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									2008-2009

Undergraduate Academic Handbook
Bachelor of Business Administration International Bachelor of Business Administration

Academic Advising
2

Academic Advising
Each BBA/iBBA student at the Schulich School of Business has access to academic advising through the Undergraduate Programs Unit, in the Schulich Student Services and International Relations Division (Room W262P, SSB). Student support is designed to help students make important decisions related to their academic progress. This Undergraduate Student Handbook outlines the academic policies of the School and the University, and provides students with a list of available support services. Every effort has been made to make this book as accurate as possible at the time of printing. If, however, any statement is at variance with regulations or policies found in the most recent York Undergraduate Calendar or the Bylaws of the Senate of the University or any other more authoritative University publication, these documents will take precedence. Please note also that policies are subject to change from time to time, as the School or University deems it to be appropriate, in order to fulfill its role and accommodate circumstances beyond its control. Such changes take precedence over previous policies. 2 0 0 8 I M P O RTA N T D AT E S Labour Day – University Closed York Undergraduate Fall term classes commence Schulich Career Day activities. All classes will be held. (Watch for room changes) Mon., Sept. 29 Rosh Hashanah (no classes or exams to be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.) Tues., Sept. 30 Rosh Hashanah (no classes or exams to be held and Wed., Oct. 1 all day) Wed., Oct. 8 Yom Kippur (no classes or exams to be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.) Thurs., Oct. 9 Yom Kippur (no classes or exams to be held all day) Mon., Oct. 13 Thanksgiving – University Closed Fri., Nov. 7 Summer Job & Internship Fair Tues., Dec. 2 Last Day of Fall and Fall/Winter term classes Dec. 5 – 22 Fall Exam Period Dec. 23 – Jan. 2 University Closed 2 0 0 9 I M P O RTA N T D AT E S Mon., Jan. 5 Winter term classes commence. Fall/Winter term classes resume Fri., Jan. 30 Deadline to apply for Spring 2008 Convocation Feb. 16 – 20 Reading Week Mon., Feb. 16 Family Day – University Closed Fri., Apr. 3 Last day of Winter and Fall/Winter term classes Apr. 6 – 27 Winter Exam Period Fri., Apr. 10 Good Friday – University Closed. No Exams. Wed., Apr. 8 Passover (no exams will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.) Thurs., Apr. 9 Passover (no exams will be held all day and and Fri., Apr. 10 all evening) Tue., Apr. 14 Passover (no exams will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.) Wed., Apr. 15 and Passover (no exams will be held all day and Thurs., Apr. 16 all evening) For other Important Dates (i.e. religious observances, sessional dates, last day to add or drop a course without academic penalty, exam schedules, and University closures) please refer to the York online services (www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm), “Important Dates” for up-to-date information. Mon., Sept. 1 Wed., Sept. 3 Fri., Sept. 26 Students are also encouraged to use the School Web site www.schulich.yorku.ca for updated information. Students unclear of the academic policies should see an Undergraduate Academic Advisor. Students can book individual appointments with an academic advisor by contacting the Undergraduate Programs Unit (see below). Students are encouraged to discuss any problems that affect their academic performance, to clarify academic policy, to plan for the upcoming academic year and to keep a copy of all correspondence (i.e., letters or emails.) Students should make decisions concerning their academic choices in keeping with Schulich’s academic regulations. Students are welcome to visit the Undergraduate Programs Unit (Room W26P, SSB) for drop-in inquiries, or may e-mail undergrad@schulich.yorku.ca or may telephone (416) 736-5081 with their questions. Office hours for the Undergraduate Programs Unit are 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. During the summer months (June, July and August) office hours are reduced to 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Fridays. I M P O RTA N T W E B S I T E S The Schulich Web site: http://www.schulich.yorku.ca • Undergraduate course and program information, Publications, Schulich Career Development Centre, Lotus Notes e-mail, Exchange-Study Abroad, forms (LOP, Guided Study, Attending Physician’s Statement, etc.), Financial Assistance and link to Wait lists. Academic Honesty Web site: www.schulich.yorku.ca/academichonesty • Includes information for both faculty and students with regards to the new University Senate Legislation on Academic Honesty York Counselling and Development Centre: http://www.yorku.ca/cdc • Includes resources and services to help students develop and fulfill their personal and academic potential (i.e. personal & group counselling, workshops, learning skills, etc.) Office of Persons with Disabilities (OPD) Web site: www.yorku.ca/opd • Includes pre-university advising, orientation for new students, advising on financial and academic matters, referrals for personal counselling, as well as other University services and community resources such as the Independent Living Assistance Program. Schulich Exchange-Study Abroad Web site: www.schulich.yorku.ca/goinginternational • Includes and up-to-date list of the Schulich partner schools as well as the application procedures for studying abroad. York Online Services: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm • Campus Events • Enrolment Access Dates, • Exam and Lecture Schedules Enrolment and Fees • Grade Reports • Forms • Important Dates • Housing • Parking and Transportation Undergraduate Business Council Web Site: http://www.ubc.schulich.yorku.ca • Includes information regarding different student clubs and activities available to all new and continuing Undergraduate Schulich students. • Orientation Week activities

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY The Schulich School of Business provides individual academic counselling for all undergraduate students to assist in course selection and with academic concerns. However, it is every student’s responsibility to: • verify the accuracy of registration records during each academic session, including all course changes • be familiar with the possible financial consequences of course and section changes • arrange a conflict-free timetable for the start of every academic session • make course changes in consultation with an academic advisor • ensure the courses chosen meet all program and degree requirements for promotion and graduation

• • • •

fulfill the requirements and be aware of academic progress in all registered courses note and abide by the sessional deadline dates published online at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm know and adhere to the University policy on academic honesty communicate her/his intention to graduate at the end of the current academic year by completion and submission of the ‘Application to Graduate’ form, available online at: www.yorku.ca/mygraduation/

At any time during your study, if any of these points are unclear, please meet with a representative from the Undergraduate Programs unit. The staff in the Undergraduate Programs unit is here to support your goals.

Schulich School of Business

Table of Contents
Academic Advising 2008 Important dates ......................................................inside 2009 Important dates ......................................................inside Important Web sites ........................................................inside Student Responsibility ......................................................inside For Assistance and Additional Information Division of Student Services & International Relations ...............................4 York University Contact Numbers .............................................................4 Enrolment and Registration Information Enrolment and Registration ......................................................................5 Sessional Course Dates ............................................................................5 Course and Section Changes....................................................................5 Wait List Procedures and the Wait List Database .......................................5 Class Photo Lists ......................................................................................6 YU-card ...................................................................................................6 Computer Access Policy ...........................................................................6 Lotus Notes E-Mail ...................................................................................6 Update Your Address and Phone Numbers................................................6 Information on Students ..........................................................................6 Registration and Fees Undergraduate Academic Fees .................................................................7 Refunds ...................................................................................................7 Health and Dental Insurance ....................................................................7 Academic Requirements Overview .................................................................................................8 Mandatory Advising Sessions....................................................................8 Transfer Credits........................................................................................8 Delayed-Entry to BBA ...............................................................................8 Switching Business Programs Within the Schulich School of Business ...........8 Courseload Requirements.........................................................................9 Courses: Business Electives .......................................................................9 Schulich Electives – Restrictions ................................................................9 Non-Business Electives..............................................................................9 Internet Courses ......................................................................................9 Degree Program Note.............................................................................10 Course Credit Exclusions ........................................................................11 Courses: Summer...................................................................................11 Areas of Specialization ...........................................................................11 Schulich Guided Study 4900-Series Elective Courses ...............................11 iBBA Language Study Requirements .......................................................12 Exchange-Study Term Abroad .................................................................12 iBBA Internship Abroad – SB/INTL 4100 3.00 ..........................................12 iBBA Globally-Focused Study ..................................................................12 Relevant Globally-Focused Courses (Sample List) ................................13-14 Grades and GPA Requirements ...............................................................15 BBA/iBBA Graduation Requirements .......................................................15 Grading Scales and Procedures..........................................................15-16 York University Undergraduate Grading Scale .........................................16 GPA Calculations....................................................................................16 Notification of Intent to Graduate ..........................................................16 Academic Policies and Regulations: Schulich School University Rules, Regulations and Policies................................................17 Assignments ..........................................................................................17 Unavoidable Absences ...........................................................................17 Attendance ............................................................................................17 Conduct ................................................................................................17 Course/Instructor Evaluations .................................................................17 Schulich Centre for Teaching Excellence..................................................17 Personal Documents...............................................................................17 Personal Information ..............................................................................17 Transcripts of Academic Records.............................................................17 Examinations .........................................................................................18 Academic Honesty .................................................................................18 Schulich School Implementation of the Senate Procedures for Dealing With Suspected Breaches of Academic Honesty ..........19-25 Grade Appeals for Schulich Courses ..................................................25-26 Grade Appeals for Courses Taken in Faculties Other Than Schulich ...........26 Required Withdrawal and the Appeal Process ....................................26-27 BBA/iBBA Program Committee ...............................................................27 Faculty Council ......................................................................................27 Schulich School of Business Approval Procedure for the Conduct of Course-Related, Non-Funded, Minimal Risk Research Involving Human Participants.............................................................27 Scholarships and Financial Assistance Introduction ...........................................................................................50 Prestigious Entrance Awards..............................................................50-51 Scholarships, Awards and Bursaries for Continuing Students ..............51-53 External Awards .....................................................................................54 York Continuing Scholarships .................................................................54 Graduating Student Awards ...................................................................54 Bursaries and Financial Assistance .....................................................54-55 Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) ...........................................55 General Information About OSAP ...........................................................55 Procedural Information Pertaining To OSAP.............................................55 Out-of-Province Students .......................................................................55 Student Life and Student Services: Schulich School Division of Student Services and International Relations ..........................56 Academic Advising and Planning ............................................................56 Career Development Centre ..............................................................56-57 Alumni Association ................................................................................57 Schulich Mentorship Program .................................................................57 Computing Services ..........................................................................57-58 Lockers ..................................................................................................59 The Trading Floor ...................................................................................59 Coffee Shop/Pub....................................................................................59 Library Services ......................................................................................59 Schulich Student Activities ................................................................60-63 Publications ...........................................................................................63 Student Life and Student Services: York University Bookstore and York Shop .......................................................................64 Office of the Ombudsperson and the Centre for Human Rights...............64 Centre for Student Community and Leadership Development .................64 Counselling and Development Centre (CDC)......................................64-65 Health Education and Promotion at York ................................................65 Health Services.......................................................................................65 Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD) ................................................65 Ron Cope Gateway Resource Room........................................................65 Security, Parking and Transportation Services .....................................65-67 Lost and Found ......................................................................................67 Shopping Services ..................................................................................67 Sports and Recreation ............................................................................67 Student Centre ......................................................................................67 Centre for Women and TransPeople at York University ............................67 Curriculum Overview Charts Direct Entry BBA (Fall 2005, Fall 2006 and Fall 2007 Entry) .....................68 Direct Entry BBA (Fall 2008 Entry)...........................................................69 BBA Delayed Entry (Entry Prior to Fall 2008) ...........................................70 BBA Delayed Entry (Fall 2008 Entry)........................................................71 iBBA (Fall 2005 Entry).............................................................................72 iBBA (Fall 2006 Entry).............................................................................73 Campus Map inside back cover front front front front cover cover cover cover BBA/iBBA Exchange-Study Abroad Introduction ...........................................................................................28 Eligibility ................................................................................................28 Registration and Tuition While on Exchange ...........................................28 Language Study .....................................................................................28 Transfer Credit .......................................................................................28 Application and Selection .......................................................................28 For More Information .............................................................................28 Partner Schools ......................................................................................29 Areas of Specialization Accounting ............................................................................................30 Economics .............................................................................................31 Entrepreneurial and Family Business Studies............................................32 Finance ..................................................................................................33 International Business ............................................................................34 Marketing..............................................................................................35 Operations Management and Information Systems .................................36 Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations ...................................37 Strategic Management ...........................................................................38 Course Descriptions 39-49

Table of Contents

Schulich School of Business

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For Assistance and Additional Information
DIVISION OF STUDENT SERVICES & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS The faculty and staff at the Schulich School of Business (SSB) are dedicated to supporting the efforts of each individual student to realize his or her fullest potential. The School’s Division of Student Services & International Relations should be consulted on questions related to all aspects of study at the School, including admissions, enrolment, registration, grade or course problems, financial assistance or special advising. This office is located in the Scotiabank Suite on the 2nd Floor, West Wing, of the Schulich School of Business.

T O P I C S T O Q U E RY
recruitment admissions academic advising Program planning petitions to BBA/iBBA Program Committee • Schulich Ambassador Program • • • • •

C O N TA C T
Praveen Muruganandan Associate Director, Undergraduate Programs Marianna Colalillo Advisor/Coordinator, Undergraduate Programs Lily Piccone Advisor/Coordinator, Undergraduate Programs Rose Bascio-Ghiandoni Undergraduate Programs Assistant Charmaine Courtis Executive Director of Student Services & International Relations Heidi Furcha Financial Administrative Assistant Amanda Barnes Acting Assistant Director, Financial Aid (Jan. 2008 until Feb. 2009) Catharine Shewell Assistant Director, Financial Aid (on Maternity Leave returning Feb 2009) Anne Caulfield Financial Aid Officer TBA Director, Student Services

TELEPHONE
(416) 736-2100 ext. 70670 (416) 736-2100 ext. 20654 (416) 736-2100 ext. 44405 (416) 736-5081

ROOM
W262L

E-MAIL
pmuruganandan@schulich.yorku.ca

W262M

mcolalillo@schulich.yorku.ca

W262C

lpiccone@schulich.yorku.ca

W262P

rbascio@schulich.yorku.ca undergrad@schulich.yorku.ca hfurcha@schulich.yorku.ca

For Assistance and Additional Information
4

• • • •

academic counselling program planning special cases International concerns

(416) 736-5059

W263C

(416) 736-2100 ext. 22293 (416) 736-2100 ext. 77979

W263B

• financial aid • fellowships, bursaries, scholarships, awards • OSAP information • emergency loans

W262J

abarnes@schulich.yorku.ca

W262J

cshewell@schulich.yorku.ca

(416) 736-2100 ext. 30515 (416) 736-2100 ext. 77971

W262K

acaulfield@schulich.yorku.ca

• • • • •

academic counselling program planning academic appeals progress and time limit inquiries Deferred exams

W262O

sosti@schulich.yorku.ca

• administrative assistant to the Director of Student Services • convocation • grades • Petitions and Appeals to the Student Affairs Committee • Academic Honesty • registration and enrolment • fee inquiries • online Registration and Enrolment help • Wait lists • course/section changes • • • • • international student advising Schulich Exchange programs orientation sessions on Exchange re-entry sessions school link with York International

Sandra Osti Records and Promotions Administrative Assistant

(416) 736-2100 ext. 77971

W262E

sosti@schulich.yorku.ca

Todd Coomber Petitions and Appeals Officer

(416) 736-2100 ext. 22744

W262E

tcoomber@schulich.yorku.ca

Carolyn Ward Manager, Enrolment Services Peter Babiak Registration Assistant Rohini Chatrath Program Assistant Philip Shea Associate Director, International Relations Keshia Gray Undergraduate International Program Coordinator Lan Yu International Information Assistant

(416) 736-2100 ext. 77007 (416) 736-2100 ext. 33745 (416) 736-2100 ext. 77974 (416) 736-2100 ext. 77893 (416) 736-2100 ext. 20653 (416) 736-5059 (416) 736-2100 ext. 77973

W262N W262 W262

cward@schulich.yorku.ca pbabiak@schulich.yorku.ca rchatrath@schulich.yorku.ca studentservices@schulich.yorku.ca pshea@schulich.yorku.ca

W263F

W263E

kgray@schulich.yorku.ca

W263K

lyu@schulich.yorku.ca exchange@schulich.yorku.ca

Y O R K U N I V E R S I T Y C O N TA C T N U M B E R S
Health plan information Transcript requests Off campus (416) 650-8066 yfshp@yorku.ca

Registrar’s Office (416) 736-5230 Order transcripts online at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/currentstudents/mystudentrecords/index/html Central Office (416) 736-5177 yiinfo@yorku.ca

York International

Schulich School of Business

Enrolment and Registration Information
Enrolment and Registration At York, enrolment in courses is completed online at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm, “Courses and Enrolment”. Each student is assigned an enrolment access date and time. The initial enrolment in courses for newly admitted 1st year students will take place during 1st year advising appointments. Continuing students can find their enrolment access dates and times through the online services Web site. Students with an outstanding balance on their student account of $75.00 or more will be blocked from enrolment. To confirm one’s intention to attend York, and to avoid the risk of de-enrolment a student must pay an enrolment deposit of $450 within 5 business days of initial enrolment in courses to be considered officially registered in courses. This applies to all students including those receiving OSAP, scholarships, and for those whose fees are being paid by an external agency. For details about the Student Accounts Statement, please refer to the online services Web site. Registration into the student’s choice of electives is dependent on course enrolment limits, and wait list rules apply for oversubscribed Schulich elective courses (see below). Students are not considered withdrawn until courses are dropped using the online system. Not attending classes does not constitute official withdrawal for either academic or financial purposes. Students who do not attend classes but are registered for the course will receive a failure grade. Sessional Course Dates Please refer to the online services Web site at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm for information on Sessional Course dates as well as Important dates. For example, the last day to add or drop a course without academic penalty, religious holidays, exam schedules and University closures. All of this information is posted on this Web site. The Schulich “Course & Schedule” Web site houses Schulich information pertaining to Schulich courses, exams and any additional sessional dates that are specific to Schulich Courses, for example, sessional dates for iBBA courses SB/INTL 3350 1.50 and SB/INTL 3400 1.50. This site can be found at: www.schulich.yorku.ca > Intranet > Course Information Course and Section Changes Course and section changes are permitted in accordance with the sessional dates and deadlines posted online. It is the responsibility of the student to recognize the consequences of course changes on registration, fees and academic progress. For more information, see ‘Academic Requirements’ in this handbook. In addition to possible academic consequences of dropping and adding courses, students should also be familiar with the possible financial consequences. Information on course fee refunds is available on the online services Web site: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm, “Money Matters”. See also the “Refunds” section of this publication. Wait List Procedures and the Wait List Database During the enrolment period, a Schulich elective course may reach its enrolment limit. When this happens, students trying to enrol in that course will be told by the online enrolment system that they may not enrol because: a) they do not meet access requirements for the remaining seats, or b) the remaining seats are reserved, or c) the course is full The Automated Wait List Database maintains a list of students who are waiting for a space in a particular Schulich elective course. Wait lists are not maintained for core courses. Students who add their names to the Priority Wait List before the Priority Wait List deadline will be given priority on a first-come, first-served basis, provided they have completed the course prerequisites and space is available. This deadline will be communicated by Schulich Student Services and is listed on the Automated Wait List Portal. Students may add their names to the wait list by logging on to the Automated Wait List Database at www.schulich.yorku.ca (Intranet > Course Information > Automated Wait List Portal). The database requires students to login with their LotusNotes username and password. After the published deadline for the Priority Wait List, the School reviews the enrolment and wait list numbers for the session, assessing demand for additional sections of scheduled Schulich elective courses, or for the addition of new, previously unscheduled courses. Professors may indicate their willingness to accept students in the third week of class to Schulich Student Services. If space is, or becomes available, students will be contacted via their Lotus Notes e-mail account, with priority given to those students on the wait list. If a new section is added, the Student Services staff will e-mail Schulich students via Lotus Notes, and advise students of the new section. Note that seniority (the number of courses completed) is used in determining priority only for those students whose names were recorded on the Priority Wait List. After those students have been awarded space, available spots will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. NOTE 1: Wait lists are not kept for 1st year or core courses. If the section of a particular 1st year or core course is full, please continue to use the online enrolment system to try to enrol into the course. Ensure that you have an alternative schedule prepared. Please refer to the sessional dates Web site for information regarding the last day to add a course. Add/drop fees may apply; see the “Refunds” section of this publication. NOTE 2: Students will not be automatically enrolled into courses from wait lists. Being on the Wait list does not automatically guarantee a seat in the course. Students will be notified by Lotus Notes e-mail that they have 1-3 days to enrol in the course. Once this period has elapsed, Student Services will advance to the next student on the wait list.

Enrolment and Registration Information

Schulich School of Business

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Enrolment and Registration Information cont’d

Class Photo Lists Every Schulich student has their photo taken for Schulich class lists, and the YU-card. Class photo lists are made available to each instructor at the beginning of term, and are used to assist instructors in learning student names, and to ensure that students are given credit for class participation. Students need to ensure that their photo is included in the database and are taken through Schulich Student Services at their New Student Enrolment Session. YU-card The YU-card is York University’s official integrated photo ID and debit card. YU-cards are issued to all registered students and are the key to important services such as York Libraries, meal plans, photo identification for exams and for OSAP pickup. New students have their class list/YU-card photo taken at their New Student Enrolment Session during the summer prior to their 1st year of study. Students will then pick up their YU-card in Schulich Student Services office (Room W262, SSB) late in the summer. The YU-card will use your class list photo, supplied to York by Student Services at Schulich. Students do NOT need to submit their own photo. The card is free but if lost, there is a $20 replacement fee payable at the YU-card Office. For a complete list of YU-card services, visit: www.yorku.ca/yucard Computer Access Policy While computer ownership is not a requirement, it is strongly encouraged. If students do not own a computer, they MUST have access to an off-site computer. In other words, they must have unlimited, personal off-site access to an IBM-compatible computer running Windows 2000 or XP, with a printer and an Internet connection. While York provides low cost dial-up service, this service is frequently busy. We recommend that students subscribe to their own Internet Service Provider. The computer must be equipped with a CD-ROM and should be capable of running the latest version of Microsoft Office. The Schulich School of Business can only provide limited printing support. Please refer to pages 57 and 58 for information regarding the Schulich computer lab as well as other campus computer lab locations and access hours.
Enrolment and Registration Information
6

Lotus Notes E-mail At their 1st year advising session each student is given a Lotus Notes e-mail account which is accessible via an internet browser. If desired, the student may download and install a desktop client version of Lotus Notes from the software repository. The student must keep abreast of Schulich and University related news via this e-mail communication. Update Your Address and Phone Numbers It is critical for the School to have updated addresses and phone numbers (we will always use your Lotus Notes address when e-mailing you) in order to be able to inform students of course information, etc. If you have moved, if your area code has changed, or if you have a new home or business phone number, update them at www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm, “My Student Record”. Students studying abroad will be required to update their next-ofkin information here. Information on Students Generally, student information is restricted and is available to only the student concerned, to those clearly designated by the student, and to appropriate academic and administrative staff of the University. Aside from name, activity status, graduation status and degree awarded for Senate-recognized programs of study, student information is not normally released to any person or agency outside the University. All emergency and highly unusual requests for confidential information concerning Schulich students are referred to the Executive Director, Student Services and International Relations. For more information, please consult the Office of the Registrar Access to Student Records policy, available online at: http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/services/policies.

Schulich School of Business

Registration and Fees
Undergraduate Academic Fees Domestic and International student fees are available online at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm, “Money Matters”. Academic fees are determined with reference to a formula set by the Province of Ontario (tuition fees plus supplementary fees). All undergraduate students are charged by course each term for all terms; fall, winter or summer. Academic fees for all undergraduate students are assessed according to the appropriate fee rates and the total credit value of the courses taken. Details about methods of payment can also be found online. Some international students, under Ministry of Training and Education regulations, may be eligible for exemption from the international student fee rates. Students are eligible for the regular fee rate if they fall into an exempt category. Please note that all documents presented by students in support of an application for exemption must be submitted before payment of academic fees. Students requiring detailed information on regular fee rates and international student fee rates, including information on the interpretation of eligibility for exemption, can refer to the current student Web site: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm, “Money Matters”. Refunds Upon withdrawal from a course, or from the University, students may be entitled to a refund of a portion of their academic fees, depending upon the date by which the withdrawal is authorized. Fees are refunded on a prorated basis. Undergraduate students should refer to the Refund Table posted at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm. Recipients of financial assistance are reminded that their award may be prorated and they may be obliged to repay a portion of the award immediately on withdrawal. Students who withdraw from their course(s) after the refund deadlines due to rare and unforeseen circumstances may apply for special consideration to the York University Financial Petitions Committee. Details regarding refunds and financial petitions are available online at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm, “Money Matters”. Health and Dental Insurance YFS Health and Dental Plan All Schulich students are members of the York Federation of Students (YFS), the central undergraduate student union at York University. The YFS administers a Health and Dental Plan for all of its members. The YFS Health Plan provides coverage year round, from September 1, 2008 to August 31, 2009. At the time of writing this handbook, the fees for the YFS Health and Dental plan was $190.11. Many of the plan benefits also support health promotion and illness prevention, such as maintenance medication and annual dental cleaning, for example; the plan offers 80% coverage on prescription drugs and birth control up to a maximum of $1,000.00; Dental coverage is 70% up to a maximum of $450.00. Other coverage on items such as physiotherapy, massage, chiropractor and naturopathy will provide $20 coverage per visit up to a maximum of $500.00 for each of the services; eye examination is $65.00 or more. A full description of the plan is available online at www.yfs.ca (Please click services/health and dental plan) or from the YFS Health Plan Office: 112 Curtis Lecture Hall Hours of Operation – 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Monday to Friday Opt-out Deadline is Friday October 10, 2008. Petition Deadline is Friday November 7, 2008. Appeal Deadline is Friday December 5, 2008. The plan is designed as an opt-out model, as this ensures that the cost remains as low as possible and that the benefits remain substantial. This means that a charge for the plan will automatically appear on your Student Account Statement. Students are able to opt-out of the plan if they have alternative or comparable coverage through an employer, parents, or partner. The YFS Health Plan Office at 112 Curtis Lecture Hall accepts proof of comparable or alternative coverage to opt out, or students may use the online opt-out service (beginning September 2nd, 2008). After opting out, the charge will be removed from your Student Account Statements by November or December 2008. If the student account has already been paid, then refund cheques from York University will be issued approximately 6 weeks after the opt-out deadline. The opt-out deadline will be widely advertised across campus. Questions about the YFS Health and Dental Plan should be directed to the YFS Health Plan Office at yfshp@yorku.ca or (416) 650-8066. University Health Insurance Plan (UHIP) for International Students and Other Non-Residents International students in Ontario must purchase the special University Health Insurance Plan (UHIP). This plan provides insurance for all international students (full-time, part-time, graduate and undergraduate) and their eligible family members, as well as eligible employees working at York University. The UHIP fees were under review when this Handbook was published. Please refer to the Current Students’ Web site for up-to-date information. Through UHIP students have coverage for such things as doctor’s services, hospital ward accommodation, all maternity claims and limited coverage for medical care outside Ontario or Canada. UHIP only covers dental care required as the result of a major accident. Routine dental expenses are the responsibility of the student. International students must register for UHIP each year that they are a student at York. Questions concerning the plan should be directed to York International’s UHIP staff at: uhip@yorku.ca. NOTE: These fees are not included in the fees posted online, but are charged on the York invoice.

Registration and Fees

Schulich School of Business

7

Academic Requirements
Overview Established in 1969, the Honours Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree program has achieved a level of excellence unsurpassed in Canadian business schools. BBA students begin to study management from Year 1 in courses exclusive to the program. Using business elective courses offered in the Schulich School, students may choose to specialize in one or more areas such as: Accounting, Economics, Entrepreneurial and Family Business Studies, Finance, International Business, Operations Management & Information Systems, Marketing, Organizational Behaviour & Industrial Relations, and Strategic Management. Students do not need to specialize if they prefer a more general approach to management. Introduced in 2000, the Honours International Bachelor of Business Administration (iBBA) is ideal for students who are seeking a strong introduction to general management along with intensive language study and an international perspective on business. Every student is required to spend at least one academic term abroad at one of the School’s exchange partners. In addition to core business courses, iBBA students are required to study at least three years of language courses (equivalent to 18.00 credit-hours) and two years of globally-focused study (equivalent to 12.00 credit-hours). Proficiency in a second language is not required for acceptance into the program, but is beneficial. An iBBA student can be learning a second language for the first time. Using business elective courses offered in the Schulich School, iBBA students might choose to specialize in one or more of the same areas available to BBA students. The BBA and iBBA programs welcome applications from all students who present strong academic credentials, demonstrated leadership abilities, exceptional writing skills, and a keen interest in pursuing the study of business. Both the BBA and iBBA degrees are honours programs requiring four years of full-time university study. Both programs integrate the study of management disciplines and non-business courses over the four years. Schulich undergraduate students major in Business Administration. Mandatory Advising Sessions Once admitted to the BBA/iBBA program, each new student is required to attend a “New Student Enrolment Session” during the months of May and June. A student will not be able to enroll into their 1st year Fall/Winter courses without having attended a “New Student Enrolment Session”. A “New Student Enrolment Session” can be booked by making live contact with a representative from the Undergraduate Programs Unit at (416) 736-5081 prior to the deadline date to confirm an applicant’s offer of acceptance. This deadline date is set by the York University Admissions Office. During the month of October, all 1st year students are required to attend a “Fall Mandatory Advising Session”. This “Fall Mandatory Advising Session” is a follow-up to their summer “New Student Enrolment Session”. At the “Fall Mandatory Advising Session” more academic regulations are reviewed as well as transitional issues are discussed. An e-mail will be sent to all 1st year students’ LotusNotes e-mail accounts reminding them to book their “Fall Mandatory Advising Session”. Failure to attend this session will be noted in the student’s file. All 1st, 2nd and 3rd year students are required to attend a “Winter Mandatory Advising Session” in late January or early February to review academic policies as well as to hear about any academic policy/regulations changes pertaining to the BBA/iBBA programs. The Undergraduate Programs Unit will send an e-mail to all 1st, 2nd and 3rd year students’ LotusNotes e-mail accounts inviting them to book their “Winter Mandatory Advising Session”. Failure to attend a “Winter Mandatory Advising Session” will result in a letter in the student file as well as a delay in the the student’s Enrolment Access Date for the upcoming Fall/Winter session. Transfer Credits Students who have studied, prior to attending Schulich, at a postsecondary institution, a Yeshiva or under the General Certificate of Education, International Baccalaureate or Advanced Placement programs may be eligible for up to 12.00 credit-hours of unspecified liberal arts transfer credits to be counted towards their BBA or iBBA degree provided that those courses were not used for the basis of admission. The Schulich School of Business reserves the right to award transfer credit independent from assessments that may be made by other York Faculties. BBA or iBBA students who have been awarded transfer credits upon admission are required to complete a minimum of 24.00 credit hours (as per program requirements) during each Fall/Winter session. Delayed-Entry to BBA Students interested in the Delayed-Entry program must complete a total of 30.00 credit hours during the Fall/Winter session of their 1st year of study including the following prerequisite courses (or equivalent): AS/AK/MATH 1550 6.00 (or equivalent) AK/AS/ECON 1000 3.00 + ECON 1010 3.00 (or equivalent) AS/AK/SC/CSE 1520 3.00 (or equivalent) AS/POLS 1090 3.00 or AS/SOSC 1340 3.00 Some courses offered through other Faculties at York University (i.e. ADMS courses offered through Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies) do not satisfy degree requirements for Schulich programs and will not be counted in the 30.00 credithours presented for admissions to Year 2. For more information, please refer to the Degree Program Note and the Course Credit Exclusion sections of this Handbook. NOTE: Delayed-Entry is not available for the iBBA program. Current 2nd, 3rd and 4th year Delayed-Entry students should consult the Curriculum Overview Charts at the back of this publication for required course progression. For more information, please visit the Undergraduate Programs Unit (room W262P, SSB) or contact them via telephone at (416) 736-5081 or via e-mail at undergrad@schulich.yorku.ca. Switching Business Programs Within the Schulich School of Business 1. Students in unusual circumstances may be permitted to switch from the iBBA to the BBA program following completion of Year 1. The following substitutions will be made: (a) SB/INTL 1300 3.00 replaces SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 (b) SB/INTL 1200 3.00 and SB/INTL 1210 3.00 replaces AS/ECON 1000 3.00 and AS/ECON 1010 3.00 (c) 1st year iBBA Language Study course becomes a non business elective. (d) 1st year non business elective or globally-focused course becomes a non business elective. Minimum credit hours of non business electives through the program must be 24.00 credit hours: 12.00 credit hours in Year 1 + 6.00 credit hours in Year 2 + 6.00 credit hours minimum in Year 3 and 4 viewed together. 2. Switching to the BBA program will be permitted only if the student is in good academic standing at the completion of her or his 1st year (30.00 credit-hours) and is eligible to proceed to Year 2 in the iBBA program. 3. Under no circumstances may students switch from the BBA to the iBBA program. Because of its integrated course structure, the BBA program does not permit entrance later than the beginning of Year 2. 4. Applications to switch must be submitted to the Undergraduate Programs Unit by May 15.

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Courseload Requirements The normal courseload in the BBA/iBBA program is 15.00 credithours per term. Students must complete a minimum of 24.00 credithours of academic work for the Fall/Winter session. To maintain good standing in the BBA/iBBA program, a total of at least 30.00 credit-hours for each year of study must be completed before the beginning of the Fall term of the following year, including all prescribed courses. The average student completes 15.00 credit-hours per semester. Students may take as many as 18.00 credit-hours per term during the Fall/Winter session. Exceptions to these course load requirements are possible only on the basis of a successful petition to the Student Affairs Committee, a Committee of Faculty Council, composed of faculty, staff and students. The Committee will review petitions related to one-time modifications to the promotion requirements as outlined in the Undergraduate Academic Handbook. For example, Schulich students must petition if they fail a core course and are requesting permission to be promoted with a revised study plan. Requests to alter the prescribed course of study, to take more than the maximum allowable credit-hours during the summer term, to drop and be promoted without necessary core courses for the academic year in question, and other matters regarding the 120.00 credit-hours required for graduation are considered by the Student Affairs Committee. An appointment with an Undergraduate Academic Advisor is required prior to submitting a petition to either the BBA/iBBA Program Committee or the Student Affairs Committee. Please note that students should not assume that a petition will be granted. Students are expected to attend all their classes and fulfill the regular requirements of the BBA/iBBA until receipt of the official decision from the Committee. Although the Schulich School does not normally offer BBA/iBBA courses during the summer, students may take up to 6.00 credithours of non-business courses at another York Faculty or at another University during the summer. For students interested in taking courses at another University, please refer to the “Courses: Summer” section of this publication. Promotion Criteria • Prior to entering the Fall term of Year 2, 30.00 credit-hours must be completed, including all prescribed core courses • • Prior to entering the Fall term of Year 3, 60.00 credit-hours must be completed, including all prescribed core courses Prior to entering the Fall term of Year 4, 90.00 credit-hours must be completed, including all prescribed core courses

Schulich Electives – Restrictions Students in the iBBA Program are not permitted to take BBA courses that overlap with iBBA core courses. Specifically, SB/ECON 3510 3.00, SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00, SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00, and SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 are prohibited for iBBA students. BBA students are not permitted to take any SB/INTL courses. NOTE: If BBA or iBBA students take more than the prescribed elective requirement(s) in a given year, that(those) additional course(s) will satisfy the elective requirement for the subsequent year. Year level requirements apply and non-business electives are counted in chronological order. Non-Business Electives Students select non-business elective courses to broaden their education. However, please note that a maximum total of 12.00 credit-hours of non-business electives will be counted towards the BBA and iBBA degree for Year 1 and Year 2. Students in the iBBA program must remember to include 12.00 credit-hours of globallyfocused study before the end of their 4th year of study. Non-business credit-hours are generally counted in chronological order and additional credit-hours are counted toward the next academic year. Required Year-Level of Non-Business Elective Courses 1. Year 1 and Year 2 students may pursue their electives at any year-level (provided that they meet the prerequisite requirement) to satisfy their non-business requirements in the first 60.00 credit-hours of their degree. 2. Year 3 students must pursue their electives at a minimum 2000-level to satisfy their non-business requirements between 60.00 and 90.00 credit-hours of their degree. 3. Year 4 students must pursue their electives at a minimum 3000level to satisfy their non-business requirements between 90.00 and 120.00 credit-hours of their degree. 4. Please note that this rule does not apply to courses taken through the Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics or the Department of French Studies, where the language of instruction is not English. This includes American Sign Language courses. 5. Year level requirements do not apply to Globally-Focused Study courses to satisfy iBBA degree requirements. Internet Courses Courses offered through the Internet (any course that indicates “INTR” as the lecture type on the online course timetable) may be taken by Schulich undergraduate students to fulfill their non-business elective requirements. A total of 12.00 credit-hours of Internet courses (throughout the length of the program), may be completed to satisfy non-business elective requirements. Year level requirements still apply.

Leave of Absence In rare and unforeseen circumstances, a student may petition for a leave of absence for one term or one academic year. This request should be made in writing and directed to the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. Prior to submitting a petition, students are required to meet with an Undergraduate Academic Advisor. Courses: Business Electives The BBA and iBBA undergraduate degrees have been designed to provide students with a rigorous education in all areas of business administration, while allowing for academic breadth in subjects other than those taught by the School. Both the BBA and iBBA curricula include core courses (which must be completed at the Schulich School of Business) and elective courses through which students may pursue their individual interests. In some areas, introductory courses are specifically required for proceeding to Year 3 and 4 courses. Students are permitted to pursue all of their Business elective courses in one subject if they wish. Registration into the student’s choice of electives will be dependent on course enrolment limits, and Wait list rules apply for oversubscribed Schulich elective courses. Please refer to the ‘Wait list Procedures and the Wait List Database’ portion located in the ‘Enrolment and Registration Information’ section of this Handbook.

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Degree Program Note There are some courses offered by other units of York University that BBA and iBBA students may not take for degree credit. Students may take these courses for their general interest, but such courses will not satisfy BBA and iBBA program requirements for either business or non-business electives, nor may they be substituted for superficially similar Schulich core courses. These courses are excluded from credit towards the BBA/iBBA degrees. The following types of courses will not count towards the BBA or iBBA programs: 1. Management or business courses offered through other units of the University including business courses in either the Economics and Business program or the Mathematics for Commerce program (including cross-listed courses). 2. Administrative Studies (ADMS) courses offered by the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies, including cross-listing of these courses in other disciplines or Faculties. 3. SB/BFND and SB/NPMG courses. Although these courses are offered through Schulich, they are open only to those students in the Faculty of Arts pursuing a Certificate in Business Fundamentals. 4. Physical Education Practica (PKIN). 5. Correspondence courses (Any course that indicates “CORS” as the lecture type on the online course timetable) 6. AS/POLS 1090 3.00 or AS/SOSC 1340 3.00 can be counted for credit toward the BBA program only if used to fulfill admission requirements for the Delayed-Entry Program.

Below is a list of courses that may not be taken for credit towards the BBA or iBBA programs: DEGREE PROGRAM NOTES LIST AK/AS/SC/CSE 3421 3.00 AK/AS/ECON 2300 3.00 AK/AS/ECON 2400 3.00 AK/AS/ECON 2450 3.00 AS/ECON 3140 3.00 AS/ECON 3150 3.00 AS/ECON 3200 3.00 AK/AS/ECON 3210 3.00 AK/ECON 3411 3.00 AK/ECON 3430 3.00 AK/ECON 3440 3.00 AK/ECON 3473/3479C 3.00 AS/ECON 3500 3.00 AK/ECON AK/ECON GL/ECON AK/ECON 3570 3580 3642 4070 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Introduction to Database Systems Intermediate Microeconomic Theory I Intermediate Macro-Economics Intermediate Macro-Economics II Monetary Economics International Trade I Industrial Organization Use of Economic Data Applied Managerial Economics Money, Banking and Finance A Money, Banking and Finance B Economics of Free Trade Areas Introductory Mathematical Statistics for Economists International Economics I International Economics II Business Ethics Economic Integration Between Unequal Partners Financial Economics International Trade II International Monetary Economics International Economics Environmental Economics II Historical Perspectives on Business (Not permitted for BBA students) System Analysis and Design II The Nature of Mathematics II Business Mathematics I Mathematics of Investment and Actuarial Science Operations Research I Business Ethics (Not permitted for BBA students) Business Ethics (Not permitted for BBA students) Ethics of Administration Business Ethics Introduction to Business, Government and Society (Permitted only for those students in the Delayed-Entry Program) Formal Organizations Introduction to Business and Society (Permitted only for those students in the Delayed-Entry Program) Business Ethics

AK/ECON 4082 3.00 AS/ECON 4190 3.00 AS/ECON 4200 3.00 GL/ECON 4290 3.00 ES/ENVS 4510 3.00 AK/HIST 2110 3.00 AK/AS/ITEC AS/SC/MATH AS/MATH AS/MATH 4010 1590 1581 2580 3.00 3.00 3.00 6.00

AS/AK/SC/MATH 3170 6.00 – AS/PHIL 3050 3.00 – AK/PHIL 3560 3.00 – AS/PHIL 3570 3.00 – AS/PHIL 3642 3.00 – AS/POLS1090 3.00 –

AS/SOCI 3620 6.00 – AS/SOSC 1340 3.00 –

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GL/SOSC 3642 3.00 –

Note: This list may change from one year to the next. For courses you are uncertain about please contact the Undergraduate Programs Office via e-mail at undergrad@schulich.yorku.ca.

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Course Credit Exclusions Course exclusions is a formal status accorded to pairs of courses that are recognized as having sufficient overlap in content to warrant specifically excluding students from obtaining credit in both. Course exclusions will be recognized by all Faculties and programs, and are listed, if applicable, following the individual course descriptions. When a student completes a pair of elective courses designated as course credit exclusions (CCE), the second CCE course and grade becomes the course and grade of record. The first CCE course and grade completed are designated NCR (No Credit Retained). This is not the case for core courses. BBA/iBBA students who want to upgrade a core course cannot do so with a course that is designated as a course credit exclusion (CCE). Core courses can be upgraded only by repeating the same core course provided the student has not already completed an upper level course in the same discipline area. For example, if a BBA/iBBA student would like to upgrade the grade he/she received in SB/OMIS 1000 3.00, he/she cannot do this with AS/AK/SC Math 2560 3.00 (or equivalent). He/she can only upgrade his/her grade for SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 by repeating SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 prior to completing SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 (the follow-up course). Courses: Summer Students in Years 1-3 Students in the first three years of the BBA and iBBA programs may complete a maximum of 6.00 credit-hours of non-business electives during the Summer session at York University. Schulich (SB) courses ordinarily are not offered during the Summer session. Students of the BBA and iBBA programs may also complete non-business electives at another accredited university. Students may take courses at another university, as non-business electives, if the courses are pre-approved by “Letter of Permission” (LOP) prior to the term in question. Students must complete an “Undergraduate Request for a Letter of Permission (LOP)” form, attach it to a course description from the host University along with a concise statement outlining why he/she is requesting to take a course at another institution. The letter should also include how many credits and toward what year level the student would like it to apply. The “Undergraduate Request for a Letter of Permission LOP” form may be obtained from the Undergraduate Programs Unit or through the Schulich Web site at: www.schulich.yorku.ca. Once completed, requests can be forwarded to an Undergraduate Programs Unit for review. BBA & iBBA students who wish to take language courses at another institution on a Letter of Permission (LOP), can submit their requests to the Undergraduate Programs Unit along with written confirmation from York’s Department of Languages or the Department of French Studies that the course taken at the other institution is indeed equivalent to a York Language course. Students must submit their request for a Letter of Permission as early as possible so that there is sufficient time for review. Academic rules and regulations regarding courses apply. Students who do not have approval for courses to be taken on a “Letter of Permission” prior to enrolling in them will not be granted credit in either the BBA or iBBA program. Credit(s) for the course(s) taken on a Letter of Permission will be added to the student record once an official transcript has been received from the host institution. It is the student’s responsibility to arrange to have the official transcript forwarded to the attention of the Records and Promotions Administrative Assistant, Division of Student Services and International Relations, Schulich School of Business.

Students in Year 4 Students in Year 4 of the BBA or iBBA program, cannot take courses in the summer following Year 4 to upgrade their grade point average unless they have yet to complete the required 120.00 credit-hours to graduate from the program by the end of the winter term of their 4th year of study. Students in Year 4 of the BBA or iBBA program, convocating in the spring, who wish to take additional courses (i.e. not for credit toward the BBA or iBBA degree) in the summer following Year 4 must complete a NonDegree Status form and return it to the Schulich Student Services office, located in room W262 of the Schulich building. Students who have graduated from the BBA or iBBA program and wish to return to York University the Fall or Winter following their convocation must complete the Non-Degree Status form and return it to the York University, Office of the Registrar. Non-Degree status students cannot take courses offered through the Schulich School of Business. Students in Year 4 of the BBA or iBBA program who are not convocating until the Fall should follow the instructions listed above for students in the first 3 years of the program. Areas of Specialization Schulich undergraduate students “major” in Business Administration. An “area of specialization” is an accumulation of 12.00 credit-hours taken as Schulich electives in each of one or two specialty areas such as: Accounting, Economics, Entrepreneurial and Family Business Studies, Finance, International Business, Operations Management and Information Systems, Marketing, Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations, and Strategic Management. A student’s interest in an area does not entitle them priority for registration or wait list purposes for Schulich electives. Students do not need to specialize if they prefer a more general approach to management. For a list of the 12.00 credit-hours required for a particular area of specialization, please refer to the ‘Areas of Specialization’ section of this Handbook. Please Note: Neither the transcript nor the degree will note an area of specialization. Students may request a letter from Student Services at the Schulich School of Business (at the point of graduation) to substantiate any claims made on resumés for employment purposes. Schulich Guided Study 4900-Series Elective Courses Enrolment in Schulich Guided Study 4900-Series Elective Courses Under guidance of a Schulich faculty member, individual students in Year 3 or 4 may undertake a special program of Guided Studies tailored to the mutual interests of the student and the faculty member. Please refer to the course outline on page 49. A student can take a maximum of 6.00 credit-hours of Guided Study courses for BBA or iBBA degree credit. Guided Study courses are coded as SB/XXXX 4900 3.00. The XXXX portion of the course code uses the functional area or program a faculty member is associated with, such as FINE 4900 3.00 or IBUS 4900 3.00. These courses are not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. To enrol in the Schulich Guided Study 4900-series elective courses, students must: • • • • download the Guided Study form from the Schulich Web site: www.schulich.yorku.ca (Intranet, Student Information). submit the completed form to the Schulich Student Services, by the end of the first week of classes in which the course is taken include the approved course topic, title and signature from the faculty member supervising the course enrol in the course upon receipt of the approved form from the Schulich Student Services. The student will be advised by e-mail to enrol in the course.

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iBBA Language Study Requirements All iBBA students are required to study a language throughout their studies at York. Students in the iBBA program are required to complete a minimum of 18.00 credit-hours of language study, achieving advanced level competency prior to graduation. Each student will choose a language for study as an integral part of the program.The languages available are those currently supported at York University: Arabic, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Prior knowledge of the language is not necessary, but beneficial. Please note that this does not necessarily translate into a 3000-level course. For example, if a student successfully completes French 1020 6.00 (Beginners), French 1030 6.00 (Intermediate), and French 1060 6.00/1080 6.00 (Advanced), in Years 1, 2, 3, respectively, then he or she has satisfied the iBBA language requirement. When a student has completed advanced level competency, before 18.00 credit-hours, he or she may choose either to continue into the 4th year level, if available in that language, or to fulfill the remaining portion of the 18.00 credit-hour language requirement by taking courses in another language supported by York University. Language requirements may be completed while on exchange. iBBA students are encouraged to continue their language study during the exchange program at the appropriate level. iBBA students can also satisfy language requirements at another accredited University on a Letter of Permission (LOP) along with written confirmation from York’s Department of Languages or the Department of French Studies and approval by the Undergraduate Program Sub-Committee. For procedures and details, please see the ‘Courses: Summer’ section of this Handbook. Exchange-Study Term Abroad iBBA students are required to spend at least one term abroad at one of Schulich’s exchange partner schools to meet their degree requirements. BBA students are also eligible to apply for an international exchange in Year 3 or 4. Direct Entry BBA and iBBA students are eligible to go on Exchange after the successful completion of all Year 1 and Year 2 core courses. For Delayed-Entry students, an international exchange is permitted in Year 4, after the completion of 2000 level core courses. For information on the Exchange Term Abroad, please refer to the ’BBA/iBBA Exchange-Study Abroad’ section of this Handbook. iBBA Internship Abroad – SB/INTL 4100 3.00 iBBA students who are able, on their own initiative, to find a summer internship abroad may be granted 3.00 credit hours towards their degree. No more than 3.00 credit hours of academic credit will be awarded for an internship, regardless of the internship’s length. Multiple internships (e.g., in successive summers) will not be awarded multiple credit. The course SB/INTL 4100 3.00 will count as a Schulich business elective. This course needs to be approved with signatures prior to the beginning of the term for which the internship is being registered and prior to departure. For students currently on Exchange, this approval can be facilitated, via e-mail, with a representative from Schulich’s International Relations Office. Approval for the internship must be obtained prior to the beginning of the term for which the internship is being registered. Steps to Enrol into SB/INTL 4100 3.00 1. Find a suitable site for a minimum 200 hour work term in another country and prepare a written proposal for either the Program Director BBA/iBBA Programs or the Associate Director BBA/iBBA Programs to review. The proposal should indicate where the internship is to take place (company name and country), the period of time, and an agreement of terms for submission of the final report upon completion of the internship.
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2. An International internship will not be considered for academic credit unless proper pre-departure protocol, (including the signing of release forms, and a degree audit approved by an Undergraduate Academic Advisor) is fulfilled prior to departure. Students must meet with a representative from Schulich’s International Relations Office prior to departure in order for enrolment to take place. For students currently on Exchange, this can all be facilitated, via e-mail, with a Schulich International Relations Office representative. 3. Enrolment must be completed by the student and tuition paid prior to the beginning of the term for which the internship is being registered. 4. At the completion of the internship, the student must submit a written report to either the Program Director BBA/iBBA Programs or the Associate Director BBA/iBBA Programs with a letter of review from the employer addressing performance, before a letter grade can be assigned. Failure to comply will result in an F grade. 5. iBBA students who plan to complete SB/INTL 4100 3.00 in the summer between their 1st and 2nd year of study will still be required to complete all of their 2nd year degree requirements by the end of the summer session following their 2nd year of study. Therefore, to be promoted to Year 3, students who completed SB/INTL 4100 3.00 in the summer following Year 1, will be required to have 63.00 credit-hours (including SB/INTL 4100 3.00) completed before they commence the fall session of their 3rd year of study. Forms can be picked up from the Schulich International Relations Office (Room W263, SSB) or they can be found at www.schulich.yorku.ca/goinginternational, select “Internships and Specialized Courses”. iBBA Globally-Focused Study As of Fall 2006, globally-focused courses have replaced the following iBBA program requirements: 1) the Political Science/Geography requirement and (2) the Region Study course requirement. iBBA students must complete at least 12.00 credit-hours of globallyfocused study in order to graduate from the program. Year level requirements do not apply. A globally-focused course is one that provides students with general knowledge of the world at large or of a different country, region, or society, with special reference to economic, political, cultural, historical and linguistic dimensions. A globally-focused course need not have a business focus. The overall objective of a globally-focused course is to introduce students to different regions’ interests, criteria, and requirements for effective economic, political, cultural and social development. The coverage may vary from course to course depending on the discipline as well as the breadth. Courses in economics, history, geography, or political science will qualify, as will more broadly based interdisciplinary courses in international relations. Courses taken on exchange may qualify. Language instruction courses will not be counted as globally-focused study. However, other courses in the department of French Studies and in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics that emphasize cultural aspects are acceptable. Many courses may be found in the Faculty or Arts and in the Faculty of Atkinson, School of Liberal and Professional Studies. Globally-focused courses may also be taken on Exchange or on a Letter of Permission, with prior approval. On the next page you will find a sample list of courses that have been approved. This list is not exhaustive. If an iBBA student finds a course that meets the globally-focused criteria and is not on the sample list, the course name, number and description should be forwarded to the Undergraduate Programs Unit for review via e-mail at undergrad@schulich.yorku.ca. If acceptable, it will be added to the sample list and the student may take the course. Please Note: inclusion in this sample list does not guarantee that every course will necessarily be available in future years. Please check the course offerings listed online for course availability.

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RELEVANT GLOBALLY-FOCUSED COURSES (SAMPLE LIST) AS/ANTH 1110 6.00 – Introduction to Social Anthropology AS/ARB 2700 6.00 – Introduction to Arab Culture AS/CH 2030 6.00 – Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture in China: Shanghai as an International and Chinese Centre AS/CH 2200 6.00 – Introduction to Chinese Literature AS/CH 3710 6.00 – Women Writers in Modern China (in Translation) AS/CH 3790 6.00 – Contemporary Chinese Culture Through Literary Texts and Film AS/CH 3791 6.00 – Contemporary Chinese Culture Through Literary Texts and Film (In Translation) AK/CLTR 2100 6.00 – Questionning Culture AK/CLTR 2850 6.00 – Understanding Culture and the Visual Environment in Western Civilization FA/DANC 2510B 3.00 – Introduction to World Dance Practices: /2511B 3.00 North Africa, Middle East, Central Asia and Diaspora FA/DANC 3510B 3.00 – Intermediate World Dance Practices: /3511B 3.00 North Africa, Middle East, Central Asia and Diaspora AS/ECON 3790 6.00 – Women in the North American Economy AS/EN 2770 6.00 – Modern Drama AS/EN 3554 3.00 – Petersburg in Russian Literature and Culture (in Translation) AK/EN 3862 3.00 – Caribbean Literature ES/ENVS 1000 6.00 – Perspectives in Environmental Studies ES/ENVS 3800N 3.00 – Urban Planning and Practice in the Global South FA/FILM 2600 6.00 – Contemporary World Cinema AS/FR 2060 3.00 – French for Management, Level II (A): Corporate Divisions AS/FR 2061 3.00 – French for Management, Level II (B): Capitalization, Decision Making Process and Management Styles AS/FR 2200 6.00 – Introduction to Literature AS/FR 3060 3.00 – French for Management, Level III: Negotiations/Joining the Workforce AS/FR 3080 6.00 – French Language and Society: Contemporary Themes AS/FR 3380 6.00 – Survey of Literature in French AS/FR 4144 3.00 – Mediated Communication in a Global Cultural Environment AS/FR 4324 3.00 – Masterpieces of the French Theatre I: From the Baroque Period to the French Revolution AS/FR 4325 3.00 – Masterpieces of the French Theatre I: From the Romantic Period to the Present Day AS/FR 4343 3.00 – Nineteenth Century French Literature: Towards Modernity AS/GEOG 1000 6.00 – World Geography AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 – Human Geography AS/GEOG 2020 6.00 – Geographical Transformations of the Caribbean Islands AK/GEOG 2500 6.00 – Introduction to Human Geography AS/GEOG 3051 3.00 – International Political Ecology AS/GEOG 3060 3.00 – Post-Colonial Geographies AS/GEOG 3081 3.00 – Land and People: Historical Geographies of Modern Ireland AS/GEOG 3710 3.00 – Society, Space and Environment in South Asia

RELEVANT GLOBALLY-FOCUSED COURSES (SAMPLE LIST) CONT’D AS/GEOG 4395 3.00 – Asia-Pacific Development: Geographical Perspectives AS/GER 2200 6.00 – Modern and Contemporary German Writers AS/GER 3600 3.00 – Berlin in German Literature and Culture AS/GER 3601 3.00 – Vienna in the Early 20th Century: Literature, Art, Culture and Politics (In Translation) AS/GER 3640 3.00 – Women in German Literature and Culture AS/GER 3792 6.00 – Recent German Film and Culture (In Translation) AS/GER 4600 3.00 – Berlin in German Literature and Culture AS/GKM 3600 6.00 – Modern Greek Literature and Culture after Independence AS/HIST 1030 6.00 – Imperialism and Nationalism in Modern Asia AS/HIST 1050 6.00 – Life, Love and Labour: An Introduction to Social and Cultural History AS/HIST 2220 6.00 – Medieval and Early Modern Europe AS/HIST 2300 6.00 – Modern Europe AS/HIST 2310 6.00 – Russian Culture: Continuity and Conflict AK/HIST 2520 6.00 – History of Modern Europe AS/HIST 2710 6.00 – East Asia: Tradition and Defiance AS/HIST 2720 6.00 – Modern Latin America, 1810 to the Present AS/HIST 2750 6.00 – African History, From 1800 to the Present AS/HIST 2790 6.00 – Islamic Civilization, 622-1400 GL/HIST 3255 3.00 – Reformation Europe 1494-1598 AS/HIST 3280 3.00 – Europeans and the Natural World to 1800 AS/HIST 3311 3.00 – History of the Soviet Union AS/HIST 3315 3.00 – Modern Ukrainian History AS/HIST 3320 6.00 – Modern Germany: 1871 to the Present AS/HIST 3382 6.00 – Russian and East European Film and Culture In Translation AS/HIST 3391 6.00 – Italy, Spain and Portugal Since 1800 AS/HIST 3392 3.00 – The Spanish Civil War AS/HIST 3395 6.00 – From the Defeat of Fascism to the Fall of Communism: Europe since 1945 AK/HIST 3515 6.00 – Europe in the Middle Ages: 300-1300 AK/HIST 3540 6.00 – Issues and Themes in Medieval Culture AS/HIST 3625 3.00 – Constitutional Law and Equal Rights in U.S. History AK/HIST 3680 6.00 – The British Empire from 1600 to the Present AS/HIST 3700 6.00 – African, Caribbean and Latin American Connections: The Making of the South Atlantic World AS/HIST 3710 6.00 – The Aftermath of Slavery in the Caribbean: Reconstructing Society in the Post-Emancipation Era AS/HIST 3732 3.00 – Contemporary Mexican History 1940-2000 AS/HIST 3733 3.00 – The Spanish Conquest of Mexico AS/HIST 3734 6.00 – Conflict, Resistance and Revolution in Latin American History AS/HIST 3760 6.00 – Modern Japan AS/HIST 3765 6.00 – Korea: A Long History of the Hermit Nation AS/HIST 3766 6.00 – Korea Since World War II

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Academic Requirements cont’d

RELEVANT GLOBALLY-FOCUSED COURSES (SAMPLE LIST) CONT’D AS/HIST AS/HIST AS/HIST AS/HIST AK/HIST 3768 3775 3791 3792 3950 3.00 3.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 – – – – – Sages and Statecraft in East Asia History of Hong Kong The Islamic Gunpowder Empires The Middle East Since 1800 Making of the African Diaspora: Slavery and Emancipation in the Americas Selected Problems in Modern Russia An Introduction to South Asian Culture: Hindi as a Medium of Cultural Expression South Asian Literary Activism: Women Writers and Filmmakers in South Asia and the Diaspora Culture and Society in East Asia One World: Historical and Cultural Perspectives of Globalization Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture Germany through the Ages: Culture and Society Defining Europe: Introduction to European Studies Texts and Contents: Studies in Literature and Culture Introduction to Korean Culture The Calypso and Caribbean Oral Literature Chinese Culture in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore: Their Literary Texts and Film How the Irish Saved Western Civilization Berlin in German Literature and Culture Vienna in the Early 20th Century: Literature, Art, Culture and Politics (In Translation) Women in German Literature and Culture Goethe and the Romantic Age The oral Traditions in Caribbean Culture African Oral Tradition Religion, Culture and Identity in the Balkans Aspects of Ukrainian Culture I Russian and East European Film and Culture (In Translation) Recent German Film and Culture (In Translation) Introduction to International Relations Intermediate Italian Language and Culture in Italy: Examining Bologna, a City at the Crossroads of Italy and Europe Aspects of Italian Culture Italian Cinema, Literature and Society Modern Italian Culture (In Translation) Italian Medieval and Renaissance Civilizations Modern and Contemporary Italian Culture Modern Italian Culture (In Translation) Contemporary Japanese Culture and Society Contemporary Korean Culture The Music of Bollywood Films Popular Music of the World Latin and Caribbean Popular Music

RELEVANT GLOBALLY-FOCUSED COURSES (SAMPLE LIST) CONT’D AS/PHIL 2550 3.00 – AS/POLS 2930 6.00 – AS/POLS 3220 3.00 – AS/AK/POLS 3230 3.00 – AS/POLS 3240 3.00 – Introduction to Islamic Philosophy Global Politics Comparative Foreign Policy Analysis Global Issues in Foreign Policy Multilateralism I: The United Nations, Regional Organizations and International Law War and Peace in the Middle East Post-Communist Transformations: Can East Become West? The Rise and Fall of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe China: The Path to Modernization and Democracy China: 21st Century Superpower Western European Politics West European Politics Revolution and Counter Revolution in Central America Political Economy of Latin America and the Caribbean Dictatorship and Democratization in South America The Global South: Politics, Policy and Development Africa: Politics of Continental Crisis Encounters of Islam and Modernity The New German Politics and European Integration Canada and the Americas Russia in World Affairs Topics in International Political Economy The Politics of Southern Africa Petersburg in Russian Literature and Culture (in Translation) Russian and East European Film and Culture (In Translation) Social, Political and Economic Themes in Western Civilization People & Cultures of South East Asia Health and Development in the Third World Health Policies and Practices in the Third World The Global Information Society Land, Food and Development in Africa and South Asia Popular Cultures, East and West Cultures of Crime and Punishment: Europe and America Cultures of Crime and Punishment: Asia and Africa Postcolonial Urbanism:Asian Cities in Context India: Culture and Society Introduction to Spanish Literature A Socio-cultural Approach to Spanish for Commerce Advanced Spanish for Commerce The Non-Christian in Medieval Spanish Literature Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture Abstract Expressionist & European Contemporaries

AS/HIST 4380 6.00 – AS/HND 2700 6.00 – AS/HND 3600 3.00 –

AS/AK/POLS 3260 6.00 – AS/POLS 3401 3.00 – AS/POLS 3500 3.00 – AS/POLS 3510 3.00 – AS/POLS AS/POLS AS/POLS AS/POLS 3515 3520 3530 3550 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 – – – –

AS/HUMA 1400 9.00 – AK/HUMA 1770 6.00 – AS/HUMA 2140 6.00 – AS/HUMA 2190 9.00 – AS/HUMA 2195 9.00 – AS/HUMA 2320 6.00 – AS/HUMA 2420 9.00 – AS/HUMA 3305 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3415 6.00 –

AS/POLS 3553 6.00 – AS/POLS 3555 3.00 – AS/POLS 3560 6.00 – AS/POLS 3570 3.00 – AS/POLS 4075 3.00 – AS/POLS 4205 3.00 – AS/POLS AS/POLS AS/POLS AS/POLS AS/RU 4225 4280 4290 4575 3750 3.00 6.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 – – – – –

AS/HUMA 3439 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3600 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3601 3.00 –

AS/HUMA 3602 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3615 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3664 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3665 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3816 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3980 3.00 – AS/HUMA 3982 6.00 – AS/HUMA 3985 3.00 –
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AS/RU 3790 6.00 – AK/SOSC 1720 6.00 – AS/SOSC 2430 6.00 – AS/SOSC 3101 3.00 – AS/SOSC 3102 3.00 – AS/SOSC 3500 3.00 – AS/SOSC 3541 3.00 – AK/SOSC 3575 6.00 – AS/SOSC 3657 3.00 – AS/SOSC 3658 3.00 – AS/SOSC 3735 3.00 – AS/SOSC 3970 6.00 – AS/SP 2200 6.00 – AS/SP 3040 6.00 – AS/SP 3050 6.00 – AS/SP 4310 3.00 – FA/VISA 2560 6.00 – FA/VISA 3680C 3.00 –

GL/ILST 2920 6.00 – AS/IT 2030 6.00 –

AS/IT 2751 AS/IT 2761 AS/IT 3750 AS/IT 3760/61

9.00 9.00 6.00 3.00

– – – –

AS/IT 3770/71 3.00 – AS/IT 4750 6.00 – AS/JP 2700 6.00 – AS/KOR FA/MUSI FA/MUSI FA/MUSI 3600 1500 1540 1550 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 – – – –

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Grades and GPA Requirements Promotion Requirements for Undergraduate Programs: 1. The minimum overall grade point average (GPA) in Schulich (SB) and non-Schulich courses combined for promotion to each subsequent year of the program is 5.00 (calculated after the Fall/Winter and again after the Summer session of each year). 2. Completion of the required courses at each year level as stated in the Curriculum Overview Charts located in the back of this publication. All core courses must be completed at the Schulich School of Business. Course Credit Exclusions (CCE) cannot be completed or repeated in place of a core course requirement for degree credit. 3. Completion of a minimum of 30.00 credit-hours at the end of Year 1, 60.00 credit-hours at the end of Year 2, 90.00 credit-hours at the end of Year 3 and 120.00 credit-hours at the end of Year 4. Each student must maintain and successfully complete a minimum of 24.00 credit-hours during each Fall/Winter session. 4. Cannot fail more than 6.00 credit-hours over a four year period. Undergraduate students who do not meet the required grade point average (GPA) or do not complete the required courses and/or receive failing grades in more than 6.00 credit-hours of course work will be withdrawn from the program. NOTE: Failure to complete a course successfully will prevent students from enrolling into the follow-up course. Please review the `Grading Scales and Procedures’ section below for more details. Dean’s Honour List A BBA/iBBA student will be placed on the Dean’s Honour List (the designation will appear on the student’s transcript) at the end of each Fall/Winter session if they have: • • • not failed any credits during the past Fall/Winter session, completed at least 24.00 credit-hours during the past Fall/Winter session, and achieved a sessional grade point average of 7.50 or better during the past Fall/Winter session.

Grading Scales and Procedures The Schulich School of Business does not use the percentage guidelines indicated in the York Undergraduate Programs Calendar. Professors will indicate the grade components and their relative weights on the course outline. If the professor uses percentages in marking, the conversion of percentages to letter grades is a matter of individual professorial discretion. Students should clarify any uncertainties about grading with the course instructor. Schulich does use the letter grade and 9.00 grading scale common to undergraduate programs at York University. The letter-grade system is the fundamental system of assessment of performance in undergraduate programs at York University. 1. The letter grade of ‘E’ is not used within the Schulich School of Business, although other York Faculties do use it. A failing grade of ‘E’ obtained in a non-Schulich course will be recorded as such and calculated into the grade point average using an index value of 1.0, except as stated in #3, below. 2. Students who fail a required course will be withdrawn from the program at the end of the academic session. Students will have the right to appeal for reinstatement to the Schulich School of Business, Student Affairs Committee. If reinstated to the program, the student must repeat the course. Students cannot complete the follow-up course until the prerequisite course is successfully completed. For example, if a student does not successfully complete SB/ACTG 2010 3.00, he/she will not be permitted to enroll and complete SB/ACTG 2011 3.00. If the student has already enrolled into the follow-up course (ie: SB/ACTG 2011 3.00), he or she will be de-enrolled from the follow-up course. This could result in a financial penalty. In turn, this will postpone the student’s BBA/iBBA Exchange Study Abroad term to Year 4. Students who fail a non-Schulich course may repeat the course, or may select another elective to replace it. If he/she chooses to repeat the same non-Schulich course, he/she can do so provided he/she has not completed an upper level course in the same discipline area. For example, if a student received a “D” grade in AS/ECON 1000 3.00, and would like to repeat the course to improve his or her overall grade point average, then he/she must repeat AS/ECON 1000 3.00 prior to completing SB/ECON 2000 3.00. The grade for his/her first attempt at AS/ECON 1000 3.00 will be designated as “No Credit Retained” and the grade for the second attempt at AS/ECON 1000 3.00 will be applied to the student’s cumulative grade point average and credit count. If the student registers and completes AS/ECON 1000 3.00 after completing SB/ECON 2000 3.00, the grade and credit for his/her second attempt at AS/ECON 1000 3.00 will be excluded from his/her average and credit count and designated as “No Credit Retained”. Students are allowed to retake a failed course only once. Student are allowed to retake a passed course once for degree credit.

BBA/iBBA Graduation Requirements Graduation requirements include: 1. The successful completion of 120.00 credit-hours of universitylevel study, with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. 2. The completion of specific courses within the required 120.00 credit-hours referred to in the Curriculum Overview Charts section of this Handbook, located at the back of this publication. 3. Students with a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 7.50 or above will be awarded their degree “with distinction” (this will appear on both the transcript and the degree parchment). 4. If a student has taken more than 120.00 credit-hours, the grade point average will be calculated based on the required courses as laid out in the Curriculum Overview Charts (located at the back of this Handbook) and the elective courses with the highest grade where surplus elective course exist. Additional courses will appear on the transcript but will not be included in the grade point average. Fourth year BBA and iBBA students who have completed the required 120.00 credit-hours to graduate from the program by the end of the winter term of their 4th year of study will be required to convocate in the spring. Courses taken in the summer following Year 4 will not be counted towards the degree requirements or used to calculate the overall grade point average.

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Academic Requirements cont’d

3. Grades are awarded for each course in which a student is enrolled. A course can be credited only once towards satisfaction of degree or certificate academic credit requirements. This also holds true when a student completes a pair of courses designated as course credit exclusions (CCE). When a student is allowed to repeat a course, only the second grade will be calculated in the student’s grade point average. Exceptions are made in instances where an upper level course has already been completed. Please refer to point 2 above. The record of both the first and second time the course was taken will appear on the student’s transcript, with the first course designated as ‘No Credit Retained’. An exception arises when the F grade was the penalty for a breach of academic honesty: the first grade will be calculated in the grade point average and the second grade will be designated as ‘No Credit Retained’. 4. Courses completed on Letters of Permission (LOP) outside York University are not used in computing grade point averages. However, a credit toward the degree is incorporated. 5. In a limited number of courses (i.e. courses completed on academic exchange), Schulich students will be awarded a grade of “pass” or “fail”. When the Pass/Fail option is used for grading a course, a “pass” does not affect the calculation of the grade point average, but a “fail” will count as 0 (zero) in the calculation of the grade point average. 6. A student who, for acceptable reasons does not complete the requirements of a course in time for a letter grade to be awarded will receive a grade of ‘I’ (Incomplete). This grade is temporary and requirements must be completed by the end of the following academic term. Failure to complete requirements within the specified time will result in a grade change from ‘I’ to ‘F’. Until one of the letter grades (below) is awarded, the ‘I’, which has no index value, will not be used in computing the grade point averages. York University Undergraduate Grading Scale Letter Grade A+ A B+ B C+ C D+ D E F
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Schulich School of Business

GPA Calculations Students receive a letter grade as a final mark for a course (e.g. ‘B’ grade). This is what will appear on student transcripts and grade reports. Also noted on grade reports are cumulative GPAs (including all courses to date) and sessional GPAs (including only the courses for the session most recently completed). For GPA calculation purposes, letter grades are translated to their corresponding numerical value on a 9.0 scale (e.g. ‘B’ grade = 6.0). The numerical values for letter grades are then multiplied by the credit-hours for the course in question (e.g. ‘B’ grade for a half year course = 6.0 multiplied by 3.00 credit-hours). Grades on a 9.0 point index are multiplied by the credit-hours and the results are added. The grand total is divided by the total number of credit-hours. Take for example, a Fall/Winter grade report as follows: 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of B+ (equals 7.0 on the 9.0 scale) 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of C (equals 4.0 on the 9.0 scale) 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of C+ (equals 5.0 on the 9.0 scale) 6 credit-hour course awarded a grade of B (equals 6.0 on the 9.0 scale) 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of C+ (equals 5.0 on the 9.0 scale) 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of A (equals 8.0 on the 9.0 scale) 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of B+ (equals 7.0 on the 9.0 scale) 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of B (equals 6.0 on the 9.0 scale) 3 credit-hour course awarded a grade of B (equals 6.0 on the 9.0 scale) 30 credit-hours for the Fall/Winter academic period 3 x 7.0 = 21.0 3 x 4.0 = 12.0 3 x 5.0 = 15.0 6 x 6.0 = 36.0 3 x 5.0 = 15.0 3 x 8.0 = 24.0 3 x 7.0 = 21.0 3 x 6.0 = 18.0 3 x 6.0 = 18.0 Total = 180.0

Index 9.0 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0

Interpretation Exceptional Excellent Very Good Good Competent Fairly Competent Passing Barely Passing Marginally Failing Failing

180.0 ÷ 30 (total number of credit-hours) = 6.0 overall GPA (B) Notification of Intent to Graduate Students who intend to graduate at the end of the current academic year must complete the ‘Application to Graduate’ form, available online (www.yorku.ca/mygraduation/). Completed forms should be submitted to the Division of Student Services and International Relations Office, Schulich School of Business. All grades for completed course work must be received by the Division of Student Services at least four weeks prior to the date of convocation.

Academic Policies and Regulations: Schulich School
University Rules, Regulations and Policies The University maintains York University and Senate policies pertaining to academic and administrative matters, as well as student conduct, on the Web. See www.yorku.ca/secretariat/policies. The Student Code of Conduct is available at www.yorku.ca/scdr. Assignments Faxing and E-mailing The Schulich School does not accept faxed or e-mailed assignments, unless specifically requested by the instructor. Normally, written assignments are to be submitted in hard copy form either at a class meeting or to the specified Schulich office, at or before the due date and time. Mailed assignments postmarked by the due date will be accepted. If conventional mailing is used, the envelope containing the assignment must be date stamped and e-mail notification that this action has been taken should be sent to the instructor. Papers/Essays Satisfying More Than One Course Assignment The policy for the submission of one paper to satisfy the course requirements of more than one course is as follows: a. Prior to preparation of the paper, students must receive written approval from all the course instructors concerned. b. Course Instructors involved must satisfy themselves that the quality and content of the completed paper meets the requirements of the individual courses. c. Papers with greater scope should be written under arrangements already in place for the ‘Schulich Guided Study 4900-Series Elective Courses’. Unavoidable Absences If a BBA/iBBA student is unable to attend classes for medical or personal reasons, it is important to notify the professor as soon as possible so that alternate arrangements can be made to complete course materials. Students must also contact the Associate Director of Undergraduate Programs at (416) 736-5081. Attendance Attendance is expected at all Schulich undergraduate classes. Students who do not attend classes may be removed from a course at the request of the instructor. In particular, students who do not attend class during the first two weeks of a semester (and who have not made alternative arrangements with the instructor in advance) may be administratively de-enrolled in order to make space in the course for other students. If students stop attending a course during the term, they must officially drop the course online. Non-attendance is not equivalent to official withdrawal from a course. If a student does not formally withdraw from a course, failure to attend will result in a grade of ‘F’. Conduct Student/Instructor Students and instructors are expected to maintain a professional relationship characterized by courtesy and mutual respect, and to refrain from actions disruptive to such a relationship. It is the responsibility of the instructor to maintain an appropriate academic atmosphere in the classroom, and the responsibility of the student to cooperate in that endeavour. Further, the instructor is the best person to decide, in the first instance, whether such an atmosphere is present in the class. A statement of the policy and procedures regarding disruptive and/or harassing behaviour by students is available from the Office of the Assistant Vice-President, the Schulich Dean’s Office, and from Schulich’s Division of Student Services and International Relations. Non-Academic Complaints Members of the University who wish to register complaints or comments about the non-academic conduct of persons at the University may obtain advice and guidance from the: Office of Student Conduct and Dispute Resolution, (416) 736-5231 or www.yorku.ca/scdr. The Office of Student Conduct and Dispute Resolution is responsible for administering the University’s non-academic code of behavioral conduct for students and student governments. The office provides direction, leadership and guidance to the University community in matters of policy interpretation regarding student non-academic conduct. The office includes complaint intake, investigation and the management of the dispute resolution processes involving students. Informal dispute resolution techniques and formal hearing processes are used to resolve disputes. The Local Adjudicator for the Schulich School of Business is the Associate Dean, Academic. Course/Instructor Evaluations At the end of each term, students are asked to complete confidential/ anonymous evaluations of each of their instructors. These questionnaires rate instructors based on a variety of criteria. The tabulated results are available in the Peter F. Bronfman Business Library, located on the second floor of the Schulich School of Business. Schulich Centre for Teaching Excellence The Schulich Centre for Teaching Excellence (SCTE) is a total resource centre providing an interface between faculty and students to maximize the learning experience in the classroom. For faculty, the SCTE offers teaching orientations and workshops, individual teaching and coaching, a website for “clickable” access to teaching techniques, resources and best practices, teaching development grants, and a library of teaching resources. Jointly with the Undergraduate Business Council and students, the SCTE also sponsors a variety of initiatives each year including the Seymour Schulich Awards for Teaching Excellence and other task forces to ensure continuous teaching innovation and excellence. Personal Documents All documents, (originals, reproductions or translations), submitted in support of applications, or any petitions to any office of the University become the property of the University. Original copies of documents such as birth and marriage certificates, citizenship papers, and certain types of educational certificates will be returned to applicants or students. Copies of transcripts in a student’s file will not be issued to the student. Personal Information Generally, student information is restricted and available only to the student concerned, to those clearly designated by the student, and to appropriate academic and administrative staff of the University. Aside from name, activity status, graduation status and degrees/ diplomas/certificates awarded for Senate-recognized programs of study, no student information is normally released to any person or agency outside the University. Data from the University records is released to Statistics Canada and to the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training for the compilation of aggregate reports. In all such cases, unique identifying information is withheld.
Academic Polices and Regulations: Schulich School

Transcripts of Academic Records Details about transcripts are available online at: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/currentstudents/mystudentrecords/index.html.

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Examinations Examination Procedures The Schulich School of Business takes measures to ensure an appropriate examination environment and to preclude improper behaviour during exams. Exam schedules and related policies appear on the current students Web site: www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/cs.htm. a. No supplemental examinations are given in the Schulich School of Business. b. Students must sign in for exams and have photo ID available. c. Student will receive and must respect clear direction about starting and stopping exams. d. Students must place all personal belongings aside during exams. e. Students are required to bring their own calculators or other resources (where permitted). Sharing is not permitted. f. Students are expected to respect the exam invigilators on duty. g. Students are expected to remain in the room during the exam and not leave except for absolute emergencies (physical reasons, illness). h. Examination booklets/answer sheets become the property of the teaching unit and are retained for the full fall or winter term immediately following the term in question. i. No examinations of any kind may be given during the last two weeks of classes. If cheating is identified, the matter will be documented (written up) by the invigilator or instructor and forwarded immediately to the Associate Dean, Academic for action. Possible penalties are indicated in the Academic Honesty section of this publication. The Schulich School is committed to respecting the religious belief and practices of all members of the community, and making accommodations for observances of special significance to adherents. Every effort will be made to avoid scheduling in-class formal examinations on days of special religious significance throughout the year. Exam Conflicts Students are encouraged to use the “Plot my Exam Schedule“ feature on the online services Web site to determine if they have an exam conflict during the final exam period. An exam conflict is categorized as: 1. two exams at the same time; or 2. three exams in the same day; or 3. three exams in three consecutive time slots over a 24-hour consecutive period. If a Schulich student is faced with either scenario 1, 2 or 3 he/ she can approach the Office of the Associate Dean of Academics, Schulich School of Business, to make alternate arrangements. For scenarios 2 and 3, students can opt to write their exams during the regular time slot. However, if the student cannot perform to the best of his/her ability, he/she will not have the opportunity to appeal his/her grade or performance. Alternate Exams Students who require alternate exam/test arrangements must register with one of York University’s Disability Service offices well in advance of exams/tests in order to be eligible. Requests for alternate exam/tests arrangements must be made online at least 15 days prior to the test of exam. Details on how to make arrangements are available at www.yorku.ca/altexams.

Unavoidable Absences – Examinations Within 24 hours of missing a final examination, students must contact either the Associate Director of Undergraduate Programs at (416) 736-5081 or the Executive Director of Student Services and International Relations. Students must also contact their course instructor. Formal documentation regarding the reason for missing the final exam must be submitted to the Associate Director of Undergraduate Programs (Room W262P) within 48 hours of missing the final exam in order to be eligible to write a deferred final exam. Please read the information below surrounding “Deferred Final Exams/Aegrotat Standing” for further procedural information. Students who miss a mid-term exam must contact their course instructor within 24 hours and must provide the course instructor with documentation substantiating the reason for the absence. A copy of the documentation must also be submitted to the Undergraduate Programs Office and will be placed in the student’s file. Accommodations and/or re-scheduling of the mid-term exam will be left to the discretion of the professor. Deferred Final Exams/Aegrotat Standing Students may be eligible for final examination deferrals or aegrotat standing on the grounds of sickness, accidents or family misfortune. Examination deferrals allow students additional time during which studies may be completed and a grade earned. Deferrals are based upon adequate documentation of sickness, accident, family misfortune or such other factors as may be deemed appropriate. Aegrotat standing excuses students from completing the required work for their studies, and ‘aegrotat standing’ is entered on transcripts instead of a grade. It is based on adequate proof of sickness, accident or family misfortune and in addition, upon the student’s having done satisfactory work up to that date. Aegrotat standing is usually reserved for the last term of the program, just before graduation. Students who miss a final exam due to illness must have their doctor fill out an “Attending Physician’s Statement”. This form can be picked up from the Undergraduate Programs Unit (room W262P, SSB) or can be retrieved from the following Web site: www.schulich.yorku.ca > Intranet > Student Information > Undergraduate Level Forms > Attending Physician’s Statement. Submitting documentation substantiating the reason for the absence will not guarantee approval of a deferred final exam. Permission to write a deferred exam is subject to review by the Schulich Student Services Office and the course instructor. If a deferred final exam is denied, the student may petition the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. If a deferred final exam is granted, the student will most likely write the deferred exam at the end of the next term the course is offered. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange the deferred final exam date with his/her course instructor and/or the department hosting the course. Students will not be permitted to enroll into the follow-up course until the prerequisite course is successfully completed. This will require a revised study plan and will require students (in particular iBBA students) to postpone their Exchange Study Abroad term to Year 4. Academic Honesty It is the responsibility of all members of the Schulich Community to be familiar with the Schulich School of Business policy on Academic Honesty which is available below and at: www.schulich.yorku.ca/academichonesty.

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Schulich School Implementation of the Senate Procedures for Dealing With Suspected Breaches of Academic Honesty Introduction On April 28, 2005, the Senate of York University approved the revised Senate Policy, Guidelines and Procedures on Academic Honesty. The Schulich School, like the rest of the University, is governed by the Senate Policy, Guidelines and Procedures on Academic Honesty, which defines York University’s commitment to academic honesty [Section 1], identifies what constitutes an offence against standards of academic honesty, provides the range of penalties that may be invoked, and identifies factors that should be taken into consideration when penalties are set [Section 2]. The Senate ‘Procedures Governing Breach of Academic Honesty’ defines the purpose, jurisdiction, and the standards of procedures governing the investigation, exploratory meeting and formal hearing for the resolution of cases of potential or alleged violations of the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty [Section 3]. The Order of Faculty or Senate Hearings on Academic Honesty is set out in Section 4. Schulich School of Business has established the following complementary procedures specific to the investigation and resolution of alleged violations of the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty involving students in Schulich-based degree program courses at graduate and undergraduate levels (with the exception of the courses in the joint EMBA program, which are governed by a separate procedures unique to the joint program). It should be noted that no penalty for academic dishonesty in Schulich-based courses may be imposed until it has been either ratified or set by the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. The procedures outlined below are consistent with those specified in the Senate Policy, Guidelines and Procedures on Academic Honesty, available online at: http://www.yorku.ca/secretariat/legislation/senate/acadhone.htm 1. Senate Policy on Academic Honesty The Policy on Academic Honesty is an affirmation and clarification for members of the University of the general obligation to maintain the highest standards of academic honesty. As a clear sense of academic honesty and responsibility is fundamental to good scholarship, the policy recognizes the general responsibility of all faculty members to foster acceptable standards of academic conduct and of the student to be mindful of and abide by such standards. Academic honesty requires that persons do not falsely claim credit for the ideas, writing or other intellectual property of others, either by presenting such works as their own or through impersonation. Similarly, academic honesty requires that persons do not cheat (attempt to gain an improper advantage in an academic evaluation), nor attempt or actually alter, suppress, falsify or fabricate any research data or results, official academic record, application or document. Suspected breaches of academic honesty will be investigated and charges shall be laid if reasonable and probable grounds exist. A student who is charged with a breach of academic honesty shall be presumed innocent until, based upon clear and compelling evidence, a committee determines the student has violated the academic honesty standards of the university. A finding of academic misconduct will lead to the range of penalties described in the guidelines which accompany this policy. In some cases the University regulations on non-academic discipline may apply. A lack of familiarity with the Senate Policy and Guidelines on Academic Honesty on the part of a student does not constitute a defense against their application. Some academic offences constitute offences under the Criminal Code of Canada; a student charged under University regulations may also be subject to criminal charges. Charges may also be laid against York University students for matters which arise at other educational institutions.

2.

Senate Guidelines on Academic Honesty

2.1 Summary of Offences Against the Standards of Academic Honesty The following summary of offences is not exhaustive, nor are the definitions provided for each offence confined to the examples cited. 2.1.1 Cheating is the attempt to gain an improper advantage in an academic evaluation. Forms of cheating include: • Obtaining a copy of an examination before it is officially available or learning an examination question before it is officially available; Copying another person’s answer to an examination question; Consulting an unauthorized source during an examination; Obtaining assistance by means of documentary, electronic or other aids which are not approved by the instructor; Changing a score or a record of an examination result; Submitting the work one has done for one class or project to a second class, or as a second project, without the prior informed consent of the relevant instructors; Submitting work prepared in collaboration with another or other member(s) of a class, when collaborative work on a project has not been authorized by the instructor; Submitting work prepared in whole or in part by another person and representing that work as one’s own; Offering for sale essays or other assignments, in whole or in part, with the expectation that these works will be submitted by a student for appraisal; Preparing work in whole or in part, with the expectation that this work will be submitted by a student for appraisal.

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2.1.2 Impersonation is to have someone impersonate one’s self in class, in a test, examination or interview, or in connection with any other type of assignment or placement associated with a course or academic program. Both the impersonator and the individual impersonated may be charged. 2.1.3 Plagiarism is the misappropriation of the work of another by representing another person’s ideas, writing or other intellectual property as one’s own. This includes the presentation of all or part of another person’s work as something one has written, paraphrasing another’s writing without proper acknowledgement, or representing another’s artistic or technical work or creation as one’s own. Any use of the work of others, whether published, unpublished or posted electronically, attributed or anonymous, must include proper acknowledgement.

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2.1.4 Improper research practices. Academic research includes the collection, analysis, interpretation and publication of information or data obtained in the scientific laboratory or in the field. Forms of improper research practices include: • • • Dishonest reporting of investigative results, either through fabrication or falsification; Taking or using the research results of others without permission or due acknowledgement; Misrepresentation or selective reporting of research results or the methods used.

2.2.1 Written disciplinary warning or reprimand. 2.2.2 Required completion of an academic honesty assignment. 2.2.3 Make-up assignment, examination or rewriting a work, subject to a lowered grade. 2.2.4 Lower grade on the assignment, examination or work. 2.2.5 Lower grade in the course. 2.2.6 Failure in the course. 2.2.7 Permanent grade of record. The grade assigned shall remain as the one grade of record for the course, even if the course is repeated. This penalty can be added to any other penalty, but shall always be attached to the penalty of failure in the course. 2.2.8 Notation on transcript. Notation on transcript can be a separate penalty or it can be added to any other penalty. Transcript notation shall always be included in cases of suspension, withholding or rescinding a York degree, diploma or certificate and expulsion from the University. Transcript notation can be for a limited period, at the end of which the notation will be removed from the student’s transcript. When no period is specified for a transcript notation, a student may petition to the Faculty Petitions Committee to have the notation removed after a period of five years from the date at which the notation was entered, with the exception of notation of expulsion from the University. 2.2.9 Suspension from the University for a definite period, not to exceed 5 years, with transcript notation. Suspension is defined as a penalty of a variable but limited period during which the student may not register in the University, imposed for serious academic offences such as plagiarism and cheating. A student who is otherwise eligible to graduate, but is suspended, may not apply to graduate until the suspension expires or is lifted. This penalty may be awarded only by a Faculty-level committee which is recognized by a Faculty Council as the responsible body to assign this penalty. 2.2.10 Expulsion from the University with transcript notation. Expulsion is defined as permanently terminating a person’s right to continue as a student in the University. This penalty may be awarded only by a Faculty-level committee which is recognized by a Faculty Council as the responsible body to assign this penalty. 2.2.11 Withholding or rescinding a York degree, diploma or certificate with transcript notation. When a Faculty decides to rescind a degree, diploma or certificate, the decision, with supporting documentation, must be forwarded to the Senate Appeals Committee for approval on behalf of Senate. 2.3 Factors Considered When Imposing Academic Penalties The circumstances surrounding each case of academic misconduct may vary to a significant degree. The penalty imposed should reflect, reasonably, these circumstances. These guidelines are not intended to restrict the authority or flexibility of Faculty committees in imposing the penalties contained in this Policy. In each case, Faculties shall exercise their discretion, taking into consideration the relevant factors, as outlined below. For the benefit of students, however, Faculties shall provide an explanation in their written decision of the major reason(s) the penalty imposed was deemed warranted.

2.1.5 Dishonesty in publication. It is a violation of academic honesty to knowingly publish information that will mislead or deceive readers. This includes the falsification or fabrication of data or information, as well as the failure to give credit to collaborators as joint authors or the listing as authors of others who have not contributed to the work. Plagiarism is also considered a form of dishonesty in publication. 2.1.6 Dissemination of information without permission. Information or experimental data that was collected with a member of faculty or another student, and other works that involved the participation of a faculty member or another student, should not be submitted for publication or otherwise disseminated without their permission. 2.1.7 Abuse of confidentiality. Taking or releasing the ideas or data of others that were given with the expectation that they are confidential is inappropriate. This includes the ideas or data obtained via the evaluation of confidential grant proposals, award applications or manuscripts that will be or may have been submitted for possible funding or publication. Unless one is authorized to do so, it is improper to obtain a password assigned to another or to copy or modify a data file or program belonging to someone else. Proper authorization means being granted permission either by the owner or originator of that material, or by an appropriate faculty member or administrator. 2.1.8 Falsification or unauthorized modification of an academic document/record. It is a breach of academic honesty to falsify, fabricate or in any way modify, either through omission or commission, an application to the University or a program, course student examination or test, transcript, grade, letter of recommendation or related document, a degree, a physician’s letter/form or any other document used in support of an academic application, record, petition/appeal or endeavor. 2.1.9 Obstruction of the academic activities of another. It is a violation of academic honesty to interfere with the scholarly activities of another in order to harass or gain unfair academic advantage. This includes interference or tampering with experimental data, with a human or animal subject, with a written or other creation (e.g., a painting, sculpture or film), with a chemical used for scientific study, or with any other object of study. 2.1.10 Aiding and abetting. Encouraging, enabling or causing others to do or attempt any of the above. 2.2 Summary of Penalties for Academic Misconduct When verified, violations of academic honesty may lead to the following range of penalties, which may be imposed singularly or in combination for any offence. The following penalties are listed in ascending order of severity.
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Important factors to be considered by committees in imposing penalties or reviewing penalty recommendations are: 2.3.1 Extent of violation: The actions which constitute specific offences of academic honesty (i.e., plagiarism, cheating) vary in terms of severity. Some instances of academic dishonesty constitute only minor infractions while others represent the most extreme form of violation. Penalties should correspond to the nature of the offence. Penalties may be imposed singularly or in combination for any offence. 2.3.2 Basic considerations include: • • The level of the student’s academic experience; Extenuating circumstances may help explain the action taken by a student, and due weight should be attached to those circumstances; If the student admits guilt, accepts responsibility for their action, and is amenable to educative remedies, committees may find it justified to levy a less severe penalty.

3.2.2 All allegations of breaches of academic honesty other than those in course work shall be communicated by the administrator, committee or other person with direct knowledge (faculty, staff, clinical supervisor, etc.,) to the student’s home Faculty. 3.2.3 Should a matter arise for which there appears to be no clear Faculty jurisdiction, the Senate Appeals Committee shall determine which Faculty shall have carriage of the matter. 3.2.4 Appeals of decisions of a Faculty committee are considered by the Senate Appeals Committee. 3.3 Investigating Potential Academic Misconduct If a person (or persons) suspect(s) a breach of academic honesty: 3.3.1 on assignments, term papers, essays, theses and dissertations, etc., the matter shall be reported to the concerned course instructor1 or graduate supervisor. For courses, if the evaluator is not the course instructor, the evaluator shall retain possession of the suspect material and provide a written report, together with the confiscated material, to the course instructor; 3.3.2 on non-course work, the person discovering the potential breach of academic honesty, shall retain possession of the suspect material and provide a written report, together with any confiscated material to the Schulich School Associate Dean Academic (hereinafter referred to as the Schulich ADA); 3.3.3 in an examination, the invigilator, who is normally the course instructor, in cases of suspected impersonation, shall ask the student concerned to remain after the examination and shall request appropriate University identification or shall otherwise attempt to identify the student. In other cases of suspected breach of academic honesty the invigilator shall confiscate any suspect material. In all cases, the student will be allowed to complete the examination. The invigilator, if other than the course instructor, shall give a full report, together with any confiscated material, to the course instructor (See the Senate Policy on Invigilation of Examinations for further information); 3.3.4 for research not conducted as part of a course, major research papers/projects, comprehensive examinations, theses and dissertations, person(s) suspecting potential academic dishonesty shall report the matter to the Schulich ADA. 3.4 Initiating an Investigation of Potential Academic Misconduct 3.4.1 When the course instructor having or sharing responsibility for a student’s research, examination, or dissertation preparation, becomes aware of a possible violation of academic honesty, it is the responsibility of the course instructor to initiate an investigation of the matter.

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2.3.3 Prior/multiple incidents: If the offence is a second (or subsequent) one for the student and/or is in combination with another offence, then a more severe penalty should be considered. 3. Procedures Governing Breach of Academic Honesty Note: The Schulich School Petitions and Appeals Officer. The person to whom questions about the academic honesty policy, guidelines and procedures should normally be addressed is the Petitions and Appeals Officer (hereinafter referred to as the PAO), who is part of the Schulich Division of Student Services and International Relations. The PAO provides procedural advice to all parties (students, faculty, staff) and maintains records of meetings and decisions reached for all cases in which the dishonesty charge reaches at least the ‘Exploratory Meeting’ phase ( see Section 3.5 below). The PAO is present at the Exploratory Meeting and also provides administrative support to the Students Affairs Committee, its panels, and subcommittees.

3.1 Purpose The following procedures are provided for the investigation and resolution of cases of alleged violations of the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty involving students in Schulichbased degree program courses at graduate and undergraduate levels (with the exception of the courses in the joint EMBA program, which are governed by separate procedures unique to the joint program). In these procedures, the term “student” includes a York graduate or undergraduate student, a York graduate, a former York student, or a student who is applying to take, is taking or has taken a York course. 3.2 Jurisdiction 3.2.1 Allegations of a breach of academic honesty by a student in a course offered by the Schulich School shall be dealt with by the Schulich School. In cases where the course is in other than the student’s home Faculty, then the student’s home Faculty (or Faculties) shall have observer status at a hearing and may make submission as to penalty. For students in joint programs or where allegations arise in more than one Faculty, the Faculties can agree on which Faculty will have jurisdiction over the proceedings.

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3.4.2 It is the responsibility of the course instructor to collect or assist in the collection of the necessary information and to be prepared to act as a witness at any committee hearing of the matter. The course instructor is not called upon to determine whether or not a breach of academic honesty has occurred, nor to impose punishment, mild or severe. Rather, the expectation is that the course instructor would determine only whether there was sufficient foundation to ask for an exploratory meeting, (described in Section 3.5). That answer may be ‘yes’ or [as reflected in 3.4.2 – iv, below], ‘no’. During the initial investigation, the course instructor is expected to: i. gather and retain all documents that are material to the concern. These documents include, but are not limited to, the student paper(s) or exam(s) in question and source documents that are the apparent source of the impropriety; ii. interview teaching assistants, graders, and/or examination invigilators who may have knowledge of what occurred; prepare written summaries of the resulting information where it appears to be relevant to the case; iii. invite the student(s) involved to meet with him/her to respond to the concerns that have been raised. The purpose of such a meeting is to determine whether there is an acceptable explanation for the evidence initially in hand. iv. If a course instructor is satisfied, based on evidence collected and discussion with the student(s), that there is an acceptable explanation for the evidence at hand, no further action need be taken and no records are retained. v. However, if the course instructor is not satisfied that there is an acceptable explanation for the initial concerns, the course instructor shall notify the PAO of the potential infraction, leading to the steps identified in 3.4.3, below. vi. If the student(s) do not respond to the request for a timely meeting or if the student(s) do not provide what the course instructor judges to be an acceptable explanation, notice of a potential breach of academic honesty shall be sent to the PAO. (Note that no formal ‘joint submission’ from student and course instructor can be struck prior to an Exploratory Meeting being held.) 3.4.3 Once notified of a potential breach of academic honesty, the PAO shall post a block on the student’s enrolment activity in the course. The student may not drop or be deregistered from the course for any reason, nor may transcripts be released to the student until a final decision is reached. A request by a student for a transcript to be sent to another institution or to a potential employer will be processed, but, if the student is found guilty of a breach of academic honesty, the recipients of the transcript will be provided automatically with an updated transcript. 3.4.4 If the investigation relates to work already presented for evaluation but not yet evaluated, the course instructor may elect to defer the evaluation of the work until after the matter has been dealt with. Normally, any evaluation of a work which relates to a charge will not be entered into the student’s record until after the matter is concluded.

3.4.5 If the course instructor or person designated by Schulich School policy decides to proceed with a formal complaint alleging a breach of academic honesty, the complaint shall be submitted in writing to the PAO as soon as is reasonably possible. The complaint shall contain a full, but concise, statement of the facts as perceived by the complainant and be accompanied by all available supporting evidence. 3.4.6 Carriage of a case by the Associate Dean Academic (ADA). When an apparent breach of academic honesty is not tied to a student’s enrolment in a specific course (examples of such infractions include ‘falsification of an academic record’, ‘improper research practices’, ‘obstruction of other’s academic activities’), the ADA or his/her designate will take carriage of the investigation and the exploratory meeting stages of the process. The ADA shall have the capacity to conduct an initial investigation parallel to that conducted by course instructors in course-related allegations, including inviting the student[s] involved to provide an explanation for the apparent problems. The ADA may also take carriage of any alleged breach of academic honesty if circumstances in his/her judgment warrant such a role. The ADA or designate may follow all three stages (investigation, exploratory meeting and formal hearing) or proceed directly with submission of a charge to the Schulich Student Affairs Committee and request a formal hearing of the matter. 3.5 Exploratory Meeting 3.5.1 When a complaint is received by the PAO, an exploratory meeting shall be arranged to determine whether or not there are reasonable and probable grounds to proceed with a charge of breach of academic honesty. The exploratory meeting is provided to allow the course instructor and the student(s) involved to determine, with the PAO present, whether they can agree on whether an infraction has occurred and (in the case where they agree that it has) whether they can agree to jointly recommend a specific penalty. At least seven calendar days’ written notice of the meeting and a brief description of the reason for the meeting shall be provided to the student. At this meeting, convened and chaired by the PAO, the student may be accompanied by a representative and the course instructor may have another person present. The meeting is organized by the PAO, who will make reasonable attempts to accommodate the schedules of the concerned parties. Should the student fail to appear at the scheduled exploratory meeting and if, in the judgment of the PAO, the student has been given appropriate notice of this meeting, the meeting may proceed without the student present. 3.5.2 The exploratory meeting will result in one of the following: i) It is agreed by all parties that no breach of academic honesty occurred. No records of the matter shall be retained and the ‘flag’ on the student file is removed. ii) Agreement is reached that the apparent breach of academic honesty was unintentional or the result of student error. In such cases, informal remedial steps

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The term “course instructor”, as used in Schulich School, is equivalent to the term “course director” used in the Senate Policy, Guidelines and Procedures on Academic Honesty. The term “course instructor” has been substituted for the term “course director” in this document.

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may be taken (such as requiring that the student rewrite an assignment, exam or essay or complete an academic honesty assignment) so that the student may correct the mistake and avoid its recurrence. Again, no permanent record will be retained and the ‘flag’ on the student record is removed. iii) If the student wishes to admit to a breach of academic honesty, a document signed by the student and the course instructor which includes the admission, a summary of the matter and a joint submission as to penalty shall be forwarded to the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. The agreedupon penalty shall not exceed failure in the course. A designated subcommittee of the Student Affairs Committee shall review such joint submissions and either confirm them or refer them to a formal hearing It is during the review of the Student Affairs subcommittee that the consideration of past offenses is to be considered to determine whether a more severe penalty is appropriate. Normally, the Student Affairs subcommittee receiving such a joint submission will impose the penalty suggested, but if the subcommittee is of the view that some other penalty would be more appropriate, it shall arrange for a formal hearing of the matter, to which the student will be invited and course instructor may be required to attend. In cases where the subcommittee determines that a formal hearing should be held, it will provide a report including the reasons for its decision to the student[s] accused, the ADA, and the panel hearing the case prior to the formal hearing. iv) If the student wishes to admit to a breach of academic honesty but no agreement is reached on recommended penalty, a document signed by the student and the course instructor, which includes the admission, a summary of the matter and individual submissions by the student and course instructor as to penalty shall be forwarded to the Student Affairs Committee, which shall arrange a formal hearing of the matter, to which the student will be invited and course instructor may be required to attend as specified in Section 3.6. v) If the student elects not to attend the exploratory meeting, and if those present find sufficient grounds to proceed with a charge of breach of academic honesty, a summary of the matter shall be forwarded to the Student Affairs Committee, which shall arrange a formal hearing of the matter, to which the student will be invited and the course instructor may be required to attend. vi) If it is decided that sufficient grounds exist to proceed with a formal charge of academic misconduct and the student does not admit to this alleged breach of academic honesty, a formal charge shall

be prepared and submitted to the Student Affairs Committee. The charge shall contain a full, but concise, statement of the facts as perceived by the complainant and be accompanied by all available supporting evidence. The PAO or person chairing the exploratory meeting will forward the documents contemplated in items iii and iv above and this section to the Schulich ADA. 3.6 Formal Hearing 3.6.1 In cases where an allegation of academic dishonesty or the penalty for acknowledged academic dishonesty in the context of a course is to be resolved by a formal hearing, the responsible body is the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. (One program is exempted from these procedures; the EMBA program will be subject to a different, parallel set of procedural regulations, reflecting the joint nature of that program between two universities) The PAO shall give the student[s] and the ADA (or designate) a written copy of the charge, a copy of the materials submitted by the course instructor which includes a summary of the evidence, a copy of the procedures to be followed by confirmed delivery, and not less than twenty-one calendar days’ written notice of the time and location of the hearing. If the student wishes to file a written response to the charge, it must be received by the PAO within fourteen calendar days of the date on which the charge was sent to the student. The PAO will send a copy of the student’s response to the charge to the course instructor and the ADA. Both the accused student[s] and the ADA (or designate) must inform the PAO of their intention to call witnesses and file names of these witnesses with the PAO at least seven calendar days prior to the hearing. In cases where an allegation of academic dishonesty or the penalty for acknowledged academic dishonesty outside the context of a course or any case for which the ADA has assumed carriage (allowed for in 3.4.6) is to be resolved by a formal hearing, the responsible body is also the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. However, when the ADA has taken carriage of a case, it is the ADA’s responsibility to supply the formal charge and summary of evidence to the student[s] involved and to the Student Affairs Committee, through the PAO. The PAO retains the responsibility for supporting the Student Affairs Committee panel during the process leading up to the formal hearing. 3.6.2 Prior to the hearing, if a student acknowledges the accuracy of the charges, the student may waive the right to a hearing by submitting a written statement that both admits guilt and waives the right to a hearing. Such a written statement shall be provided at least seven days before the scheduled hearing to allow the course instructor to review the matter and provide input to the Schulich Student Affairs Sub-Committee.

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Normally all panelists shall be elected members of the Student Affairs Committee, chosen at random by the PAO. However, in cases where scheduling or other factors make the timely organization of a panel difficult, the Chair of the Student Affairs committee may appoint any Schulich tenure stream faculty members to a faculty role on the panel and any members of either the Graduate Student Council or Undergraduate Student Council to the student position on the panel. In cases where the ADA has developed (not just assembled) evidence, a designate will be chosen as ‘case presenter’ to allow the ADA to be a witness at the formal hearing of the matter. Members of the Student Affairs Committee or others asked to be part of a panel shall be told the identities of the student(s) and faculty member(s) involved. Any person asked to serve on a panel is required to disclose to the PAO any prior relationships with the student or faculty members involved which may be considered a conflict of interest or create an apprehension of bias. The panel will assess any such claim and rule as to whether the panel member should be replaced. If the panel recommends the replacement of a member, the PAO shall ask the Chair of the Student Affairs Committee to identify a replacement panel member. [Note: Simply knowing an accused student or having taught a class that he/she has taken does not normally constitute a conflict of interest or create an apprehension of bias.]
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i) In this statement, the student may make submissions as to appropriate penalty and give reasons. If the course instructor submitting the charge concurs with the penalty recommendation of the student, a jointly signed submission will be forwarded to the Student Affairs Sub-Committee. In such cases, the agreedupon penalty shall not exceed failure in the course. Should the Student Affairs Sub-Committee find that some other penalty would be more appropriate, it shall arrange for a formal hearing of the matter, to which the student will be invited and the course instructor may be required to attend. ii) If the faculty member and student do not agree on a recommended penalty, individual submissions as to penalty shall be made by the student and course instructor to the Student Affairs Committee, which shall arrange a formal hearing of the matter, to which the student will be invited and the course instructor may be required to attend. 3.6.3 Formal hearings shall be heard in front of a three-person Panel, all of whom are normally members of the Student Affairs Committee. Each panel will be comprised of two faculty members2, one of whom shall be Chair, and one student. The panel shall select its own Chair. Only the committee members, a recording secretary (normally, the PAO), the case presenter (the ADA or his/her designate3), the student charged, each party’s representative(s)/adviser(s) (who may be lawyers), and the witnesses may be present at a hearing. Committee members shall be at “arms length” from the student charged with a breach of academic honesty. 4 Committee members are not at “arms length” if they have had a significant personal or professional relationship with the student charged. Witnesses shall be present at the hearing only while testifying. Exceptions to this policy may be made at the discretion of the committee. The PAO will provide administrative support to the panel, and will act as recording secretary to take notes at the hearing. A record prepared from these notes will constitute the official record of the proceedings. Parties may, if they wish, arrange for their own written record of the hearing to be taken. The Chair of panel has full authority to assure an orderly and expeditious hearing. Any person who disrupts a hearing, or who fails to adhere to the rulings of the committee may be required to leave. 3.6.4 The panel shall consider the facts and circumstances of the case and determine whether there has been a breach of academic honesty. If a finding of academic misconduct is determined, the panel shall hear submissions as to the appropriate penalty and then decide the penalty. 3.6.5 If a student fails to appear at a hearing after proper notice, the hearing may proceed, a decision may be made and sanctions may be imposed, unless the student can establish, in advance of the hearing and to the satisfaction of the panel, that there are circumstances beyond her or his control which make an appearance impossible or unfairly burdensome.
Academic Polices and Regulations: Schulich School

3.6.6 Parties must be allowed a full and fair opportunity to present their evidence and to respond to the evidence presented against them. Parties are allowed to crossexamine each other’s witnesses in matters related to the charge. The panel has the discretion to make rulings as to admissibility of evidence or the suitability of cross-examination. The panel is not bound by formal rules of evidence applicable in courts of law. 3.6.7 When the parties have presented all available relevant evidence and witnesses, each party may present a final argument. Following this the parties shall be excused without further discussion. The panel shall then enter into closed session to determine whether a breach of academic honesty has occurred. A finding of academic misconduct supported by a majority of panel members shall be binding. 3.6.8 If the panel does not render a finding of academic misconduct, all records of the charge and hearing will be held by the Schulich School until such time as appeals procedures are exhausted or abandoned. Thereafter, a record consisting of the complaint and the decision letter will be placed in a confidential file retained in the Office of the Dean of the Schulich School. 3.6.9 Following a finding of academic misconduct, the panel shall next allow both parties to make a presentation as to suitable penalty. At this point the panel may be made aware of other academic offences in the student’s file. The panel will again enter into closed session and decide upon the sanction. A decision by the majority of the panel to impose a particular penalty shall be binding. The decision of the panel, as described in Item 4.8 of the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty, must be communicated to the parties in writing, and delivered by confirmed delivery. A record of the offence, the proceedings and the finding will be retained in the Office of the Dean of Schulich School, regardless of the severity of the penalty, and be held for a time consistent with the University’s records retention guidelines. This record is for internal academic purposes only. A note shall be placed on the Student Information System to bar retroactive withdrawal from the course. 3.6.10 If the student is found to have committed a breach of academic honesty in work related to a funded research project, the Vice President Academic shall be notified and the Vice President or a designate shall determine whether to notify the granting agency. 3.6.11 If a student from another institution enrolled in a joint program or attending York on Letter of Permission is found to have committed a breach of academic honesty, notice of the Schulich Student Affairs Committee’s findings will be sent to the other institution. 4. Order of Faculty or Senate Hearings on Academic Honesty The following indicates the order in which a Faculty or Senate committee should proceed when hearing a charge of breach of academic honesty. The committee may alter the order in the interests of fairness or in cases where multiple students are charged with related offences. 4.1 The Chair shall: • • introduce the parties and members of the committee; identify the nature of the case and evidence before the committee.

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4.2

The presenter’s case: • • briefly describe the case to be presented, in an opening statement; present support for the charge through oral testimony of complainant and witnesses, and through documentary evidence; the student (or his/her representative) may ask questions of each of the presenter’s witnesses at the close of that person’s testimony; committee members normally ask questions at the end of each person’s testimony but may interrupt if clarity is required.

Grade Appeals for Schulich Courses Grounds for Appeal A student may appeal to the Schulich Appeals Officer (the Associate Dean, Academic or in his/her absence, the Director of the student’s degree program) to have a grade changed on the following grounds only: a. A clerical or computational error has resulted in a miscalculation of the grade. b. The grade awarded did not fairly reflect the student’s academic performance according to the grading system used by the instructor. Procedures for Appeal Students should first attempt to resolve the appeal informally with the instructor who may at that time alter the grade. If a further appeal is required, the following procedure must be followed: a. A formal written appeal must be made to the Schulich Appeals Officer by February 15 for fall courses, June 1 for winter courses and September 15 for summer courses. In the absence of both the Associate Dean, Academic and the Program Director, the Dean of the Schulich School of Business, will act as the Appeals Officer. b. The Appeals Officer will assure that there has been an attempt to resolve the issue informally, obtaining agreement of the instructor and student. If such agreement is obtained, the instructor will then establish the agreed upon grade and the appeal will terminate. c. i. If item b) above is unsuccessful, the Appeals Officer is empowered to require submission of all relevant documents including final examination, term examinations, homework assignments, reports, papers and the instructor’s grade books as well as other documents identified as pertaining to the student’s grade. Instructors are required to retain all such documents not returned to the student for a period of one autumn or winter term after the end of any course’s active term. The Appeals Officer, student and instructor shall be allowed access to all such documents pertaining to the student’s grades if requested. Such access will be provided to the student in a form that protects the privacy of academic records of other students. ii. The Appeals Officer is authorized to request assistance in appraisal of these documents. Normally, the request shall be made to the coordinator of the area in which the course was taught or the coordinator’s representative, before other individuals are consulted. The Appeals Officer, instructor and student shall be given access to such appraisals. iii. The Appeals Officer will prepare a written decision on the appeal. The decision may be to retain, to raise, or to lower the student’s grade. Substantial and convincing evidence must be shown for the grade to be changed. iv. The instructor may voluntarily alter the grade as recommended by the Appeals Officer’s report. In cases where the instructor is unwilling or unable by reasons of absence or health to alter the grade, the Appeals Officer is empowered to alter the formal record of the grade as reported by the instructor and used by the University. d. The student will be notified of the decision by registered mail or other form of confirmed delivery, and a copy of the correspondence will be sent to the instructor.
Academic Polices and Regulations: Schulich School

•

•

4.3

The student’s case: • the student (or his/her representative) shall briefly reply and indicate main arguments in an opening statement; present support for his/her case through oral testimony provided by him/herself and witnesses as well as documentary evidence.; the presenter may ask questions of each of the student’s witnesses at the close of that person’s testimony; committee members normally ask questions at the end of each person’s testimony but may interrupt if clarity is required.

•

•

•

4.4

The presenter shall be allowed to present testimony or other evidence in reply to new issues raised in the student’s case which were not raised in the original presentation. At any time the committee may require other witnesses or the production of other written or documentary evidence and may, if it sees fit, adjourn the hearing after allowing both parties the opportunity to speak to the adjournment. Following the presentation of evidence, the parties are entitled to make closing arguments and to summarize briefly the main points of their cases, but no new evidence may be introduced. This will proceed in the following order: the student (or his/her representative) followed by the presenter. The committee will move into closed sessions for deliberations and decision. If there is a finding of academic misconduct, the committee will then consider submissions as to appropriate penalty, then return to closed sessions and decide on the appropriate penalty. The written decision of the committee shall include: • the names of committee members and all who appeared; • • • a summary of the cases of the parties; the committee’s findings of fact, decision and reasons; the route of appeal.

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.8

Senate Policy, Guidelines and Procedures on Academic Honesty Approved Senate April 28, 2005 Schulich School Implementation of Senate Procedures Governing Breach of Academic Honesty, Approved Schulich School Faculty Council October 7, 2005.

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Late Grade Reappraisal Appeals for late grade reappraisals (past the deadline date) should be directed to the Schulich Associate Dean, Academic. In the case of denial, an appeal may be made to the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. Appealing the Decision of an Appeals Officer The student or the instructor may apply for leave to appeal the decision of the Appeals Officer to the Executive Committee of the Schulich Faculty Council within fifteen (15) days of receipt of the registered letter containing the appeal decision. Grade Appeals for Courses Taken in Faculties Other Than Schulich Grade reappraisal (appeal) procedures for course taken through other Faculties are listed in the undergraduate calendar for each Faculty. Information regarding requests for reappraisal of final grades for courses taken through the Faculty of Arts can be obtained from the Office of the Faculty Council (Room 143 Atkinson, (416) 736-2100 ext. 60430). Deadlines to submit a formal written appeal are: February 15 for fall courses, June 1 for winter courses and September 15 for summer courses. Required Withdrawal and the Appeal Process Grounds for Appeal A student may appeal a required withdrawal decision resulting from a failure to comply with School regulations and standards concerning: a. Academic performance. b. Residency or continuous registration requirements. c. Time limitations to complete the program of studies. d. Academic dishonesty (withdrawal on this basis can be appealed through the procedures outlined under ‘Academic honesty’). The procedures outlined in this publication apply only to grounds ‘a’-’c’. Procedures for Appeal a. A formal written appeal must be made by the student to the Schulich Executive Director of Student Services & International Relations (hereafter, EDSS) within fifteen (15) days of the date on which the withdrawal notice was received. In the absence of the Executive Director, the Schulich Associate Dean, Academic, will act in his/her place. The written appeal will cite specific information which supports the grounds of the appeal. b. The EDSS will investigate the information provided by the student. In addition, the EDSS may collect other relevant information and may consult with responsible individuals such as area coordinators, program chairs, faculty members and staff. c. The EDSS will prepare a letter to the student containing his/her decision and the reasons for the decision. The letter will be limited to either of the following: i. To grant or reject the appeal if the appeal is based solely on an administrative or clerical error. ii. To refer the appeal to the Schulich Student Affairs Committee if it concerns academic or other substantive matters. Order of Appeal within Student Affairs Committee The Schulich Student Affairs Committee will review any appeal referred to it by the EDSS under ‘Procedures for Appeal’ (c) above and will take the following action: a. Promptly inform the student in writing of his/her right to appear in person before the Schulich Student Affairs Committee. b. Set a date for hearing the appeal in consultation with the student.

c. Ensure a quorum for the meeting consisting of the Chair, two professors and two student members of the Committee. d. Request any member of the Schulich Student Affairs Committee with a conflict of interest to remove himself/herself from voting. e. Ensure that the student is given access to all relevant documents, obtain copies of any written information to be presented by the student and attempt to verify the accuracy of this information. f. Hold the hearing and promptly inform the student of the decision and the reasons for it by registered mail. Other Appeals to the Student Affairs Committee Students may submit a formal petition to the Schulich Student Affairs Committee to appeal Schulich School academic regulations and deadlines. The petition form, accompanied by a letter and supporting documentation should be submitted to the Schulich Student Affairs Committee, c/o The Director, Student Services, Schulich. The letter should outline any compelling or extenuating circumstances that prevented the student from complying with the School’s regulations and/or deadlines. Supporting documentation must be submitted with the petition. Petitions denied by the Student Affairs Committee should follow appeal procedures outlined in the section entitled “Required Withdrawal and the Appeal Process”, in this publication. Appealing Student Affairs Committee Decisions The student, the EDSS, or any concerned faculty member may apply for leave to appeal the decision of the Schulich Student Affairs Committee to the Executive Committee of the Schulich Faculty Council within fifteen (15) days of receipt of the registered letter mentioned previously. Further Appeal At the Executive Committee Level The appeals process Appeals of grades or debarment will be permitted only on the following grounds: a. New evidence (i.e. evidence relevant to the decision made at the level of the Appeals Officer or at the Schulich Student Affairs Committee level, but through no fault of the applicant, was not presented at that level). Generally speaking, events or academic performance subsequent to the Appeals Officer’s or the Schulich Student Affairs Committee’s decision are not to be construed as new evidence. b. Evidence of procedural irregularity in the Appeals Officer’s or the Schulich Student Affairs Committee’s consideration of the case. Procedural irregularities consist of actions taken or not taken by a Faculty or School, its officers, committees, or members with respect to the previous disposition of the case which violate or nullify one or all of the following: i. normal and written procedures at the University or the School. ii. unwritten but recognized custom in the School’s or Areas’ handling of the cases substantially similar to that being appealed. Procedure for appeal The application for leave to appeal will be considered by an “Appeals Panel” of the Schulich Executive Committee composed of the Chair of the Executive Committee, MBA Program Director, PhD Program Director, Undergraduate Program Director and the Dean (ex-officio). The Chair will request any member of the Appeals Panel with a conflict of interest to remove himself/herself from the proceedings. Three members of the Appeals Panel will constitute a quorum. The application for leave to appeal should contain a succinct statement of the grounds on which the applicant intends to rely, a summary of the evidence to be relied upon, as well as all relevant

Academic Polices and Regulations: Schulich School

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documentation. Upon written request, an applicant shall be given without charge by the School, copies of all School documents which may support this summary of evidence. Determination of prima facie case The Appeals Panel will consider the documents submitted in relating to an appeal to determine whether or not a prima facie case has been established on the grounds indicated. Parties are not present at this hearing. If the Appeals Panel determines that a prima facie case has not been established, it may deny leave to appeal and promptly advise the applicant and other concerned parties by registered mail. If the Appeals Panel is satisfied that a prima facie case has been established, it will allow the appeal to be heard by the Executive Committee. The chair, in consultation with concerned parties, will set a date for the hearing. Order of appeal within the Schulich Executive Committee The following list indicates the order of an appeal where the parties are present. The Committee may alter the order of the hearing in the interests of fairness to any or all of the parties. a. The Chair shall: i. identify the parties and members of the committee. ii. clarify any procedural requirements. b. The applicant or representative shall: i. briefly describe the case to be presented. ii. provide factual support for his/her case through documentary evidence and testimony of applicant and witness, if relevant. iii. the respondent or representative may ask questions of each witness at the close of that person’s testimony. c. The respondent or representative shall: i. briefly reply and indicate main arguments. ii. provide factual support for his/her case through documentary evidence and testimony of respondent or witness, if relevant. iii. the applicant or representative may ask questions of each witness at the close of that person’s testimony. d. The applicant and his/her witnesses shall be allowed to offer testimony or other evidence in reply to new issues raised in the respondent’s presentation. e. At this point or sooner, the Committee may require other witnesses or the production of other written or documentary evidence and may adjourn the hearing after allowing both parties the opportunity to speak to the adjournment. After this, no new arguments or evidence regarding the appeal may be introduced. f. The respondent followed by the applicant is entitled to make closing arguments and to briefly summarize the main points of his/her case. g. The Committee will move in camera for deliberations and discussion. h. The written decision of the Committee shall include: i. the names of the Committee members and all who appeared. ii. a brief summary of the cases of the parties. iii. the Committee’s findings of fact, decision and reasons. iv. the route of further appeal. NOTE: 1. Committee members normally ask questions at the end of each person’s testimony or interrupt any time if clarity is required.

BBA/iBBA Program Committee The BBA/iBBA Program Committee is the Faculty body which is responsible for the program design. This Committee meets regularly to review, revise and enhance the BBA/iBBA offerings. It addresses all issues related to the development of the undergraduate degrees and its students. The Committee is comprised of faculty members, undergraduate students and members of the administration and is chaired by the Program Director BBA/iBBA Programs. Faculty Council The Schulich Faculty Council is the principal policy-making body of the School. It approves all academic policies and regulations under which the School operates. Representatives of the Schulich student body are voting members. Schulich School of Business Approval Procedure for the Conduct of Course-Related, Non-Funded, Minimal Risk Research Involving Human Participants York University Policy The Senate Policy for the Ethics Review Process for Research Involving Human Participants states that all university-based research involving human participants, whether funded or nonfunded, faculty or student, scholarly, commercial or consultative, is subject to this ethics review process. The review of course-related, non-funded, minimal risk research is the responsibility of each Faculty of York University, and data on approved research projects are to be reported annually to the York Human Participants Review Committee by June 30th. Schulich School of Business Approvals All course-related, non-funded, minimal risk research involving human participants undertaken by graduate and undergraduate students requires approval from the Schulich School of Business (SSB) Human Participants Review Committee (HPRC) before it may begin. As well as other applicable courses, this includes work done by students in the Strategy Field Study, International Field Study, Global Leadership Program, Aboriginal Economic Development Program, and York Consulting Group (YCG). SSB Human Participants Review Committee (HPRC) The Associate Dean, Research and the SSB Research Committee will form the SSB Human Participants Review Committee, and as such, it will act as adjudicator for approvals before the conduct of such research. Reviews will be done by at least two members of the SSB Human Participants Research Committee who are at arm’s length from the student research. The Committee will be available to review any work on an on-going basis throughout the academic year (i.e. reviews will not be limited to the start of the term) and they will respond particularly promptly for student work in six week courses so that the condensed time frames of such courses can be accommodated. In addition, they will review and pre-approve instructor developed generic research protocols, if appropriate, for a particular course related research agenda. SSB Appeals Mechanism In case of appeals, the appeals mechanism will consist of a committee composed of the Associate Dean, Academic and the specific Program Director (BBA, iBBA, MBA, IMBA, MPA, PhD) for the student project in question.
Academic Polices and Regulations: Schulich School

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BBA/iBBA Exchange-Study Abroad
28

BBA/iBBA Exchange-Study Abroad
Introduction Recognizing the need to understand management and business in an international context, the Schulich School of Business offers an ever-expanding number of opportunities for undergraduate students to study abroad. At present, students have the option of studying on Exchange in many countries. The Schulich exchange programs are formal reciprocal business school to business school partnerships that allow both domestic and international students from Schulich to spend one term studying abroad at a partner school. The exchange programs are open to any Schulich undergraduate student who meets the eligibility criteria (note that iBBA students must participate in a Schulich exchange). The benefits of participating in an exchange are numerous: • exposure to new perspectives and a more global outlook • The expansion of career options. • An increase of cross-cultural communication skills. • The development of language proficiency skills. • Schulich students on exchange are registered at York, pay tuition to York, and therefore remain eligible for any scholarships or financial aid that would have been available if they studied on York’s campus. • All academic courses successfully completed on exchange are transferred to the Schulich degree as either Schulich core, business or non-business elective courses, language or globallyfocused study. Eligibility While the Exchange-Study Abroad program is mandatory for iBBA students to graduate, BBA students are eligible to apply for an international exchange during Year 3 or 4, for one term of study, provided that they have met promotional criteria (successfully completed all 1st and 2nd year core courses) and an overall grade point average of 5.5 for the academic session prior to their exchange term. It is recommended that Delayed-Entry students wishing to go on exchange go in their 4th year after having completed all 2000 level core courses. Registration and Tuition While on Exchange While on exchange, students must register at York, pay tuition to York and are considered to be students of York University, even though study takes place on another campus. Students must study full-time during the exchange term(s) and register in 12.00 or 15.00 credit-hours worth of courses prior to departing for their term abroad. As a registered York student, an exchange program participant remains eligible for York scholarships and financial assistance (bursaries and loans). A limited number of bursaries may be available to offset some of the additional costs of exchange. Bursaries are awarded based on need. Language Study Students in the iBBA program will generally be given priority for exchange partner schools that teach in their iBBA designated nonEnglish language. For programs taught in English, the Selection Committee will consider iBBA students alongside the BBA applicant pool. iBBA students’ desired term of study should be considered alongside a plan for language study courses at York. Note that different schools will have different requirements for language ability; some teach courses in both English and the host language, allowing students the opportunity to develop business language skills in some courses while taking some courses in English, while other schools teach entirely in the host language. Proof of language proficiency (language referee) is required if students wish to take courses in a language other than English. The staff in Schulich’s International Relations Unit will assist students with questions. Please contact the Schulich International Relations Office for further details. Transfer Credit All students are required to study full-time while on exchange (minimum of 12.00 credit-hours and maximum 15.00 credit-hours) for each term of study. Most of Schulich’s partner schools allow for a one-term exchange, while some require a full academic year exchange. All courses taken on exchange are evaluated at Schulich on a pass/fail basis upon review of the academic transcript from the exchange partner school. Transfer credit is evaluated prior to departure and upon return. Note that most exchange partner schools have courses that can be used for transfer as Year 3 core course equivalents; however, if a suitable replacement is not available, the missing courses can be taken at York upon return. Approved academic language courses will be transferred as non-business electives for BBA students and will count toward the language requirements for the iBBA program. Language level equivalency is evaluated prior to departure and upon return. Business courses taught in the host school language may also be considered as fulfilling language requirements. Application and Selection Students are asked to research potential partner schools as part of the application. In addition to the application package the Exchange Selection Committee conducts a personal evaluation of each applicant. Due to space availability, the Schulich School is not always able to accommodate each student’s preference of exchange school. Applications are available on the Study Abroad Web site (www.schulich.yorku.ca/goinginternational). Applications for Fall 2009, Winter 2010 or Fall/Winter 2009-2010 are due in early December in the International Relations Office (room W263, SSB). For More Information Schulich Exchange Program Information Sessions will be held in the Fall term. At these sessions, students have an opportunity to learn about the exchange experience. For detailed information on the Undergraduate Exchange Programs visit the Study Abroad Web site at www.schulich.yorku.ca/goinginternational, or the Resource Room in the Schulich International Relations Office, Room W263, or contact the Undergraduate International Program Coordinator at exchange@schulich.yorku.ca.

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BBA/iBBA Exchange-Study Abroad

Partner Schools
COUNTRY
Argentina Australia Australia Australia Austria Belgium Brazil Chile China China China China China Czech Republic Denmark France France France France France France France France France Germany Germany Italy Japan Mexico Mexico Netherlands Netherlands Norway Norway Russia Singapore Singapore Singapore South Korea South Korea Spain Switzerland Taiwan Thailand United Kingdom United Kingdom United Kingdom United Kingdom Uruguay

CITY
Buenos Aires Sydney Sydney Queensland Vienna Louvain-la Neuve São Paolo Santiago/Viña del Mar Beijing Hong Kong Hong Kong Hong Kong Hong Kong Prague Copenhagen Cergy-Pontoise Lille Nice/Lille Lyon Rouen Strasbourg Paris Paris Puyricard Mannheim Oestrich-Winkel Milan Beppu Monterrey/Guadalajara Mexico City Rotterdam Tilburg Bergen Oslo Saint-Petersburg Singapore Singapore Singapore Seoul Seoul Barcelona St. Gallen Taipai Bangkok Bath Lancaster Coventry Manchester Montevideo

SCHOOL
Universidad de San Andrés Macquarie University University of New South Wales Griffith University Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien IAG Louvain School of Management FGV-EAESP Universidad Adolfo Ibañez Peking University Chinese University of Hong Kong City University of Hong Kong Hong Kong University of Science and Technology University of Hong Kong University of Economics Copenhagen Business School EPSCI – Groupe ESSEC IÉSEG School of Management EDHEC Business School – Lille-Nice E.M. Lyon ESC – Rouen IECS School of Management Université Paris Dauphine HEC School of Management IAE Aix-en-Provence Universität Mannheim European Business School Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University Tec de Monterrey (ITESM) Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México RSM Erasmus University Universiteit van Tilburg Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration Norwegian School of Management BI Saint-Petersburg State University Nanyang Business School National University of Singapore Singapore School of Management Yonsei University Korea University Business School ESADE Business School University of St. Gallen National Chengchi University Chulalongkorn University University of Bath Lancaster University University of Warwick Manchester Business School Universidad ORT

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION
Spanish English English English English/German English/French Portuguese/Limited English Spanish English/Mandarin English English English English English English English/French English/French English/French French English/French English/French English/French English/French English/French English/German English/German English/Italian English/Japanese English/Spanish English/Spanish English English English English English English English English English/Korean English/Korean English/Spanish English/German English/Mandarin English English English English English Spanish

Note: • Schulich is in the process of developing new partnerships for undergraduate students. Please visit our Study Abroad Web site at www.schulich.yorku.ca/goinginternational for the most up-to-date information.
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Areas of Specialization
ACCOUNTING
Suite S344, SSB (416) 736-5062 Schulich’s accounting courses cover the principal subjects in the field: financial accounting, managerial accounting, taxation and auditing. Financial accounting, for example, is the basis for investment analysis, corporate “forensic” analysis, and merger and acquisition analysis. It is also the basis for external reporting to shareholders and other stakeholders. Managerial accounting traditionally provides information for managerial decision-making such as resource allocation and performance evaluation. In courses, emphasis is placed on evaluation and judgment rather than on memorization. The Schulich School of Business approaches the teaching of accounting by stressing critical thinking and analytical skills, as well as the necessary technical material. The courses are very demanding, but are crucial for any student who is interested in the financial aspects of business and the capital markets. Schulich graduates specializing in accounting have followed career paths leading to the positions of: owner/operator – product or service corporation; chief financial officer – international corporation; partner – taxation, business acquisitions, consulting; auditor – public accounting firm; financial analyst; pension administrator; chief executive officer; professor; lending officer – bank; underwriter; investigative accountant; lawyer/investigator; executive – nonprofit organization. In addition, Schulich graduates have used their Schulich management degree as a stepping stone to additional professional designations or degrees. These include: certified general accountant (CGA), certified management accountant (CMA), chartered accountant (CA), law (LLB), graduate (MBA) or doctorate (PhD). Faculty Accounting faculty members have a wide variety of backgrounds and extensive professional experience. Canada’s leading advanced and intermediate accounting textbooks were written by Schulich faculty members. Recent research includes topics such as accounting education, applied ethics, executive compensation, accounting for non-profit organizations, and international accounting harmonization, audit judgement, taxation of employee stock options, personal tax planning and policy, performance metrics incentive plans, pension accounting, social accountability, accounting regulation and standard setting, strategic cost management, management decision-making, strategic performance measurement systems and translation of management ideas. Area Coordinator Marcia Annisette BSc Hons. (WI), MSc & PhD (Manchester), FCCA (UK), CA (Trinidad & Tobago) Associate Professor of Accounting Thomas H. Beechy BBA (George Washington), MBA (Northwestern), DBA (Washington), CPA (Illinois) Professor Emeritus of Accounting Kathryn Bewley BA (Toronto), MBA (York), PhD (Waterloo), CA (Ontario) Associate Professor, Cross-Appointed to the School of Administrative Studies, Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies Janne Chung BS & MA Accounting, M. Accountancy (Truman State), PhD (ECowan), CMA Associate Professor of Accounting Gail Drory BA (Western), MA & MBA (York), CA (Ontario) Adjunct Professor of Accounting Elizabeth Farrell BA & BPHE (Queen’s), MBA (York), CA (Ontario) Adjunct Professor of Accounting Cameron Graham BSc (Alberta), MDiv. (Vancouver School of Theology), MBA (Calgary), PhD (Calgary) Associate Professor of Accounting Sylvia Hsingwen Hsu MD (Taipei), MBA (Chengchi), PhD (Wisconsin-Madison) Assistant Professor of Accounting Amin Mawani BCom (Alberta), MA (Toronto), LL.M (York), PhD (Waterloo), CMA, FCMA, CFP Associate Professor of Accounting & Taxation Sandy Qian Qu Bachelor of Economics (Central University of Finance & Economics – China), MBA (Windsor), PhD (Alberta) Assistant Professor of Accounting Alan J. Richardson BSc & MPI & PhD (Queen’s), CGA (Ontario), FCGA (Canada) Professor of Accounting Linda Thorne BCom (Toronto), MBA (York), PhD (McGill), CA (Ontario) Associate Professor of Accounting V. Umashanker Trivedi BSc (Andhra), PhD (Arizona) Associate Professor of Accounting Elective Courses SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG SB/ACTG 3000 3110 3120 3700 4160 4200 4400 4450 4600 4610 4620 4710 4720 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Financial Reporting and Analysis Intermediate Financial Accounting I Intermediate Financial Accounting II Taxes and Decision-Making Advanced Financial Accounting Contemporary Issues in Accounting Managerial Cost Accounting and Analysis Management Accounting and Control Systems Auditing Standards and Applications Advanced Auditing Auditing Information Systems Introduction to Income Taxation Advanced Income Taxation

Areas of Specialization
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P R O F E S S I O N A L A C C O U N TA N C Y Qualifying for one of the professional accounting designations requires study of both financial and managerial accounting, taxation, auditing, law and information systems. Chartered Accountant (CA): Students can earn at York University all 51.00 credit hour requirements for the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario. BBA students can fulfill within their 120.00 credit-hour degree requirements all courses to qualify as a CA. The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario prescribes a series of requirements leading to the CA designation. For details, contact: The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario, 69 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 1B3. http://www.icao.on.ca/

Certified Management Accountant (CMA): The Society of Management The Society of Management Accountants offers a course of studies leading to the CMA designation. Schulich graduates wishing to qualify as a CMA are granted exemptions from certain CMA courses, making it possible to earn the CMA designation in 2 years. For details, contact: The Society of Management Accountants of Ontario, 70 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5J 2M4. http://www.cma-ontario.org/ Certified General Accountant (CGA): The Certified General Accountants Association offers a course of studies leading to the CGA designation. Schulich graduates may obtain advanced standing in the CGA program, considerably reducing the time period required to obtain the CGA designation. For details, contact: The Certified General Accountants Association of Ontario, 240 Eglinton Ave. East, Toronto, Ontario, M4P 1K8. http://www.cga-ontario.org/

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ECONOMICS
Suite N205, SSB (416) 736-5068 The economics specialization focuses on explaining the economic and social interactions of individuals, firms and governments in the global environment. Schulich’s economics electives provide a logical and consistent framework for analyzing economic and business factors that affect corporations and day-to-day management problems. In a series of well integrated economic electives, students learn to use economic tools to explain and forecast movements in critical variables such as interest rates, exchange rates, unemployment and economic growth, in order to understand competitive interactions and institutional influences that affect corporate and organizational strategies. This specialization requires that students complete a series of elective courses to be selected from a number of areas including international economics, money and banking, industrial economics, markets and regulations, and economic forecasting. Graduates specializing in economics have followed career paths leading to senior executive positions in investment banks, merchant banks, venture capital firms, management consulting firms, federal and provincial governments, multinational corporations and product or service companies. Faculty Economic faculty members have a wide variety of backgrounds with many years of senior level experience in corporate and government sectors, including experience in international investment banking, corporate finance advisory, management consulting, start-up technology companies, and government economic ministries. Recent research by the faculty includes topics in international business, business sustainability and the environment, international technology transfer, economic forecasting, new public management, transportation economics, tourism, and money and banking. Faculty members have also taught students, managers and executives as well as government officials in numerous countries across Europe, Asia and Africa, and have been consultants to various international agencies and private sector organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank. Area Coordinator Atipol Bhanich Supapol BA (Carleton), MA (Northeastern), PhD (Carleton) Associate Professor of Economics David Barrows BSBA & MA (Northeastern) Sessional Lecturer in Economics and Policy Donald J. Daly BA & BCom & MA (Queen’s), PhD (Chicago) Senior Scholar in Economics Irene Henriques BSc & MSc (Montreal), PhD (Queen’s) Associate Professor of Economics Fred Lazar BCom (Toronto), MA & PhD (Harvard) Associate Professor of Economics, Cross-appointed to Department of Economics, Faculty of Arts Perry Sadorsky BSc Hons & MA (UBC), PhD (Queen’s) Associate Professor of Economics John Smithin BA (London Polytechnic), MA & PhD (McMaster) Professor of Economics, Cross-appointed to Department of Economics, Faculty of Arts Theodore Tolias BA (Aristotle), MA (Toronto), PhD (ABD) (Manitoba) Sessional Lecturer in Economics Bernard M. Wolf BA (CUNY), MA & PhD (Yale) Professor of Economics Director of the International MBA Program Farrokh Zandi BA (Pahlavi), MA (Lakehead), PhD (Carleton) Associate Director BBA/iBBA Programs Sessional Lecturer in Economics Elective Courses SB/ECON SB/ECON SB/ECON SB/ECON SB/ECON SB/ECON 3200 3510 4070 4210 4220 4600 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Economics of Business Management Applied International Economics Natural Resource and Environmental Economics Economic Forecasting and Analysis Macroeconomics and The Supply Side Economic Evaluation of Health Care Programs

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E N T R E P R E N E U R I A L A N D F A M I LY B U S I N E S S S T U D I E S
Suite N305A, SSB (416) 736-2100 ext. 77960 Courses are designed for individuals who are running their own business and would like to know what to do to make their businesses bigger or what they should/would do differently next time. Entrepreneurship involves the pursuit of opportunities beyond currently existing resources and the building of growing business organizations. The Schulich Entrepreneurial Studies program is focused on growing both firms and family businesses. Schulich graduates specializing in Entrepreneurial Studies have started their own businesses or followed alternate career paths leading to: owner and/or manager of a small or medium-sized enterprise; heir to a family firm; professional manager in a family business; manager in a larger organization doing business with smaller entrepreneurial firms (e.g. a chartered bank or manufacturer using subcontractors, economic development agencies etc.). Faculty Entrepreneurial Studies faculty members have a wealth of experience in the entrepreneurial sector as consultants, advisors, board members, venture capitalists, financing and marketing experts, economic development officers and most importantly, as entrepreneurs. They have published books, numerous articles and technical monographs and are sought after frequently by the media to comment on economic or business issues. Current research involves banking, corporate governance in small to medium-sized enterprises, succession in family business, franchising, financing growing firms, strategic alliances, exporting by small firms, and doing business in the emerging economies of Eastern and Central Europe and the CIS. Program Director Eileen Fischer BA & MASc (Waterloo), PhD (Queen’s) Professor of Marketing and The Anne & Max Tannebaum Chair of Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise Marketing Area Coordinator Director of Entrepreneurial Studies Barbara Benoliel BA (Toronto), MBSc (Tel Aviv), PhD HOD (Fielding) Sessional Lecturer in Entrepreneurial Studies Douglas Cumming B.Com. (McGill), MA (Queen’s), J.D. & PhD (Toronto), CFA Associate Professor of Finance & Entrepreneurship Ontario Research Chair in Economics & Cross Cultural Studies James L. Darroch BA & MA & PhD (Toronto), MBA & PhD (York) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Yuval Deutsch BA & MA (Hebrew), PhD (UBC) Assistant Professor of Policy and Entrepreneurial Studies Laurence Ginsberg BCom (Manitoba), MBA (Toronto), CA (Ontario) Sessional Lecturer in Entrepreneurial Studies Kelly LeCouvie BA (Western), BCom & MBA (Windsor), PhD (York) Sessional Lecturer in Entrepreneurial Studies Gregory A. Milavsky BApSc (Toronto), MBA (Harvard) Sessional Lecturer in Entrepreneurial Studies Theodore Peridis BSc (Athens), MA (Kent), MPhil & PhD (New York) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Area Coordinator of Strategic Management/Policy Co-Director, York Consulting Group Rein Peterson BEng (McGill), MBA (Western), PhD (Cornell), PEng (NS) Professor Emeritus of Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise Steve Pulver BA (Toronto), MBA (York) Sessional Lecturer in Entrepreneurial Studies Kevin Talbot BBA & MBA (York) Adjunct Professor in Entrepreneurial Studies David Valliere BSc & MEng (Toronto), MBA (W. Ont.) Sessional Lecturer in Entrepreneurial Studies Elective Courses SB/ENTR SB/ENTR SB/ENTR SB/ENTR 4600 4700 4800 4950 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Entrepreneurship & New Venture Creation Financing Growing Ventures Social Entrepreneurship Managing the Family Enterprise

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Additional Recommended Elective Courses SB/ACTG 4450 3.00 SB/FINE 3100 3.00 SB/FINE 4050 3.00 SB/IBUS 3100 3.00 SB/IBUS 4950 3.00 SB/MKTG 3100 3.00 SB/OBIR 4500 3.00 SB/OMIS 4730 3.00 Management Accounting & Control Systems Financial Management Personal Finance Introduction to International Business Business Ethics in a Global Community Marketing Research Developing Management Skills Systems Analysis and Design

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FINANCE
Suite N204, SSB (416) 736-5072 The Schulich School of Business offers one of the most extensive finance programs in Canada, with coverage of the full spectrum of financial activities in Canadian business, including corporate finance, financial management and investment management. Courses focus on forward thinking for company planning by forecasting primarily cash flows to maximize value for shareholders. Elective courses include Personal Finance and Management of Canadian Financial Institutions. Students may complement their finance specialization with courses in accounting, economics and management science. The work of the faculty brings theoretical rigor to practical applications. For example, students participate in an investment game in one of their electives. Faculty members have developed a unique approach to personal investment management over the human lifecycle. One professor presented groundbreaking research on retirement strategies using computer scenario modelling that contradicted conventional wisdom in retirement planning. Other research areas include the management of financial institutions, the application of financial theory to the development of new products and international financial management. Graduates are well positioned to build careers in the retail side of banking or as financial advisors and financial analysts. Faculty The teaching, research and consulting activities of finance faculty members are numerous and cover the fields of investments and corporate finance. The work of the faculty brings theoretical rigor to practical applications. For example, faculty members have developed a unique approach to personal investment management over the human lifecycle. They have won numerous awards for this work and are in high demand by practitioners from across Canada. Other research areas include the effect of thin trading on stock prices, the management of financial institutions, the application of financial theory to the development of new products and international financial management. Area Coordinator Mark J. Kamstra BA (Queen’s), MA (UBC), PhD (California) Associate Professor of Finance Melanie Cao BSc, MA (Huazhong), MBA (Ottawa), PhD (Toronto) Associate Professor of Finance Douglas Cumming B.Com. (McGill), MA (Queen’s), J.D. & PhD (Toronto), CFA Associate Professor of Finance & Entrepreneurship Ontario Research Chair in Economics & Cross Cultural Studies Ming Dong BS (Fudan), MS (New York), PhD (Ohio State) Associate Professor of Finance Nadia Massoud MA (Waterloo), PhD (Queen’s) Associate Professor of Finance Elizabeth M. Maynes BA (McMaster), MA & PhD (Queen’s) Associate Professor of Finance Program Director BBA/iBBA Programs Moshe Arye Milevsky BA (Yeshiva), MA & PhD (York) Associate Professor of Finance Debarshi K. Nandy BS (Hons) & MS (Calcutta, India), PhD (Boston College) Assistant Professor of Finance Eliezer Z. Prisman BA (Hebrew), MSc & DSc (Technion) Professor of Finance Nigel Martin Chair in Finance Director, Financial Engineering Program Gordon S. Roberts BA (Oberlin), MA & PhD (Boston College) Professor of Finance CIBC Professor of Financial Services Pauline M. Shum BA Hons. (UBC), MA & PhD (Toronto) Associate Professor of Finance Yisong Tian BSc (Nankai), MBA & PhD (York) Associate Professor of Finance Elective Courses Financial Management Investments Fixed Income Fundamentals Personal Finance Advanced Corporate Finance Investments International Financial Management Management of Canadian Financial Institutions SB/FINE 4800 3.00 Options, Futures & Other Derivative Securities SB/PROP 4950 3.00 Real Estate Finance SB/FINE SB/FINE SB/FINE SB/FINE SB/FINE SB/FINE SB/FINE SB/FINE 3100 3200 3810 4050 4150 4200 4400 4700 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L B U S I N E S S
Schulich’s international business concentration helps graduates develop career paths to Canadian and foreign corporations, banks and governments. Its goal is to develop the management skills required to do business in an international environment. To enhance their employment possibilities, students are encouraged to combine other specializations with international business (e.g. international business with a marketing focus). Students interested in international business may wish to consider applying to participate in a Study Abroad academic exchange, as Canada’s Global Business School, Schulich has partnerships with many of the world’s leading management schools. Faculty Schulich faculty teaching in this specialization has a wide range of foreign business and research experience. In addition, many have studied and taught at foreign universities or worked abroad in corporate international operations. Visiting professors from overseas also enrich course offerings. Concentration Coordinator TBA Preet Aulakh BSc & MA (Punjab), PhD (Texas) Associate Professor of International Business and Pierre Lassonde Chair in International Business Director, PhD Program in Administration Thomas H. Beechy BBA (George Washington), MBA (Northwestern), DBA (Washington), CPA (Illinois) Professor Emeritus of Accounting Atipol Bhanich Supapol BA (Carleton), MA (Northeastern), PhD (Carleton) Associate Professor and Area Coordinator of Economics Samuel K. Bonsu BBA (PEI), MBA (Simon Fraser), PhD (Rhode Island) Assistant Professor of Marketing Cyril Bouquet MBA (Ottawa), PhD (Western) Assistant Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Alexandra Campbell BA Hons (York), MBA & PhD (Toronto) Associate Professor of Marketing Wesley Cragg BA Hons & MA (Alberta), BPhil & DPhil (Oxford) Professor Emeritus, Business Ethics Cross-appointed to the Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts Andrew Crane BSc (Warwick), PhD (Nottingham) George R. Gardiner Professor of Business Ethics Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Eileen Fischer BA & MASc (Waterloo), PhD (Queen’s) Professor of Marketing and Anne & Max Tanenbaum Chair in Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise Marketing Area Coordinator Director of Entrepreneurial Studies Dezsö J. Horváth Eng (Malmö), MBA & PhD (Umeå) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Dean & Tanna H. Schulich Chair in Strategic Management David Johnston BA & MA & PhD (W. Ont.) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems
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Matthias Kipping MA (Paris-Sorbonne), MPA (Harvard), PhD (Müchen, Germany) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Chair in Business History Charles J. McMillan BA (PEI), MBA (Alberta), PhD (Bradford) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy and International Business Alan Middleton BSc (London), MBA & PhD (York) Assistant Professor of Marketing Yigang Pan BA & MA (Beijing), MPhil & PhD (Columbia) Professor of Marketing and Scotia Bank Professor of International Business Theodore Peridis BSc (Athens), MA (Kent), MPhil & PhD (New York) Chair and Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Co-director, York Consulting Group Alan J. Richardson BSc & MPI & PhD (Queen’s), CGA (Ontario), FCGA (Canada) Professor and Area Coordinator of Accounting Theodore Tolias BA (Aristotle), MA (Toronto), PhD (ABD) (Manitoba) Sessional Lecturer in Economics Michael Wade HBA, MBA and PhD (W. Ont.) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems Stephen Weiss BA (Lafayette), MA & PhD (Pennsylvania) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy and International Business Tom Wesson BCom (Queen’s), MBA & PhD (Harvard) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Eleanor Westney BA & MA (Toronto), MA & PhD (Princeton) Scotiabank Professor of International Business Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Bernard M. Wolf BA (CUNY), MA & PhD (Yale) Professor of Economics Director of the International MBA Program Lorna Wright BA (Wilfred Laurier), MA (Essex, England), MIM (Thunderbird), PhD (W. Ont.) Associate Professor of International Business Farrokh Zandi BA (Pahlavi), MA (Lakehead), PhD (Carleton) Associate Director BBA/iBBA Programs Sessional Lecturer in Economics Elective Courses SB/ECON 3510 3.00 Applied International Economics (available only to BBA students) SB/FINE 4400 3.00 International Financial Management SB/IBUS 3100 3.00 Introduction to International Business SB/IBUS 4950 3.00 Business Ethics in a Global Community (available only to BBA students) SB/MKTG 4400 3.00 International Marketing

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MARKETING
Suite N304, SSB (416) 736-5076 Marketing is a key aspect of any organization – profit or nonprofit, new or mature, small or large, in Canada or abroad. Schulich’s marketing electives help students to develop an understanding of the elements of marketing strategy, the details of marketing tactics, the unique challenges of marketing specific types of offerings, and some of the key ideas behind marketing to distinct target markets. Graduates specializing in marketing have pursued careers in: brand or product management, marketing communications, market research, personal selling and sales management, academe, non-profit management, and a host of related areas. Many have also founded their own firms. Faculty In this specialization, Schulich faculty are concerned with marketing for the real world. Their education, experience and related expertise cover a wide range of contemporary marketing issues, all of which are reflected in the School’s required and elective marketing courses. Individual faculty have won a number of awards for both teaching and research. Professors are currently conducting research in the fields of consumer behaviour, marketing strategy and business-tobusiness marketing. Area Coordinator Eileen Fischer BA & MASc (Waterloo), PhD (Queen’s) Professor of Marketing and The Anne & Max Tannebaum Chair of Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise Marketing Area Coordinator Director of Entrepreneurial Studies Russell W. Belk B.S. & PhD (Minnesota) Professor and Kraft Foods Canada Chair of Marketing Samuel K. Bonsu BBA (PEI), MBA (Simon Fraser), & PhD (Rhode Island) Associate Professor of Marketing Alexandra Campbell BA Hons (York), MBA & PhD (Toronto) Associate Professor of Marketing Peter Darke BSc (McMaster), MA & PhD (Toronto) Associate Professor of Marketing Brenda Gainer BA Hons (Alberta), MA (Carleton), MBA (Maine), PhD (York) Associate Professor of Marketing Royal Bank Professor of Non-profit Management Markus Giesler BA, MA, MBA, PhD (Witten/Herdecke) Assistant Professor of Marketing Roger M. Heeler BSc (London), MBA & PhD (Stanford) Professor Emeritus of Marketing Ashwin Joshi BAS Hons (Trent), PhD (Queen’s) Associate Professor of Marketing Director, MBA Program Robert V. Kozinets BBA & MBA (York), PhD (Queen’s) Associate Professor of Marketing Yigang Pan BA & MBA (Beijing), MPhil & PhD (Columbia) Professor of Marketing and Scotia Bank Professor of International Business Marshall D. Rice BA (Manitoba), MS & PhD (Illinois) Associate Professor of Marketing Ajay K. Sirsi Hons BComm (Delhi), MBA (Oklahoma), MA (Florida), PhD (Arizona) Associate Professor of Marketing Detlev Zwick MS (Montpellier), MS (Memphis), PhD (Rhode Island) Associate Professor of Marketing Elective Courses SB/MKTG SB/MKTG SB/MKTG SB/MKTG SB/MKTG SB/MKTG SB/MKTG SB/MKTG SB/MKTG 3100 4100 4150 4250 4320 4321 4400 4550 4560 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Marketing Research Marketing Communications Consumer Behaviour Retail Marketing Strategies Tourism, Sport and Leisure Marketing Entertainment Marketing International Marketing Brand Management E-Commerce and the Art of High Tech Marketing

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O P E R AT I O N S M A N A G E M E N T A N D I N F O R M AT I O N S Y S T E M S
Suite S337, SSB (416) 736-5074 The courses offered by the department of Operations Management and Information Systems provide solid grounding in mathematical analysis and information technologies as well as applied knowledge of operations management and information systems. A specialization in Operations Management and Information Systems provides an understanding of operations and systems, management of information systems, and the ability to solve complex, real-world problems. As a result, graduates from our specialization help organizations operate more efficiently and effectively, and work in positions as business analysts, systems analysts and other information technology professionals, management consultants, and operations managers. Graduates from this program work in all sectors within Canada and abroad, especially in the banking and financial, services, retail and distribution, manufacturing, and services industries. In fact, our courses teach invaluable analytical and information systems skills critical for any management career. Faculty The Operations Management and Information Systems faculty come from backgrounds as varied as business, engineering, mathematics and statistics, and economics and have worked and schooled in nearly all corners of the world. They possess a wide variety of real-world work and consulting experiences, and have research interests in operations management, information systems, and operational research. The excellence of their scholarship has been recognized by extensive publication in prestigious journals, numerous awards and honours, and translations of their works into several languages. As a highlight of their achievements, for example, faculty members’ research and consulting are credited with tens of millions of cost savings by a Silicon Valley high-tech firm and a Canadian retailer. Area Coordinator Wade D. Cook BSc (Mt. Allison), MSc (Queen’s), PhD (Dalhousie) Gordon Charlton Shaw Professor of Management Science and Information Systems Associate Dean, Research Markus Biehl MS (Kaiserlautern), PhD (Georgia) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems John Buzacott BSc & BE (Sydney), MSc & PhD (Birmingham), Dr.h.c. (TU Eindhoven) Professor Emeritus of Operations Management and Information Systems Richard H. Irving BASc & MASc & PhD (Waterloo) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems David Johnston BA & MA & PhD (Western) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems Henry Kim BASc (Toronto), MEng (Michigan), PhD (Toronto) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems Murat Kristal BSc (Metu), MBA (Bilkent), PhD (North Carolina) Assistant Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems Ronald J. McClean BSc & MASc & PhD (Waterloo) Assistant Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems Executive Director, Information Services and Technology Dorit Nevo BA (Haifa), MSc (Technion), PhD (UBC) Assistant Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems Mark Pagell B.S. (Drexel), PhD (Michigan State) Associate Professor of Operation Management and Information Systems Daniele Thomassin Singh BBA & MBA (Laval), PhD (Case Western Reserve) Assistant Professor of Operation Management and Information Systems Peter Tryfos BEc (Athens), MBA (SUNY), PhD (Berkeley) Professor Emeritus of Operations Management and Information Systems Michael Wade HBA, MBA and PhD (Western) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems J. Scott Yeomans BAdmin & BSc (Regina), MASc (Toronto), PhD (McMaster) Associate Professor of Operations Management and Information Systems Elective Courses SB/OMIS 3670 3.00 Spreadsheet-Based Decision Support Systems SB/OMIS 3730 3.00 Database Management with Microsoft Access SB/OMIS 4000 3.00 Models & Applications in Operational Research SB/OMIS 4200 3.00 Quantitative Business Research & Analysis SB/OMIS 4550 3.00 Inventory Management SB/OMIS 4560 3.00 Supply Chain Management SB/OMIS 4670 3.00 Web Enabled Decision Support Systems SB/OMIS 4710 3.00 Information Systems SB/OMIS 4730 3.00 Systems Analysis and Design

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O R G A N I Z AT I O N A L B E H A V I O U R A N D I N D U S T R I A L R E L AT I O N S
Suite N303, SSB (416) 736-5096 As we begin the twenty-first century, the environment in which organizations operate is increasingly turbulent, rocked by forces such as globalization and rapid technological change. Social and demographic forces have dramatically changed the make-up of today’s workforce, which is now the most educated and ethnically diverse in history, in addition to having the greatest representation of women. These developments are profoundly affecting the way in which organizations structure themselves, just as they are influencing individuals’ attitudes to and expectations of both organizations and work. The specialization elective courses within organizational behaviour/industrial relations prepare graduates to work effectively with others in today’s challenging environment. They provide opportunities to explore in greater depth, among others, issues in these areas: the impact of organizational structure on individual and organizational effectiveness; leadership; conflict management; decision-making; motivation; career management; diversity and stress. Specialization within organizational behaviour is compatible with careers in consulting, human resources, organizational design, and change management. In addition, the field can be effectively combined with other specializations. Faculty Schulich faculty in this specialization represent a broad range of backgrounds, interests and accomplishments in a field whose centrality to effective management practice and organizational effectiveness is increasingly recognized. Faculty members have attained a strong national and international reputation through scholarly and business publications and through their teaching expertise. Area Coordinator Patricia Bradshaw BCom (Queen’s), PhD (York) Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Chris Bell BS (McGill), PhD (Duke) Assistant Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Ronald J. Burke BA (Manitoba), MA & PhD (Michigan) Professor Emeritus of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations David E. Dimick BA (St. Olaf), MA & PhD (Minnesota) Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Associate Dean, Academic Ingo Holzinger BBA (Bremen), MS (Paderborn. Germany), PhD (Wisconsin – Madison) Assistant Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Rekha Karambayya BSc (Madras), MBA (Indian Institute of Management), PhD (Northwestern) Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Robert G. Lucas BCom & MSc (UBC), PhD (Cornell) Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Gareth Morgan BSc (London), MA (Texas), PhD (Lancaster) Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Distinguished Research Professor Christine Oliver BA (Queen’s), MBA & PhD (Toronto) Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Henry J. Knowles Chair of Organizational Strategy Hazel Rosin BA (Haifa), MSW (Wilfrid Laurier), MPhil & PhD (Yale) Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Eleanor Westney BA & MA (Toronto), MA & PhD (Princeton) Scotiabank Professor of International Business Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations Lorna Wright BA (Wilfred Laurier), MA (Essex, England), MIM (Thunderbird), PhD (Western) Associate Professor of International Business Elective Courses SB/OBIR SB/OBIR SB/OBIR SB/OBIR Management of Human Resources Labour Relations The Management of Change Organizational Behaviour in Cross-Border Business SB/OBIR 4500 3.00 Developing Management Skills SB/OBIR 4560 3.00 Conflict and Negotiations SB/OBIR 4950 3.00 Leadership Models in Literature and Legend 4200 4250 4350 4400 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

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S T R AT E G I C M A N A G E M E N T
Suite N305, SSB (416) 736-5087 The Strategic Management specialization aims to prepare future CEOs. The emphasis in this integrative specialization is on applying and synthesizing concepts and techniques from the various functional areas of accounting, finance, managerial economics, marketing, operations management, and organizational behaviour in the context of strategy making. Courses in this specialization aim to develop students’ ability to: 1) Identify and analyze critical threats and opportunities confronting an organization, 2) Make recommendations for the development and use of the firms’ recourses and capabilities to effectively respond to these threats and opportunities. Faculty Faculty members teaching Strategic Management offerings have a wide variety of back grounds and professional experience. In research, they are at the cutting edge of their fields. They have published books, numerous articles in prestige journals and won numerous awards and honors. Area Coordinator Theodore Peridis BSc (Athens), MA (Kent), MPhil & PhD (New York) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Co-Director, York Consulting Group Preet Aulakh BSc & MA (Punjab), PhD (Texas) Associate Professor of International Business and Pierre Lassonde Chair in International Business Director, PhD Program in Administration Ellen R. Auster BA (Colgate), MA & PhD (Cornell) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Director, Schulich Centre for Teaching Excellence (SCTE) Cyril Bouquet MBA (Ottawa), PhD (Western) Assistant Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Wesley Cragg BA Hons & MA (Alberta), BPhil & DPhil (Oxford) Professor Emeritus, Business Ethics Cross-appointed to Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts Andrew Crane BSc (Warwick), PhD (Nottingham) George R. Gardiner Professor of Business Ethics Professor of Strategic Management/Policy James L. Darroch BA & MA & PhD (Toronto), MBA & PhD (York) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Yuval Deutsch BA & MA (Hebrew), PhD (UBC) Associate Professor of Policy & Entrepreneurial Studies Moshe Farjoun BSc (Technion), MS & PhD (Northwestern) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy James M. Gillies, CM BA (UWO); MA (Brown), PhD (Indiana), Hon LLD (Simon Fraser) Professor Emeritus of Policy Dean Emeritus University Professor (York) Dezsö J. Horvath Eng (Malmö), MBA & PhD (Umeå) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Dean & Tanna H. Schulich Chair in Strategic Management Matthias Kipping MA (Paris-Sorbonne), MPA (Harvard), PhD (München, Germany) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Chair in Business History Stan Xiao Li PhD (University of Toronto) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Charles J. McMillan BA (PEI), MBA (Alberta), PhD (Bradford) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy and International Business Anoop Madhok B.Com (Calcutta), MBA (Cincinnati), MA (Johns Hopkins), PhD (McGill) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Dirk Matten Dipl.-Kfm. (Essen, Germany), Dr.rer.pol. (Düsseldorf, Germany), Dr.habil. (Düsseldorf, Germany) Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Hewlett-Packard Chair in Corporate Social Responsibility Rein Peterson BEng (McGill), MBA (Western), PhD (Cornell), PEng (NS) Professor Emeritus of Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise Willow Sheremata BSc (McGill), MSc (Toronto), MBA (Pennsylvania), MPh & PhD (New York) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Justin Tan Professor of Management Newmont Chair in Business Strategy Stephen Weiss BA (Lafayette), MA & PhD (Pennsylvania) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy and International Business Tom Wesson BCom (Queen’s), MBA & PhD (Harvard) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy H. Thomas Wilson AB (Tufts), MA & PhD (Rutgers) Professor Emeritus of Strategic Management/Policy Cross-appointed to Osgoode Hall Law School Brenda J. Zimmerman BSc (Toronto), MBA & PhD (York), CA (Ontario) Associate Professor of Strategic Management/Policy Director, Health Industry Management Program Elective Courses Economics of Business Management Economic Forecasting and Analysis Entrepreneurship & New Venture Creation Financing Growing Ventures Financial Management Introduction to International Business Business Ethics in Global Community (available only to BBA only) SB/MGMT 3030 3.00 Creating Global Capitalism SB/MGMT 4700 3.00 Project Management SB/MKTG 4550 3.00 Brand Management SB/OBIR 4350 3.00 The Management of Change SB/OBIR 4500 3.00 Developing Management Skills SB/OBIR 4560 3.00 Conflict and Negotiation SB/OBIR 4950 3.00 Leadership Models in Literature and Legend SB/OMIS 4560 3.00 Supply Chain Management SB/SGMT 4300 3.00 Strategic Thinking Skills SB/ECON 3200 3.00 SB/ECON 4210 3.00 SB/ENTR 4600 3.00 SB/ENTR 4700 3.00 SB/FINE 3100 3.00 SB/IBUS 3100 3.00 SB/IBUS 4950 3.00

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Course Descriptions
New courses may be created after this publication went to print. Students should consult the Schulich Web site and the online Lecture Schedule for the most recent information. AK/AS/ECON 1000 3.00 Introduction to Microeconomics An introduction to the principles and methods of economics, with emphasis on microeconomic theory. Topics will include the theory of markets, price determination and the theory of the firm. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Course Credit Exclusion: SB/INTL 1200 3.00 AK/AS/ECON 1010 3.00 Introduction to Macroeconomics An introduction to the principles and methods of economics, with emphasis on macroeconomic theory. Topics will include the theory of money and banking, the theory of international trade and finance and the economic analysis of such selected topics as unemployment, inflation and government budget policy. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Course Credit Exclusion: SB/INTL 1210 3.00 SB/ACTG 2010 3.00/2011 3.00 Introduction to Financial Accounting I and II NOTE: Successful completion of SB/ACTG 2010 3.00 is a prerequisite for SB/ACTG 2011 3.00. Students who have not successfully completed SB/ACTG 2010 3.00 will be withdrawn from SB/ACTG 2011 3.00. This two-course sequence develops students’ understanding of financial accounting information so that they can be informed and effective users of the information. The courses focus on uses of accounting information for different decisions and from different stakeholder’s perspectives, and consider the economic and behavioural effects that accounting treatments have on users and preparers. Readings from current publications are used to demonstrate practical applications of the issues discussed in class. Classroom techniques such as case studies, classroom discussions, student presentations and group and individual research projects (intended to develop students’ critical skills) are employed. Note: SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 is not available to exchange students visiting Schulich unless it is a full year exchange and SB/ACTG 2010 3.00 is taken in the fall. Course Credit Exclusion: GL/ECON 2710 3.00, AS/ECON 3580 3.00 SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 Management Accounting Concepts This course stresses the understanding of basic accounting concepts which underlie management decisions for performance appraisal, pricing, output, financing, investment and other purposes encountered in various organizational settings. Emphasis is placed on applying these concepts in case situations, rather than on technical aspects of management accounting. (Formerly: SB/ACTG 3020 3.00). Note: This course cannot be completed via the MBA program as a Guided Study course. Corequisite: SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: GL/ECON 2720 3.00, AS/ECON 3590 3.00 SB/ACTG 3000 3.00 Financial Reporting and Analysis Publicly-issued financial statements are “general purpose” statements, issued to a variety of users and prepared using generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). However, the statements are based on management’s financial reporting objectives (e.g., profit maximization; income smoothing; tax minimization) as well as on many management estimates and disclosure decisions. Statements based on GAAP do not usually reflect the needs of the individual user. In this course, students will learn to apply diagnostic, analytical and judgmental skills to understanding financial statements from the point of view of external users who need to make various types of decisions such as performance evaluation, loan decisions, and stock valuation. (Formerly: SB/ACTG 4950 3.00 or SB/ACTG 4250 3.00). Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 SB/ACTG 3110 3.00 Intermediate Financial Accounting I This course examines the concepts, objectives and techniques underlying asset valuation and income determination, including alternative asset measurement bases and accounting for changing prices. The course has a decision orientation. Special emphasis is placed on accounting policy choices and the criteria by which such choices are made, as well as on analyzing financial statements prepared under differing accounting policy alternatives. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: ACTG 2011 3.00; Year 3 BBA/iBBA standing required SB/ACTG 3120 3.00 Intermediate Financial Accounting II This is an extension of SB/ACTG 3110 3.00, but with a primary focus on the valuation and presentation of liabilities and owners’ equity. Major topics include current, long-term and contingent liabilities; leases; pensions; corporate income tax allocation; capital transactions; earnings per share and analysis of financial statements under differing accounting policies. The criteria by which both preparers and users make decisions are emphasized. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 3110 3.00 SB/ACTG 3700 3.00 Taxes and Decision-Making This course will allow students in Entrepreneurship, Finance, Strategy, Marketing, and Organizational Behaviour & Industrial Relations to appreciate the role of taxation for decision-making in their own fields. The conceptual framework developed in this course will allow students to analyze a broad set of personal and corporate tax problems in a systematic way. The business and personal tax implications of business decision-making are interdependent and must be considered simultaneously. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich.
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SB/ACTG 4160 3.00 Advanced Financial Accounting The final course in the three-course financial accounting core, this course emphasizes accounting for inter-corporate investments and for international activities. The application of accounting principles to case situations in specialized industries and nonprofit organizations is also stressed. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 3120 3.00 SB/ACTG 4200 3.00 Contemporary Issues in Accounting This course concentrates on the application of accounting theory to controversial issues in financial accounting. The topics covered vary with the changing importance of current accounting issues. Source materials include current accounting literature and the research publications of professional accounting organizations. The development of research, writing and analytical skills is emphasized. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 3110 3.00 SB/ACTG 4400 3.00 Managerial Cost Accounting and Analysis This course develops problem-solving skills for internal accounting applications. Topics include: cost concepts and analysis, cost accumulation for product costing and variance analysis, and cost analysis for decisions involving alternatives. Cases and problems are used. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 SB/ACTG 4450 3.00 Management Accounting and Control Systems This course focuses on the theory and practice of the design and administration of management planning and control systems. The point of view emphasized is management and organization theory. Theory and research literature are reviewed. Cases of actual company systems are used. A research project may be required. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 SB/ACTG 4600 3.00 Auditing Standards and Applications This course focuses on the standards and applications underlying the latest function and the responsibilities of external and internal auditors. The theory of audit evidence and certain basic techniques are used to provide an understanding of auditing methodology. The auditor’s responsibility beyond the financial audit and current developments in auditing are also examined. Students may be expected to complete a research paper or project. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 3120 3.00 and Year 4 BBA/iBBA standing. Students who were on exchange in Year 3 may take ACTG 3120 3.00 and ACTG 4600 3.00 concurrently.

SB/ACTG 4610 3.00 Advanced Auditing This course extends students’ knowledge in the area of auditing by examining the role of the profession in society today, evaluating current issues facing auditors, and building on their understanding of the general audit frame work and its fundamental theories. It also examines specific audit topics such as comprehensive auditing, audit of not-for-profit organizations, environmental auditing and small business audits. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 4600 3.00 SB/ACTG 4620 3.00 Auditing Information Systems This course is designed to introduce and enhance the students’ knowledge about the topic of auditing in computerized environments. Specifically, this course will focus on issues like information system concepts, audit and control risks, and implementation and evaluation of security and controls. The course will also focus on the impact of the rapidly changing IT environment on the audit function and the tools available, including professional standards to cope with such change. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 4600 3.00 Recommended: SB/OMIS 4710 3.00 (or equivalent) SB/ACTG 4710 3.00 Introduction to Income Taxation The basic concepts and techniques of income taxation and applications to personal and corporate contexts are examined. Emphasis is placed upon accounting applications. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 3120 3.00 and Year 4 BBA/iBBA standing. Students who were on exchange in Year 3 may take ACTG 3120 3.00 and ACTG 4710 3.00 concurrently. SB/ACTG 4720 3.00 Advanced Income Taxation A continuation of SB/ACTG 4710 3.00, this course concentrates in greater detail on the taxation of business income. Note: Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisite: SB/ACTG 4710 3.00 SB/ECON 2000 3.00 Applied Macroeconomics This course provides students with an overview of the aggregative performance of the economy with emphasis on policy application and implications for business. Topics discussed include the determination of key macroeconomic variables such as real GDP, the inflation rate, the unemployment rate, interest rates and exchange rates and the effect of government monetary and fiscal policies. (Formerly: SB/ECON 3000 3.00). Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. Prerequisites: AS/ECON 1000 3.00 and AS/ECON 1010 3.00 Course Credit Exclusions: AK/AS/ECON 2400 3.00 and AK/AS/ECON 2450 3.00

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SB/ECON 3200 3.00 Economics of Business Management Application of economic theory to provide guidance for business managers and to facilitate complex decision making in an environment of risk and uncertainty. This course is concerned with the firm’s competitive positioning and as such is designed as an integrative course to integrate into economics a variety of concepts from marketing, finance and accounting. Topics include firms’ boundaries; horizontal and vertical integration; market and competitive analysis; pricing decisions, advertising and promotional decisions; product quality and competitive strategy; and investment decisions. Prerequisite: AS/ECON 1000 3.00 or SB/INTL 1200 3.00 Course Credit Exclusions: AS/AK/ECON 2300 3.00, AK/ECON 3411 3.00 SB/ECON 3510 3.00 Applied International Economics This course examines international economics from the viewpoint of the firm and the nation. International trade, foreign investment, tariffs, economic integration, the balance of payments, the foreign exchange market and the international system are among the topics studied. Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. Prerequisite: SB/ECON 2000 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: SB/INTL 2200 3.00, AS/ECON 3150 3.00, AK/ECON 3570 3.00, AK/ECON 3479 3.00, AK/ECON 3570 3.00, and 3580 3.00, AK/ECON 4070 3.00, AS/ECON 4190 3.00, GL/ECON 4290 3.00. SB/ECON 4070 3.00 Natural Resource and Environmental Economics This course will cover the principles of natural resource and environmental economics. The emphasis is on models developed in non-renewable resources (oil, gold, copper etc.) and renewable resources (fisheries and forests). As the environment is becoming a growing concern to consumers as well as producers, emphasis will be placed on the management of natural resources in an environmentally conscious manner. Prerequisite: AS/ECON 1000 3.00 and AS/ECON 1010 3.00 or SB/INTL 1200 3.00 and SB/INTL 1210 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: ES/ENVS 4510 3.00 SB/ECON 4210 3.00 Economic Forecasting and Analysis An increasing number of organizations make explicit forecasts of the economic environment within which they will be operating as a basis for forward-looking plans. This course assesses the main forecasting methods in relation to the length of the forecasting time horizon. Several systematic appraisals of past forecasts are reviewed. Prerequisite: SB/ECON 2000 3.00 or SB/INTL 1200 3.00 and SB/INTL 1210 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: AS/AK/ECON 3210 3.00 SB/ECON 4220 3.00 Macroeconomics and the Supply Side Increasingly, governments are using fiscal, monetary and industrial policies to achieve major national goals. This course emphasizes economic theory and quantitative evidence to investigate the effects of such government policies on Canada’s international competitiveness. Attention is given to corporate strategies which respond to government initiatives and changes in the global marketplace. Prerequisites: SB/ECON 2000 3.00 or SB/INTL 1200 3.00 and SB/INTL 1210 3.00 and SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 or SB/OMIS 2000 3.00 SB/ECON 4600 3.00

Economic Evaluation of Health Care Programs This course examines Canadian Health Care system within a Global context. Specifically, it focuses on economic returns and the effects of health policy on the quality and life. The objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of health from the economics and management perspectives, and to equip students with analytical tools and techniques to undertake systematic economic evaluation of health programs and policies. Prerequisites: AK/AS/ECON 1000 3.00 and AK/AS/ECON 1010 3.00 or SB/INTL 1200 3.00 and SB/INTL 1210 3.00 SB/ENTR 4600 3.00 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate settings. The focus will be on content and process questions, as well as on formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures. This is an intensively interactive capstone course that applies and synthesizes concepts and techniques from the functional areas of accounting, finance, managerial economics, marketing, operations management, and organizational behaviour in the context of new venture development. The course is centered on the creation of a detailed business development plan. Note: Open to 4th year BBA/iBBA students only. SB/ENTR 4700 3.00 Financing Growing Ventures This course engages a range of topics central to the private equity world including the challenges of fundraising, the perspectives of institutional investors, evaluating investment opportunities, structuring deals, monitoring investments and exiting investments. SB/ENTR 4800 3.00 Social Entrepreneurship Social entrepreneurship refers to social innovation and betterment through entrepreneurial solutions. This course helps students understand “pro-poor”, for-profit and non-profit social enterprise, and addresses strategies for creating successful social enterprises of various kinds. To help students develop relevant skills, the course incorporates an applied project aimed at facilitating for-profit social entrepreneurship in local communities. SB/ENTR 4950 3.00 Managing the Family Enterprise In a family business, three constructs interact: the business system, the family system and the ownership system. Development stages, success factors and business strategies, challenges of succession, governance processes, shareholder agreements, family meetings and conflict resolution mechanisms will be examined.

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SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Introduction to Finance Students learn about investment and financing in this course. The investment decision allocates scarce resources to projects in the organization, and involves asset valuation, capital budgeting, risk management, working capital management and performance assessment. The financing decision chooses sources of cash to finance the investment decisions and involves capital structure, financial instruments, the risk-return trade-off, financial planning and the cost of capital. Ethical considerations and management in the global context are integrated into these topics. Course Credit Exclusion: AS/ECON 4400 3.00 SB/FINE 3100 3.00 Financial Management In this course, students develop their knowledge and skills as financial managers. The course includes both the study of financial management theories and the analysis of business cases. Building on the basics of financial management introduced in SB/FINE 2000 3.00, the course covers capital structure decisions, dividend policy, working capital management, and capital budgeting, business valuation, mergers and acquisitions and risk management. Prerequisite: SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: AS/ECON 4400 3.00, AS/ECON 4420 3.00 and AS/ECON 4410 3.00 SB/FINE 3200 3.00 Investments This course surveys major investment problems. Factors affecting the term structure and risk structure of yields on financial claims are identified and analyzed. Stress is placed on modern capital asset pricing theory and the principles of personal and institutional portfolio management are developed. Valuation models for common stock prices are discussed. The institutional structure of the investment markets in Canada is viewed, with special emphasis on the role of security exchanges and the impact of institutional investors. Emphasis is placed on the efficiency of financial asset markets in adjusting to information entering the marketplace. (Formerly: SB/FINE 4200 3.00) Prerequisite: SB/FINE 2000 3.00 SB/FINE 3810 3.00 Fixed Income Fundamentals This course introduces the basic concepts and valuation techniques used in the bond market. The first part of the course covers bond prices and their relationship to the no-arbitrage condition, the term structure of interest rates and its estimation. The next part focuses on determination of present value of different cash flows, valuation of financial instruments and bond portfolio. Prerequisite: SB/FINE 2000 3.00 SB/FINE 4050 3.00 Personal Finance Students learn personal financial management both for professional work in the financial services industry and for their own families. Topics include goal-setting, budgeting, taxation, debt management, risk management, insurance, investment principles and practice, and retirement planning. Much of the course is based upon realistic problems and cases. Prerequisite: SB/FINE 2000 3.00
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SB/FINE 4150 3.00 Advanced Corporate Finance Building on the concepts, models and decision situations presented in SB/FINE 2000 3.00 and 3100 3.00, the course exposes students to more advanced, complex and specialized decision situations in the areas of corporate investment, financing, financial planning and financial management. Applications and case analyzes are important aspects of the course. Prerequisite: SB/FINE 3100 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: AS/ECON 4420 3.00 SB/FINE 4400 3.00 International Financial Management Students will be introduced to the forces that determine exchange rates, the measures and management of currency exchange and interest rate risks through financial instruments such as currency options, forwards, futures and interest and currency swaps. Students will discuss broad-sweep topics of general interest through in-class group presentations. The emphasis will be on the theory and practice of treasury risk management in today’s increasing global financial markets. Prerequisites: SB/ECON 3510 3.00 or SB/IBUS 3100 3.00 or SB/INTL 2200 3.00; and SB/FINE 3200 3.00 SB/FINE 4700 3.00 Management of Canadian Financial Institutions This course is designed to prepare managers for the newly developing financial services industry. The initial part of the course provides the conceptual background for a broad view of the management function in financial services. The second part of the course develops a generic set of tools for managing return and the various kinds of risk facing managers in this industry. The final part reviews recent adventures and misadventures of industry sectors, including: financial regulators, central and chartered banking, trust companies, mortgage loan companies, credit unions and caisse populaires, investment bankers, property and casualty insurers, life insurers and investment funds. Near- and long-term market-size factors are considered, including demographics, foreign competition in the Canadian market, as well as the opportunities and threats facing Canadian institutions that venture abroad. Prerequisite: SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: GL/ECON 3380 3.00 SB/FINE 4800 3.00 Options, Futures and Other Derivative Securities This course explains the way in which derivative securities such as options, futures contracts, forward contracts, swaps and interest rate caps can be valued. It discusses arbitrage relationships, risk neutral valuation, the creation of options synthetically, numerical procedures and the evaluation of credit risk. Prerequisites: SB/FINE 2000 3.00, SB/FINE 3100 3.00, SB/FINE 3200 3.00 and SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 or SB/OMIS 2000 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: AS/ECON 4410 3.00

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SB/IBUS 3100 3.00 Introduction to International Business This course provides a broad coverage of the essential elements of international business. Topics covered include: international business patterns; cross-cultural systems affecting the conduct of international business; theories of international business; international financial institutions; multinational corporations; and functional management and operational concerns. (Formerly: SB/IBUS 4400 3.00). SB/IBUS 4950 3.00 Business Ethics in a Global Community The course is designed to introduce business students to the relevance and importance of ethics and social responsibility in international business management. Important learning objectives are to increase students’ awareness and understanding of ethical issues in international business, and to provide students with useful conceptual tools to guide analysis and decisions. Particular emphasis will be placed on maintaining managerial relevance by blending concepts in the disciplines of management, law, cross-cultural theory, and ethics with readings and cases. The ultimate intent of the course is to leave students better equipped to identify, think critically about, and resolve ethical issues that are encountered in one’s working life at the individual, organizational, and societal levels. Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. SB/INTL 1200 3.00 Microeconomics for Managers This course provides students with analytical tools useful for dealing with microeconomics from a manager’s perspective. The course focuses explicitly on the application of economic concepts and theories, including market behaviour, price determination, and theories of competition. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Course Credit Exclusion: AK/AS/ECON 1000 3.00 SB/INTL 1210 3.00 Macroeconomics for Managers This course provides students with an overview of the aggregative performance of the economy with emphasis on policy application and implications for business. Topics discussed include the determination of key macroeconomic variables such as real GDP, the inflation rate, the unemployment rate, interest rates, and the effect of governments’ monetary and fiscal policies. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Course Credit Exclusion: AK/AS/ECON 1010 3.00

SB/INTL 1300 3.00 Organizational Behaviour Across Cultures The purpose of this course is to introduce students to organizational behaviour – a discipline that studies organizations and the individuals and groups within them. Furthermore, the course stresses the importance of developing an international perspective and crosscultural sensitivity to organizational behaviour issues. Interpersonal and group skills and new ways of dealing with issues ranging from ethical use of organizationally based power to technological change to workforce diversity are introduced. Through cases, exercises, and experiential activities, skills in stress management, conflict, leadership, motivation, and other work-related issues will be introduced. The central objective of the course is to create a knowledge base from which students can develop organizational competence. The course is grounded in an assessment that the changing demands on managers imply a need for intellectual flexibility and an increasingly broad range of managerial skills. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Course Credit Exclusion: SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 and SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00 SB/INTL 2200 3.00 International Economics This course examines international economics from the viewpoint of the firm and the nation. International trade, foreign investment, tariffs and other trade barriers, economic integration, the balance of payments, the foreign exchange market, and the international monetary system are among the topics studied. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Prerequisites: SB/INTL 1200 3.00 and SB/INTL 1210 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: SB/ECON 3510 3.00 SB/INTL 3350 1.50 Applied Cross Cultural Management This course contributes to the development of knowledge and skills needed to manage effectively in different cultural environments and to work effectively with people from other cultures. The course uses the case study methodology to provide the student an opportunity to examine, in a real world context, the many cross cultural management issues that organizations and managers face in today’s global business climate. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. This course is not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Must be taken in conjunction with SB/INTL 3400 1.50. SB/INTL 3400 1.50 Business and Sustainability This course helps students understand how international businesses are re-aligning and re-inventing their corporate strategies toward more sustainable business models. Students can develop insights into cross-cultural approaches to sustainability and corporate social responsibility. The course also promotes understanding of how shareholder value can be reconciled with notions of “sustainable value added” – i.e., the preservation and creation of environmental and social capital and how sustainability strategy can create competitive advantage. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. This course is not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Must be taken in conjunction with SB/INTL 3350 1.50
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SB/INTL 3500 3.00 International Business Ethics This course develops students’ knowledge about the ethical issues facing corporations in their relations with different stakeholders in global economy. Dealing with a range of controversial business practices, such as outsourcing to sweatshops, polluting the environment, and paying bribes, the course outlines tools and frameworks for understanding and assessing such practices, and evaluating ways of managing international business ethics. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. This course is not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. SB/INTL 4100 3.00 Internship Abroad iBBA students who are able, on their own initiative, to find a summer internship abroad may be granted 3.00 credit-hours towards their degree. No more than 3.00 credit-hours of academic credit will be awarded for an internship, regardless of the internship’s length. Multiple internships (e.g., in successive summers) will not be awarded multiple credit. The course SB/INTL 4100 3.00 will count as a Schulich business elective. This course needs to be approved with signatures prior to the beginning of the term for which the internship is being registered and prior to departure. For students currently on Exchange, this approval can be facilitated, via e-mail, with a representative from Schulich’s International Relations Office. Approval for the internship must be obtained prior to the beginning of the term for which the internship is being registered. For iBBA students to enrol and obtain internship credit, there are several steps that need to be completed prior to departure and upon return before the work term will be recognized for degree credit: (1) Find a suitable site for a minimum 200 hour work term in another country and prepare a written proposal for either the Program Director BBA/iBBA Programs or the Associate Director BBA/iBBA Programs to review. The proposal should indicate where the internship is to take place (company name and country), the period of time, and an agreement of terms for submission of the final report upon completion of the internship, (2) An International internship will not be considered for academic credit unless proper pre-departure protocol, (including the signing of release forms, and a degree audit approved by an Undergraduate Academic Advisor) is fulfilled prior to departure. Students must meet with a representative from Schulich’s International Relations Office prior to departure in order for enrolment to take place. For students currently on Exchange, this can all be facilitated, via e-mail, with a Schulich International Relations Office representative, (3) Enrolment must be completed by the student and tuition paid prior to the beginning of the term for which the internship is being registered, (4) At the completion of the internship, the student must submit a written report to either the Program Director BBA/iBBA Programs or the Associate Director BBA/iBBA Programs with a letter of review from the employer addressing performance, before a letter grade can be assigned. Failure to comply will result in an F grade, (5) iBBA students who plan to complete SB/INTL 4100 3.00 in the summer between their 1st and 2nd year of study will still be required to complete all of their 2nd year degree requirements by the end of the summer session following their 2nd year of study. Therefore, to be promoted to Year 3, students who completed SB/INTL 4100 3.00 in the summer following Year 1, will be required to have 63.00 credit-hours (including SB/INTL 4100 3.00) completed before they commence the fall session of their 3rd year of study. Forms can be picked up from the Schulich International Relations Office (Room W263, SSB) or they can be found at www.schulich.yorku.ca/goinginternational, select “Internships and Specialized Courses”.
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SB/INTL 4400 3.00 Strategic Management for International Business This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of strategy and strategic management, and explores the task of developing, implementing, executing and monitoring an organization’s strategy, with particular focus on firms operating in international markets. The emphasis is on the kinds of problems and issues that affect the success of the entire organization. Examples are drawn from all sizes and types of organizations, although the majority of content and the cases discussed deal with profit-oriented enterprises operating the competitive global business environment. The course uses readings, lectures, case discussions and role playing to expose students to a wide range of concepts and to the many types of situations that face managers and bear directly on an organization’s ultimate success. Note: Not open to BBA students for credit. Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich. Effective Fall 2008, this course cannot be completed on Exchange. Prerequisites: All 3000-level iBBA core courses SB/MGMT 1000 3.00 Managing Contemporary Enterprise This course covers management concepts and theories on a wide range of topics (e.g. strategy, marketing, finance) all within a “Sustainability Mindset” highlighting the societal, economic and environmental context of contemporary business. It provides a solid foundation for helping students develop the general management skills (e.g. teamwork, decision making) required for succeeding in the dynamic workplace of the 21st century. SB/MGMT 1010 3.00 The Environmental Context of Management This course provides an overview of the major contemporary institutions and issues that, taken together, define the operating environment of Canadian business. Through lectures, tutorials, textbook and additional reading materials, the course will examine the societal, economic, political, legal, and international context of management. Degree Program Note: AS/POLS 1090 3.00 or AS/SOSC 1340 3.00 replaces this course for Delayed-Entry students only. SB/MGMT 1030 3.00 Business History This course helps students understand the historical forces that have shaped Canadian business and how they impact its present and future. The course traces the evolution of different business sectors, examines the emergence of management as a professional field, identifies the key stakeholders involved in these developments, and locates the position of Canadian business within a global context. In addition, the course content is used to emphasize critical thinking, analysis, reading and writing skills. Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. Course Credit Exclusion: AK/HIST 2110 3.00 (for BBA students only)

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SB/MGMT 1040 3.00 Applied Business Ethics This course introduces students to the ethical issues that relate to the profession of business. In recent decades, ethical issues clearly have become increasingly important to the smooth functioning of the marketplace in general and businesses in particular. Both the corporate community and the general public have demanded that those who have chosen business as a profession should have a better grasp of these issues and the logical and analytical skills to apply ethics to the business decisions that they make. This course is not available for iBBA credit. Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. SB/MGMT 2000 3.00 Quantitative Analysis for Management Decisions Through this course, students will develop their knowledge of quantitative techniques and their application to managerial decision making. Cases and decision situations will be based on knowledge that students have acquired throughout the 1st year of the BBA program, including analysis and evaluation of portfolio performance, financing plans (including operating leverage and financial leverage), investment analysis (including discounted cash flow analysis), and proposals based on marketing and sampling information. Students will be required to formulate and present a problem, analyze alternative approaches and possible outcomes, determine which analytical tools are appropriate, and develop a cogent recommendation. A wide-range of quantitative tools will be employed including logic, ratios, equations of lines, presentation of data, probability theory, descriptive statistics and statistical inference, regression analysis, forecasting, time value of money and financial ratios. Note: This course is not available for iBBA credit for the students who commenced the iBBA program prior to Fall 2006. Prerequisite: SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 SB/MGMT 3030 3.00 Creating Global Capitalism This course examines the role of firms and entrepreneurs in the creation of the global economy over the past two centuries. Based on a historical perspective, the course addresses many contemporary issues related to globalization: the opportunities and problems of operating abroad, the role of governments in attracting and controlling foreign investment, the contribution of multinationals to growth and prosperity. Prerequisite: Open only to students in Year 3 or Year 4. SB/MGMT 3100 3.00 Business Administration and the Law This course familiarizes students with basic legal principles relevant to business administration. Topics include: the Canadian judicial system; contract law; tort law (including professional negligence, defamation and product liability); forms of carrying on business (including sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations); agency and employment law; government regulation of business (including consumer protection, privacy, competition and environmental law); and intellectural property law. (Formerly: SB/MGMT 4200 3.00) Course Credit Exclusion: AS/ECON 4500 3.00, AS/ECON 4510 3.00, AS/POLS 3165 3.00, and AS/SOSC 3165 3.00

SB/MGMT 3200 3.00 Management Issues in the Nonprofit Sector This course serves as a general introduction to the nonprofit organization. It explores the historic roots and social, political and economic function of the nonprofit sector in Canada. It examines both the legal and policy environments in which nonprofit organizations operate, and the unique organizational structures and governance practices that are characteristic of this sector. Additionally, this course will examine the accounting, marketing, staffing and fundraising issues of the sector. This course will appeal both to students who intend to pursue careers in the nonprofit sector, as well as to students who will be involved with nonprofit organizations over the course of their careers (either as board members and volunteers, or because their work in government or in the private sector brings them into contact and partnership with nonprofit organizations). SB/MGMT 4300 3.00 Corporate Social Responsibility This course provides a comprehensive introduction to CSR by taking a distinctly global focus through readings and case analysis. The global focus not only reflects the main themes and issues raised in CSR debates, but also enables the student to appreciate the topic from the perspective of various regional settings. The emphasis is on providing a conceptual understanding of why CSR has become so important and a basic overview of how corporations have responded to this challenge. SB/MGMT 4700 3.00 Project Management This course prepares students to work on project teams. Students will learn the basic concepts of project management and will, through the use of software, be exposed to computerized methods for project management. In addition, students will learn the organizational and interpersonal aspects of project management. Topics include project strategy, time management and scheduling, risk management, cost management, and resource management. SB/MGMT 4950 3.00 Ethics in Strategy and Risk Management Strategy and risk management must be approached from a holistic and integrative perspective that includes ethics. The company’s value proposition and reputation are closely linked to ethical issues which have the potential to not only destroy the company’s reputation, but the very company. This course will develop a process for analyzing and resolving the ethical issues inherent in strategy and risk management. SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 Marketing Management This course examines the managerial problems involved in formulating and implementing marketing plans in business and non-profit enterprises. Emphasis is placed on the importance of buying behaviour in influencing marketing decisions. Each element of market responsibility, product development, pricing policy, promotional planning and relationships with marketing channels is examined. The course develops an understanding of the importance of an integrated marketing program and of the need to relate marketing to other departments within the enterprise.

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SB/MKTG 3100 3.00 Marketing Research This course develops a managerial appreciation of marketing research. The steps of the research project are delineated, from problem definition through research design, sample selection, data collection, analysis and presentation. The concepts discussed are integrated into the broader requirements of a marketing information system. A major term project is required. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/MKTG 4100 3.00 Marketing Communications This course explores management problems that arise when formulating, implementing and evaluating programs in the areas of advertising, selling and related sales promotional activities. The course sets forth a framework for formulating an internally consistent ‘communications strategy’ to meet particular marketing objectives. Frequent use is made of concepts from other disciplines, particularly the behavioural sciences. A variety of teaching approaches is employed, including analysis of case studies, discussion of readings and invited guest participants. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/MKTG 4150 3.00 Consumer Behaviour What do products and services mean to consumers? How do consumers decide what to buy? What are the effects of the social environment on purchases? This course examines these and other fundamental marketing concerns by blending contemporary theory and research with application to actual market problems. Recent contemporary theory topics have included low involvement buying, situation analysis and alternative explanations of consumer motivations. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/MKTG 4250 3.00 Retail Marketing Strategies Retailing is a cornerstone of marketing because it brings together the two most important players in business – buyers and sellers. In this course the student will learn and apply such topics as category management, service quality, customer satisfaction, relationship marketing, and retention marketing to solve problems confronted by marketers in this rapidly evolving industry. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/MKTG 4320 3.00 Tourism, Sport and Leisure Marketing This explores the tourism-sports-leisure (TSL) industry, one of the fastest growing sectors of the economy. Students will learn about unique strategic challenges of TSL marketing. In addition, expertise of the cultural, societal, and technological context of TSL production and consumption will be discussed to prepare students for jobs in this complex and competitive marketplace. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00

SB/MKTG 4321 3.00 Entertainment Marketing Using an effective combination of readings, class discussions, real world entertainment marketing cases, and guest speakers, this course develops a managerial and socio-cultural perspective on the marketing of entertainment. Attention is focused on analyzing the relationship between the global marketplace and entertainment business decision making; the determination of entertainment products, services, experiences, prices, channels, and communication strategies; and the firm’s overall system for planning and controlling its entertainment marketing effort. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/MKTG 4400 3.00 International Marketing This course satisfies two interrelated objectives: to improve the student’s marketing decision-making ability through the solution of complex multinational marketing problems; and to increase the student’s sensitivity to different cultural, socioeconomic and legal environments encountered in the international marketplace. The course uses readings, cases and a group project. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/MKTG 4550 3.00 Brand Management This course focuses on the role of products in the marketing mix. Topics include: planning and creation of new products, deletion of obsolete products and management of mature products in the product line. Instructional methods include lectures, case analysis and textbook discussion. Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/MKTG 4560 3.00 E-Commerce and the Art of High Tech Marketing This course presents strategic themes and issues often associated with success in the networked economy, highlighting how these differ from the fundamentals of old economy success. It provides students with an understanding of the different types of business models and the role of marketing in the networked economy. It offers guiding principles for dealing with increasingly technologically mediated customer interface and with new communications approaches possible in the networked economy. (Formerly: SB/MKTG 4960 3.00) Prerequisite: SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 Behavioural Components of Organizations This course provides an introduction to the study of organizations from a behavioural science frame of reference. The course emphasizes psychological and social approaches to understanding basic aspects of human behaviour in all types of work organizations. Topics include: the motivation to work, individual differences, leadership and authority, and group dynamics. As well as lectures and discussions, the course emphasizes experiential learning through the use of exercises, demonstrations, cases and projects. This course is not available for iBBA credit. Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. BBA students who commenced the program in Fall 2008 must complete SB/OBIR 1000 3.00 in the Winter term of their 1st year of study. BBA students who commenced the program prior to Fall 2008 must complete SB/OBIR 2000 3.00 during the Fall term of their 2nd year of study. Course Credit Exclusion: SB/INTL 1300 3.00, AK/AS/SC PSYC 3570 3.00

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SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00 Behavioural Problems and Issues in Organizations This course begins by considering the effects that “macro” variables such as structure, technology and the external environment have on organizational behaviour. The course also deals with common issues such as decision-making, communications, conflict and change in the context of organizational effectiveness. Lectures, cases and exercises are used in conjunction with selected readings. Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. BBA students who commenced the program in Fall 2008 must complete SB/OBIR 2010 3.00 in the Fall term of their 2nd year of study. BBA students who commenced the program prior to Fall 2008 must complete SB/OBIR 3010 3.00 during the Winter term of their 3rd year of study. Prerequisite: SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: SB/INTL 1300 3.00 SB/OBIR 4200 3.00 Management of Human Resources Employees are the most complex and critical of the resources organizations use. This course examines: the relationship between the overall management of the organization and human resources management (HRM), and the shared and complementary responsibilities of personnel specialists and other managers in effective HRM. Policies and practices affecting both HRM logistics (recruiting, selection, and training) and motivation (performance appraisal, reward systems) are included. Prerequisites: SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 and SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00, or SB/INTL 1300 3.00 SB/OBIR 4250 3.00 Labour Relations This course examines collective bargaining and union/management relations. Topics include: union development, growth and structure; management as a bargaining organization; the legal framework for collective bargaining; the bargaining process; conflict and conflict resolution; substantive issues in collective bargaining; contract administration and the grievance procedure; and public sector, white collar and professional unionism, and collective bargaining. Prerequisites: SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 and SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00, or SB/INTL 1300 3.00 SB/OBIR 4350 3.00 The Management of Change As the environment of many business and nonprofit organizations becomes increasingly complex and unstable, it is imperative that top managers be able to create a climate of flexibility and adaptability in their operations. Organizations must be able to undertake major change without destructive side effects to be truly successful. This course surveys the major methods available to the modern manager for effectively managing the process of change and creating a general climate in which needed changes are sought and welcomed throughout the organization. Prerequisites: SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 and SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00, or SB/INTL 1300 3.00

SB/OBIR 4400 3.00 Organizational Behaviour in Cross-border Business This course extends the basic frameworks and theories of Organization Behaviour into the context of international business, using fundamental OB concepts, including mind-sets and identities, interests and power, organizational roles and design, to enable students to work more effectively in terms of teams, leadership, motivation, negotiation, ethics, and organizational learning in cross-border business. Prerequisites: SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00 SB/OBIR 4500 3.00 Developing Management Skills This course provides basic instruction in, and extensive opportunities for, the practice of a number of personal and interpersonal skills of value to improving managerial effectiveness, including: stress and time management, presentation and meeting leadership skills, conflict management and negotiation skills, motivation, influencing others and effective listening. Classes are devoted primarily to experiential exercises; therefore, very little absenteeism is permitted. A high percentage of the grade is based on participation in class, and the remainder is based on real-world applications of skills covered in this course. Prerequisites: SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 and SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00, or SB/INTL 1300 3.00 SB/OBIR 4560 3.00 Conflict and Negotiation This course is designed to help students understand the theory and practice of negotiation, persuasion, and group decision making in the workplace and to help them become more comfortable and confident with the negotiation process. The course will provide participants with an opportunity to develop skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks. Considerable emphasis will be placed on role-playing exercises and case studies. Prerequisites: SB/OBIR 1000/2000 3.00 and SB/OBIR 2010/3010 3.00, or SB/INTL 1300 3.00 SB/OBIR 4950 3.00 Leadership Models in Literature and Legend This course examines the phenomenon of leadership in business and public life. Contemporary thinking on selected aspects of leadership will be illustrated using the work of famous writers including Shakespeare, Orwell, Dorothy Parker, Joan Didion, and Vaclav Havel. Film will supplement the basic readings. The course will also examine the leadership profile of historic figures, e.g., Henry V, Sir Ernest Shackleton, Raoul Wallenberg and Martin Luther King Jr. SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 Statistics for Management Decisions This course will present the elements of basic statistics, probability and statistical modelling. Specifically, it covers statistical measures such as averages (mean, median, mode), measures of dispersion for univariate and bivariate data, and graphical representations. The basic rules of probability covering marginal, joint, and conditional probabilities, and some of the standard probability distributions are presented. The course also covers the basics of regression analysis, and time series modelling. (Formerly: SB/MGTS 1000 3.00 or SB/MGTS 2000 3.00) Course Credit Exclusion: SB/OMIS 2000 3.00, AS/AK/SC MATH 2560 3.00 (see online course description for a list of additional course credit exclusions), AS/MATH 2565 3.00
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SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 Management Science Modelling and Analysis This course examines a broad range of concepts using management science models, particularly as they pertain to production and operations management. The course emphasizes techniques, but also strives to convey an appreciation of how these techniques can be used to solve problems in operations and planning. Prerequisites: SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 and SB/MGMT 2000 3.00 SB/OMIS 3670 3.00 Spreadsheet-Based Decision Support Systems Decision support systems (DSS) are intelligent information systems that are used to extract data from various sources, provide interfaces and processing methods, and derive meaningful decisions there from. By combining Excel with its built-in programming language, VBA, this course shows how to create spreadsheet-based DSS and demonstrates how to successfully integrate them into actual business applications. No prior VBA background is required. Prerequisite: SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 Course Credit Exclusion: SB/OMIS 4660 3.00 SB/OMIS 3730 3.00 Database Management with Microsoft Access Database Management Systems are computer-based systems used by organizations to manage the vast amount of data that accompany daily operations. This course provides an applied introduction to database management systems and their use in the business environment. The course covers the fundamentals of database analysis and design as well as provides a hands-on experience in designing and building databases using Microsoft Access. Specific topics covered include the role of database systems, the relational database model, and entity-relationship diagrams, as well as applied skills such as formulating queries, designing forms, and creating reports in Microsoft Access. At the end of the course you will be able to design and build a fully operational database to support the management of any business operation. Course Credit Exclusion: AK/AS/SC/CSE 1550 3.00 SB/OMIS 4000 3.00 Models and Applications in Operational Research This course surveys selected topics in Operational Research (OR). Emphasis is placed on the practical application of OR tools rather than on the mathematical properties. Application areas include: financial planning and portfolio selection, production, priority planning and marketing. Topics include: linear programming and its applications, programming to achieve a set of goals or targets with applications in finance and production, capital budgeting and project selection, transportation and network models, and portfolio models.

SB/OMIS 4200 3.00 Quantitative Business Research and Analysis The course seeks to sharpen students’ analytical skills and improve their understanding of modern analytical methods. It employs a mixture of lectures and cases. The lectures examine quantitative methods with applications in all areas of business. They include topics in model building and forecasting, experimental and sampling design, time series analysis, econometric modelling and multivariate methods. The cases apply these methods to contemporary real-world problems and issues. They are drawn mainly from the Canadian environment in such diverse areas as insurance, assessment and valuation of real estate, measurement of television and radio ratings, disposal of credit applications and setting of credit limits, industrial quality control, energy requirements, population trends etc. SB/OMIS 4550 3.00 Inventory Management This course explores practical methods for planning and controlling inventories that can be understood and implemented by managers. Inventories are studied as a component of total business strategy. Specific topics include: statistical forecasting procedures and their evaluations, the nature of production and inventory systems, scheduling and planning of aggregate production, workforce and inventories, and the design of operational decision systems for transmitting aggregate policy decisions consistently to the level of the individual stock keeping unit. SB/OMIS 4560 3.00 Supply Chain Management Supply chain management is an important concept underlying the strategy and operations of virtually all firms that manufacture and/or distribute products. The torrid pace of improvements in information technologies made supply chain management both possible and at the same time more complicated. This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the fundamental trade-offs involved in designing and operating supply chains. Prerequisites: SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 and SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 SB/OMIS 4670 3.00 Web Enabled Decision Support Systems Decision support systems (DSS) are intelligent information systems that can be used to extract large quantities of data from a database, provide interfaces and methods to effectively process it, and derive meaningful decisions of managerial/economic significance from it. This course demonstrates how to create web-enabled DSS using some of the most widely used information technology tools (Microsoft Access, Visual Studio, VB, NET, ASP.NET, IIS) and shows how to successfully integrate them into actual business practice. To accomplish this, the course covers three basic components: (1) An overview of the principles of good DSS design and of the role of Access databases in this design. (2) A detailed introduction to the VB .NET and ASP .NET programming languages used for designing both desktop-based and web-based DSS environments. (3) The “web-enabling” of several DSS applications through the demonstration of selected business case studies. People possessing the ability to develop web-based DSS applications are invaluable to the growing number of companies using enterprise resource planning (ERP) packages and investing in data warehousing. This course demonstrates how business graduates can readily fill this critical role in society’s exploding information revolution.

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SB/OMIS 4710 3.00 Information Systems This course introduces students to the management issues, concepts and terminology associated with information systems technology. With its focus on management issues, this course is of interest to students with either a technical or a non-technical background. Issues discussed include: The role of computers in modern organizations; data models and their relation to organization models; systems development processes; and systems theory. Students will learn to recognize opportunities for use of computer-based technology at strategic, tactical and operations levels; the technical and organizational problems generated by introducing new technology; and the long-term organizational implications of these decisions. SB/OMIS 4730 3.00 Systems Analysis and Design Information systems analysis and design refers to the process by which computer-based information systems are developed for organizations by systems analysts, designers, and users. It includes tasks such as studying the business to identify opportunities to apply new technology, surveying the requirements of people within the organization, creating the blueprint for the new system, and implementing the new system in the organization. In this course students learn both the theoretical foundations and the applied skills involved in systems analysis and design. Hands-on work includes applying popular analysis techniques like Data Flow Diagrams and UML using commercial software, and analyzing and design an information system for a term project. The skills learned in this course will be invaluable for a business analyst, systems analyst, or management consultant positions. Course Credit Exclusion: AK/ITEC 2010 3.00 SB/PROP 4950 3.00 Real Estate Finance This course provides an understanding of the fundamental tools and techniques of financial analysis used when making decisions to borrow, lend, invest in, or manage real property assets. Set within an overview of the real estate industry that provides some important institutional characteristics of the industry, the course focuses on applied analytical approaches and methodologies that are transferable to many different problem areas. Topics include methods of evaluation and appraisal, risk assessment, discounted cash flow analysis, mortgage calculations, taxation, use of leverage, debt and deal structuring, and portfolio investment. SB/PUBL 4000 3.00 Business and Government This course covers the process of public policy formulation and governmental planning and programming. Particular study is given to business-government relations in Canada. Through readings and case studies, this course will explore: (1) the structure and process of government; (2) the differences between managing in government and in the private sector; (3) the dominant values and concerns of government; (4) how public policy is developed and the role business can play in the process, and (5) mechanisms for businessgovernment interactions.

SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 Strategic Management This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of strategy and strategic management, and explores the task of developing, implementing, executing, and monitoring an organization’s strategy. The emphasis is on the kinds of problems and issues that affect the success of the entire organization. Examples are drawn from all sizes and types of organizations, businesses, not-for-profits, government agencies, and the third sector. Nevertheless, the majority of content and the cases discussed deal with profit-oriented enterprises operating in a competitive environment. The course uses readings, lectures, case discussions and role playing to expose students to a wide range of concepts and to the many types of situations that face managers and bear directly on an organization’s ultimate success. This course is not available for iBBA credit. (Formerly: SB/SGMT 4010 3.00) Note: Not open to iBBA students for credit. Effective Fall 2008 this course cannot be completed on Exchange by BBA Direct-Entry students. Exceptions may be made for Delayed-Entry students going on Exchange during their 4th year of study. SB/SGMT 4300 3.00 Strategic Thinking Skills This course combines the necessary strategic and analytical thinking skills for effective management. This course is about identifying, analyzing and articulating the key issues that impact organizations and applying the appropriate frameworks that can assist managers in reaching better decisions. Students use the frameworks and strategic analysis tools developed in SGMT 3000 and systematically apply them to real-life business situations. (Formerly: SB/SGMT 3300 3.00) Prerequisite: SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 or SB/INTL 4400 3.00 Schulich Guided Study 4900-Series Elective Courses Under guidance of a Schulich faculty member, individual students in Year 3 or 4 may undertake a special program of Guided Studies tailored to the mutual interests of the student and the faculty member. These studies are co-designed by the student and the faculty member in advance of start of the academic term. The student and faculty member must sign a Guided Study Form that includes: 1. the explicit learning objectives for the student, 2. an agreement on the most appropriate means of achieving these objectives, and 3. a means of assessment to demonstrate that the learning objectives have been met. Guided Study courses normally are supervised by a full-time (i.e. tenure-stream) faculty member. If the supervisor is a part-time or contract instructor, a full-time faculty member must co-sign the form. Guided Study courses should have a minimal overlap with courses that a student has previously taken and with courses that otherwise are available through normal course offerings. A student can take a maximum of 6.0 credit-hours of Guided Study courses for BBA or iBBA degree credit. Guided Study courses are coded as SB/XXXX 4900 3.00. The XXXX portion of the course code uses the functional area or program a faculty member is associated with, such as FINE 4900 3.00 or IBUS 4900 3.00. Not available to exchange students visiting Schulich.
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Scholarships and Financial Assistance
Students entering, continuing in or graduating from the Schulich School of Business BBA or iBBA programs are eligible for a range of financial assistance. Assistance programs sponsored by the government (OSAP), specific entrance scholarships and in-course awards given either by the University or faculty in recognition of scholastic achievement are just some of the options available. Additionally, a number of scholarships, awards and bursaries sponsored by generous donations from individuals, corporations and the Ontario government are available. In certain situations, students will find they have extenuating circumstances and cannot pay their fees on time. York may provide academic fee deferments and short-term emergency loans to support these situations. Students are encouraged to review this section and familiarize themselves with the help available. Notices of Schulich specific Scholarships (non-entrance), Bursaries, and Awards for the Fall term are communicated to students via the Schulich Lotus Notes system at the beginning of the Fall Term. Students apply online for Schulich Specific awards each September through the Schulich Student Portal. York University bursary and award applications are available online in September at www.yorku.ca/osfs/bursaries.shtml. Bursaries for international students are also available through York International. For more information, visit York International’s Web site, http://international.yorku.ca/, or telephone (416) 736-5177. * Please note that some of the postings in this section require that students must satisfy OSOTF residency requirements to apply. This reference is for bursaries and awards that received the support provided as matching funds by the Ontario Government. These postings are for students who have been Ontario residents for at least 12 months before starting their program. In addition, they must be either Canadian citizens or landed immigrants, and must be able to demonstrate financial need. Questions regarding financial aid can be directed to the Financial Aid Officer, Anne Caulfield at (416) 736-2100 ext. 30515, or to the Acting Assistant Director, Financial Aid, Amanda Barnes (Catharine Shewell will return from her maternity leave in February 2009) at (416) 736-2100 ext. 77979 in the Division of Student Services and International Relations, Scotiabank Suite, 2nd Floor, West Wing, Schulich School of Business.

PRESTIGIOUS ENTRANCE AWARDS
President’s Scholarship Value: $21,600.00 ($5,400.00 x 4 years)
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(no application required) Tanna H. Schulich BBA/iBBA Entrance Scholarship Value: $5,000.00 (5 scholarships available) plus a York University Entrance Scholarship In recognition of academic excellence and merit, Seymour Schulich has created the Tanna H. Schulich BBA/iBBA Entrance Scholarship. The scholarships are presented to incoming BBA/iBBA students who have demonstrated academic excellence. Recipients will have been active in their community and demonstrated leadership qualities either in school or through extracurricular activities. Edith Schulich Entrance Award Value: $5000.00 plus a York University Entrance Scholarship Awarded to an incoming BBA/iBBA student who has demonstrated both exceptional academic ability in their high school graduating year (88% or better) and can demonstrate financial need. OSOTF guidelines apply*. Steven K. Hudson BBA/iBBA Entrance Award Value: $5,000.00 plus a York University Entrance Scholarship Awarded to a 1st year BBA/iBBA student who has achieved first class standing in the senior year of high school, has shown strong entrepreneurial achievements, and financial need. OSOTF guidelines apply*. Nissan Canada Leadership Entrance Award Value: $3,125.00 plus a York University Entrance Scholarship, if eligible Awarded to an incoming Schulich School of Business BBA/iBBA student who demonstrates academic excellence. OSOTF guidelines apply*.

Awarded to Ontario secondary school students who present the highest entrance averages. There are over 18 awards available to all incoming Undergraduate York University students. The Global Leader of Tomorrow Award Value: $15,000.00 (renewable for up to 4 years of undergraduate study) Awarded to new international student applicants with outstanding academic achievement (‘A’ average or equivalent). Must demonstrate community service, achievement in the arts or sports, and excellence in other areas of individual endeavour. Preference is given where financial need is demonstrated. Must not have been out of full-time school for more than two years. Seymour Schulich BBA/iBBA Entrance Scholarship Value: $5,000.00 (5 scholarships available) plus a York University Entrance Scholarship In recognition of academic excellence and merit, Seymour Schulich has created the Seymour Schulich BBA/iBBA Entrance Scholarship. The scholarships are presented to incoming BBA/iBBA students who have demonstrated academic excellence. Recipients will have been active in their community and demonstrated leadership qualities either in school or through extracurricular activities.

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York University Renewable Entrance Scholarships Value: $500.00 – $12,000.00 (varies according to the student’s admission average) Effective with the 2006 academic year, the York University Renewable Entrance Scholarships are awarded to Canadian high school students applying to a direct-entry undergraduate program, who have completed their secondary school diploma with high academic standing. Scholarship values are as follows: $ 12,000 ($3,000 x 4 years) – final admissions average 95% and above $ 8,000 ($2,000 x 4 years) – final admissions average 90% – 94.9% $ 4,000 ($1,000 x 4 years) – final admissions average 85% – 89.9% $ 2,000 ($500 x 4 years) – final admissions average 80% – 84.9%

This scholarship cannot be held in conjunction with any other renewable entrance scholarship or a Continuing Student Scholarship. To renew these scholarships, recipients must maintain a minimum 8.0 GPA over a minimum 24.00 credits taken during the entire academic year (previous summer and fall/winter session). This scholarship can be held within the first four years of program of study (direct entry). No application is required. Students will be considered based on their final admissions average (final grades including prerequisites). Provost Awards Value: $1,000.00 Awarded to applicants who have graduate from a College of Applied Arts and Technology within the past three years and who present high academic standing.

PRESTIGIOUS ENTRANCE AWARDS

(Application required) Harry W. Arthurs Alumni Entrance Scholarship Value: $24,000.00 ($6,000.00 x 4 years) plus a York University Entrance Scholarship This award recognizes the achievements of past York President, Harry W. Arthurs. It is directed to an exceptional group of people, York graduates, whose children or grandchildren intend to carry on a tradition of studying at York. Applicants must be the child or grandchild of a York University degree holder; a minimum admission average of 90% on OAC courses (or equivalent); record of participation and leadership in extra-curricular student life. Awards of Distinction – Merit Scholarships Value: $2,000.00 plus York Entrance Scholarship These scholarships are awarded to applicants short-listed for the Awards of Distinction. Criteria include: outstanding academic record; participation in community and/or school; achievements in the arts or sports; excellence in other areas of individual endeavour. For a complete listing of Prestigious Entrance Awards, please consult www.yorku.ca/web/futurestudents/scholarships
Scholarships and Financial Assistance

Betty Jean & John Bankes Entrance Scholarship (1)/Alumni Award Scholarship (2)/Bruce Bryden Entrance Scholarship (1) Value: $32,000.00 ($8,000.00 renewable for up to 4 years, plus the cost of residence for 1st year of approximately $4,000.00) These are York’s most prestigious entrance awards. Criteria include: outstanding academic record; participation in community and/or school; achievements in the arts or sports; excellence in other areas of individual endeavour. Awards of Achievement Value: $24,000.00 each ($6,000.00 x 4 years) This award is renewable for up to four years of undergraduate study and is renewed on the condition that a student is academically eligible to continue in an honours program and continues to demonstrate financial need. An Award of Achievement cannot be held in conjunction with the York University President Scholarship/ Award of Distinction or Visionary Leadership Award. It is awarded to a maximum of 8 applicants.

SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS AND BURSARIES FOR CONTINUING STUDENTS
Undergraduate students are the beneficiaries of many privately funded scholarships. Donors have recognized the importance of supporting not only the academic excellence of the program, but also the opportunity to maintain a continuing link with the graduates of the program. In some cases, donors have also provided bursary support to permit students who may otherwise have had difficulty in continuing with their full-time studies. The following list briefly identifies the qualifications required of continuing students to earn these awards. Ernst & Young BBA Award Value: $5,000.00 • • awarded to two 3rd year BBA/iBBA students academic excellence, demonstrated leadership in school, extracurricular activities or work, community involvement and financial need preference given to students who plan to pursue an accounting specialization OSOTF guidelines apply* application required

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HSBC President’s Award for iBBA Value: $3,750.00 • presented to the student with the highest academic standing after completion of the first 90 credits of the iBBA program • application is not required The Toronto Dominion Bank Bursary Value: $3,000.00 • 3rd or 4th year BBA/iBBA student • minimum cumulative GPA of B+ (7.0) • OSOTF guidelines apply* • application required YUFA (York University Faculty Association) Foundation Undergraduate Scholarships Value: $3,000.00 • this award goes to each of the top students in the Faculties of Arts, Pure and Applied Science, Fine Arts • Glendon, Osgoode, Atkinson and the Schulich School of Business • eligible students will have completed between 10 and 15 courses at York • achieved the highest CGPA (Cumulative Grade Point Average) in their faculty • will subsequently re-register at York to complete their undergraduate degree program • application is not required Issac Akande Scholarship Value: $2000.00 • awarded annually to a BBA, iBBA, MBA, iMBA student enrolled in 1st year who has been involved in extracurricular activities within the Black or wider community • the recipient will have demonstrated academic excellence and financial need • application required Cambridge Mercantile Foreign Exchange Essay Prize Value: $1,000.00 (first prize), $500.00 (second prize) • Cambridge Mercantile Corp. offers a first and second prize for research/white papers on topics related to the foreign currency exchange markets from students registered in Schulich MBA/IMBA and BBA/iBBA programs • the winning papers are selected by a Schulich School of Business panel and are posted on the Cambridge Mercantile Corp. Web site (www.cambridgefx.com) • a maximum of four prizes per year are awarded • essay and application form required Jack Goodfield Memorial Bursary Value: $1,000.00 • 4th year BBA/iBBA student • pursuing studies in Accounting • demonstrated academic excellence • demonstrated financial need • application required

Metropolitan Toronto Road Builders Association Scholarships Value: $1,000.00 each • award is given to two students entering their 4th year of the BBA/iBBA program • must achieve high academic standing in their 3rd year of study • application required Winchcombe Scholarship Value: $1,000.00 • top students entering 3rd and 4th year BBA/iBBA and 2nd year MBA • strong academic standing • application required The Thomas H. Beechy Award for International Exchange Value: $1,000.00 • 2nd or 3rd year BBA/iBBA student who intends to participate in the Exchange Study Abroad Program • minimum B (6.0) GPA in Schulich courses • demonstrated financial need • OSOTF guidelines apply* • application required General Motors of Canada Limited Bursary Value: $1,000.00 • student in BBA/iBBA or MBA program • demonstrated financial need • preference will be given first to disabled students and then to students who have undergone a personal hardship, such as the death of a parent, having the effect of putting them under financial strain • OSOTF guidelines apply* • application required Federation of Chinese Canadian Professionals Scholarship Value: $1,000.00 • award given to a 3rd year BBA/iBBA student • must demonstrate academic excellence • must demonstrate financial need • application required Nicholas Gareri Award Value: $500.00 • 1st year BBA/iBBA student • demonstrated financial need • OSOTF guidelines apply* • application required Discretionary Scholarships Value: $500.00 • two students from each of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th years of the BBA/iBBA program will receive this award • must demonstrate academic excellence (GPA of 7.0 or better) • must demonstrate financial need • application is not required Michael A. Katigbak Award Value: $500.00 • 1st year BBA/iBBA student • demonstrated financial need • OSOTF guidelines apply* • application required

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The Sam G. and Rose T. Reisman Award Value: $500.00 • awarded to an undergraduate student at any level • based on merit and a recognized academic achievement in his/her chosen area of study • preference is given to students with an affiliation with the Schulich School of Business • demonstrated financial need • Ontario resident • application required Class of ‘97 BBA Bursaries Value: $500.00 • • • • full-time BBA/iBBA student demonstrated financial need OSOTF guidelines apply* application required

Bruno Amadi Bursary Value: $300.00 • • • • • completion of at least one full year of study in the BBA/iBBA program minimum GPA of B (6.0) pursuing studies in Finance or Marketing OSOTF guidelines apply* application required

A.L. Tune Bursary Value: $250.00 • • • • 3rd or 4th year BBA/iBBA student demonstrated academic excellence demonstrated financial need application required

Gordon Charlton Shaw Bursary Value: $250.00 • • • • strong academic standing demonstrated financial need OSOTF guidelines apply* application required

The James Bray Bursary in memory of Mrs. Anne Bray Value: $500.00 • • • • BBA/iBBA student demonstrated financial need OSOTF guidelines apply* application required

Gordon Charlton Shaw Achievement Award Value: $200.00 • awarded annually to a 4th year BBA/iBBA student who has demonstrated academic excellence and has made a significant contribution to student life. Application required
Scholarships and Financial Assistance

Allen S. Berg Award for Excellence in Entrepreneurial Studies, in honour of Dr. Rein Peterson Value: $400.00 • awarded annually to a full-time 2nd year MBA/iMBA or 4th year BBA/iBBA student for high academic achievement in entrepreneurial studies • application required Michael Bond Memorial Scholarship Value: $400.00 • awarded to a 4th year BBA/iBBA student based upon academic achievement • student must demonstrate a special interest in the field of Operations Management and Information Systems or the field of Marketing • application required The Joshua Tan Memorial Scholarship Value: $350.00 • 4th year BBA/iBBA student with concentration in Finance • minimum cumulative GPA of B+ (7.0) • consideration will be given to one or more of the following: financial need, demonstrated compassion, a demonstrated sense of fairness and a distinguished contribution to volunteer service • application required Maritime Life Award Value: $300.00 • • • • • 3rd year BBA/iBBA student minimum cumulative GPA of 6.0 (B) demonstrated financial need OSOTF guidelines apply* application required

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Stanley L. Warner Memorial Award Value: $200.00 • • • • 3rd or 4th year BBA student demonstrated academic excellence extra-curricular involvement in the arts, sports, or community application required

Bernandine Nightingale Memorial Foundation Marketing Scholarship Value: $50.00 • • • 4th year BBA/iBBA student demonstrated academic achievement and interest in Marketing application required

Schulich Travel Bursary Value: Depends on the distance traveled, maximum amount $2,500.00 • • • • • compensation given to students for travel expenses to and from exchange sites must demonstrate financial need OSOTF guidelines apply* application, plane ticket, receipt from travel agent, and boarding passes required consult with the Schulich Financial Aid staff for estimated flight costs

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EXTERNAL AWARDS
External organizations offer various scholarships open to undergraduate students of the Schulich School of Business. External award notices are posted on the Schulich Web site. An external awards information page is available on the university Web site at www.yorku.ca/osfs/externalaw

YORK CONTINUING SCHOLARSHIPS
The York Continuing Scholarship is a scholarship that is awarded to students who maintain a high cumulative average from one year to the next. This is a scholarship that does not require an application. The Office of Student Financial Services will formulate automatically which students are eligible for the award and make the allocation according to a limited pool of money.

G R A D U AT I N G S T U D E N T A W A R D S
The Alan and Esther Hockin Achievement Award Value: $500.00 • awarded to a graduating BBA/iBBA student who has achieved the highest academic distinction • application is not required Alan S. Berg Prize for Excellence Value: $250.00 • • for academic excellence in the BBA/iBBA program and entrepreneurial studies application is not required Governor General Silver Medal Value: Medal • • • awarded to two graduating students in the final year of an Honours program at York University based on academic excellence application not required
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Jack F. Graydon Memorial Award Value: Book Award • awarded annually to a graduating BBA/iBBA student who has achieved the highest proficiency in marketing research and related courses application is not required

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Gordon Charlton Shaw Achievement Award Value: $200.00 • awarded annually to a graduating BBA/iBBA student who has demonstrated academic excellence and has made a significant contribution to student life application is not required

Murray G. Ross Award Value: Medal • • • named in honour of York University for scholarship and outstanding contributions to undergraduate student life application is not required

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B U R S A R I E S A N D F I N A N C I A L A S S I S TA N C E
There are two offices undergraduate students can approach for financial assistance: the Schulich Financial Aid unit as well as the Office of Student Financial Services located in the Student Services Building. York University remains committed to helping students and their families. York has brought together funds from various sources to increase the resources available for student support. After listening to the students, York has created new and flexible programs for making this aid available. York’s bursary program recognizes that students may need assistance to reach their goals – assistance that is based on their financial needs. Information and application is available at: www.yorku.ca/osfs/bursaries York University Undergraduate Bursary • • • • • the value of the award is variable and based upon financial need applications are available on the York Web site after the beginning of classes in September available to Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents or Protected Persons Undergraduate students are eligible to apply for the York Undergraduate Bursary, which is available online international students are eligible to apply for the Emergency Bursary Fund

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Service Bursaries Many students enjoy volunteering their time and participating in campus activities, but are hampered by their financial obligations. They cannot afford to give up time that could be spent earning money, even though this unpaid work will give them valuable experience for the future. To address this issue, York has developed the Service Bursary Program. Students are eligible, for a stipend of $2,000 (payable in four installments throughout the year) for participating for a minimum of 5 hours a week, throughout the Fall/Winter session. There are approximately 200 positions on campus. Positions are posted on the www.workopoliscampus.com Web site, after classes begin in September. (Available to Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents.)

Undergraduate Residence Life Bursaries Bursaries valued up to $1,000 are available to encourage students to make a valuable contribution to their residence community. Applications are available after classes begin. (Available to Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents). Ontario Work/Study Plan This year the Work/Study program will provide over 800 part-time positions on campus. This popular form of assistance helps students meet part of the cost of their education while providing valuable learning experience and employment-related skills. Work/Study supplements other government and University financial aid programs. To be eligible, students must demonstrate financial need. Details are available online at: www.yorku.ca/osfs/wrkstdy.shtml.

O N TA R I O S T U D E N T A S S I S TA N C E P R O G R A M ( O S A P )
Financial aid is available to students in the form of Canada and Ontario Student Loans through the Ontario Student Assistance Program. For information and to apply, the OSAP Web site is http://osap.gov.on.ca. General Information About OSAP The basic premise of OSAP is that it is intended to help students with education-related expenses and not to replace student or family financial responsibilities for post-secondary education. It is a need-based loan program. The Ministry of Education and Training has a set formula: they calculate costs and resources, and then they subtract the resources from costs. Need (the difference between the two) up to the provincial and federal maximums, will be considered. OSAP entitlement is comprised of two loans: a Canada Student Loan (from the federal government) and an Ontario Student Loan (from the provincial government). In order to be eligible for a Canada Student Loan, one must be a Canadian citizen or Landed Immigrant in Canada with a valid Social Insurance Number (it cannot start with a 9). In order to be eligible for an Ontario Student Loan, one must be living in Ontario for 12 consecutive months prior to the start of post-secondary studies. PLEASE NOTE: If students are in Ontario for less than 12 months at the start of postsecondary studies they will not become eligible for the Ontario Student Loan once 12 months have elapsed. To establish residency, students must be in Ontario for 12 months in a row before school starts. Students in Ontario for less than 12 months are eligible to apply for a Canada Student Loan entitlement. Loans are payment-free and interest-free as long as one is enrolled as a full-time student for every term of assessment. At York, to be considered a full-time student one must be enrolled in at least 9.00 credit-hours per term; one cannot average out the credits over the year. Changes in circumstances throughout the school year can affect OSAP entitlement for the year. Depending on the change, awards may increase or decrease. Changes such as increase or decrease in course load, increase or decrease in income, change of residence etc. can all affect entitlement. To ensure that any change in entitlement is not detrimental to post-secondary studies, consult with a representative from the Office of Student Financial Services in the West Office Building at York University prior to making any changes. For more information on OSAP for York University students contact: Student Financial Services Student Services Centre York University 4700 Keele Street Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 Tel: (416) 872-YORK Fax: (416) 736-5386 Web site: www.yorku.ca/osfs Procedural Information Pertaining To OSAP OSAP • Students applying for OSAP must remember to do so early. Students may apply online via the government Web site at http://osap.gov.on.ca. Applying online does not require a fee. For those students who apply for OSAP on a paper application, a $10.00 certified cheque must be attached to the application. • Students should apply for OSAP for the Fall prior to June 15, 2008. Remember it takes approximately six weeks for loans to arrive. • All loan documents are post-dated by the government to the first day of classes. • When negotiating student loans students must present their Social Insurance Card and photo identification. • To check whether your OSAP loan has arrived at the university, consult the financial document tracker at: www.yorku.ca/osfs/osap_trackingdocs • When loan documents arrive at the University, students need to pick up their documents from an area designated by the Office of Student Financial Services. Students will then take the documents to a designated Canada Post outlet, where it is then mailed to the National Student Loan Centre for processing. Out-of-Province Students For information regarding other provincial student loan programs, please consult the Web site of the provincial student assistance office. Out-of-province student assistance information and Web site links are available at: http://www.yorku.ca/osfs/outofprovince.shtml

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Student Life and Student Services: Schulich School
The faculty, management and support staff of the Schulich School of Business are dedicated to supporting the academic efforts of each individual student to realize his or her fullest potential. The School’s Division of Student Services & International Relations should be consulted on questions related to all aspects of study at the School. See the beginning pages of this publication for a complete listing of staff members and their responsibilities. For more detailed academic information on specific functional areas or programs, use the contacts listed at the beginning of this publication. Computing Services should be consulted on questions related to computing. The Career Development Centre should be consulted on questions related to career management. (See below.) Division of Student Services and International Relations The Division of Student Services & International Relations (SSIR) supports students in their pursuit of academic, professional and personal goals from the first contact with the school through to graduation. The division offers specialized services and facilitates linkages within the larger university community for Schulich students. The SSIR office is located in the Scotiabank Suite on the 2nd floor, West Wing of the Schulich School of Business. When dealing with the Division, it is important to talk to the appropriate person. See the ‘For Assistance and Additional Information’ list of staff members to contact. Office hours are: Monday – Thursday Friday* *Friday (June/July/Aug) Academic Advising and Planning The Undergraduate Programs Unit supports students’ pursuits in completing their academic requirements from the first contact with the school through to graduation. The Undergraduate Programs Unit provides help through various advising formats: all 1st year students are required to attend an extensive 1st year ‘Enrolment Appointment’, a ‘Mandatory Fall Advising Session’ and a ‘Winter Mandatory Advising Session’. Mandatory Advising Sessions for continuing students (Years 2, 3 and 4) are also conducted during the Winter term. The Undergraduate Programs Unit also provides help through individual appointments, e-mail, telephone, with regards to course planning/sequencing, and planning for Exchange. Students who need assistance with course-related matters should first approach the instructor in question or, if that is not practical, the Coordinator for the area in which the course is offered. In addition, students encountering personal difficulties that are interfering with their academic progress should meet with an Undergraduate Advisor located in room W262, Schulich School of Business at their earliest opportunity. 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Career Development Centre 2nd Floor, Suite N202 Schulich School of Business Tel: (416) 736-5080; Fax: (416) 650-4915 E-mail: career@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: www.schulich.yorku.ca Hours of Operation Business Hours (September to November and January to March) Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Business Hours (December, April and May) Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Summer Hours (June to August) Monday to Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. After hours appointments available by request. The Schulich School of Business views career management as a lifelong undertaking. To assist current students and graduates with this major commitment, the School offers a range of programs exclusive to Schulich students through the Career Development Centre (CDC). These activities permit individuals to identify career objectives, develop career plans and hone skills for career management. The Centre is staffed by professional counsellors who have relevant work experience. Although obtaining a rewarding position is ultimately each student’s own responsibility, the CDC professionals facilitate the process by providing the opportunities for candidates and employers to share information and assess one another. The CDC annually attracts Canadian, US and offshore companies to recruit full-time, internship and summer positions. Undergraduate Students have access to their own BBA/iBBA Career Manager, who will be the prime contact and liaison between students, student clubs and associations, recruiters and potential employers. Alumni job postings and support services are available after graduation. Career Development Program (CDP) The CDP is a program designed to prepare BBA/iBBA students to successfully pursue career opportunities. It includes training tools and resources, such as workshops and handbooks, events, programs and one-on-one counselling. The CDP is made up of six (6) Journey Maps – step-by-step outlines to guide training and preparation in critical skill and development areas: • Self Assessment & Skill Development (Career Leader – College) • Career Objectives • Personal Marketing • Development • Application Process • Career Progress There are four (4) key stages in preparation for pursuing career opportunities: 1. Education: Involves Students gaining basic information regarding Career Skills or Personal Development. 2. Development: Involves Students independently utilizing tools and exercises to reinforce basic Career Skills or Personal Development principles. 3. Experience: Involves Students gaining practical experience with Career Skills and Personal Development. 4. Contact: Involves Students coming in direct contact with Corporate Recruiters and Human Resources personnel through the recruitment process. Copies of the CDP are available on the Virtual Career Centre Web site.
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Rules for Using the CDC Services and Resources The CDC has developed a document outlining the expectations regarding the participation and personal conduct of students during the events and activities coordinated on their behalf. It also explains the consequences of any breach of the agreement, including the potential suspension of all Career Development Centre activities and privileges. This document is currently available in the Professional Guidelines section of the Career Portal and hard copies are available at the CDC office in room N202, SSB. Please review it at your earliest convenience. The CDC provides a comprehensive, self-help Web site listing upcoming recruiting events, workshops, jobs, related links and tips for career success. The Web site features an announcement board for upcoming events and resources specifically suited for BBA/iBBA students including: Vault industry and Corporate guides. Workshops The CDC offers a series of workshops on job search, self-assessment, resumé writing, interview techniques, networking and etiquette. Some of these workshops are conducted by professionals from various industries. Dates of these workshops appear on the CDC Web site, CareerQuest. Some sessions are specifically targeted to undergraduate students. Attendance to the workshop is required prior to getting access to individual counselling. Resources The CDC has compiled a wide range of resources in a variety of forms, including hard copy, video and Internet access. These are located in the Schulich CDC and the Peter F. Bronfman Business Library. Resources include: • a collection of books and videos for loan to develop job search strategies and to research management career opportunities • company videos, brochures and binders to help prepare for interviews • Interview Stream (an online interview practice tool) • salary data on Schulich graduates • corporate and industry profiles • Wet Feet Press and Vault Reports, Industry Corporate Guides • Goinglobal guides on internships & finding employment overseas Career Month A major feature of career planning and development is the Schulich Career Day held at the end of Career month each September. Career month is an opportunity for graduating and current students to meet with prospective employers to discuss career opportunities during career-related events. Workshops will help students prepare for the busy and crucial fall recruiting season. Senior management, human resource professionals and Schulich alumni represent the companies that recruit on campus. Additional program or industry specific recruiting events are planned throughout the year. Company Information Sessions A key component of career management is networking. Company information sessions offer students an opportunity to meet recruiters and determine if a particular company matches their personal career goals. Some sessions, however are only open to BBAs or MBAs. Information sessions begin in September and are posted on the CDC Web site, and on CareerQuest. Such sessions require business attire. Some events will have limited enrolment and all require registration online.

Industry Networking Breakfasts To keep the momentum going, each winter term the CDC hosts a series of industry specific Networking Breakfasts giving students the opportunity to network with top-notch professionals. Students can discuss challenges, career trends, opportunities and all other issues that are current in today’s workplace. All students must register online for these events as there is limited enrolment. Business attire is required for all events. CareerQuest CareerQuest is the online job search tool used by the CDC to enable students to view password protected jobs, conduct research, have access to a wide variety of job opportunities, submit applications electronically, and sign up for corporate information sessions, workshops and other events. Full-time, summer internship and part-time positions are posted on CareerQuest. To access CareerQuest, please visit www.schulich.yorku.ca > Careers > Students and Alumni Career Portal > Career Portal > CareerQuest Summary All our services and resources are available free of charge, providing you adhere to our Professional Guidelines. Alumni Association The Schulich International Alumni Association now has over 20,000 alumni with 80 Alumni Chapters worldwide. This large and important global network hosts a series of diverse networking events to foster business, professional and social contacts; to source internship and career opportunities for students worldwide; to provide support for students on exchange; and to offer innovative continuing education and executive development for Schulich Alumni. The Schulich online E-mail Alumni Directory (Schulich Net Directories) helps Alumni keep in touch with the School and with each other. For more information, visit the Alumni Relations Web site at www.schulich.yorku.ca/alumni.
Student Life and Student Services: Schulich School

Schulich Mentorship Program The Schulich Mentorship Program facilitates mentor relationships between Schulich alumni and current Schulich students. Students help to build their networks and give advice on career development, schooling, and achieving work-life balance. The Program is open to 3rd and 4th year BBA students, MBA students who have completed at least 5 courses, and to all accelerated MBA students. To enrol in the Program, students are required to fill out the online registration form, submit their resume and answer a few questions. For more information and to register, visit the Mentorship Web site at www.schulich.yorku.ca/mentorship or contact mentorship@schulich.yorku.ca. Computing Services Computing Locations/Hours Schulich School students have access to university-wide and Schulich-specific services in a number of locations: • Schulich Information Services and Technology General Office Room W354, SSB (416) 736-5824, option #2 Schulich Information Services and Technology Helpdesk Room W354A, SSB (416) 736-5824, option #1 Department of Information Services and Technology Prof. Ron McClean (416) 736-2100 ext. 77954
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•

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Schulich Helpdesk and Drop-In Computer Lab Hours Monday – Friday Weekends 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Printing • Use of the laser printers costs $0.10 per page and requires the use of the York Library photocopy card Anti-Virus • The University provides free Anti-Virus software. All students using University facilities to link personal machines to the internet are expected to install and regularly update virus protection • Computer advisors can provide details Schulich Software UNIX (phoenix): • Accessible from home, lab computers and laptops: - Kermit - GPSS - E-mail (UNIX-based) - Minitab - SAS - TeX - LaTeX - News - SPSSX - LISREL - MAPLE V Lab Desktop (SIRIUS): • MS Office XP Pro including Word, Powerpoint, Excel and Access • SAS • Netscape, Internet Explorer and Firefox • Netscape and Internet Explorer • Telnet • MS Project • FTP • SPSS • Lotus Notes • MAPLE • MATLAB • Visual Studio Lotus Notes-based Conferencing and Messaging System • Accessible from home, lab computers and laptops • available for collaborative work Online Training Documentation • Schulich students may download, copy and/or print online documents Sessions • Helpdesk staff are available for additional help for all Schulich students in Room W354, SSB

During the month of August, the hours for the Schulich Computer Lab may be reduced. Changes in hours will be posted. York University Client Support Services Computing Commons Lab, William Small Centre Counter Office Hours Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. – 5:15 p.m.

(416) 736-5800 online help: www.yorku.ca/computing E-mail: helpdesk@yorku.ca Fax: (416) 736-5830 Hours for Computing Commons Lab Monday – Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 8:00 a.m. – 10:50 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 7:50 p.m. 10:00 a.m. – 7:50 p.m. 12:00 p.m. – 10:50 p.m.

Connectivity Note: A passport York account is required to authenticate all University networks and internet resources. All registered students are provided with a Passport York Account: (http://www.yorku.ca/computing/students/accounts/index.html). Schulich School • a 24-hour PC laptop Connectivity Lab is available throughout the Schulich building through wall outlets or wireless connectivity • Schulich helpdesk staff in room W354A, SSB can provide details Microcomputers • HP P4 computers running WIN XP and MS Office XP, are located in Room S336, SSB and networked to the Internet and to local personal storage on SIRIUS, the Student File server. Online Library System • Every computing account has access to the York University online Library system called Yorkline Personal Computing Recommendations • For requirements beyond the minimum, contact the Executive Director of Information Services and Technology: Ron McClean, (416) 736-2100, ext. 77954; E-mail: rmcclean@schulich.yorku.ca • minimum personal laptop requirements include: - capability of connecting to the School’s network wired and/or wireless (8oz.11B/G) networks - Pentium 4 - 256 Mb RAM - 20 Gb (Gigabyte) disk - PCMCIA type II slot - 56 kb Modem - CD ROM • minimum personal desktop system configuration requirements include: - Pentium 4 - 256 Mb RAM - 40 Gb disk - SVGA - 28.8 fax/modem - CD ROM

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SCHULICH SERVICES
Lockers Availability A limited number of lockers are available to full-time students at the start of each term, on a first-come, first-served basis. Lockers are located in the basement of the Schulich School of Business close to the student clubs area. Fees/Payments • Rental fees vary depending on the term • All rental fees are non-refundable • Payment may be made by VISA or MasterCard Locks • Locker combination codes are reset each August and reassigned every fall Note: The Schulich School of Business will not assume any responsibility for items stolen or damaged in assigned lockers. All lockers must be cleaned out by July 31. Any materials left in the lockers after this date will be removed and discarded. The Trading Floor The Trading Floor, is Schulich’s retail store for Schulich logo merchandise. It is located on the main floor of the Schulich Building adjacent to the CIBC Market Place and across from Timothy’s coffee shop. The store includes clothing, gift items and some convenient items targeted at out student population and Schulich faculty and employees. Phone number: (416) 650-8254 Coffee Shop/Pub Tuchners Located in the lower level of the Schulich School of Business, Tuchners offers a place to relax, meet groups and purchase a variety of food and beverages. Tuchners is open: Monday-Thursday 11:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. Friday 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday closed May-August closed Phone number: (416) 736-5846 Timothy’s Café Located on the main floor of the Schulich School of Business, in the CIBC Marketplace. Timothy’s is open: Monday-Thursday 7:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday 7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Open Sunday for scheduled classes Phone number: (416) 650-8300 Library Services The Peter F. Bronfman Business Library, located on the second floor of the Schulich School of Business, provides access to a comprehensive collection of print materials and an outstanding collection of electronic marketing, financial, company, industry, full-text articles/newspapers and numeric databases. Off campus access to most of the electronic resources is available to students 24/7. Research support is available in person, via e-mail, IM chat and phone. For complete information see: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/BG/index.htm Students have access to four other York University Libraries: Scott Library (humanities and social sciences), Steacie Science and Engineering Library, Osgoode Hall Law School Library and the Leslie Frost Library located on the Glendon Campus. York University students are entitled to reciprocal borrowing privileges at many other Canadian University Libraries. For more information see: http://www.library.yorku.ca/ccm/jsp/hompage.jsp York University Libraries provide a full range of services to students with special needs such as adaptive equipment, facilitated services for library materials retrieval, etc.

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SCHULICH STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Schulich Ambassador Program In addition to the support that the Undergraduate Programs Unit provides for students in the classroom, the Undergraduate Programs Unit has developed the Schulich Ambassador Program. The Schulich Ambassador Program is an opportunity for undergraduate BBA/iBBA students to become involved with the Schulich Community while developing essential leadership skills necessary to be successful in the global marketplace. Through participation in various recruitment events, transitional activities and projects that help students strive towards personal excellence, the Schulich Ambassador Program is designed with the intention to help students meet its basic objective: Becoming an Inspiring Leader. For more information on this program, please contact undergrad@schulich.yorku.ca. Undergraduate Business Council (UBC) Web site: www.ubc.schulich.yorku.ca The Undergraduate Business Council (UBC) is the official student government of the Schulich School of Business. As the governing body, our mission is to represent our undergraduate students on a social, academic, and professional level. The UBC’s fundamental purpose is to enhance our undergraduate students’ university experience by instilling a sense of identity and involvement with their peers, the faculty and the Schulich community. Feel free to stop by and visit us at the UBC office located on the main floor of the Schulich School of Business, room W140C or check out our Web site. Student Clubs and Activities We have an abundance of extracurricular activities planned for the upcoming academic year. It is these activities that differentiate the Schulich School of Business from the rest of the business schools across Canada. We have many student-run clubs that help promote our school’s reputation, abilities, and initiative. We believe that the reason for getting involved in our student clubs is threefold. First, you gain the opportunity to develop professional skills and contact that will help you succeed in the business world. Second, you get the opportunity to meet older students or students of your own age that can act as a mentor on various levels. Finally, getting involved in these clubs is a great way to embark on a friendship that will last you a lifetime! We encourage you to find that balance between academic and social life. By getting involved you will add immeasurable value to your university experience and gain key opportunities to develop professional skills that will help you succeed in the business world. To find out more about how to join or help out in the following groups, please contact the Undergraduate Business Council via e-mail or visit the UBC Web site at: www.ubc.schulich.yorku.ca Accounting Society E-mail: accountingsociety@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: www.schulichaccountingsociety.com Do you ever wonder what accountant really do for a living, do you want to network, do you want to get a head start in your career, then the Accounting Society is the place to be. As a member of the Accounting Society you will gain valuable knowledge about the profession throughout the year. Most importantly, you will get a chance to meet with recruiters and alumni. The Accounting Society is also a great place to network with your peers who can help you with your transition into university. Currently we are putting together some great events such as the accounting dinner, lecture series, and social events that will help you complete your university experience. In addition, we will continue to publish the insightful Professional Perspectives magazine. ACE (Advancing Canadian Entrepreneurship Inc.) Web site: http://www.acecanada.ca ACE York is an integral part of a multi-national organization called ACE Canada (www.acecanada.ca). Our mission is to spread entrepreneurship throughout our community by running profitable businesses while concurrently helping to enhance and support our community. Last year we generated $108,000 for troubled youth in the Jane and Finch area to help them start their own businesses. We went to Hollywood and created a 90 minute documentary which will be shown at Silver City Richmond Hill in early 2008. Among other things, this year we are planning a trip to Africa to teach poverish children how to start a local business. AIESEC (Association Internationale des Etudiants en Sciences Economiques et Commerciales) E-mail: aiesec@yorku.ca Web site: http://www.yorku.ca/aiesec YOUNG, INNOVATIVE & GLOBAL. AIESEC is recognized by the United Nations as the world’s largest student-run, non profit organization. We are dedicated to helping young people around the world develop valuable skills through unique international exchange programs and associated projects. In the past year we have worked with companies like Mackenzie Financial, The Equion Group, IBM, The Toronto Star, Bombardier and Royal Bank. We have brought trainees in from France, Germany, Mexico and India, and we have sent members to Finland, India, Turkey and Italy. AIESEC welcomes all dedicated, goal oriented individuals who are interested in getting involved and making a change. For more information, visit our office or contact any of our executive members and we’ll be glad to answer your inquiries.

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APEX (Achieving Professional Excellence) Conference E-mail: info@apexconference.com Web site: www.apexconference.com Achieving Professional Excellence (APEX) is an annual student conference that caters to undergraduate business students. Established in 1998, APEX has had nine successful and inspiring years. Increasing in size every year, APEX brings together students from all across North America, APEX’s mandate is to provide delegates with the soft skills needed to compete and succeed in today’s challenging workplace. This is done by the means of educational workshops, and reputable keynote speakers. During the three days at APEX, delegates learn skills that are not taught in the classroom and those which prove to be invaluable in both professional and personal aspects of life. APEX 2008, the tenth initiative will be held in March at a beautiful downtown location. A delegate fee will cover all meals and entertainment. For more information please visit the APEX 2008 website at: www.apexconference.com Bright !deas Group (B!G) E-mail: big.membership@gmail.com Web site: http://big.schulich.yorku.ca The Bright !deas Group is a student-run Schulich organization that offers marketing consulting services to community SMEs as well as large multinational corporations. We work with real clients. We deliver real results. This year we will be working on our biggest project ever, consulting for the Canadian subsidiary of a multinational conglomerate. We recruit raw Schulich talent, providing these elite students with the networking opportunities and hands-on experiences essential to their professional success. B!G is always seeking skilled and talented candidates for its advertising design, public relations, research, data analysis and report writing teams. Interested applicants should submit their resumes and cover letters to: big.membership@gmail.com. Business Law Society (BLA) E-mail: bla@schulich.yorku.ca The Business Law Association (BLA), previously known as the Undergraduate Business Law Society (UBLS), is a student-run, non-profit organization based at the Schulich School of Business, York University. We are a growing club aiming to assist and nurture students who are interested in the field of business law, and provide a medium for students to gain insight into the business law arena. As one of the fastest growing organizations in York University, with membership more than doubling every year, we are constantly trying to maximize the experience we provide for our members. BLA has many exciting initiatives planned for the upcoming academic year, including seminars, guest speakers, and what will prove to be a dream trip for our members – visiting the illustrious Harvard University. Please visit our website or drop in to visit us for more info.

Charity Association E-mail: charity@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: http://sca.schulich.yorku.ca The Schulich Charity Association is a student run organization that works together, hand in hand, with members of our community in an effort to raise funds for a variety of worthwhile charitable causes. The Association provides an excellent opportunity to partake in social activities such as pub nights and the famous annual GROOVE fashion show. You will receive the satisfaction of helping those less fortunate through your time and effort, while having a great time doing it! Being a member provides an occasion to further enhance your business and personal skills. By engaging in promoting, organizing and gathering sponsorships, you will gain invaluable skills. Contact us or visit the website for more information, and we look forward to an amazing year ahead. “Give the Gift of Giving – WHAT ARE YOU DOING FOR OTHERS?” Corporate Social Responsibility Society E-mail: csrsociety@gmail.com Web site: http://www.csrsociety.com Corporate Social Responsibility is transforming the business world as we know it. The leaders of tomorrow will understand the importance of incorporating the welfare of society into their business agenda. The competitive advantage of the future will be gained from responsible business practices that are embedded in the mission, values, and operations of an enterprise. CSRS offers the student body at the opportunity to discover the importance of social responsibility in our rapidly changing global marketplace. By working along-side Schulich faculty, influential business leaders, and members of Schulich’s MBA Net-Impact organization, members will build greater awareness of the issues that are essential for corporate success. CSRS is the first undergraduate student organization at Schulich focused on CSR and is ranked #1 in Canada for student initiative by Corporate Knights Magazine. Our main event is the annual Schulich CORE Conference. CSR is our legacy- make it yours! DECA E-mail: yorkdeca@gmail.com York DECA is an organization designed to assist students in preparing for a career in any aspect of business. Through case analysis, students are able to apply their knowledge of various disciplines (including finance, marketing and management) to sell themselves and their ideas as they apply to real-world problems. Competing against some of North America’s top business schools, our members will be given the opportunity to showcase their talents, while networking with industry executives and other university students during the annual case competition. Our organization provides members with the problem solving and soft skills that classroom training cannot provide, but are crucial for success in the business world. Join York DECA to prepare you for the needs of business, today, and in the future.

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Schulich Information Technology Association (SITA) E-mail: sita.schulich@gmail.com Web site: http://sita.schulich.yorku.ca IT is everywhere! As a student-based organization, SITA’s aim is to help students understand technology from a managerial perspective. In the face of mounting global competition and a new knowledgebased economy, tomorrow’s leaders must understand how technology can be used to create a competitive advantage and achieve business objectives. Each year, the club hosts a number of events, ranging from Guest Speakers and Excel/PowerPoint Workshops to social and informal gatherings. The club is right for anyone interested in better understanding technology surrounding their everyday life, regardless of their majors. The Association will also act as a student forum for discussing I.T. issues and will raise public awareness of the Management Information Systems and Electronic Commerce specializations at the Schulich School of Business. The Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender Association (LGBT) E-mail: lgbt@schulich.yorku.ca LGBT Schulich is a networking and social club for LGBT members of the Schulich School of Business and also serves as a support network for business students struggling with issues of coming out to colleagues, co-workers, and friends. The club’s membership is open to both BBA and MBA students, as well as faculty and staff. The vision of LGBT Schulich is to create the most LGBT positive business school in Canada, in North America, and the world. Open Arms Committee (International Student Liaison) Web site: http://oac.schulich.yorku.ca The purpose of the Open Arms Committee (OAC) is to facilitate the transition of exchange and international students from their native country to Canada. The goal of the committee is to welcome incoming students, to help foreign students adjust to their new environments, and to provide information relevant to help students settle into Schulich. As one of the top ranked business schools, the Schulich School of Business has developed an excellent reputation worldwide. The Open Arms Committee can help to maintain this reputation by further representing Schulich as a fun and enjoyable place for exchange and international students to study for the upcoming year. As a Schulich student you can meet students from a school that you may wish to attend for your own exchange or return the hospitality to those from a host country you have visited. It is an excellent opportunity to share some good times with exchange students and also familiarize yourself with the differences that exist in cultures globally, making great friends and networking on a worldwide scale.

Schulich Real Property Student Association E-mail: srpsa@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: http://srpsa.schulich.yorku.ca Open to all Schulich School of Business students interested in the real property industry, the SRPSA is a student-run club that acts as a “bridge” between academics and business. Its mission is to provide students with the opportunity to learn about the real property industry via guest speakers, alumni mixers and various other events that are held throughout the year. The mainstay of the SRPSA is the annual “Breakfast Series”. Approximately once a month, the Association will visit an industry firm for an informal early morning presentation by one or two members of the firm’s management followed by a brief question and answer period. Topics might include information on the firm itself, industry trends, personal experience and/or career advice. In the past, participants have covered the whole spectrum of industry players - developers, owners, financiers and consultants. Another important part of the SRPSA is the summer internship program offered to members pursuing a specialization in real property. Over the past several years, a number of real property students have gained summer employment in real estate banking, development and property management. The internships are only offered to SRPSA members. The process involves putting together a resume book of all members and forwarding it to interested employers in the industry. Schulich Sports Information about various Schulich sports activities and events (soccer, basketball, squash, flag football, etc.) will be available during the Club Fair Week taking place over the first week of classes. Information on the other sports and/recreation facilities on campus, please refer to the “Sports and Recreation” section of this Handbook. Schulich Toastmasters E-mail: toastmasters@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: http://www.toastmasters.org Strong communication and public speaking skills are an asset in all aspects of life and especially in the business world. At Toastmasters, we help you acquire the art of public speaking, think critically, and listen effectively in a supportive and positive learning environment. Because Toastmasters leads you to develop strong communication and leadership skills, this in turn fosters self-confidence and personal growth. Moreover, Toastmasters is an internationally-acclaimed organization with clubs located across 90 countries. For additional information, please contact us or check out the official Toastmasters website. Women In Leadership (WIL) E-mail: wil@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: http://wil.schulich.yorku.ca Women In Leadership is a student organization designed to create a network between women in pursuit of a business degree. WIL serves the Schulich community by providing a series of professional, educational and networking events designed to enhance understanding and appreciation of women’s role in business. Members of WIL are offered the opportunity to participate in forums for exchange of ideas, listen to guest speakers, network with established business women, and a lot more! WIL is committed to give its members a chance to develop key personal relationships and business contacts that will help them to achieve their goals in today’s business environment.

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York Investment Club (YIC) E-mail: yic@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: http://www.yorkinvestmentclub.com Founded in 2001, the York Investment Club (YIC) has been the largest organized club at the Schulich School of Business since 2002, with a membership of over 350 students in the 2006-2007 year. YIC’s mandate is focused on educating our members in the various facets of equity and non-equity investing through an interactive and social environment. As the most active club at Schulich, we offer a wide variety of events, competitions, contests, social outings, and professional guest speakers. By providing the knowledge, skills, and confidence to begin investing on their own, we strive to supply our membership with the essential tools they need to succeed in their personal and professional lives. Our club has flourished because it has consistently delivered in these areas and provided its members with a fulfilling and enjoyable extracurricular student club experience. York Marketing Association E-mail: info@yorkmarketing.ca Web site: http://www.yorkmarketing.ca The York Marketing Association (YMA) is one of the most vibrant and well-known student-run organizations at one of the world’s top business schools, the Schulich School of Business. YMA is Schulich’s and York University’s largest marketing association, offering members the exposure and knowledge needed to enter the world of Marketing. YMA attracts more than 150 dedicated members each year, comprising of students from the undergraduate BBA program. The mission of the YMA is to provide its members with a current and relevant connection to the world of Marketing. Every year YMA strives to bring its members closer to the Marketing Industry through the various firstrate interactive events that are planned extensively with representatives from the Industry’s leading companies. YMA’s most prestigious event is the annual marketing conference which takes place every year in January and is comprised of engaging speakers, challenging marketing tasks, and most importantly unforgettable social events.

YUFIC (York Undergraduate Finance and Industry Club) E-mail: info@yufic.com Web site: Web site: http://www.yufic.com As one of Schulich’s oldest and most respected student organizations, the York University Finance & Industry Club (YUFIC) has built its reputation on the mandate of bridging the gap between the corporate and student community. YUFIC has long held the tradition of developing business students into young industry professionals. In fact, the breadth of Bay Street gurus and industry leaders who can trace their present day success to the skills and relations they acquired during their time with the organization speaks volumes about YUFIC’s wellreputed curriculum. YUFIC’s curriculum is dual focused: (1) To guide students through professional development by helping them hone their business demeanour, while at the same time expanding their ring of industry contacts within Canada’s largest financial and diversified firms; (2) To enrich students with the necessary technical skills prescribed by our corporate partners so that they may excel within their interviews and careers at large. Sample sessions include: “Valuations: Welcome to Investment Banking”, “Sample CFA Workshop”, and many more. What can prospective YUFIC members look forward too? The annual YUFIC Cocktail, Corporate Information Sessions, Technical Workshops, Company Visits, Imagine. Conference, and much more! For more information on these events and our curriculum, please visit our website at www.yufic.com or speak to one of our representatives in person!

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P U B L I C AT I O N S
The Insider Media Group Email: content@insidermediagroup.com Web site: http://www.insidermediagroup.com The Insider Media Group is the dynamic and exclusive ‘Voice of the Schulich School of Business’. The Insider provides a forum for discussion and a means of communication for students, faculty, administration, and the outside community. The student run organization produces a monthly news-magazine featuring a number of columnists, movie reviews, feature articles, interviews, and regular updates on events, such as sports. Our sections include News &Views, Student Life, Features, Internal News, and Sports & Entertainment. In addition, the Insider runs an interactive web site www.insidermediagroup.com where individuals can go to view student photographs taken over the course of the year, post messages and keep informed about Schulich events. We’re always looking for interested and motivated people to help us produce both the print and online versions of the Insider. Whether you would like to join the team as a section contributor for articles, be a message board moderator, or would like to help with INSIDER ONLINE (no technical experience necessary), please click on the link below to reach our application form. Find out more information about joining our team at www.insidermediagroup.com. Commercial Business Publications The National Post is provided free of charge on a daily basis. Business Week, Canadian Business, the Financial Times, the Globe and Mail, the Wall Street Journal and Fortune magazine publications are available in the Peter F. Bronfman Business Library, Schulich School of Business. Students are strongly encouraged to read the National Post, the Financial Post, or the Wall Street Journal.

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Bookstore and York Shop The York University Bookstore is located in York Lanes. Over 50,000 titles of general interest (including business titles, journals, magazines, academic remainders, sale books, audio books, CDs, etc. ), as well as texts prescribed for courses, ( new and used ) are stocked. A wide selection of stationery and gift items and electronic accessories are also available. The York Shop, (located next to the Bookstore) carries York insignia clothing, gifts and many other accessories, (hats, scarves, etc ) for all ages. The Web site offers a variety of services for faculty, students and staff – from faculty text orders, buying and selling textbooks, sales of general books, clothing, gifts and other accessories, and providing information on new books, specials, hours of operation and events at the bookstore. The bookstore can be reached by: Tel: (416) 736-5024 Fax: (416) 736-5733 Email: bookstor@yorku.ca Or through our Web site: www.bookstore.yorku.ca Office of the Ombudsperson and Centre for Human Rights This Office provides an independent, impartial and confidential process through which any current student or employee of the York University community may pursue the just, fair and equitable resolution of complaints about University-related concerns. Such complaints may be about: • alleged unfairness in a University process, application of a process or absence of a process as outlined in its policies, procedures, rules or directives; • alleged discrimination and/or harassment as defined in the Ontario Human Rights Code or York University’s human rights policies. Centre for Student Community and Leadership Development The Centre for Student Community and Leadership Development is dedicated to continuously improving the quality of student life at York University. Student Community and Leadership Development enriches student life by: promoting education, awareness and growth; celebrating diversity; encouraging collaboration; developing citizenship. The Centre for Student Community and Leadership Development includes the following core units: • • • • • • • • Student Leadership Training and Development Orientation York is U Student Organizations and Activities Aboriginal Counselling and Services Health Education and Promotion Off-campus Housing Residence Life

More information is available on the Centre’s Web site: http://www.yorku.ca/scld Counselling and Development Centre (CDC) The Counselling and Development Centre (CDC) helps students to realize, develop and fulfill their personal and academic potential through an assortment of diverse programs. The Counselling and Development Centre’s reception area in Room N110 of the Bennett Centre for Student Services is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, telephone (416) 736-5297. Web site: www.yorku.ca/cdc. Personal Counselling York students are invited to discuss their personal concerns with a counsellor. In order to make an appointment, come to Room N110 of the Bennett Centre for Student Services between 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday or telephone (416) 736-5297. All interviews are confidential. Learning Skills Through individual consultation and workshops, students can work at improving reading, listening, note taking, memory, time management, exam preparation, essay writing skills and academic stress management. Learning Disabilities Program The Learning Disabilities Program provides a range of specialized services to students with learning disabilities, including advice on courses and academic programs, academic accommodations, orientation to campus facilities and services, psychodiagnostic assessment, personal and career counselling, learning skills counselling and workshops, peer tutoring, consultation and advocacy regarding academic concerns.

Services include impartial information, advice, referrals, problem solving and informed intervention. Staff are available to listen to concerns, issues, and complaints, to clarify university policy and procedure, to explore informal and alternative conflict resolution options and to help find the person or department that can address specific inquiries. The Office conducts investigations, but more often facilitates resolutions through mediation. It collaborates with other offices across York as needed to solve problems and correct miscommunication. The Office of the Ombudsperson can be a last resort, offering assistance when existing channels, processes, and procedures have failed to adequately address or bring resolution to a problem. Alternatively, it may be a first stop for those who do not know where to begin. The Office assists individuals and groups in order to address and resolve allegations of discrimination and harassment as defined by the Ontario Human Rights Code and York’s human rights policies and provisions. The Office plays a significant role in promoting Human Rights through the distribution of information and educational programming. It houses an extensive collection of print and audiovisual resources. The Ombudsperson and Director of the Centre for Human Rights at York University reports to the President of the University but has an arms-length relationship and is independent of all administrative structures. Located at S327 Ross Building, open Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and other hours by arrangement, (416) 736-5682, TTY (416) 650-8023; ombuds@yorku.ca; http://www.yorku.ca/ombuds

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Psychiatric Dis/Abilities Program Educational support for students with on-going mental health issues such as depression, post traumatic stress, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder and schizophrenia. Services include: annual orientation to campus, one-on-one educational support, access to assistive technology, learning skills workshops, peer groups/workshops and peer mentor program, advocacy and self-advocacy and linkages to community resources. Group Program The CDC offers groups and workshops with a variety of focuses and themes, including: assertiveness training, effective presentation skills, eating and body image, anger management, achieving goals, stress management, mindfulness, building self-esteem and self-confidence and avoiding procrastination among others. Most groups are offered during both the fall and winter terms depending on enrolment. Community Mental Health Consultation and Outreach The staff of CDC are available to consult with any member of the York University community with regard to aspects of campus psychological well-being and development. Outreach programs may be tailored to community needs. Health Education and Promotion at York Located in the Centre for Student Community & Leadership Development, Health Education & Promotion at York exists to guide and support the development and maintenance of a comprehensive healthy campus. Their goal is to provide education and information to students through various formats, and to work behind the scenes to make York a healthier place through policies and studentcentered initiatives. And yes, they give out free condoms! A professional health educator is available to students, free of charge. Students can schedule an appointment, send an email, or place a phone call to discuss any personal health questions with a professional health educator. Whether it’s a question about a recent medical diagnosis for themselves or a family member, or questions on how to eat healthy with little time and money, Health Education & Promotion is available to help. All services are free and confidential. Several events are held throughout the year on a weekly and annual basis. For a glance at upcoming events, visit the Web site at www.yorku.ca/healthed and click on the Events Calendar. Tel: (416) 736-5196 E-mail: healthed@yorku.ca Web site: www.yorku.ca/healthed Health Services York Lanes Health Centre On-campus medical facilities are located in the York Lanes Health Centre. While appointments are advised, walk-ins are welcome. The centre has a number of offices which can all be accessed through the main telephone number: (416) 736-5525. Health Services Include: • Family Medicine for all ages • Dental clinic • Chiropractic services • Massage therapy • Dermatology clinic • Psychiatric clinic • Travel Medicine • Total eyewear care • Naturopath

Mandatory Health and Dental Insurance Plan: All Full-Time Domestic Students For information on the compulsory York University Health and Dental Insurance Plan, visit the York Federation of Students (YFS) Web site at www.yfs.ca. Questions should be directed to the YFS Health Plan Office at yfshp@yorku.ca or (416) 650-8066. Mandatory Health Insurance Plan: All International Students For information on the compulsory York University Health Insurance Plan (UHIP), contact the York International UHIP staff at: uhip@yorku.ca. Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD) The Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD) provides information, support and advocacy on behalf of students, staff and faculty with physical and sensory disabilities as well as medical conditions. Office assistance includes advising on financial and academic matters, referrals for personal counselling as well as other university services and community resources such as the Independent Living Assistance program. Students who have received acceptance to the University, should contact the OPD as soon as possible. While the OPD offers a short orientation, students should take part in their college or Faculty orientation, which will provide valuable information and the opportunity to meet fellow peers. The Office of Persons with Disabilities is open Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The office is located in N108 Ross Building, (416) 736-5140 (Voice), (416) 736-5263 (TYY), (416) 650-8068 (Fax). You may also reach the OPD by e-mail at opd@yorku.ca, or Web site at: http://www.yorku.ca/opd. Ron Cope Gateway Resource Room 117A Curtis Lecture Hall (416) 736-5081 (voice) (416) 736-5829 (TTY and Fax) rcope@yorku.ca (e-mail) www.yorku.ca/roncope (Web Site) Resources for students who are Deaf and hard of hearing, including a specialized resource collection, bursary support, and e-mentoring. Security, Parking and Transportation Services Security Services The York University Security Services department is located in the William Small Centre, room 228, at the Keele Campus and in the Greenhouse at the Glendon Campus. We are comprised of dedicated security personnel who are focused on the delivery of quality security services to all people within our community. Our service is ‘community based’. This means we seek collegial partnerships with community stakeholders and provide inclusive solutions to security problems for our campus’ that best meet the needs of the large and diverse community we serve. Security Services remains committed to the timely delivery of security services in a professional and sensitive manner, treating all persons with the utmost respect, dignity and absolute fairness. York University Security Services is comprised of four groups: patrol, property watch, campus relations and investigations. Each partners with various community groups or external agencies to provide a specific need to the community, such as pro-active patrolling, service response, emergency response, pro-active event planning, crime prevention, safety programs, statistical analysis, outreach/liaison, and investigation of complaints and criminal activity. Security Services has partnerships within the University community and with external agencies and organizations to provide a better, more efficient and effective service to our community.
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The security and safety of the campus requires the cooperation and support of the whole community. Security Services encourages the community to take personal precautions and report any suspicious activity immediately. The Security Control Centre is staffed and operational 24 hours a day/365 days a year. Any security related information may be obtained by contacting Security Services’ general telephone number at (416) 650-8000 or ext. 58000. For all urgent matters contact (416) 736-5333 or ext. 33333. 911 Emergencies: In a Life Threatening Emergency call 911 Direct. For situations where people or property is at immediate risk, for example a medical emergency, fire or a crime in progress we ask that you contact 911 directly, and then notify Security Services at (416) 736-5333 or ext. 33333. York Security meets and expedites emergency vehicles directly to the scene of the emergency so that valuable time is not lost searching for a particular building or location. Keele Campus: York University 4700 Keele Street, 228 William Small Centre Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 General matters: (416) 650-8000 or ext. 58000 Emergencies: (416) 736-5333 or ext. 33333 Fax: (416) 736-5377 or ext. 55377 E-mail: scc@yorku.ca Glendon Campus: York University 2275 Bayview Avenue, Greenhouse Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M6 General matters: (416) 650-8000 or ext. 58000 Emergencies: (416) 736-5333 or ext. 33333 Fax: (416) 736-5377 or ext. 55377 E-mail: scc@yorku.ca For more information on Security Services, please visit our Web site: www.yorku.ca/security Parking Services A limited supply of parking permits are available to all community members on a first come, first serve basis. Parking Services encourages early purchases for the availability of space and to avoid any line ups. Please ensure you have fully completed an application form. Incomplete applications will result in unnecessary delays. In order to purchase a parking permit, you must provide a valid vehicle ownership or registration (photocopy of the front and back of your vehicle ownership will be sufficient for mail in and drop off applications). If the vehicle driver is different than the vehicle owner, the vehicle owner must also sign the application. Parking permits can not be issued to persons or vehicles with outstanding violations on their parking account. For information regarding outstanding violations please call (416) 736-5705 for the Keele Campus, and (416) 487-6788 for Glendon Campus and ask to speak to a Violations Officer. Acceptable payment methods to purchase your permit are cash, cheque, debit, Visa, Mastercard, or AMEX. To avoid line-ups and the need to apply in person, applications can be processed by mail/fax. Applicants renewing their parking permits may be eligible to renew online. Please visit our Web site at: http://www.yorku.ca/parking/ for more information.

Parking and Transportation Services are located in: Keele Campus Parking Services Parking and Transportation Services Room 222, William Small Centre, 155 Campus Walk York University 4700 Keele Street Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 Daily parking is also available in selected lots and Parking Garages on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, visit our Web site at http://www.yorku.ca/parking/, or call (416) 736-5335, or ext 55335. Transportation Services Carpooling Carpooling is a simple way for students and staff to save thousands on gas, maintenance and parking by sharing a ride. Carpooling is an effective option for individuals who commute long distances to and from school/work and have limited access to public transit. For information on how to start carpooling or to register for a free ride-matching service, go to the Smart Commute North Toronto, Vaughan Web site http://www.smartcommuteNTV.ca to find a carpool partner to York University. On average it costs $9,000 a year to own and operate a personal vehicle. When you switch from driving alone, you can save a lot of money while helping to reduce traffic congestion, improve air quality and conserve energy. Van-Go VAN GO is a service designed to assist persons with disabilities with their transportation needs at York University. This service is a joint effort between Transportation Services and the Office for Persons with Disabilities, in consultation with ABLE York. The service operates from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Mondays to Fridays, during the academic year. For more information, please call (416) 736-2100 ext. 82646 (VANGO) or the Office for Persons with Disabilities at (416) 736 5140. Glendon-Keele Shuttle Service Security, Parking and Transportation Services offers a complimentary Glendon-Keele Shuttle Service for the York community. For further information and schedule details, please call (416) 736-2100 ext. 22546 (or (416) 736-5454 from 6 p.m. to 12 a.m.) or visit our Web site: http://www.yorku.ca/transportation/shuttle.htm. GO Train Shuttle Service Security, Parking and Transportation Services offers a complimentary GO Train Shuttle Service to/from the York University GO train Station and York University. For further information and schedule details, please call (416) 736-2100 ext. 22546 or visit our Web site: http://www.yorku.ca/transportation/shuttle.htm. Public Transit York University is serviced by several GTA transit systems including York Region Transit/VIVA, GO Transit, Greyhound, and TTC. Further details about transportation services are available at: http//www.yorku.ca/transportation/ or via e-mail at transit@yorku.ca, or via telephone at (416) 736-2100 ext. 22546.

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Student Life and Student Services: York University cont’d

goSAFE The primary role of the goSAFE program is to provide safer movement after dark for students, faculty and staff. Student Safety Officers will meet you at campus bus stops, parking lots, buildings and/or residences and safely accompany you to either your destination or one of the goSAFE stops on campus. There are two routes on campus the North Route and the South Route with 12 pick-up/drop off locations. It is a complimentary safety service provided to the York community by Security, Parking and Transportation Services, CSBO. The Service operates daily during the academic year (September to April) from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m., and during the summer months (May to August) from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. For more information, please call the goSAFE Office at (416) 736-5454 or ext. 55454, or visit us at: http://www.yorku.ca/gosafe/. Lost and Found A Lost and Found office is maintained on the Keele campus at N101 Ross, with operating hours from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, and from 5 to 7 p.m., on Wednesdays and Thursdays. We can also be reached via e-mail lost@yorku.ca. If you are leaving a message by phone or e-mail, please indicate a description of the item that you lost, the date and time that you last saw it, and a contact name and number (or e-mail) where you can be reached. Any items turned into this office are retained for 30 days only. On the Glendon campus, enquiries should be directed to the Security and Parking Office in the Greenhouse, or call (416) 487-6808. The University regrets that it cannot be responsible for items of personal property left unattended on the grounds or within buildings. For further information, please visit our Web site at: http://www.yorku.ca/gosafe/lostfound.html, or call us at (416) 736-2100, ext. 33369. Shopping Services The York Lanes Building includes the following services/stores: a drugstore, medical and dental centres, computer store, convenience store and gift shops, hairdressing shop, camera/film store, post office, travel service, a bank, a credit union, various restaurants and food outlets, and the University Bookstore. Several pubs and restaurants are found across the campus. Sports and Recreation The multi-purpose Tait McKenzie Centre located at the Northwest edge of campus features four gymnasia, 5 North American squash courts, fitness centre (free weights, selectorize machines, cardio equipment) high performance centre ( free weights and lifting platforms), upper gym aerobic centre, 5 multi-purpose studios, spinning studio, 25 metre swimming pool and sport injury clinic. Adjacent to Tait Mckenzie there are a number of sports fields which include The York Stadium, 5 sport playing fields, intramural sport field (with lights), 9 outdoor tennis courts (4 courts with lights), and 4 softball fields. Other facilities include the Canlan Ice Sports arena with a feature rink and 5 additional rinks; City of Toronto Track and Field Centre with an outdoor track (8 lane, 400m synthetic track and separate jumps and throwing areas), an indoor track (4 lane banked 200 metre) and 2 weight training areas; and the National Tennis Centre with 9 outdoor courts and 4 indoor courts (winter only). York University, through the School of Kinesiology and Health Science, has developed programs in both sport and recreation, aimed at offering opportunities across the broad continuum of physical activity to all students. Programs include interuniversity sports; casual recreation in basketball, indoor soccer, badminton, table tennis, tennis, swimming, hockey, squash, pleasure skating; intramural sports; instructional classes in dance, martial arts, tennis, aquatics, mind and body fitness, squash, spinning and skating; aerobics and cross-training classes; and a variety of sport clubs.

The University also encourages students to take advantage of the exciting environment generated through sport and recreation at York by attending events held on campus throughout the season. For information call customer service at (416) 736-5184 or check the Web sites at: www.sport.yorku.ca or www.recreation.yorku.ca Student Centre The Student Centre, designed by renowned Toronto architect, Jack Diamond, is the hub of student life at York and in 1996 won the Governor-General’s Award for Architecture. The facility houses the York Federation of Students, the Graduate Students Association, and student services including the Volunteer Centre, The Centre for Women and TransPeople at York University, TBLGAY, and OPIRG. The Underground, York’s largest full-service restaurant and nightclub, is located in the lower level of the Student Centre and recently completed a $2 million renovation. The Student Centre also features the Lee Wiggins Childcare Centre, Travel Cuts, Gateway Newsstand, and a 500 seat food court including Treats, Subway, Wendy’s, Jimmy the Greek, KFC, Taco Bell, Panzerotto and Pizza, Pagoda, and Yogen Früz. Centre for Women and TransPeople at York University The Centre for Women and Trans People (“the Centre”) is a studentfunded, collectively run, volunteer-driven organization at York University. The Centre is a progressive, pro-choice, anti-racist, queer-positive, trans-positive, feminist organization committed to: • helping to break the social isolation that women and trans people face on campus through programming, socials and networking events individual and collective empowerment through esteem building, education & decolonization providing services such as peer-to-peer crisis intervention, peer counselling, advocacy & referrals from a feminist, antioppressive framework acting as a resource base for understanding, exposing and organizing on issues around gender violence and social justice creating working relationships between students and the University administration, where students are directly involved in developing programs and policies that make the campus safer for everyone developing a culture of resistance and celebration by supporting local artists

• •

• •

•

The Centre offers The Centre offers free workshops and programs every semester. We also offer a comfortable lounge with couches and chairs, free phone, computer and internet access, a fridge, a microwave, and good company! Whether students want to debrief with someone about their day, or are looking for a place to chill/eat their lunch/catch up on their readings/get involved in the Centre’s work – don’t be shy, drop by and check it out! The Centre is located in room 322 in the Student Centre. Tel: (416) 736-2100 ext. 33484 Web site: www.yorku.ca/ywc

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Curriculum Overview Charts
D I R E C T E N T RY B B A ( FA L L 2 0 0 5 , FA L L 2 0 0 6 A N D FA L L 2 0 0 7 E N T RY ) YEAR 1 FA L L T E R M Introduction to Microeconomics AK/AS/ECON 1000 3.00 Managing Contemporary Enterprise SB/MGMT 1000 3.00 Business History or Applied Business Ethics SB/MGMT 1030 3.00 or SB/MGMT 1040 3.00 Statistics for Management Decisions SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 WINTER TERM Introduction to Macroeconomics AK/AS/ECON 1010 3.00 The Environmental Context of Management SB/MGMT 1010 3.00 Business History or Applied Business Ethics SB/MGMT 1030 3.00 or SB/MGMT 1040 3.00 Introduction to Financial Accounting I SB/ACTG 2010 3.00
Please note that non-business electives at the 1000 and 2000 level are acceptable in Years 1 and 2 (i.e. the first 60.00 credithours earned towards the BBA degree). Credit will not be granted for ADMS and other courses indicated as course credit exclusions or degree program notes.

Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours YEAR 2 FA L L T E R M Introduction to Financial Accounting II SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 Applied Macroeconomics SB/ECON 2000 3.00 Quantitative Analysis for Management Decisions SB/MGMT 2000 3.00 Behavioural Components of Organizations SB/OBIR 2000 3.00 WINTER TERM Management Accounting Concepts SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 Introduction to Finance SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Marketing Management SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 Management Science Modelling and Analysis SB/OMIS 2010 3.00

Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours Y E A R 3 * and Y E A R 4 **Strategic Management SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 ***Behavioural Problems and Issues in Organizations SB/OBIR 3010 3.00
In Year 3 (i.e. once students have earned 60.00 credit-hours and before earning 90.00 credithours), electives must be 2000 level or higher. In Year 4 (i.e. over 90.00 credithours), electives must be 3000 or 4000 level.

Schulich Electives Total of 18.00 credit-hours Schulich Electives or Non-Business Electives Total of 24.00 credit-hours Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 12.00 credit-hours
* Students who are planning on going on Exchange in Year 3 cannot delay core courses as outlined in the curriculum for the term they are studying at Schulich. ** Must be completed in the Fall or Winter term of Year 3. Direct Entry BBA students who are in Year 4 for the Fall/Winter 2008-09 academic session will be completing this course during the Fall or Winter term of their 4th year of study if they did not have a chance to complete it during 3rd year of study. Effective Fall 2008, this course cannot be completed on Exchange. *** Must be completed in the Winter term of Year 3.

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Curriculum Overview Charts cont’d

D I R E C T E N T RY B B A ( FA L L 2 0 0 8 E N T RY ) YEAR 1 FA L L T E R M Introduction to Microeconomics AK/AS/ECON 1000 3.00 Managing Contemporary Enterprise SB/MGMT 1000 3.00 Business History or Applied Business Ethics SB/MGMT 1030 3.00 or SB/MGMT 1040 3.00 Statistics for Management Decisions SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 WINTER TERM Introduction to Macroeconomics AK/AS/ECON 1010 3.00 Behavioural Components of Organizations SB/OBIR 1000 3.00 Business History or Applied Business Ethics SB/MGMT 1030 3.00 or SB/MGMT 1040 3.00 Introduction to Financial Accounting I SB/ACTG 2010 3.00
Please note that non-business electives at the 1000 and 2000 level are acceptable in Years 1 and 2 (i.e. the first 60.00 credithours earned towards the BBA degree). Credit will not be granted for ADMS and other courses indicated as course credit exclusions or degree program notes.

Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours YEAR 2 FA L L T E R M Introduction to Financial Accounting II SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 Applied Macroeconomics SB/ECON 2000 3.00 Quantitative Analysis for Management Decisions SB/MGMT 2000 3.00 Behavioural Problems and Issues in Organizations SB/OBIR 2010 3.00 WINTER TERM Management Accounting Concepts SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 Introduction to Finance SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Marketing Management SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 Management Science Modelling and Analysis SB/OMIS 2010 3.00

Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours Y E A R 3 * and Y E A R 4 **Strategic Management SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 ***SB/SGMT 3.00 Integrative Course (Course number TBA)
In Year 3 (i.e. once students have earned 60.00 credit-hours and before earning 90.00 credithours), electives must be 2000 level or higher. In Year 4 (i.e. over 90.00 credithours), electives must be 3000 or 4000 level.

Schulich Electives Total of 18.00 credit-hours Schulich Electives or Non-Business Electives Total of 24.00 credit-hours Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 12.00 credit-hours
* Students who are planning on going on exchange in Year 3 cannot delay core courses as outlined in the curriculum for the term they are studying at Schulich. ** Must be completed in the Fall or Winter term of Year 3. Effective Fall 2008, this course cannot be completed on Exchange. *** This course will be offered in both the Fall and Winter terms. It may be completed in either Year 3 or Year 4.

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Curriculum Overview Charts cont’d

B B A D E L AY E D - E N T RY ( E N T RY P R I O R T O FA L L 2 0 0 8 ) YEAR 2 FA L L T E R M Introduction to Financial Accounting I SB/ACTG 2010 3.00 Statistics for Management Decisions SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 Applied Macroeconomics SB/ECON 2000 3.00 Managing Contemporary Enterprise SB/MGMT 1000 3.00 Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours YEAR 3 FA L L T E R M Management Accounting Concepts SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 Quantitative Analysis for Management Decisions SB/MGMT 2000 3.00 Behavioural Components of Organizations SB/OBIR 2000 3.00 Schulich Elective 3.00 credit-hours WINTER TERM Introduction to Finance SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Management Science Modelling and Analysis SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 Behavioural Problems and Issues in Organizations SB/OBIR 3010 3.00 Schulich Elective 3.00 credit-hours
In Year 3 (i.e. once students have earned 60.00 credit-hours and before earning 90.00 credithours), electives must be 2000 level or higher. Credit will not be granted for ADMS and other courses indicated as course credit exclusions or degree program notes.

WINTER TERM Introduction to Financial Accounting II SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 Marketing Management SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 Business History SB/MGMT 1030 3.00 Applied Business Ethics SB/MGMT 1040 3.00

Schulich Electives or Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours (Minimum 2000 Level) YEAR 4* FA L L T E R M **Strategic Management or Schulich Elective SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 or 3.00 credit-hours Schulich Elective 3.00 credit-hours Schulich or Non-Business Elective 3.00 credit-hours WINTER TERM **Strategic Management or Schulich Elective SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 or 3.00 credit-hours Schulich Elective 3.00 credit-hours Non-Business Elective 3.00 credit-hours
In Year 4 (i.e. over 90.00 credithours), electives must be 3000 or 4000 level.

Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours (Minimum 3000 Level) Schulich Electives or Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours (Minimum 3000 Level)
* Delayed-Entry students wishing to go on exchange, can only go in their 4th year of study, after having completed all 2000 level core courses. ** Delayed-Entry students must complete this course during the Fall or Winter session of their 4th year of study. Effective Fall 2008, this course cannot be completed on Exchange by Direct-Entry BBA students. However, exceptions may be made for Delayed-Entry students planning to go on Exchange.

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Curriculum Overview Charts cont’d

B B A D E L AY E D - E N T RY ( FA L L 2 0 0 8 E N T RY ) YEAR 2 FA L L T E R M Introduction to Financial Accounting I SB/ACTG 2010 3.00 Statistics for Management Decisions SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 Applied Macroeconomics SB/ECON 2000 3.00 Managing Contemporary Enterprise SB/MGMT 1000 3.00 Non-Business Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours WINTER TERM Introduction to Financial Accounting II SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 Marketing Management SB/MKTG 2030 3.00 Business History SB/MGMT 1030 3.00 Applied Business History SB/MGMT 1040 3.00 Behavioural Components of Organizations SB/OBIR 1000 3.00 YEAR 3 FA L L T E R M Management Accounting Concepts SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 Quantitative Analysis for Management Decisions SB/MGMT 2000 3.00 Behavioural Problems and Issues in Organizations SB/OBIR 2010 3.00 Schulich Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours WINTER TERM Introduction to Finance SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Management Science Modelling and Analysis SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 Schulich Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours Non-Business Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours
In Year 3 (i.e. once students have earned 60.00 credit-hours and before earning 90.00 credithours), electives must be 2000 level or higher. Credit will not be granted for ADMS and other course credit exclusions or degree program notes.

Schulich Electives or Non-Business Elective(s) Total of 6.00 credit-hours (Minimum 2000 Level) YEAR 4* FA L L T E R M **Strategic Management SB/SGMT 3000 3.00 Schulich Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours Schulich or Non-Business Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours WINTER TERM ***SB/SGMT 3.00 Integrative Course (Course number TBA) Schulich Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours Non-Business Elective Total of 3.00 credit-hours
In Year 4 (i.e. over 90.00 credithours), electives must be 3000 or 4000 level.

Schulich Elective or Non-Business Elective Total of 6.00 credit-hours Non-Business Elective Total of 6.00 credit-hours
* Delayed-Entry students wishing to go on Exchange, can only go in their 4th year of study, after having completed all 2000 level core courses. ** Delayed-Entry students must complete this course during the Fall or Winter session of their 4th year of study. *** Delayed-Entry Students must complete this course during the Fall or Winter session of their 4th year of study.

Curriculum Overview Charts

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Curriculum Overview Charts cont’d

i B B A ( FA L L 2 0 0 5 E N T RY ) Y E A R 3 and Y E A R 4 *Management Accounting Concepts SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 *Applied Cross Cultural Management SB/INTL 3350 1.50† *Business & Sustainability SB/INTL 3400 1.50† ***International Business Ethics SB/INTL 3500 3.00 *Management Science Modelling and Analysis SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 **Strategic Management for International Business SB/INTL 4400 3.00 Language Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours Globally-Focused Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours Schulich Electives or Non-Business Electives Total of 9.00 credit-hours
* Recommended for Year 3. ** Must be taken in Year 4 at the Schulich School of Business. Effective Fall 2008, this course cannot be completed on Exchange. It will be offered in the Fall and Winter terms. *** Must be taken in the Fall term of Year 3. † SB/INTL 3350 1.50 and SB/INTL 3400 1.50 must be taken together in the same term (only offered in the Fall Term). NOTE: Students who are planning on going on exchange in Year 3 must successfully complete all 1st and 2nd year core courses prior to the Fall term of Year 3. Students who are planning to go on Exchange in Year 3 cannot delay core courses as outlined in the curriculum for the term they are studying at Schulich. Please note that non-business electives at the 1000 and 2000 level are acceptable in Years 1 and 2 (i.e. the first 60.00 credithours earned towards the iBBA degree). Credit will not be granted for ADMS and other courses indicated as course credit exclusions or degree program notes. In Year 3 (i.e. once students have earned 60.00 credit-hours and before earning 90.00 credithours), electives, must be 2000 level or higher, except for language and globally-focused study. In Year 4 (i.e. over 90.00 credithours), electives must be 3000 or 4000, level except for language and globally-focused courses.

Schulich Electives 24.00 credit-hours

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Curriculum Overview Charts cont’d

i B B A ( FA L L 2 0 0 6 E N T RY ) YEAR 1 FA L L T E R M Microeconomics for Managers SB/INTL 1200 3.00 Managing Contemporary Enterprise SB/MGMT 1000 3.00 Statistics for Management Decisions SB/OMIS 1000 3.00 WINTER TERM Macroeconomics for Managers SB/INTL 1210 3.00 Environmental Context of Management SB/MGMT 1010 3.00 Organizational Behaviour Across Cultures SB/INTL 1300 3.00
Please note that non-business electives at the 1000 and 2000 level are acceptable in Years 1 and 2 (i.e. the first 60.00 credithours earned towards the iBBA degree). Credit will not be granted for ADMS and other courses indicated as course credit exclusions or degree program notes.

*Language Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours Non-Business or **Globally Focused Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours YEAR 2 FA L L T E R M Introduction to Financial Accounting I SB/ACTG 2010 3.00 International Economics SB/INTL 2200 3.00 Quantitative Analysis for Management Decisions SB/MGMT 2000 3.00 *Language Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours Non-Business Elective(s) or **Globally-Focused Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours Y E A R 3 and Y E A R 4 FA L L T E R M ***Management Accounting Concepts SB/ACTG 2020 3.00 ***Applied Cross Cultural Management SB/INTL 3350 1.50† ***Business & Sustainability SB/INTL 3400 1.50† ***International Business Ethics SB/INTL 3500 3.00 ***Management Science Modelling and Analysis SB/OMIS 2010 3.00 ****Strategic Management for International Business SB/INTL 4400 3.00 *Language Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours Non-Business Electives or Schulich Electives Total of 9.00 credit-hours Non-Business or **Globally-Focused Study Total of 6.00 credit-hours
* Students are required to complete 18.00 credit-hours of language study, achieving Advanced Level competency to meet graduation requirements. ** Students are required to complete 12.00 credit-hours of Globally-Focused study to meet graduation requirements. Year level requirements do not apply. *** Recommended for Year 3. † SB/INTL 3350 1.50 and SB/INTL 3400 1.50 must be taken together in the same term (only offered in the Fall Term). **** Must be taken in Year 4 at the Schulich School of Business. Effective Fall 2008, this course cannot be completed on Exchange. It will be offered in the Fall and Winter terms.
Schulich School of Business

WINTER TERM Introduction to Financial Accounting II SB/ACTG 2011 3.00 Introduction to Finance SB/FINE 2000 3.00 Marketing Management SB/MKTG 2030 3.00

WINTER TERM

In Year 3 (i.e. once students have earned 60.00 credit-hours and before earning 90.00 credit-hours), electives, must be 2000 level or higher, except for language and globally-focused study. In Year 4 (i.e. over 90.00 credithours), electives must be 3000 or 4000, level except for language and globally-focused courses.

Schulich Electives 24.00 credit-hours

NOTE: Students who are planning on going on exchange in Year 3 must successfully complete all 1st and 2nd year core courses prior to the Fall term of Year 3. Students who are planning to go on Exchange in Year 3 cannot delay core courses as outlined in the curriculum for the term they are studying at Schulich.

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Notes

Notes
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York Campus Map
For a more detailed map, please visit: http://www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/maps/york2d/index.htm.

Campus Map

York Campus Address: 4700 Keele St., Toronto, ON M3J 1P3
Location: York University is located on the west side of Keele St. between Finch and Steeles Ave. There are entrances from Keele St., Jane St., Steeles Ave. and Finch Ave.
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Toronto Canada

Division of Student Services and International Relations Scotiabank Suite, 2nd Floor, West Wing Schulich School of Business York University 4700 Keele Street Toronto, Ontario Canada M3J 1P3 Tel: (416) 736-5081 E-mail: undergrad@schulich.yorku.ca Web site: www.schulich.yorku.ca


								
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