Marvelous Members of Magical Myths - CPSB by forrests

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									Differentiated Instruction Technology Project Template
General/Contact Information:
Name: School: Subject: Unit Title: Activity Title: This lesson is differentiated by: DI Strategy used:
type the letter a to place a check mark in the box

Sharon Crawford-Weatherford

Email: Grade Level:

sharon.crawford@cpsb.org

S. J. Welsh Middle ELA Mythology
Marvelous Members of Magical Myths
Content__ which is what the student needs to learn or how the student will get access to the information

6th grade
4 GLE(s) Assessed: Activity No.: 46 1

Unit No.:

Process_YES_ activities in which the student engages in order to make sense of or master the content

Product_YES_ culminating projects that ask the student to rehearse, apply, and extend what he or she has learned in a unit; and

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Anchoring Concept Mapping Cubing Journal Prompts

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Literature Circles RAFT Self-Directed Learning Tiered Products

Mini-Lesson Procedure:
Objectives:
(list all that apply)

1. Review the essential elements of a myth. (ELA-5-M3) (ELA-6-M3) (ELA4-M4) 2. Identify and Locate myth characters of interest using available resources. (ELA-5-M3) (ELA-2-M2) 3. Research and/or create backgrounds and character traits of at least two mythological characters. (ELA-5-M1) 4. Utilize information gained from research to develop a technology-based product that consists of at least two mythological characters. (ELA5-M3),(ELA-5-M3) (ELA-2-M3) (ELA-4-M4)

Procedures:

Type in the cell below.

Hook, Find, and Thinker: (Students already put into groups-DI by using tiered products) (Teacher) “Ever wonder why certain things happen?” For example: Why do onions make us cry? Why do trees grow up instead of down? Why must tornadoes be so destructive? Why do zebras have stripes? Why do skunks stink? Why does it get foggy or cloudy? I could go on and on. Today, we fortunately have science and technology to help us answer most of these questions. Long ago when science and technology were not near as advanced as what we have today, people would make up stories or myths to explain and answer why things happen and how things of the world came to be. Were these people stupid or dumb? No, in fact, we would probably do much the same thing given their time and place. Moreover, some of today‟s words and idioms were derived from some of the

but Midas soon finds that his “gift” isn‟t all that great-especially when he tries to eat and drink,-his meal turns to gold. That‟s one golden nugget you can‟t eat! (Just laugh like it‟s funny- This might be a good time to point out what a play on words is.) “Nike. Just do it. “There‟s a reason for this one, too. In mythology Nike was the Goddess of Victory. Pretty neat, eh? I‟m not going to tell you all of the influences of mythology on today‟s language because in the near future, I‟m going to want you to find some yourself. For the next few minutes I‟d like to turn your attention to the television to review what makes a myth, a myth” (Play “Unitedstreaming-Understanding Genre-Myths” video segment). *Upon completion of segment, do a quick question and answer to check for understanding. Hand out instructions and materials to all three groups. Level One group will be instructed to do the following: Using the “Greek and Roman Goddesses, Gods, Heroes, and Creatures” handout and the web site MYTHWEB, select, research, and jot down the required bio “facts” of at least two mythological characters. With this information and the provided materials, create a “Magical Myth Trading Card” for each selected character. (See instruction handout for all final product requirements and expectations.) Myth Trading Cards.doc Trading Card Instructions.doc

mythweb.html
Level Two will be instructed two do the following: Using the “Greek and Roman Goddesses, Gods, Heroes, and Creatures” handout and the web site MYTHWEB, select, research, and jot down the bio ”facts” of at least two mythological characters. With this information, some imagination and wit, and the provided materials, produce an obituary for each selected character. Explain to them that even though the gods and goddesses were said to be immortal, with all of the scientific developments throughout the years, the believability of the stories are “dying” down. Thus, we must put these characters to rest. The title of the obituary page can be a word play such as this: “Dying to be Immortal”, or “Another Immortal Bites the Dust”. Encourage this group to use their knowledge of the characters and myths to make up some of the funeral arrangements. For instance, “Aphrodite will be buried Wednesday, April 3, 2007, at 2:00 p.m. under the direction of Ambrosia Funeral Home for the Gods. Goddess Aphrodite passed away in her residence shortly after realizing she had a wrinkle…” (She‟s the goddess of beauty, of course!) Give these students real obituary entries from the newspaper, so that they‟ll have something to follow (you may want to be extra careful to select an obituary of a person who is not a relative or friend of the student!) All product expectations and requirements will be provided on an instruction sheet. Tell the students to include an illustration with each obituary. Sample Obituary.doc Instructions for yth Obituary.doc mythweb.html Level Three will be instructed to do the following: After reading several myths from the MYTHWEB site and reviewing the make up of this type of genre, create two original modern-day mythological characters. Tell the students to begin thinking of an occurrence that happens in daily life that perplexes them. Since they may not know a scientific explanation for it, they must explain why it occurs through a mythological character/creature. Give them an example and requirements for them to follow and encourage word play in their mythological biographies along with a great “hook”. Have students include

an illustration with each new character. **If two is too many to create, just have them do one.** For example, An occurrence that may be perplexing may be when only one sock is found in the dryer instead of two. Where did the other one go? Surely it was put in the dryer at the same time, right??!! Well, perhaps it was Laundophy, the God of Laundry (also known as Lintmyster in Greek). He is the temperamental son of Febreezia and Tide. When Laundophy is angry or is having a temper-tantrum-and believe me, he‟s full of a lot of hot air- he does things to the laundry, like purposefully overlooks grass stains or lets the clothes in the wash mildew and the colors run. When Laundophy is happy or pleased, he sprinkles an extra dose of spring-scented detergent on the load or makes sure the clothes come out extra clean and have very few wrinkles. His weakness is that he‟s allergic to some types of material, so sometimes he may accidentally “sneeze” bleach on colored clothing. Laundophy „s strength is, literally, his physical strength. He gets a fabulous workout from rubbing and tossing all the clothes around. His stomach looks like a six pack…. of Downy….Ba dump bum!

Modern Day Myth Character.doc mythweb.html

Teacher‟s Technology Tools for Instruction:
This includes software that teachers will use to present information to students in an effort to build a knowledge base.
Select all that applies to the teacher's use as an instructional tool by typing the letter a to create a checkmark.

Student‟s Technology Tools for Instruction:
This includes software that students will use to create a final product.
Select all that applies to the student's choice as a technology product by typing the letter a to create a checkmark.

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Microsoft Word Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Excel Microsoft Access Microsoft Publisher Windows Movie Maker Photo Story for Windows Inspiration/Kidspiration Unitedstreaming videos Handhelds Inspiration/Kidspiration Other:

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Microsoft Word Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Excel Microsoft Access Microsoft Publisher Windows Movie Maker Photo Story for Windows Inspiration/Kidspiration United Streaming videos Handhelds Inspiration/ Kidspiration Other: Create a list of student's technology resources (websites) below:

Create a list of teacher's technology resources (websites) below:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

“Unitedstreaming-Understanding Genre-Myths” video segment

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

mythweb.html

Identify Type of Assessment Strategy Used in this Lesson:
Formal Assessment with Rubric:
Select all that applies by typing the letter a to create a checkmark.

Informal Assessment Types:
Select all that applies by typing the letter a to create a checkmark.

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Constructed Response Items PowerPoint Concept Mapping Graphs (line, pie, circle, etc.) Movie Commercial Flyer Advertisement Other: (list below)Obituaries, trading cards, compositions

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KWL Chart (pre and/or post assessment) Journal Writing Q& A Session Checklists

Other: (list below)

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 5. 6. 7. 8.

Attach Reproducible Materials: Handouts, Rubrics, Checklists
1. 2. 3. 4.

Myth Trading Cards.doc Trading Card Instructions.doc

Modern Day Myth Character.doc
GreekandRomans.rtf

Sample Obituary.doc Instructions for Myth Obituary.doc

Background Information: Students must know the basics of browsing a web site and how to distinguish important information from “filler” info.

Overview: This unit focuses on reading and responding to, as well as writing myths and applying a variety of strategies to demonstrate comprehension. Myths provide students with the opportunity to experience the lives of ancient peoples and to compare their thoughts with those of people of today. The defining characteristics and literary elements of myths (creation, nature, hero) will be analyzed. Writing and group processes provide opportunity for proofreading, revision, publication, and evaluation. Vocabulary and grammar instruction occurs within the context of the literature and student writing. Approximate time duration: The lesson and activities should take about three to four days. Other GLEs Louisiana Framework
42b. 39b. Locate and integrate information from grade-appropriate resources, including electronic sources (e.g., Web sites, databases) (ELA-5-M2) Evaluate media for various purposes, including images/sensory details (ELA-4-M5) Locate and select information using organizational features of gradeappropriate resources, including frequently accessed and bookmarked Web addresses (ELA-5-M1) Demonstrate active listening strategies for various purposes, including viewing a video to interpret the meaning of the story, to determine the speaker’s/character’s attitude using verbal and nonverbal cues, and to draw conclusions about the presentation (ELA-4-M4) Develop grade-appropriate compositions applying writing processes such as publishing using technology (ELA-2-M3) Develop grade-appropriate compositions applying writing processes such as prewriting (e.g., brainstorming, researching, raising questions, generating graphic organizers) (ELA-2-M3)

41c.

37a.

20f.

20b.

19c.

17c.

10a.

Develop grade-appropriate compositions on student- or teacherselected topics that include information/ideas selected to engage the interest of the reader (ELA-2-M2) Write multiparagraph compositions on student- or teacher-selected topics organized with elaboration (e.g., fact, examples, and/or specific details) (ELA-2-M1) Use knowledge of the distinctive characteristics to classify and interpret elements of various genres, including fiction (e.g., myths, historical fiction) (ELA-6-M3)

Lesson Materials/ Reproducible Materials: “Greek and Roman Goddesses, Gods, Heroes, and Creatures” handouts (One for every student) “Myth Trading Card” handout (Two for each student in Level 1) Instructions handout for Level 1 (one per student in Level 1) “Another Immortal Bites the Dust” Instructional handout (One for each student in Level 2) “Sample Obituary” (One for each student in Level 2) “Modern Day Myth” Instructional handout (One for each student in Level 3. Pencil colors/ Line less paper Technology ToolsHardware: Access to the Computer Lab Software: Microsoft Word Powerpoint Web sites: mythweb.html “Unitedstreaming-Understanding Genre-Myths” video segment Accommodations and Modifications: Preferential Seating Extended Time Peer Help Tiered instruction Assessment Procedures: Use individual instructional sheets as the rubric.


								
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