget the Kindergarten Splash Competition on June 2nd. The youngest
members of our school will show us how much they have learned this semester.
The Splash will be followed by a barbecue by the lake.


                   The Addmenian Wire - September 2004

Director’s Message

Thanks to everyone for a smooth start to the school year. We are delighted to
welcome 60 new students to our community. This is a growth of 20 students
over last academic year. We are also happy to welcome Dr A. Smith, High
School economics, Mr G. Pompidou, French teacher and Mr P. Picasso, Middle
School Art teacher to ISA.
Parents and sometimes students, have been asking why ISA follows a US
modelled curriculum, why sport is important in our school, why our students are
so active in local charities and why we have included a theme week in this
year’s calendar. To answer these questions, and any others you might have, I
will be holding a Director’s Coffee Morning on October 14th, 11 am in the ‘Need a
Fix’ Café near the town square. The Elementary and Secondary School Principal
will also attend to help with questions. I look forward to seeing you there.




                                    Sheet 16
This academic year we have some major projects in store. As our enrolment is
expanding we have constructed some temporary classrooms in the school
grounds. The Board of Trustees is looking at a long- term plan for the school and
hopes to share its thoughts with you in a later version of ‘The Wire’. This year
will also see completion of the ISA Self-Study by June 2005 in preparation for
the Council of International Schools (CIS) Accreditation Visit in September 2005.
There are still vacancies on some of the committees and I do encourage you to
join us in this most important school improvement process.

Let’s have a great year!

C. Goldberg

Calendar for September

September 3rd Friends of ISA AGM 11am

September 11th Addmenia National Day Public Holiday.

September 12th High School Soccer Try Outs

September 13th School Activities Program begins

September 14th Elementary Curriculum Evening

September 15th Middle School Disco sponsored by the High School Student
Council

September 18th Outreach Program visit to Kranvov Village School

September 22nd Report deadline for Group 1 CIS Accreditation Committees.

September 25th-26th Board of Trustees Training ‘ Governance through
Partnership’ facilitated by the Council of International Schools Consultancy
Service.

September 28th ‘An Evening of Improvisation’ by the High School Drama Club.


Info Item A2e: ISA Friends Newsletter Articles

                           Friends of ISA (May 2004)

The Speaker at our next meeting will be Dr Help from the US Embassy
Counselling Services. Dr Help’s talk will be on “ Painless Re entry to the Home
Environment’. This talk will be of particular importance to families who will be
returning home in the next few months and families who are relocating. As Dr
Help wishes to create information packages for all participants she would
appreciate an indication of numbers in advance. Please call: 1234 5678 by May
15th if you intend coming.

This week is the final week for handing in old toys to the school office. We will
be delivering all toys collected to the local orphanage on May 30th.
Congratulations to the Expansion family on the birth of their new daughter,
Catriona on April 15th. We have sent round a diaper care package on the
community’s behalf.

A shipment of good quality shoes has arrived at the local market. A chance to
stock up on school shoes before the new academic year begins!




                                   Sheet 17
News from the Friends of ISA (August 2004)

Keep September 3rd free on your calendar. All six places on the Friends of ISA
executive Committee will be hotly contested! Once the elections are over E.
Windsor from the British Association will give a talk on ‘ Developments in
Addmenia and How They Affect the Expatriate Community’

The annual Friends of ISA Charity Ball will be held in the Friendship Hotel on
November 12th. We are actively seeking sponsors for this event so please let us
know if you can help. Drop us a note in the Friends of ISA Box in the Reception
Area.

Sports News (August 2004)

Congratulations to Grade 10 student T. Woods who won the International
Schools Golf Challenge during the vacation. The event, held in Carmel
California, was attended by over 30 Junior players from international schools
around the world. Assisted by Coach Player he achieved 4 birdies and 1 eagle
on the first day and finished 4 under par at the end of the competition. Well
done and enjoy your prize to the Old Course!

J. Fonda, High School PE.

CIS Accreditation News (August 2004)

The School Profile Committee finished their task at the end of last academic year
and we recently received the results of the Opinion Surveys which were carried
out through Endicott College. Thank you for your efforts in completing this
important part of our self-study. The results of the Opinion Surveys have been
passed to the Section A-G Committees to be included in their analysis.

To facilitate the distribution of work we have split the various committees into
different Groups. This is to avoid overburdening individuals at any one time.
Group One Committee Reports are due at the end of December 2004. Group Two
Committees will start work immediately thereafter and complete their reports by
June 2005. We are pleased to report that the Self- Study process is already
generating excellent ideas and outstanding plans are being formed to improve
our students’ educational experiences.

Info Item 3: Details of the process by which ISA’s Philosophy and
Objectives have been developed and regularly reviewed.

Info Item A3a
                                        From the Director’s Desk
To: All Staff
From: C.Goldberg
Date: January 2002

Since taking up the leadership of the school one of my first observations was
that there are many changes within our school community, changes which are
not reflected in the current Philosophy and Objectives Statement. Furthermore
our Philosophy and Objectives Statement has not undergone a major review
since the school’s inception in 1992. A minor review has taken place in 1997
after the school’s population began to diversify. This resulted in some minor
changes to the wording of the statement. Given the above I am looking for some
volunteers to work with me on a Philosophy Review Committee which will create
a new statement appropriate for the community we serve.

If you are interested please contact my Personal Assistant I. D. Everything.

Many thanks for your support in this important endeavour!




                                    Sheet 18
Info Item A3b

       Minutes of the Philosophy Review Committee Meeting 7th Feb 2002

Present: S. Busy, (Board of Trustees), C. Goldberg (Director), E. Clapton (music
teacher), B. Gates (I.T. teacher).

   1. Welcome

Dr Goldberg thanked everyone for agreeing to serve on this committee. She
informed the committee that it was necessary to review the school’s P&O due to
the many changes in the demography of the school community and also as the
P&O had not had a major review since it was originally written. A minor review
in 1997 resulted only in some changes of words. Dr Goldberg also reminded the
committee that a review of the P&O was also expected as part of the school’s
self-study leading to the CIS accreditation Process.

   2. Way Forward

A discussion ensued on the best way to proceed. It was finally decided to look
at the Philosophy and Objectives statements of similar schools and to bring
them to the next meeting. It was also decided to look at the current statement
and make a list of the elements which each committee member felt should
remain and to make a list of elements not in the current statement which
committee members feel should be included. It is also necessary to seek input
from the sponsoring embassies. It was decided to do this through the
representatives on the Board.

   3. Action

       •   Each member to look for the P&O statement of at least one like school.
       •   Each member to make a list of the aspects of the current P&O which
           should remain
       •   Each member to make a list of concepts not included in the current
           P&O which committee members feel ought to be included in the light of
           our current community and its needs.

   4. Next Meeting

21st February 2002, Director’s Office. Eric to supply the cookies.

           Minutes of the Philosophy Review Committee Meeting 21st Feb 2002

Present: C. Goldberg (Director), E. Clapton (music teacher), B. Gates (I.T.
teacher).
Apologies: S. Busy, (Board of Trustees)

               1. Matters Arising

Committee members shared the examples of other school’s P&O as well as their
list of concepts which they felt should remain in the new P&O and concepts
which should be added to the new P&O. A long discussion and negotiation
process followed.

It was finally decided that the following areas should be included:
•   Statement of the population the school serves.
•   Highly academic programme focused on skills
•   Higher order thinking skills
•   Creativity
•   Love of learning
•   Importance of healthy living
•   International understanding
•   Appreciation of the host country
•   Appreciation of living within a community
•   Assistance with transitions
•   Respect for others and their rights.
                                  Sheet 19
                  2. Action

The above list of concepts was distributed amongst members. Members agreed
to write a draft statement using the concepts allocated. C. Goldberg to keep S.
Busy informed of progress.

                  3. Next meeting

It was agreed to meet on 7th March 2002 at 3pm in the Director’s Office. B.
Gates to supply snacks.


           Minutes of the Philosophy Review Committee Meeting 7th March 2002

Present: S. Busy (Board of Trustees), C. Goldberg (Director), E. Clapton (music
teacher).

Apologies: B. Gates

   1. Matters Arising

Committee members shared their drafts of the sections they were allocated. C.
Goldberg shared the drafts (and cookies!) on B. Gates’ behalf. A lengthy
discussion took place. The following first draft was agreed:

The International School of Addmenia offers American college Preparatory
Education in English which aims to ensure that all students reach their
individual full potential. The school accepts students of different abilities.

The aims of the International School of Addmenia are to:

       •     Provide a highly academic programme
       •     Assist students see connections
       •     Encourage creativity and self- expression
       •     Foster intellectual curiosity and awareness of the richness and variety
             of human experience
       •     Help students understand the importance of physical fitness.

As an international school we aim to develop in our students a deep sense of
inter cultural and international understanding. Hence we aim to:

   •       Assist students adjust to living in Addmenia
   •       Help students understand their importance within a community

Action

Members were asked to review the draft before the next meeting on the 14th
March 2002 at which point a draft for presentation to the Board should be
finalized.

Next Meeting
14th March 3.30 pm, Director’s Office. C. Goldberg to supply refreshments.

       Minutes of the Philosophy Review Committee Meeting 14th March 2002
Present: S. Busy (Board of Trustees), C. Goldberg (Director), E. Clapton (music
teacher), B. Gates (I.T. teacher).

           1.Matters Arising

Members of the committee gave input into proposed amendments to the draft
Philosophy and Objectives statement. Members expressed concern about some
of the wording being too prescriptive for a philosophy statement as well as the
need to expand some of the introductory statements. The following statement
was agreed on for presentation to the Board.
                                      Sheet 20
The International School of Addmenia offers American college Preparatory
Education fostering an enthusiasm for learning which aims to ensure that all
students reach their individual full potential. The school accepts students of
different abilities.

The aims of the International School of Addmenia are to:

       •    Provide a highly academic program.
       •    Promote analytic understanding and an integrated view of the various
            academic disciplines.
       •    Encourage creativity and self- expression.
       •    Foster intellectual curiosity and awareness of the richness and variety
            of human experience.
       •    Relate physical activity and fitness to a way of life and as a means to a
            positive self-image.

As an international school we aim to develop in our students a deep sense of
inter cultural and international understanding. The school offers an atmosphere
of trust and support which aims to:

   •       Maximize the educational and social opportunities of living in Addmenia.
   •       Help students understand their importance within a community.
   •       Allow students to continue their studies in a new environment.

           2. Action

C. Goldberg to present this draft to the Board at their meeting next week. We
will reconvene after the Board has considered the draft.

      3.Next Meeting
28th March 2002 . 3pm, Director’s Office. S. Busy promised to bring lemonade
and pizza.

       Minutes of the Philosophy Review Committee Meeting 28th March 2002

Present: S. Busy, (Board of Trustees), C. Goldberg (Director), E. Clapton (music
teacher), B. Gates (I.T. teacher).
1.Matters Arising
C. Goldberg brought the committee up to date with the Board’s reaction to the
draft P&O. In general they were in agreement with the essence of the draft but
would like more emphasis on the fact that we are a K-12 school, more emphasis
on our non-discriminatory admissions policy and suggested some other less
major rewordings.
After introducing the ideas and requests for change by the Board the following
(draft 2) was agreed. This draft will be presented to the Board at their meeting
on 21st May 2002.

The International School of Addmenia offers K through 12 instruction and
American college preparatory education fostering an enthusiasm for learning
and the realization of each student’s individual potential. The language of
instruction is English. The school’s policy of admissions is non-discriminatory.

The International School of Addmenia provides an intellectually challenging
programme of studies which aims to:

   •   Provide students with academic skills
   •   Promote analytic understanding and an integrated view of the various
       academic disciplines
   •   Encourage creativity and self-expression
   •   Foster intellectual curiosity and awareness of the richness and variety of
       human experience
   •   Relate physical activity and fitness to a way of life and as a means to a
       positive self-image
                                      Sheet 21
The International School of Addmenia emphasizes the importance of mutual
acceptance and understanding, and an awareness of the increasing
interdependence among different peoples of the world. The school offers an
atmosphere of trust and support which aims to:

   •   Maximize the educational and social opportunities of living in Addmenia
   •   Encourage the development of self worth and the ability to take the
       initiative for the well-being of both self and the community
   •   Allow students to continue their studies in a new environment

The International School of Addmenia strives to cultivate and perpetuate such
values as honesty, responsibility, kindness, tolerance and respect for the rights
of others.
2.Action
C. Goldberg to present draft 2 to the Board.
3.Next Meeting
A future meeting will only be called if the Board requests further amendments.
C. Goldberg thanked everyone for their participation and their hard work.

Info Item A3c

                             From the Director’s Desk

                             Memorandum


To: S. Busy, (Board of Trustees), E. Clapton (music teacher), B. Gates (I.T.
teacher).

From: C.Goldberg, Director

Date 22nd May 2002


I am very pleased to inform you that Draft 2 of the ISA Philosophy and
Objectives statement was formally approved at last night’s meeting. I realize
this has been a major project that has taken up much of your time. Please be
assured that the Board and I sincerely appreciate all your efforts to support the
development of our school. I look forward to collaborating with you on a future
project.

Once again, many thanks and I am pleased to say that since this was such a
major review we have no plans to revisit the philosophy and objectives
statement in the near future.

Carol Goldberg

Info Items A4: Details of the action planning process (who, when, how)
by which ISA translates its Philosophy and Objectives into practice.

Info Item A4a

                                            From the Desk of the Director
To: The Philosophy Committee
From: C. Goldberg
Date: 1st Sept 2004

ISA plans to develop a formal action planning process which translates the
Philosophy and Objectives into practice as part of the upcoming Strategic
Planning Process. The Strategic Planning process will be driven by the school’s
Philosophy and Objectives.

In the meantime as you are aware I make every effort to remind staff and the
rest of the school community of the importance of the school’s philosophy and
that we must always relate our practices to the ideals and principles embodied
in it.

Hope this helps, thanks for contacting me!     Carol
                                    Sheet 22
Info Item A4b
        Extract from the Director’s Welcome Day Speech September 2003

 “Over their years of schooling our expatriate students must deal with many
changes and consequent challenges. An important part of the International
School of Addmenia’s philosophy is to prepare our students for these changes
and to help them appreciate the unique learning experiences which can be had
from life overseas. I quote

‘ The school offers an atmosphere of trust and support which aims to :
      • Maximise the educational and social opportunities of living in
         Addmenia.
      • Allow students to continue their studies in a new environment.

As a fellow parent of the school I encourage you to work in partnership with the
school to fulfil this most important mission.”

Info Item A4c

Extract from the Director’s United Nations Celebration Speech October 2002

 “Welcome to one of the highlights of the International School of Addmenia’s
calendar, our annual United Nations Celebration. As the school’s philosophy
reminds us:

‘The International School of Addmenia emphasizes the importance of mutual
acceptance and understanding, and an awareness of the increasing
interdependence among different peoples of the world.’

Today is a celebration of this interdependence and an opportunity to learn more
about the diverse cultures which make up our international community.”

Info Item A4d

Extract from the Introduction to the Elementary Curriculum Information Evening.
November 2003

 “This evening is about sharing in your child’s education. Many of the methods
we use to teach the children are really rather different from the way we were
taught and may be different from the way your child was taught previously.
Please ask as many questions as you like just remember that the school’s
philosophy is to:

    •   Provide students with academic skills
    •   Promote analytic understanding and an integrated view of the various
        academic disciplines
    •   Encourage creativity and self-expression
    •   Foster intellectual curiosity and awareness of the richness and variety
        of human experience.”

Info Item A4e

Extracts from the Director’s Opening Remarks at the Annual Swimming
Carnival. March 2004
  “Nowadays the media constantly remind us of the importance of physical
fitness for health and general well- being. Many of us, and I include myself in
this statement, struggle to make time for sport and struggle to keep to a fitness
programme. Our swimming carnival is a powerful means of implementing our
philosophy to

‘ relate physical activity and fitness to a way of life and as a means to a positive
self-image’

and to help our youngsters avoid the struggles which we experience.”



                                     Sheet 23
Info Item A5: Details of the process by which the practical impact of the
Philosophy and Objectives on school life is monitored at ISA (who, when,
how). Includes the results of the latest monitoring.
                                 Facsimile
To: Dr Wiseman
Educational Consultancy Services
(+36 4321 6543)

From: C. Goldberg
Director, International School of Addmenia
(+99 1234 5678)

Date: 25th March 2004

Thank you for your recent correspondence. Here are more details of what we
have planned.

A process which monitors the practical impact of the Philosophy and Objectives
on school life is to be developed as part of the upcoming Strategic Planning
exercise. The school’s Philosophy and Objectives will drive the strategic
planning process. We aim to create a series of success indicators for our
strategic objectives. These strategic objectives will stem from the ideals and
principles in the Philosophy and Objectives. We are looking for a consultant to
come in and help us set up the process. Is this something your organization can
help us with?

We have also begun to research to what extent we can use results from the CIS
7th Edition Accreditation surveys to gain feedback on the impact of the
Philosophy and Objectives.

I look forward to hearing from you,

Best wishes,

C. Goldberg Ed D

Info Item A6: ISA Admission Policies and Procedures.

Info Item A6a
                    Policy No. 8.20 Admission of Students

Applications for admissions are accepted throughout the year. Families seeking
admission for their child (ren) should make an appointment with the Principal or
the Admissions Officer.

The International School of Addmenia upholds a non-discriminatory policy of
admissions. Students are admitted if the school can offer a programme to meet
their individual needs. As a pivot for the Anglophone, yet international,
community in Addmenia the school makes every effort to support an eligible
student’s application.

The school currently offers limited Special Educational support and some
support for students who need assistance with the English Language.
Placement in all classes will be made on the basis of the child’s previous records
and the assessment of the School. This initial placement is tentative, and the
school may advise a change of class after the child’s abilities have been
thoroughly observed.


Adopted: September 1996
Approving Body: International School of Addmenia School Board.
Cross References: Policy No: 1.20 School Philosophy and Objectives
           Policies 8.20 subcodes (all pertain to admission and placement)




                                    Sheet 24
Info Item A6b

      Policy No: 8.201 Admission Requirements and Priorities

As stated in the memorandum of understanding signed jointly in March 1992 by
the ambassadors of the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada and the
Minister for Foreign Affairs of the government of Addmenia, the school is
founded as an international school for education in the English Language to
serve dependent embassy and foreign community children. As such, eligible
students are deemed to be passport holders from the countries of the three
supporting nations as well as other foreign passport holders.

Nationals of Addmenia can only be admitted to the school with prior approval
from the Addmenian Ministry of Education.

Priority Admission will be given according to the following ranking: (a)students
of diplomatic families from the supporting missions, (b) passport holders from
the countries of the three supporting embassies (c)students of other foreign
diplomatic missions (d) other passport holders.


Approved: September 1992
Approving Body: International School of Addmenia School Board.
Legal Reference: Memorandum of Understanding between the Embassies of the
United States of America, the United Kingdom, and Canada and the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs of the government of Addmenia. March 1992.
Cross references: Policy No.1.20 School Philosophy and Objectives
                  Policy No.8.20 Admission of Students

Info Item A6c

ISA Admissions Procedures

  1. Initial contact made with the school.
  2. Contact followed up by the Admissions Officer.
  3. Formal Application made to the School which includes previous
  school records if available.
  4. Application reviewed by Principal
  5. EITHER Student admitted
  OR
  5a Informal placement tests conducted by the Elementary or
  Secondary School Head to ascertain student needs
  5b Admission decision made
  6. Welcome package sent, admission date set
   and receiving class teacher(s) advised
Sheet 25
STEP TWO: WRITE THE DESCRIPTIVE PROFILE

The Self-Study Committee should produce the Descriptive Profile of this area
by responding succinctly to all the questions shown and by filling out any
forms in cases where they are provided.

Responses to the questions and entries on any forms should be purely factual,
and should not include evaluations or judgments. The Self-Study Committee
has ample opportunities to express its opinions in Steps Three and Four.

Later, once verified, this Descriptive Profile will inform the Visiting Team as it
writes its report. Therefore, its contents must be as current and accurate as
possible, reflecting the situation in the school, as the Visiting Team will find it.
Normally, a Descriptive Profile should occupy just one to two typed pages.

Questions to be answered, with the Standards in mind, when producing the
Descriptive Profile:

1. By what process, and by whom, was the current Philosophy and Objectives
   Statement created?

2. When was the current Philosophy and Objectives Statement formally
   approved, and by whom?

3. What are the major features of the Philosophy and Objectives Statement?

4. By what means is the Philosophy and Objectives Statement communicated
   to the entire school community and appropriate recipients outside that
   community?

5. What action planning processes are used to translate the Philosophy and
   Objectives into practice?

6. What means are used to monitor the school’s effectiveness in putting its
   Philosophy and Objectives into practice?

7. What features of the Philosophy and Objectives commit the school to act
   within the auspices of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human
   Rights?

8. What features of the Philosophy and Objectives Statement commit the
   school to promote international and inter-cultural experiences for its
   students? How does this commitment show itself in practice?

9. What admissions policies and procedures are in use, and how do they
   ensure there is a reasonable match between an admitted student’s needs
   and the programme offered by the school?
Sheet 26
STEP THREE:           RATE THE SCHOOL AGAINST THE INDICATORS AND
                      THE STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION

The Committee should use the information collected in Step One as a source
of evidence upon which the ratings in this step will be based.

     i. For each Standard, the Self-Study Committee should first consider all
        the Indicators provided and rate the school's own practice against each
        one (W = Widely Implemented; P = Partially Implemented; N = Not
        Implemented). Given that the circumstances of each school are unique,
        the Committee may wish to add one or more of its own Indicators to the
        list and also give a rating against them. The Committee may comment
        on any of its ratings if considered to be appropriate.

     ii. The Self-Study Committee should then examine each Standard for
         Accreditation, and rate the school accordingly (M = Meets the Standard;
         D = Does Not Meet the Standard; E = Exceeds the Standard). The
         Committee's work in rating the school against the Indicators, both those
         provided and any others added, will guide the process of rating the
         Standard. All ratings of "D" or "E" must be accompanied by brief
         comments. The Committee may also comment on any "M" rating.


          Section A: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD ONE                 Rating
                                                                       W, P or N
1a     The Philosophy and Objectives Statement defines the core
       values and mission of the school.

1b     The Philosophy and Objectives Statement addresses the
       needs of students, and some indication of the ways in which
       the school intends to meet them.

1c     The Philosophy and Objectives Statement establishes
       expectations for high quality education.

1d     The school's admissions policies and procedures require
       that adequate information be obtained, and that appropriate
       evaluations be carried out, to ensure that there is a
       reasonable match between a student's needs and the
       programme offered.

1e     On-going assessment procedures monitor the extent to
       which any given student is benefiting from school
       programmes. If a student is not benefiting from the
       programme, clear and effective procedures assist such an
       individual to find a more appropriate education.



                     Section A: STANDARD ONE                            Rating
                                                                       E, M or D

The school shall have a clear and effective written statement of its
philosophy and objectives, appropriate for the students it serves
Sheet 27
       Section A: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD TWO                   Rating
                                                                      W, P or N
2a   The Philosophy and Objectives Statement was created by a
     process involving input from the broad school community.

2b   The Philosophy and Objectives Statement is widely
     published in all major school documents, and is
     appropriately displayed on school premises.

2c   Promotional documents and activities project a realistic
     picture of the school.

2d   Promotional documents and activities provide parents with
     an adequate basis for appraising the suitability of the school
     for their children.

2e   There are periodic reviews of the Philosophy and Objectives,
     which involve the broad school community.



                   Section A: STANDARD TWO                             Rating
                                                                      E, M or D
The school’s philosophy and objectives shall be generally known,
understood and accepted by the governing body, school
management, staff, parents and students.




      Section A: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD THREE                  Rating
                                                                      W, P or N
3a   Appropriate action planning procedures are in use to
     translate the Philosophy and Objectives into practice.

3b   Appropriate procedures are used to monitor the effectiveness
     of the Philosophy and Objectives in the life of the school.

3c   Appropriate reference is made to the Philosophy and
     Objectives in decision-making processes.

3d   Effective procedures are used to collect and analyse hard
     data and opinions to determine the school's degree of
     success in achieving the aspirations expressed in its
     Philosophy and Objectives.

3e   Effective procedures are used to enable the school to react
     positively if evidence shows that the aspirations expressed in
     the Philosophy and Objectives are not being achieved.



                  Section A: STANDARD THREE                            Rating
                                                                      E, M or D
There shall be procedures, which enable the school to determine
its degree of success in putting its Philosophy and Objectives into
practice.




                                   Sheet 28
       Section A: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD FOUR                     Rating
                                                                         W, P or N
4a   The Philosophy and Objectives Statement is consistent with
     the spirit of the United Nations Universal Declaration of
     Human Rights.

4b   In practice, the school operates within the spirit of the
     United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.



                   Section A: STANDARD FOUR                               Rating
                                                                         E, M or D
The school’s Philosophy and Objectives shall lead the school to
act within the spirit of the United Nations Universal Declaration
of Human Rights.




       Section A: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD FIVE                     Rating
                                                                         W, P or N
5a   The Philosophy and Objectives Statement clearly states the
     school's commitment to promoting international and
     intercultural experiences for its students.

5b   In practice, all students at all levels are receiving experiences
     in internationalism and interculturalism through the formal
     curriculum and/or activities programme offered at the
     school.


                    Section A: STANDARD FIVE                              Rating
                                                                         E, M or D

The Philosophy and Objectives shall commit the school to
promoting international and inter-cultural experiences for its
students.



COMMENTS on any of the Standards or Indicators ratings (obligatory for "D"
and "E" ratings against Standards, optional for any other rating) should be
made here:
Sheet 29
STEP FOUR: WRITE THE STATEMENT OF CONCLUSIONS

In a series of brief statements, keeping the Standards in mind, the Self-Study
Committee should write its main conclusions for this Section with respect to:

  i. Principal strengths in the area concerned which impact positively upon
     the quality of students’ learning and/or well-being

  ii. Principal factors needing strengthening in order to improve the quality of
      students’ learning and/or well-being

  iii. Proposals for Improvement, which will impact positively upon the quality
       of students’ learning and/or well being. These proposals will be useful
       to the school as it draws up its Action Plans for inclusion in the First
       Progress Report at a later stage of the accreditation process. The
       Committee should ensure that it includes Proposals for Improvement,
       which addresses all Standards given a "D" rating in Step Three.

PRINCIPAL STRENGTHS which impact positively upon the quality of students’
learning and/or well-being.




PRINCIPAL FACTORS NEEDING STRENGTHENING in order to improve the
quality of students’ learning and/or well-being




PROPOSALS FOR IMPROVEMENT, which will impact positively upon
the quality of students’ learning and/or well being.
STEP FIVE: ASSEMBLE, SIGN AND SUBMIT THE SELF-STUDY REPORT

All members of the Committee signed the Report, which was duly accepted and
approved by the Self-Study Steering Committee.

                                 Sheet 30
                                  SECTION B

                                CURRICULUM


 PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR PREPARING THIS SECTION OF THE REPORT
             AT THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF ADDMENIA
     TYPED NAME                POSITION         SIGNATURE
R. Descartes            French and Social
                        Studies Teacher
B. Napoleon             Lead French Teacher

L. Pasteur                 Science Teacher

G. Pompidou                French Teacher


                         SECTION B: CURRICULUM

Introduction

The curriculum standards address the design, delivery, assessment and
review of the full range of educational experiences and programmes that make
up the school experience. Each school is expected to adopt and implement a
comprehensive academic curriculum and a programme of student activities
that meet the needs of students and reflect the mission of the school. If the
curriculum is based on an outside published source, the school’s
documentation should show how that curriculum is adapted to meet the
needs of the students and to accomplish school goals.

In defining what students should know, understand, and be able to do, the
school is encouraged to emphasize both vertical and horizontal articulation
within and between disciplines and across divisions of the school and to use
the resources of the host country to enhance the learning experience. The
academic programme, while sometimes taught in discrete subjects, should be
designed to identify common strands and to reinforce curriculum links so that
students can make meaningful connections and build on previous work in
significant ways.

Knowledge of developmental and learning style differences among students is
essential to the use of a student-centred pedagogy where diverse learning and
assessment strategies are evident. Appropriate professional development
offerings will enhance the development, delivery, and evaluation of the school’s
curriculum and its other programmes.

In effective schools, the results of student assessment are used to evaluate the
strength of the curriculum and to inform decisions about teaching strategies
as well as to measure student progress. The regular analysis, dissemination,
and use of assessment data reflect an environment where continuous
improvement is valued.

Section B is different from the other Sections (A, and C to G) in that it
articulates standards and indicators that will be used to create multiple self-
study reports. As a consequence, the school must determine in advance how
many curriculum reports will be necessary to fully reflect both its
organisational structure and the scope of its subject offerings. Separate self-
study committees should be assigned to create the reports that are described
below.

Horizontal Approach by School Division. Using the same set of curriculum
standards and indicators, the school will follow the five steps described in the
instructions below to create a series of curriculum reports, one for each of its
divisions. The number of these horizontal reports will reflect the school’s
unique grade range and organisation structure (e.g. Section B – Elementary,
Section B – Middle School, Section B – Secondary, etc.). It will be the decision
of the school as to how many of these horizontal reports will be completed as
part of the self-study.

                                   Sheet 31
Vertical Approach by Subject Area. The school will also use the same set of
standards and indicators to create a series of vertical curriculum reports, one
for each of the subject areas that are taught (e.g. Section B – Mathematics,
Section B – Music, Section B – Science, etc.). Each of these reports should
cover the full range of grades (year-groups) in which the subject is taught. It
will be the decision of the school as to how many of these vertical reports will
be needed in order to cover the full range of subject offerings. Schools may
decide to evaluate the English as a Second (or Other) Language programme in
one of these vertical Section B reports, though the ELS requirements in
Section E must also be fulfilled.


NOTE:
Please see Appendix B for more practical guidance concerning this area
of the school's Self-Study.



Instructions

Each of the Self-Study Committee groups should now follow Steps One to Five
as they consider the curriculum.

STEP ONE: COLLECT AND REVIEW THE INFORMATION

The Self-Study Committee should collect the following information, both to
assist it in the rating of Indicators and Standards in Step Three and as
evidence (to be made available to the Visiting Team) to support those ratings:

First, collect and review the Profiles and the analysis of the survey results
generated in Part One of the Self-Study, as well as the current version of the
Philosophy and Objectives.

Secondly, collect and review all the materials requested in the list below.
Current documents should be used whenever possible. Items marked with an
asterisk* must be included in the report eventually to be sent to Visiting Team
members. The other items are likely to be too bulky or too expensive to be
duplicated. Therefore only a brief summary of these items should be contained
in the report to be sent to the Visiting Team, and the complete items should be
available in the Team Meeting Rooms at the school and the hotel for perusal
during the Team Visit week. All material, either sent to Team members or
made available during the visit week, should be clearly organised and labelled.

Some documents, such as curriculum guides, may be collected for the first of
the many curriculum reports and then simply referenced in the others if
appropriate, hence avoiding duplication of effort.

  1. Written curriculum guides for the school division or subject area

  The materials will be available for review in the Team Room. Curriculum
  outlines exist for each course. These outlines list the content covered in each
  course, the number of assessments given per year and in general indicate
  resources available. Work is in progress to add information on extension
  activities for those classes where students are at different levels.
Sheet 32
   2. A listing* of teachers in the division or subject area including their grade
      level or subject assignment and qualifications (this information should
      be extracted from the whole staff list assembled in Part One of the Self-
      Study).

NAME         M    Natio    ROLE      Full or     Number of     Numbe     POST-               N
             /F   n-         IN       Part-         years        r of    SECONDARY           O
                  ality   SCHOO       Time       employed       years    QUALIFICATIO        T
                              L        (%)           in        in ISA    NS                  E
                           (Title,               education      (incl.   AND                 #
                          subject                (incl. this     this    INSTITUTIONS
                              s                     year)       year)
                          taught,
                            etc.)
R.        M       Add-    French     33%        11             11        University of
Descartes         menia   2                                              Paris, BA
                  n                                                      Equiv. French
                                                                         For. Lang
B. .         M    Add-    French     100%       20             11        National
Napoleon          menia   4,                                             University of
                  n       Grades                                         Addmenia, B Ed
                          6,7,8                                          M Ed Curric. &
                                                                         Instruct.
                                                                         University of
                                                                         Goodtown
L.           M    Add-    French     33%        15             2         Université
Pasteur           menia   3                                              Louvaine La
                  n                                                      Neuve B Ed Fr.
                                                                         FL
G.           M    Add-    French     100%       35             1         Addmenia
Pompidou          menia   1, Elem.                                       National
                  n       French                                         Teachers
                                                                         Institute Dip Ed.

   3. A chart or timetable showing the daily or weekly schedule of classes,
      with times and locations, for all classes in the school division or subject
      area

   This will available in the Team Room.

   4. Where appropriate, a chart* indicating the names of subjects or courses,
      numbers of sections (i.e. parallel groups) and enrolments by class or
      course, and the credit status and nature of the offering (elective or
      required)


   Name             No. of     Enrolment Credit Status
                    Sections   per class
   Grade 1          2          10,10     Required for non ESL students
   French
   Grade 2          2          11,13           Required for non ESL students
   French
   Grade 3          2          14,15           Required for non ESL students
   French
   Grade 4          2          17,16           Required for non ESL students
French
Grade 5          2          14,13        Required for non ESL students
French
Grade 6          2          12, 14       Required for non ESL students
French
Grade 7          2          10,11        Required for non ESL students
French
Grade 8          1          23           Required for non ESL students
French
French 1         2          22,22        Required
French 2         2          20,22        Required
French 3         2          10, 10       Elective
French 4         1          12           Elective

Note: Two years of High School foreign language study are required for
graduation. Native French speakers ( at present two students) are required to
study a foreign language of their choice outside of school. The school must
approve the course and its content, then it will award credit for the course. At
present these two students are studying German at the local Goethe Institute.
The school will review its foreign language offerings in the light of future
student needs.

                                  Sheet 33
5. A statement of philosophy*, if one exists, for the school division or
   subject area

There is no particular statement of philosophy for the area of Modern
Languages.

6. A summary of recent professional development offerings or experiences
   related to curriculum design, implementation, assessment or review

As the budget for professional development was cut, no school sponsored
professional development offerings or experiences were available. One High
School teacher personally financed a Master’s degree in Curriculum and
Instruction.

7. A copy of the assessment policy* and/or or a description of assessment
   practices* as appropriate to the school division or subject area being
   reported

There is no school-wide or subject area written assessment policy. Teachers
follow generally understood guidelines. The minimum number of assessments
required for each course is listed in the curriculum guides. Each assessment
is graded according to the set of criteria established for speaking, reading,
writing and listening. In the Elementary and Middle Schools assessments can
be based on teacher observations or written tests. In the High School a range
of formative, diagnostic and summative tests are administered. The results of
external examinations, which are encouraged but not required by the school,
are published at the end of each year. The school uses feedback from the
examination boards to evaluate teacher effectiveness.

8. Documentation on the range of learning activities that are typical in the
   school division or subject area being reported

Please refer to the Fact Sheet below.

9. Results of student achievements for the last three years. (see information
   collected in Part One of the self-study under the heading “Student
   Achievements”)

IGCSE RESULTS

     Exam         2003           2002           2001
     Grade        (12 entries)   (14 entries)   (10 entries)
     A            4              6              2
     B            2              3              4
     C            5              2              3
     D            0              1              0
     E            1              2              0
     F            0              0              0
     G            0              0              1

    AP Results
Grade      2003          2002          2001
Obtained   (8 entries)   (6 entries)   (7 entries)
5          3             2             1
4          1             2             2
3          1             0             2
2          2             0             1
1          1             2             1




                         Sheet 34
STEP TWO: COMPLETE THE FACT SHEET (SUBJECT AREA REPORTS)
OR WRITE THE DESCRIPTIVE PROFILE (SCHOOL DIVISION REPORTS)

In the case of vertical subject area reports, the Self-Study Committee should
complete the Fact Sheet found in the appendix.

In the case of horizontal school division reports, the Self-Study Committee
should produce a Descriptive Profile of the division of the school by responding
succinctly to all the questions shown.

Responses to the questions and entries on any forms should be purely factual,
and should not include evaluations or judgments. The Self-Study Committee
has ample opportunities to express its opinions in Steps Three and Four.

Later, once verified, this Descriptive Profile or the Fact Sheet will inform the
Visiting Team as it writes its report. Therefore its contents must be as current
and accurate as possible, reflecting the situation in the school as the Visiting
Team will find it. Normally, a Descriptive Profile should occupy just one to two
typed pages.


                       SUBJECT AREA FACT SHEET

  Complete the sections of this document that are relevant to the grade level
                            structure of the school.

Name of Subject Area: Modern Languages
Divisions: Elementary, Middle,           High School
No. of Teachers(by division): 4 cross-school
Frequency of Class Meetings per Week (by division): 2, 5 and 5
Date of Most Recent Update of Curriculum (by division):     1994, 1996 and
1997                                   or )



       Elementary                     Middle                    High
                    TYPICAL INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES
   List typical teaching strategies and include information about levelling or
                               grouping practices.

   •   Classes                 •   Classes taught in      •   Classes grouped
       conducted in                homeroom                   according to
       homeroom                    groupings, (mixed          language
       groupings (mixed            language                   competencies.
       language                    competencies)          •   Classes follow
       competencies).          •   Classes follow             prescribed
   •   Classes follow              prescribed                 textbook.
       prescribed                  textbook for each      •   Role-plays,
       textbook for each           grade, more                simulation
       grade.                      advanced                   exercises, peer
   •   Teacher                     students assist            coaching, student
       introduces words            beginners or do            self directed
       and phrases,                extension                  research, group
       students repeat             activities                 activities, oral
       and copy words          •   Teacher                    presentations,
    and phrases and      introduces           teacher lectures.
    translations, some   teaching points as
    role-plays,          per the prescribed
•   Native speakers      textbook, some
    or more fluent       role-play, peer
    speakers peer        coaching, self
    coach.               directed research.




                          Sheet 35
                 SUBJECT AREA FACT SHEET (continued)

       Elementary                      Middle                     High
                     CORE INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES
          List core texts, kits, or other resources by grade or course.

Grades 1-5                   Grades 6-8                 French 1
Introduction to French for   Next Steps in French for   Communication in
US Schools, Books 1 & 2,     US Schools, Books 1-3,     French, Notre Dame
Eiffel Tower Publishing,     Eiffel Tower Publishing,   Press, New York, 2002.
New Jersey, 1989.            New Jersey, 1989.          Essential French
                                                        Grammar – All You Need
                                                        to Know, Montparnasse
                                                        Press, San
                                                        Fransicsco,2001.
                                                        Various websites, CD
                                                        ROMS, DVDs
                                                        Teacher- made resources
                                                        based on student needs

                                                        French 2
                                                        Advanced
                                                        Communication in
                                                        French, Notre Dame
                                                        Press, New York, 2002.
                                                        Essential French
                                                        Grammar – All You Need
                                                        to Know, Montparnasse
                                                        Press, San
                                                        Fransicsco,2001
                                                        Various websites, CD
                                                        ROMS DVDs
                                                        Teacher-made resources
                                                        based on student needs.

                                                        French 3
                                                        An Introduction to French
                                                        Literature, Sorbonne
                                                        Publishing, Los Angeles,
                                                        2000
                                                        Essential French
                                                        Grammar – All You Need
                                                        to Know, Montparnasse
                                                        Press, San
                                                        Fransicsco,2001.
                                                        Various websites, CD
                                                        ROMS DVDs
                                                        Teacher-made resources
                                                        based on student needs.

                                                        French 4
                                                        French Literature for the
                                                        21st Century Student.
                                                        Sorbonne Publishing, Los
                                                        Angeles, 2000.
           Essential French
           Grammar – All You Need
           to Know, Montparnasse
           Press, San
           Fransicsco,2001
           Various websites, CD
           ROMS DVDs
           Teacher-made resources
           based on student needs.



Sheet 36
      Elementary                      Middle                   High
                          ASSESSMENT METHODS
List, by grade or course, any standardised testing or departmental tests as
well as examples of types of typical teacher prepared assessments.

Grades 1-5                 Grades 6-8                  French 1
   • Weekly                   • Weekly                    • Baseline
      vocabulary                 vocabulary                  assessments
      quizzes.                   quizzes.                    administered at
   • End of Chapter           • End of Chapter               beginning of year.
      written and                written and              • Student portfolios,
      speaking tests             speaking tests              assessed
   • Department               • Department                   according to
      Semester                   Semester                    predetermined
      examinations               examinations                criteria
      which test                 which test               • Quizzes, end of
      reading, writing,          reading, writing,           unit tests
      speaking and               speaking and             • Graded Oral
      listening sections         listening sections.         Presentations
      (Grades 4&5)                                        • Department
                                                             Semester
                                                             Examinations
                                                       French 2
                                                          • Baseline
                                                             assessments
                                                             administered at
                                                             beginning of year.
                                                          • Student portfolios,
                                                             assessed
                                                             according to
                                                             predetermined
                                                             criteria
                                                          • Quizzes, end of
                                                             unit tests
                                                          • Self and peer
                                                             assessment of
                                                             written exercises.
                                                          • Graded Oral
                                                             Presentations
                                                          • Year project
                                                             assessment.
                                                          • Department
                                                             Semester
                                                             Examinations

                                                       French 3
                                                          • Baseline
                                                             assessments
                                                             administered at
                                                             beginning of year.
                                                          • Student portfolios,
                                                             assessed
                                                             according to
                                                             predetermined
               criteria
           •   Quizzes, end of
               unit tests
           •   Graded Oral
               Presentations
           •   Student Exchange
               project
               assessment
           •   Department
               Semester
               Examinations

Sheet 37
       Elementary                     Middle                     High
                      ASSESSMENT METHODS (Contd.)
List, by grade or course, any standardised testing or departmental tests as
well as examples of types of typical teacher prepared assessments.
                                                       French 4
                                                          • Baseline
                                                             assessments
                                                             administered at
                                                             beginning of year.
                                                          • Student portfolios,
                                                             assessed
                                                             according to
                                                             predetermined
                                                             criteria
                                                          • Quizzes, end of
                                                             unit tests
                                                          • Graded Oral
                                                             Presentations
                                                          • Department
                                                             Semester
                                                             Examinations
                                                          • International
                                                             General Certificate
                                                             of Education ,
                                                             Cambridge Board
                                                             Examinations and
                                                             Advanced
                                                             Placement
                                                             Examinations
                                                             (optional)



      Elementary                   Middle                   Secondary
                             ASSESSMENT USE
  List examples of ways in which the results of assessment are analysed and
                                    used.

Grades 1-5                 Grades 6-8                 Grades 9-12
Results of assessments        • Reported to              • Reported to
are reported to parents          parents                    parents
and given to the class        • Reported to              • Reported to
teacher for information.         classroom teacher          Department Head
                                 and Principal           • Stored in
                              • Stored in                   student’s records
                                 student’s records          for transfer to
                                 as information for         transcript
                                 future teachers.        • Student self
                                                            assessments used
                                                            to set learning
                                                            goals.
                                                         • Baseline
                                                            assessments used
                                                            formatively to
           determine level of
           student
           competency.




Sheet 38
Elementary                Middle                      Secondary
                         ASSESSMENT USE (Contd.)
  List examples of ways in which the results of assessment are analysed and
                                    used.
                                                      Grade 12 only
                                                         • External
                                                            examination
                                                            results tabulated,
                                                            published in the
                                                            school profile and
                                                            compared with
                                                            national and
                                                            international
                                                            averages and the
                                                            school’s
                                                            performance in
                                                            previous years.
                                                         • Feedback from
                                                            external
                                                            examination
                                                            boards used by
                                                            principal to
                                                            analyse
                                                            effectiveness of
                                                            teacher
                                                            performance at
                                                            this level.



        Elementary                  Middle                  Secondary
      SUBJECT-RELATED, CO-CURRICULAR, OR EXTRA-CURRICULAR
                               OPPORTUNITIES
List any clubs, competitions/contests, teams, etc. Include activities that
utilize the diversity of the staff and students and the culture of the host
country.
French Speaking            French speaking          French speaking counties
countries represented in   countries represented in represented in the annual
the annual United          the annual United        United Nations
Nations celebrations.      Nations celebrations.    celebrations.

French speaking parents    French cookery club.      High School is a member
visit classes once per                               of the local Alliance
year to talk about their   French teachers run a     Française and students
country.                   pétanque club.            and staff use
                                                     facilities/activities.

                                                     French Club.

                                                     Annual school Tour de
                                                     France competition
                                                     around the city and its
                                                     neighbourhood.
           French speaking parents
           act as volunteer
           classroom language
           assistants.

           Student exchange
           programme with a lycée
           in Paris.

           Annual French trip to a
           French speaking country

           Outreach programme to
           support a village school in
           Senegal

           Visiting author
           programme includes
           French speaking authors
Sheet 39
         Elementary                  Middle                 Secondary
                  UNIQUE LEARNING AREA FEATURES
Note any subject-specific aspects of the program such as specialized facilities,
                             labs, equipment, etc.

The school has budgeted      The school aims to           The school has begun a
for the purchase of a        purchase a number of         French section in the
number of listening          French CD ROMS               school library.
centres.                     appropriate for this level
                                                          The school aims to
                                                          register with a number of
                                                          websites.




STEP THREE:    RATE THE SCHOOL AGAINST THE INDICATORS AND
THE STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION

The Committee should use the information collected in Step One as a source
of evidence upon which the ratings in this step will be based.

     i. For each Standard, the Self-Study Committee should first consider all
        the Indicators provided and rate the school's own practice against each
        one (W = Widely Implemented; P = Partially Implemented; N = Not
        Implemented). Given that the circumstances of each school are unique,
        the Committee may wish to add one or more of its own Indicators to the
        list and also give a rating against them. The Committee may comment on
        any of its ratings if considered to be appropriate.

     ii. The Self-Study Committee should then examine each Standard for
         Accreditation, and rate the school accordingly (M = Meets the Standard;
         D = Does Not Meet the Standard; E = Exceeds the Standard). The
         Committee's work in rating the school against the Indicators, both those
         provided and any others added, will guide the process of rating the
         Standard. All ratings of "D" or "E" must be accompanied by brief
         comments. The Committee may also comment on any "M" rating.


       Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD ONE                    Rating
                                                                        W, P or
                                                                        N
1a     Curriculum design and delivery are consistent with the           P
       school’s philosophy, objectives, and policies.
1b     The curriculum reflects school policies on:                      W
         i. admissions and placement
         ii. student assessment                                         P
         iii. student records                                           W
         iv. reports on student achievement                             W
Section B: STANDARD ONE                                         Rating
                                                                E, M or
                                                                D
The curriculum, in its content, design, implementation,         M
assessment and review, shall reflect the school’s philosophy,
objectives and policies.



                                Sheet 40
     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD TWO                     Rating
                                                                       W, P or
                                                                       N
2a   Written curriculum materials indicate the scope and               P
     sequence for each course/grade.
2b   Written curriculum materials specify expected learning            P
     outcomes in terms of what students should know,
     understand and be able to do.
2c   Written curriculum materials include references to the            N
     methodologies that are used.
2d   Written curriculum materials include information about            P
     teaching materials and resources.
2e   Written curriculum materials indicate assessments to be           N
     used to measure student progress.
2f   Written curriculum materials include references to links          N
     within and across disciplines.



Section B: STANDARD TWO                                                Rating
                                                                       E, M or
                                                                       D
The curriculum shall be comprehensively documented.                    M*



     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD THREE Rating
                                                     W, P or
                                                     N
3a   The curriculum is appropriately balanced.       W

3b   The curriculum ensures that all students can profit from          P
     school offerings.

3c   All students are challenged by the content of their courses.      N

3d   The professional staff demonstrates a thorough                    W
     understanding of the patterns of physical, intellectual, social
     and emotional growth of students.



Section B: STANDARD THREE                                              Rating
                                                                       E, M or
                                                                       D
Curriculum design shall provide for the varied                         M
developmental, academic, social, physical and emotional
needs of students.


     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD FOUR                    Rating
                                                                       W, P or
                                                                       N
4a   Teachers meet regularly with colleagues in other school           W
     divisions to strengthen vertical curriculum articulation.
4b   Teachers meet regularly with colleagues in other disciplines   N
     to strengthen links across disciplines.
4c   The curriculum includes multi-disciplinary experiences         P
     and/or activities, where appropriate.
4d   There is clear designation of responsibility for over-seeing   W
     effective curriculum planning, design and implementation.



Section B: STANDARD FOUR                                            Rating
                                                                    E, M or
                                                                    D
The curriculum shall be articulated vertically and                  M*
horizontally throughout the school to ensure continuity
within and among divisions and disciplines.
                                 Sheet 41
     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD FIVE                  Rating
                                                                     W, P or
                                                                     N
5a   Local cultures are incorporated into the curriculum in          P
     appropriate ways.

5b   The cultural diversity of the community is used to enrich the   W
     curriculum.




Section B: STANDARD FIVE                                             Rating
                                                                     E, M or
                                                                     D
The curriculum shall utilise the cultural diversity of the host      M
country and the school community to enhance the
educational experiences of students.


     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD SIX                   Rating
                                                                     W, P or
                                                                     N
6a   The curriculum emphasises the processes of gathering,           W
     organising, presenting and applying ideas and information.
6b   The curriculum provides experiences in critical thinking and    W
     problem solving skills.
6c   The curriculum provides opportunities for students to           P
     develop awareness of their own learning styles.



Section B: STANDARD SIX                                              Rating
                                                                     E, M or
                                                                     D
The curriculum shall develop those skills and abilities which        M
will prepare students for lifelong learning.




     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD SEVEN                 Rating
                                                                     W, P or
                                                                     N
7a   The school provides relevant professional development to        N
     assist teachers in designing and developing curriculum.
7b   The school provides professional development in content         N
     areas relevant to teachers’ assignments.
7c   The school provides professional development to assist          N
     teachers in improving pedagogy.



Section B: STANDARD SEVEN                                            Rating
                                                               E, M or
                                                               D
The school shall provide ongoing professional development to   D
improve implementation of the curriculum.




                               Sheet 42
     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD EIGHT               Rating
                                                                   W, P or
                                                                   N
8a   Teaching methods vary according to the nature of the          P
     subject matter.

8b   Teachers create stimulating learning environments to engage   W
     students.

8c   Teachers use varied methods, materials and technology to      P
     address individual student needs, abilities and learning
     styles.
8d   Teaching methods provide appropriately for students for       P
     whom English is not the first language.


Section B: STANDARD EIGHT                                          Rating
                                                                   E, M or
                                                                   D
The teaching staff shall implement the curriculum through a        M
range of approaches and teaching strategies that recognise
diverse learning styles.


     Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD NINE                Rating
                                                                   W, P or
                                                                   N
9a   Assignment of teachers reflects expertise and qualifications  W
     in the appropriate subject/content area(s).
9b   Appropriate paraprofessional support is assigned to assist W
     teachers.

9c   Class sizes are appropriate to the subject or grade.          W

9d   The school provides appropriate texts and/or other print      W
     materials for curriculum implementation.
9e   Appropriate technology resources are available to enhance     P
     teaching and learning.

9f   Appropriate specialized equipment is available to support     P
     implementation of the curriculum.
9g   Teaching, storage and work spaces are appropriate to the      W
     subjects and students taught.



Section B: STANDARD NINE                                           Rating
                                                                   E, M or
                                                                   D
The school shall provide appropriate support and resources         M
to implement the curriculum.


      Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD TEN                Rating
                                                                  W, P or
                                                                  N
10a   Expected learner outcomes are shared with parents and       N
      students.

10b   Grading standards and criteria are clearly stated.          W

10c   Lesson planning reflects clearly defined learner outcomes   P
      and previously communicated expectations.




Section B: STANDARD TEN                                           Rating
                                                                  E, M or
                                                                  D
Teachers shall establish and communicate clear expectations       M
to students and parents.
                                Sheet 43
      Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD                    Rating
      ELEVEN                                                       W, P or
                                                                   N
11a   Teachers prepare and apply assessment materials which        W
      ascertain students’ achievement of desired outcomes.
11b   Teachers analyse student performance through a variety of    P
      assessment models, such as: formal testing, self-
      assessment, peer review, projects, etc.
11c   The school provides sufficient means to secure assessment    P
      instruments that compare student achievement with
      similar students elsewhere.
11d   The school regularly monitors the quality of student         P
      assessment procedures.




Section B: STANDARD ELEVEN                                         Rating
                                                                   E, M or
                                                                   D
The school shall regularly assess the effectiveness of             M*
teaching and learning.


      Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD                    Rating
      TWELVE                                                       W, P or
                                                                   N
12a   Staff members develop, review and revise the curriculum on   N
      a regular basis.

12b   The school encourages pilot curriculum innovations,          P
      monitored by appropriate assessment techniques.
12c   Staff members consider current educational thinking in       N
      revising curriculum and instruction.




Section B: STANDARD TWELVE                                         Rating
                                                                   E, M or
                                                                   D
Curriculum revisions shall be made on a regular basis after        D
consideration of current educational thinking and pedagogy.



      Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD                    Rating
      THIRTEEN                                                     W, P or
                                                                   N
13a   Teachers use the results of student assessment to modify     P
      teaching and to improve learning.
13b achers use the results of student assessment in curriculum     N
                                planning.
Section B: STANDARD THIRTEEN                                   Rating
                                                               E, M or
                                                               D
Administrators and teachers shall use the results of student   M*
assessment to evaluate and revise curriculum and
methodology on a continuing basis.




                                Sheet 44
      Section B: INDICATORS RELATED TO STANDARD                     Rating
      FOURTEEN                                                      W, P or
                                                                    N
14a   The school provides regular information on student            W
      achievement to help parents remain advised of their child’s
      progress.
14b   The school has a thorough, effective system of reporting on   W
      school and student performance.
14c   The overall results of any standardised achievement tests     W
      are shared with the school community.



Section B: STANDARD FOURTEEN                                        Rating
                                                                    E, M or
                                                                    D
The school shall record, analyse and report to appropriate          E
members of the school community the results of school and
student performance.



COMMENTS on any of the Standards or Indicators ratings (obligatory for "D"
and "E" ratings against Standards, optional for any other rating) should be
made here:


Indicator 1a The foreign language programme, which consists of French only
and does not offer classes in the host country language, does not support the
aim of maximizing the educational and social opportunities of living in
Addmenia.


Indicator B1bi




Standard B2



Indicator B3c



Standard B4



Standard B7
Indicator B9e




Indicator B10a




                 Sheet 45
Indicator B11b




Standard B11




Standard B12




Standard B13




Standard B14
Sheet 46
STEP FOUR: WRITE THE STATEMENT OF CONCLUSIONS

In a series of brief statements, keeping the Standards in mind, the Self-Study
Committee should write its main conclusions for this Section with respect to:

  i. Principal strengths in the area concerned which impact positively upon
     the quality of students’ learning and/or well-being




  ii. Principal factors needing strengthening in order to improve the quality of
      students’ learning and/or well-being




  iii. Proposals for Improvement which will impact positively upon the quality
       of students’ learning and/or well-being. These proposals will be useful to
       the school as it draws up its Action Plans for inclusion in the First
       Progress Report at a later stage of the accreditation process. The
       Committee should ensure that it includes Proposals for Improvement
       which address all Standards given a "D" rating in Step Three.




STEP FIVE: ASSEMBLE, SIGN AND SUBMIT THE SELF-STUDY REPORT

The Self-Study Committee should carefully assemble all the materials collected
and produced during Steps One to Four inclusive, so as to form the Self-Study
Report on the Section concerned.
As evidence of the co-operative action which is so vital in this process, the
cover page for this Section in the report should carry the name, position and
signature of all the Self-Study Committee members responsible for it. Note: no
one person should be exclusively responsible for evaluating any particular
area of a school's operation.

The Self-Study Committee should submit its report to the Self-Study Steering
Committee.


                                   Sheet 47

								
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