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					Foreign & Commonwealth Office

ANTARCTIC TREATY Annual Exchange of Information Under Article VII (5) for 2006 – 2007

UNITED KINGDOM ACTIVITIES

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ANTARCTIC TREATY EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION UNDER ARTICLE VII (5) FOR 2006-2007 UNITED KINGDOM ACTIVITIES (The Roman numerals refer to the sections of the Standard format for the Annual Exchanges of Information annexed to Recommendation VIII-6 of the Eighth Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting.) I. DETAILS OF SHIPS, AIRCRAFT AND OTHER VEHICLES Royal Research Ships (British Antarctic Survey) Vessel RRS Ernest Shackleton RRS James Clark Ross Gross Registered Tonnage 4028 tonnes 5732 tonnes Remarks No armaments No armaments

Ice Patrol Ship (Royal Navy) Vessel HMS Endurance Deadweight 2500 tonnes Remarks Sundry small arms

Aircraft (British Antarctic Survey) Aircraft DHC-6 de Havilland Twin Otter wheel/ski aircraft DHC-6 de Havilland Twin Otter wheel/ski aircraft DHC-6 de Havilland Twin Otter wheel/ski aircraft DHC-6 de Havilland Twin Otter wheel/ski aircraft DHC-7 de Havilland Dash 7 aircraft Registration VP-FAZ VP-FBB VP-FBC VP-FBL VP-FBQ

The aircraft will be based in the Antarctic during the summer and flown by civilian personnel (see para. IV(c) below). The Twin Otter aircraft are used to provide logistic and science support for scientists in the Antarctic Peninsula, Ellsworth Land, Ronne Ice Shelf, Coats Land, Dronning Maud Land and polewards of Halley station. The Dash 7 aircraft will operate between the Falkland Islands and Rothera Station and provide logistic support within Antarctica. See also Annex VI for information on aircraft landing facilities. Aircraft (Royal Navy) 2

Two unarmed Royal Navy Lynx helicopters aboard HMS Endurance. These are used to provide aerial photographic and logistic support for field operations of the British Antarctic Survey and for hydrographic survey purposes. Military equipment Only on HMS Endurance. II. DETAILS OF EXPEDITIONS Ships: The itinerary of RRS Ernest Shackleton is presented on the BAS Web site www.antarctica.ac.uk The itinerary of RRS James Clark Ross is presented on the BAS Web site www.antarctica.ac.uk The itinerary of HMS Endurance is presented in Annex I Section 3. Aircraft: The flight schedule for DHC-7 Aircraft (VP-FBQ) is presented on the BAS web site www.antarctica.ac.uk III. DETAILS OF STATIONS IN THE ANTARCTIC Fuller details of the UK Antarctic stations are to be found on the COMNAP Web Site http://www.comnap.aq. The full address of the UK home page on the COMNAP site is: http://www.comnap.aq/comnap/comnap.nsf/P/CountryByISO/UK Summer and winter operation Station Rothera Adelaide Island Halley Coats Land Position 67º34'S 68º08'W 75º33'S 26º30'W Opened 1 Dec 1975 6 Jan 1956 Remarks Scientific station with laboratories, wharf and airfield Geospace, ozone and meteorological observatory Clean Air Laboratory (CASLAB), skiway

Summer operation only

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Station Fossil Bluff Alexander Island Signy South Orkney Islands IV. PERSONNEL See Annex II.

Position 71º20'S 68º17'W 60º43'S 45º36'W

Opened 20 Feb 1961 18 Mar 1947

Remarks Air transit station Terrestrial and freshwater biological laboratory

Military personnel aboard HMS Endurance V. PERSONAL ARMAMENTS None. VI. BRITISH ANTARCTIC SURVEY PROGRAMME OF WORK See Annex III. VII. AUTOMATIC RECORDING STATIONS & OBSERVATORIES See Annex IV. VIII. (a) TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES AND COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT Air Transport See paragraph I above. (b) Radio Communications See Annex V. Information prepared in accordance with Recommendation VI-2 of the Sixth Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting. (c) Description of Airfields See Annex VI. More information is provided in Antarctic Flight Information Manual. The Standing Committee on Antarctic Logistics and Operations (SCALOP) of the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programmes (COMNAP) produces this. The document was produced at the request of the ATCM, and is updated annually prior to the start of the Antarctic summer season. IX. FACILITIES FOR RENDERING ASSISTANCE

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(a)

Aircraft Four twin-engined de Havilland DHC-6 aircraft will be available in the Antarctic Peninsula area from November 2006 to March 2007. A wheels-only de Havilland DHC-7 aircraft will be available at Rothera Station from November 2006 to March 2007. Two Lynx helicopters on HMS Endurance.

(b)

Runways (Aircraft landing facilities in use by the British Antarctic Survey). (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) A crushed gravel runway adjacent to Rothera Station, Rothera Point, Adelaide Island. An extensive snow runway about 5 km NNW of Rothera Station, Rothera Point, Adelaide Island. Snow runway about 1.6 km SSE of Fossil Bluff, Alexander Island. This is subject to melting and refreezing during the summer, so may be unusable. Snow runway adjacent to Halley station, Brunt Ice Shelf. A blue ice runway at Sky Blu.

(c)

Fuel Available For emergency only: Aviation Turbine Kerosene at Halley and Rothera.

(d)

Navigation Aids See Annex VI.

(e)

Medical facilities Signy Halley Rothera Advanced first aid facilities only in summer Doctor, X-ray, Anaesthetic equipment Doctor, X-ray, Anaesthetic equipment

(f)

Accommodation Emergency accommodation can be provided at all stations. See also Annex VIII.

X.

NOTICE OF EXPEDITIONS TO THE ANTARCTIC NOT ORGANISED BY THE PARTY BUT ORGANISED IN, OR PROCEEDING FROM THE PARTY'S TERRITORY (Private Expeditions) See Annex VII.

XI.

NOTIFICATION OF UNOCCUPIED REFUGES AND STATIONS See Annex VIII. 5

XII.

ANNUAL RETURN OF THE NUMBERS OF EACH SPECIES KILLED OR CAPTURED IN THE ANTARCTIC TREATY AREA BAS Scientists undertook the weighing and non-lethal diet sampling of penguins at Signy Island, South Orkney Islands during the summer field season. Less than 3000 Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae), Chinstrap (P. Antarctica) and Gentoo (P. papua) penguins were captured temporarily for this work. No penguins were killed. BAS Scientists undertook biomentric measurements of 36 skuas at Rothera Point, and 50 skuas at Anchorage Island. In addition, non-lethal blood and feather sampling of southern giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus), brown skuas (Catharacta lonnbergi) and south polar skuas (Catharacta maccormicki) was undertaken at Signy Island, South Orkney Islands and at Anchorage, Lagoon and Léonie Islands, Marguerite Bay. Less than 40 giant petrels and 30 skuas were sampled. No birds were killed.

XIII.

NOTICE OF THE INTENDED USE OF RADIO-ISOTOPES IN SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS IN THE ANTARCTIC TREATY AREA See Annex IX.

XIV. NOTICE OF INTENDED USE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ROCKETS IN THE ANTARCTIC TREATY AREA This project has ceased until further notice. XVI. NOTICE OF PERMITS ISSUED IN ACCORDANCE WITH ANTARCTIC ACT 1994 See Annex X. XVII. WASTE MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR PERIOD 1 OCTOBER 2006 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2007 See Annex XI. XVIII. ENACTMENT OF UNITED KINGDOM DOMESTIC LEGISLATION TO GIVE EFFECT TO THE ANTARCTIC TREATY The Antarctic Act, 1994 (except for sections 3 to 7) was brought into effect in the United Kingdom on 1 November 1995 (Statutory Instrument 1995 No. 2748), consequent to the United Kingdom‟s ratification of the Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty on 25 April 1995. The Regulations to the Act (The Antarctic Regulations, 1995) in respect of the United Kingdom also came into effect on 1 November 1995 (Statutory Instrument No. 2741). Section 7 of the Antarctic Act 1994 was brought into effect on 1 November 1996. Sections 5 and 6 of the Antarctic Act 1994 were brought into effect on 1 June 1997 and 1 October 1997 respectively.

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Sections 3 and 4 were both brought into effect on the date that the Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty came into force, 14 January 1998. The Antarctic Regulations 1995 are amended by the Antarctic (Amendment) Regulations. These may be cited together as the Antarctic Regulations 1995-2004. The Antarctic Act 1994 was extended to British Overseas Territories by the Antarctic Act (Overseas Territories) Order 1995 (Statutory Instrument 1995 No 1030).

Polar Regions Unit Overseas Territories Department Foreign and Commonwealth Office London SW1A 2AH www.fco.gov.uk/antarctica November 2006

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ANNEX I Section 1 RRS ERNEST SHACKLETON – ITINERARY 2006-07

The itinerary for RRS Ernest Shackleton can be found at the following web site address : www.antarctica.ac.uk under the section on “Living and Working/ships”

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ANNEX I Section 2 RRS JAMES CLARK ROSS – ITINERARY 2006-07

The itinerary for RRS James Clark Ross can be found at the following web site address : www.antarctica.ac.uk under the section “Living and Working/ships”

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ANNEX I Section 3 HMS ENDURANCE – ITINERARY 2006-2007 Depart Falklands 31 October 2006 Four work periods south of 60o South latitude areas to be visited (Antarctic Peninsula, Erebus and Terror Gulf & South Orkney Islands) Aerial Photography of Tourist Site Guideline inspections carried out last Hydrographic survey work in and around the Antarctic Peninsula as prioritised by the Hydrographic Committee of Antarctica (HCA) Logistical support to British Antarctic Survey (deployment of field parties). Return Falklands 29 March 2007

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ANNEX 1 Section 4 DASH-7 PASSENGER AND CARGO SCHEDULE 2006-07

The following flights are scheduled between Stanley, Falkland Islands and Rothera Station, Antactica. Flight No. 1 SOUTH 2 SOUTH 3 SOUTH 4 SOUTH 5 SOUTH 6 SOUTH 7 SOUTH 8 SOUTH 9 SOUTH 10 SOUTH 11 SOUTH 12 SOUTH 13 SOUTH 14 SOUTH 15 SOUTH 16 SOUTH 17 SOUTH 18 SOUTH 19 SOUTH 20 SOUTH 21 SOUTH Date 14 November 2006 21 November 2006 22 November 2006 23 November 2006 25 November 2006 26 November 2006 29 November 2006 14 December 2006 21 December 2006 04 January 2007 11 January 2007 15 January 2007 23 January 2007 01 February 2007 06 February 2007 15 February 2007 20 February 2007 27 February 2007 06 March 2007 01 April 2007 06 April 2007 Flight No. NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH NORTH Date 20 November 2006 21 November 2006 22 November 2006 24 November 2006 25 November 2006 28 November 2006 13 December 2006 20 December 2006 03 January 2007 10 January 2007 14 January 2007 22 January 2007 01 February 2007 05 February 2007 14 February 2007 19 February 2007 26 February 2007 05 March 2007 09 March 2007 05 April 2007 12 April 2007

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ANNEX II OCCUPATIONS AND SPECIALISATIONS OF ANTARCTIC PERSONNEL 2006/07 SUMMER PERSONNEL RRS Ernest Shackleton Maximum number of personnel - 54 RRS James Clark Ross Maximum number of personnel - 51 RRS Ernest Shackleton Maximum number of crew - 23 Number and rank of military personnel - 0 RRS James Clark Ross Maximum number of crew - 29 Number and rank of military personnel - 0 Halley Research Station Maximum number of personnel - 45 Number and rank of military personnel - 2
Lt S CANTRELL RN Official Number C041069V Clearance Number HQBFSAI/3069.06 Lt J MURRAY RN Official Number C040993W Clearance Number HQBFSAI/3070.06

Rothera Research Station Maximum number of personnel - 115 Number and rank of military personnel - 0 Signy Research Station Maximum number of personnel - 13 Number and rank of military personnel - 0 WINTERING PERSONNEL Halley Maximum number of personnel - 18 Number and rank of military personnel - 0 Rothera Maximum number of personnel - 21 Number and rank of military personnel - 0 AIRCRAFT PERSONNEL, WINTER AND SUMMER

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Maximum number of personnel – 15

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ANNEX III
UK ANTARCTIC PROGRAMME OF WORK

OCTOBER 2006 TO SEPTEMBER 2007 STATIONS TO BE OCCUPIED Station Rothera Wintering staff 21 Activities planned Geoscience, glaciology, terrestrial & inshore biology, human physiology and health, meteorology, meteorological studies using imagery, ozone studies, mapping, UV impact mesosphere studies. marine surface satellite studies,

Halley

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Surface and upper-air meteorology, human physiology and health, meteorological studies using satellite imagery, turbidity, ozone studies, mesosphere studies, geomagnetism, ionospheric observations above Halley and poleward, airglow and auroral observations, whistler observations, ULF pulsations Lake chemistry, microbial & plant ecology, invertebrate ecology & physiology, CCAMLR monitoring. Meteorology.

Signy Fossil Bluff

0 0

UK SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMES OCTOBER 2006 TO SEPTEMBER 2007 The research programmes of BAS are planned on a five-year timetable. The programme was based on proposals from staff. After international peer review organised by the NERC, the most highly rated were integrated into the Survey‟s infrastructure capability. The outcome is a suite of nine research programmes. In addition, the Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI) provides access to Antarctica for projects that are bid for competitively by BAS and NERC staff and the scientific research community in British universities. The UK Antarctic programme optimises the use of two research vessels RRS James Clark Ross and RRS Ernest Shackleton, three Antarctic research stations, Halley, Rothera and Signy, and the fleet of four Twin Otter and one Dash-7 aircraft. The nine major BAS scientific programmes are: Greenhouse to Ice-House Evolution of the Antarctic Cryosphere and Palaeoenvironment (GEACEP) Climate and Chemistry: Forcings, Feedbacks and Phasings in the Earth System (CACHE) 14

Glacial Retreat in Antarctica and Deglaciation of the Earth System (GRADES) Biodiversity, Function, Limits and Adaptation from Molecules to Ecosystems (BIOFLAME) Integrating Southern Ocean Ecosystems into the Earth System (DISCOVERY 2010) Antarctic Climate and the Earth System (ACES) Sun Earth Connections (SEC) Natural Complexity Programme (COMPLEXITY) Long-Term Monitoring and Survey (LTMS) These programmes are described in the booklet Global Science in the Antarctic Context, 2005-2010. This information is reproduced on the BAS website in the section www.antarctica.ac.uk/BAS_Science/programmes2005-2010/index.html. Besides the programme of the British Antarctic Survey there are a number of Antarcticrelated studies undertaken in UK universities and research institutes. Some of these are funded directly by the British Antarctic Survey, and some are funded by the Natural Environment Research Council and from other academic sources. Details of the BAS-funded Antarctic Funding Initiative may be accessed through: http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/About_BAS/Corporate/AFI/Index.html

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ANNEX IV AUTOMATIC RECORDING STATIONS AND OBSERVATORIES

At Halley Research Station (WMO 89022) Advanced ionospheric sounder (AIS) Southern Hemisphere Auroral Radar Experiment (SHARE) Radar Four wide-beam riometers with directional aerials Imaging Riometer System (IRIS) with 49 beams Fluxgate magnetometer Search Coil magentometer VLF radio receivers and analysis system Airglow imager Dobson spectrophotometer Radiosonde system Automatic weather stations Meteorological instruments Laser Cloud Base Recorder 5 levels of turbulence probes (4 m to 32 m) 6 levels of temperature, humidity and wind vector (1 m to 32 m) Snow Temperature Profiles at 10 cm resolution to 2 m depth Acoustic Radar Array 6 element Microbarograph Array Digital all-sky camera Dartcom HRPT receiver Medical X-ray machine Bomem spectrometer PC computers, radio communications, satellite communications, local area network Clean Air Sector laboratory instruments: High Volume aerosol samplers (HiVol) Cascade Impactor Low volume aerosol sampler (LoVol) Aethalometer for soot carbon Condensation nucleus counter At 77°31'24"S, 23°25'18"W Fluxgate magnetometer At 79°04'36"S, 24°07'11"W Fluxgate magnetometer

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At 80°53'30"S, 22°14'48"W Fluxgate magnetometer Infra red radiometer At 81°30'00"S, 03°00'00"E Fluxgate magnetometer At 82°53'58"S, 12°14'57"W Fluxgate magnetometer At 84°21'34"S, 23°51'06"W Fluxgate magnetometer Infra red radiometer At 85°21'25"S, 02°03'44"E Fluxgate magnetometer At 85°23'22"S, 95°58'26"E Fluxgate magnetometer At 86°59'57"S, 28°24'49"E Fluxgate magnetometer At 86°30'53"S, 68°10'30"E Fluxgate magnetometer At 88°01'31"S, 43°51'56"W Fluxgate magnetometer At Larsen Ice Shelf 66.9ºS 60.9ºW (WMO 89262) Automatic Weather Station At Butler Island 72.2ºS 60.2ºW (WMO 89266) Automatic Weather Station

17

At Sky Blu 75ºS 71ºW (WMO 89272) Infra red radiometer Automatic Weather Station At Rothera Research Station (WMO 89062) Bentham spectroradiometer Laboratory glass washing machine Water purification system Medical X-ray machine Meteorological instruments including satellite receivers & transmitter Laser Cloud Base Recorder Radiosonde system Antarctic Reception of Imagery for Environmental Sciences (ARIES) satellite receiver and associated hardware for collecting imagery of Antarctic weather systems Horace weather forecast display system Système Automatique d'Observations Zenithales (SAOZ) UV-visible spectrometer system, computer and spectral data analysis suite Sea water level recorder Microbiology incubators Microbalances Environmental growth cabinets -20°C freezers -80°C freezers Carbolite furnaces Ovens Data loggers Centrifuge Incubators Fluorimeter Class II microbiological safety cabinet Marine aquarium system VLF receiver experiment Bomem spectrometer CTD with fluorometer and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensor MF radar for mesospheric winds Meteor scatter radar Fluxgate magnetometer Spectrophotometer Autoclave Fume Hoods PC computers, radio communications, satellite communications, local area network pH meter Scintillation counter Liquid nitrogen generator 18

Microwave oven Waterbaths (benchtop) Microscopes Fume cupboard At Signy Research Station (WMO 89042) Microclimate stations (two) Microbalances (two) Sea water level recorder Data loggers Sea ice camera for unattended operation Fume cupboards (one); exhaust only Centrifuge Sanyo incubator, PH meter Corers Laminar flow cabinet -80C freezer Water deioniser Fluorimeter Furnace Freezer and refrigerator PC computers, radio communications, satellite communications, local area network At Fossil Bluff (89065) Infra red radiometer Automatic weather station Equipment used in aircraft GPS equipment Polarimetric radar system HF antenna radiation pattern measurement equipment Scintrex Magnetometer System and data logger/ AGIS data acquisition system Airborne gravimeter (5-83) L&R modified by ZLS (ultra-sys) Zeiss camera Leika 530 GP5 Best Airborne Turbulence (BAT) Probe Hygrometer - General Eastern 1011C Thermometer De-iced Rosemount 102 Thermometer Normall Rosemount 102 Static pressure Goodrich 2011T Dynamic pressure Goodrich 2011T GPS 4 antenna Javad AT4 Radiometer Upward facing, vis Eppley PIR 19

Radiometer Upward facing, IR Eppley PSP Radiometer Downward facing, vis Eppley PIR Radiometer Downward facing, IR Eppley PSP IR thermometer Video camera Sony Data logger National Instruments +PC For ground surveys/field use Dual frequency GPS receivers for geophysical survey Theodolites (various) and levels Hand-held GPS receivers for navigation 72 channel seismograph with peripheral cables and geophones Geodimeter 220 Electronic Distance Measurement EDMs Land based gravimeters Two hot water drills (40 kW power) for obtaining seismic shot holes Hot water drill (250 kW power) for drilling through ice shelves with a proven capability of 600 metres Borehole oceanographic profiling system Ice sounding radars Automatic weather station Microclimate loggers Laptop computers 2 hand operated ice core drills capable of attaining 20 metres Electromechanical ice core drill for attaining 200 metres of ice core Ice core drilling winch Portable ice core conductivity measurer Geological field equipment (hammers, collecting bags, boxes) Hand-held computers/GPS systems for digital mapping

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ANNEX V

INFORMATION ON UNITED KINGDOM TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND SCHEDULES IN THE ANTARCTIC

Date of preparation

November 2006

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INFORMATION ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND SCHEDULES FOR THE YEAR 2006 - 2007 COUNTRY: UNITED KINGDOM STATION: BIRD ISLAND ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE ON THIS INFORMATION: The Director British Antarctic Survey High Cross, Madingley Road Cambridge CB3 OET Telephone: + 44 (0)1223 221400 Telegrams: Polasurvey, Cambridge Telex: 817725 Telephone:

LAT 5400'S LONG 3803'W CALLSIGN ZBH 22 SELCAL 05438 INMARSAT STD B I/D TPH 382343127 FAX 382343131

+ 44 (0)1223 362616

TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER AM. H3E, J3E FI.B 250 W PEP FREQUENCY SELECTION

RECEIVERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE FREQUENC Y SELECTION

REMARKS

TRP 8250 S

1.6-30 MHz

Synthesised

PRM 4021 TA 944C

2-15.9 MHz

H3E, J3E 10/100 W PEP

Synthesised

Transceiver with linear amp

2-11.9 MHz PRM 4051

H3E, J3E 5W

Synthesised

Transceiver

22

156-162 MHz Icom M59e 1635.5 MHz 1645.0 MHz NERA SATURN B+

FM J3E 25 W

Synthesised

FRG 7700

0.15-29.9 MHz

AM H3E, J3E

Synthesised

General purpose B/C receiver

TDM 36 W

1535 MHz 1543.5 MHz

TDM

Marine band VHF transceiver

INFORMATION ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND SCHEDULES FOR THE YEAR 2006 - 2007

COUNTRY: UNITED KINGDOM STATION: LAT 7558'S CALLSIGN ZHF 22 SELCAL 89022 INMARSAT STD B I/D TPH 323202010 FAX 323202011 TLX 323202013 ZHFZ HALLEY

ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE ON THIS INFORMATION: The Director British Antarctic Survey High Cross, Madingley Road LONG 02634'W Cambridge CB3 OET Telephone: Telegrams: Telex: Fax No: + 44 (0)1223 221400 Polasurvey, Cambridge 817725 + 44 (0)1223 362616

TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER FREQUENC Y SELECTION

RECEIVERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE FREQUENC Y SELECTION

REMARKS

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SKANTI TRP8757 S TXCVRS (x2)

1.6-30 MHz

J3E, R3E, H3E, A1A, H2A, F1B 750 W PEP

Synthesised 100 Hz steps

SKANTI R8000

10 kHz-30 MHz

J3E, R3E, H3E, A3E, F1B, A1A, H2A

Synthesised 10 Hz steps

1.6-30 MHz PRM 4790A

A3E, J3E 20 Watts

Synthesised 100 Hz steps

HF Field Transceiver

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STATION: HALLEY ZHF 22 TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER FREQUENCY SELECTION RECEIVERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE FREQUENC Y SELECTION REMARKS

VHF TXCVR SAILOR RT2048

154.40163.75 MHz

F3E 25 Watts

Synthesised

KENWOO D TK260

156-161 MHz

F3E 5 Watts

Synthesised

Handheld Channels 6, 8, 9, 16 programmed Handheld Channels 1-16 Programmed Air/Ground Communication s Handheld Air/Ground Communication s

156-161 MHz STANDAR D HX390 118-136.975 MHz JOTRON TR-6102 WALTER DITTEL FSG 5 118-136.975 MHz

F3E 5 Watts

Synthesised

A3E 10 Watts A3E 1 Watt

Synthesised

Synthesised

Inmarsat 25

Terminal Saturn Bm

1626.51646.5 MHz

TDM 33/25 dBW EIRP

1530.0-1559.0 MHz

TDM

26

STATION: HALLEY ZHF 22

ANTENNA

FACSIMILE

TELEPRINTER REMARKS LIST OF AVAILABLE FREQUENCIES

TYPE

AZIMUTH (IN DEGREES OR OMNI) OMNI

TYPE

GROUP

TYPE

SPEED (BAUD) 50 ARQ or UNPROTECTED TELEX AVAILABLE Frequencies pairs scanned on ARQ (KHz): (RX, TX) (3800, 3186) (4030, 4553) (7623, 7623) (8198, 9106) (11255, 11565) (14475, 14915) (16040, 16315) Frequencies in common use for RT (KHz): 4067, 5080, 5150, 5800 6210, 7450, 7775, 9106, 9115, 10049, 11055, 11255, 12425, 14915

WIDEBAN D FAN DIPOLE (x2) INVERTE DV DIPOLE

PITNEY BOWES 9820

GPIII

XH5112

OMNI

27

INFORMATION ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND SCHEDULES FOR THE YEAR 2006 - 2007 COUNTRY: UNITED KINGDOM STATION: RRS JAMES CLARK ROSS LONG ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE ON THIS INFORMATION: The Director British Antarctic Survey High Cross, Madingley Road Cambridge CB3 OET Telephone: + 44 (0)1223 221400 Telegrams: Polasurvey, Cambridge Telex: 817725 Fax No: + 44 (0)1223 362616

LAT MOBILE CALLSIGN

ZDLP SELCAL 50441 TPH 374033920 FAX 374033924 TLX 374033926 ZDLP
TRANSMITTERS

RECEIVERS FREQUENCY SELECTION Synthesised Synthesised TYPE FREQUENCY BANDS WITH WITH 15 kHz-30 MHz TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT A1A, A2A, J3E, R3E, F1B, A2A, H2B, A3E, H3E FREQUENCY SELECTION RECEIVER RECEIVER Synthesised

REMARKS

TYPE

FREQUENCY BANDS 1.6-30 MHz 1.6-30 MHz

TYPES OF TRANSMISSION AND POWER J3E, R3E, H3E, A1/H2A, F1B 750 W PEP

TRP 8757 D TRP 8757 S

TRANSREC TRANSREC OCEANIC

NERA SAT B SAILOR VHF-FM RT 146 SAILOR RT 2048 TRP 3000

1636.5-1645 MHz

EIRE 40 W

SINGLE CH

156-161 MHz

G3EJN (PHASE MOD) As above

Synthesised

SAILOR R501

2182 kHz 1535-1543.5 MHz

156-161 MHz

Synthesised TR 6102 118-136 MHz

156-161 MHz JOTRON VHFAM TR 6102 118-136 MHz

As above As above

Synthesised Synthesised

28

STATION: RRS JAMES CLARK ROSS ANTENNA TYPE AZIMUTH (IN DEGREES OR OMNI) OMNI OMNI OMNI OMNI FACSIMILE TYPE GROUP TELEPRINT ER TYPE SPEED (BAUD) REMARKS LIST OF AVAILABLE FREQUENCIES

A59ST AT100D STA10A Z5086001

PITNEY BOWES 8050

GPIII

TT1585E TEXTEL3200 PCU 9000

50

SAT-STD B TLX

50

HF TLX - ARQ or UNPROTECTED AVAILABLE

NORMALLY ALLOCATED MARINE FREQUENCIES PLUS FREQUENCIES ALLOCATED FOR USE IN ANTARCTIC WATERS

GMT

FREQUENCI ES USED TRANSMITTIN G RECEIVING TYPE OF EMISSION

CIRCUIT CONDUCT TYPE OF TRAFFIC SX OR DX SIDEBAN D

REMARKS

STATION WORKED

OPEN

CLOSE

29

INFORMATION ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND SCHEDULES FOR THE YEAR 2006 - 2007 COUNTRY: UNITED KINGDOM STATION: RRS ERNEST SHACKLETON LONG ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE ON THIS INFORMATION: The Director British Antarctic Survey High Cross, Madingley Road Cambridge CB3 OET Telephone: Telegrams: Telex: 817725 Fax No: + 44 (0)1223 221400 Polasurvey, Cambridge + 44 (0)1223 362616

LAT MOBILE CALLSIGN

ZDLS1 SELCAL 45968 INMARSAT TPH 374035710 FAX 374035712 Telex 374035714 ZDLS1 TRANSMITTE RS

RECEIVERS FREQUENCY SELECTION TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT FREQUENC Y SELECTION RECEIVER RECEIVER

REMARKS

TYPE

FREQUENC Y BANDS 1.6-30 MHz 1.6-30 MHz

TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER J3E, R3E, H3E, A1/H2A, F1B 750 W PEP

TRP 8757 D TRP 8757 S

Synthesised Synthesised

TRANSRE C TRANSRE C

WITH WITH

Frequency capability

TRP 3000

156-161 MHz

VHF-FM 30

Synthesised

Transceiver

SAILOR 2047/D JOTRON TR6102 NERA SATURN BM

156-161 MHz

VHF-FM

Synthesised

VHF Transceiver VHF

118-136 MHz

6A3E, 2.5 W

Synthesised VHF-AM transceiver Maritime satellite terminal

1635.5-1645 MHz

TDM 36 W

1535-1543 MHz

31

STATION: RRS ERNEST SHACKLETON

GMT

FREQUENCI ES USED TRANSMITTIN G RECEIVING TYPE OF EMISSION

CIRCUIT CONDUCT TYPE OF TRAFFIC SX OR DX SIDEBAN D

REMARKS

STATION WORKED UK Antarctic Stations BAS Headquarters in Cambridge, UK

OPEN

CLOSE

HX

HX

RRS Ernest Shackleton only operates during season Nov-May. Main mode of communication via e-mail

ANTENNA TYPE AZIMUTH (IN DEGREES OR OMNI) OMNI-TX

FACSIMILE TYPE GROUP

TELEPRINT ER TYPE SPEED (BAUD) 50

REMARKS

LIST OF AVAILABLE FREQUENCIES

Comrod

Brother 8250p

PCU 9000 with Scancom software.

Maritime TOR protected wide band - unprotected available

Normal allocated maritime Freqs plus Freqs allocated for use in

32

Cage Dipole OMNI RX OMNI-TX OMNI-TX

Antarctic waters.

1.3 M DISH

DISH

33

INFORMATION ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND SCHEDULES FOR THE YEAR 2006 - 2007

COUNTRY: UNITED KINGDOM STATION: ROTHERA

LAT 6734'S LONG 6808'W CALLSIGN ZHF 45 TPH 323201510 FAX 323201514 Telex 323201517 ZHFR TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER A1A, H3E, J3E, F1B 750 W PEP

ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE ON THIS INFORMATION: The Director British Antarctic Survey High Cross, Madingley Road Cambridge CB3 OET Telephone: + 44 (0)1223 221400 Telegrams: Polasurvey, Cambridge Telex: 817725 Fax No: + 44 (0)1223 362616

RECEIVERS FREQUENC Y SELECTION TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE FREQUENC Y SELECTION

REMARKS

SKANTI TRP 8757D TRIPLE TXCVR's SAC-NDB TYPE SA100 DUAL

1-30 MHz

Synthesised 100 Hz steps

SKANTI R8001

0.15-30 MHz

A1B, A3A, H3E, J3E, F1B

Synthesised 10 Hz steps

310KHz

A2A or A3E 100 W

34

STATION: ROTHERA ZHF 45 TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER FREQUENCY SELECTION RECEIVERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE FREQUENC Y SELECTION REMARKS

HF Field TXCVR

PRM4021

2-16 MHz

A3E, J3E, A1A 10 W A3E, J3E, A1A 10 W A1A, J3E 5W A1A J3E 20 W A1A, A3E, J3E F2B 20 W

Synthesised 100 Hz steps Synthesised 100 Hz steps Synthesised 100 Hz steps Synthesised 100 Hz steps Synthesised 100 Hz steps

PRM4031

2-30 MHz

PRM4051

2-12 MHz

PRM 4041

2-30 MHz

PRM 4790A

2-30 MHz

35

STATION: ROTHERA ZHF 45 TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER FREQUENCY SELECTION RECEIVERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE FREQUENC Y SELECTION REMARKS

NDB SS 1000A 310 kHz A1A 100 W PEP Fixed frequency crystal

DME Fernau DME2020 INMARSAT EQUIPMENT NERA SATURN BM

Ch119Y

PULSE 100 WATTS

119Y

1636.51645 MHz

TDM 40 W

1535-1543.5 MHz L BAND

TDM

36

STATION: ROTHERA ZHF 45 TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF TRANSMISSI ON AND POWER FREQUENCY SELECTION RECEIVERS TYPE FREQUEN CY BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTIO N AVAILABL E FREQUENCY SELECTION REMARKS

VHF TRANSRECEIVE R 156-158 MHz Icom M59 156-158 MHz Icom M15 118-136 MHz JOTRON 118-136 MHz DITTEL Channel 18 Motorola Channel 1 Motorola 156-158 MHz Icom M3 VHF-FM 5 Watt Synthesised Marine channel repeater 10 Watt Synthesised VHF-FM 25 Watt VHF-FM 5 Watt VHF-AM 50 Watt VHF-AM 2 Watt 25 Watt Synthesised

Synthesised Synthesised Synthesised 118.1, 118.3 121.5 118.1, 118.3 121.5

Synthesised

37

STATION: ROTHERA ZHF 45 ANTENNA FACSIMILE TELEPRINTER REMARKS TYPE AZIMUTH (IN DEGREES OR OMNI) STEERABLE TYPE GROUP TYPE SPEED (BAUD) 3186, 3250, 3800, 4892 5930, 7623, 8190, 9480 LIST OF AVAILABLE FREQUENCIES

SABRE RLPA SABRE 800-4 800-4 NDB SAC MONOPO LE

Brother 8250

GP 111 XH5112 50

0/180 90/270

TT1585E TEXTEL320

50

Used with SES terminal

OMNI

Frequencies in common use 4067, 4553, 5080, 5800 6386.5, 7450, 8198, 8265 9106, 10049, 11055, 11255 12425, 14915, 17975

38

STATION: ROTHERA ZHF 45 GMT STATION WORKED HALLEY DEEP FIELD FIELD PARTIES STANLEY FOSSIL BLUFF MET SCHEDS FIELD PARTIES INTERBASE BAS HQ MET SCHEDS INTERBASE DEEP FIELD BAS HQ FIELD PARTIES 1000 1015 1030 1100 1130 1135 1200 1230 1430 1735 1830 1830 2000 2230 2330 2335 0000-1000 5080U, 7775U, 39 1015 1030 1045 1130 1135 1200 1230 7775U, 8855U, 9106U, 10049U 4067U, 5080U as required 5080U, 6386.5U 11055U, 9106U Satellite as required 4067U 9106U, 7623U, 11055U Satellite 5080U, 4067U 5080U, 4067U 0000 as required J3E J3E SAFETY DAILY J3E MET OCT-MAR DAILY 9106U, 7775U 7775U, 9106U 4067U, 5080U, 7775U J3E J3E J3E J3E J3E J3E J3E J3E SATELLITE J3E J3E J3E SATELLITE J3E J3E MET SAFETY SAFETY ADMIN MET MET MET SAFETY ADMIN ADMIN FAX MET MET ADMIN E-MAIL SAFETY ADMIN MET DAILY OCT-MAR DAILY OCT-MAR DAILY OCT-MAR DAILY OCT-MAR DAILY DAILY OCT-MAR DAILY APR-SEP SATURDAY MON-FRI DAILY OCT-MAR DAILY APR-SEP SATURDAY MON-FRI OCT-MAR DAILY OPEN CLOSE FREQUENCIES USED TRANSMITTIN G RECEIVING CIRCUIT CONDUCT TYPE OF EMISSION TYPE OF TRAFFIC SX DX SIDEBAN D REMARKS

1445 1800 1900 2015 2330 2335

FOSSIL BLUFF MET SCHEDS LISTENING WATCHES

1130-2359

118.1 MHz, 156.8 MHz & Marine Channel 6 2023.5

J3E

OCT-MAR DAILY

APR-SEP DAILY

DURING PERIOD OCT-MAR, 6, 8, 10, 11 AND 12 MHZ FREQUENCIES ARE USED AS REQUIRED TO COMMUNICATE WITH AIRCRAFT AND DISTANT FIELD PARTIES

40

INFORMATION ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND SCHEDULES FOR THE YEAR 2006 - 2007 COUNTRY: UNITED KINGDOM STATION: LAT 6043'S CALLSIGN ZHF 33 SELCAL 89042 INMARSAT TPH 382341575 FAX 382341579 SIGNY ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE ON THIS INFORMATION: The Director British Antarctic Survey High Cross, Madingley Road LONG 4536'W Cambridge CB3 OET Telephone: + 44 (0)1223 221400 Telegrams: Polasurvey, Cambridge Telex: 817725 Fax No: + 44 (0)1223 362616

SIGNY STATION OPERATES SUMMER ONLY

TRANSMITTERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS 2-28 MHz TYPES OF TRANSMISSIO N AND POWER J3E, R3E, H3E FIB 250 W PEP 25W FREQUENCY SELECTION

RECEIVERS TYPE FREQUENC Y BANDS TYPES OF RECEPTION AVAILABLE FREQUENC Y SELECTION

REMARKS

SKANTI TRP 8253S Navico HF Field TXCVR

Synthesised

156-161MHz

Synthesised

VHF Marine radio

41

Inmarsat Equipment Nera SATURN Bt 1636.5-1645 MHz TDM 36 EIRE 1535-1543.5 MHz TDM

42

STATION: SIGNY ZHF 33 ANTENNA TYPE AZIMUTH (IN DEGREES OR OMNI) 120 approx FACSIMILE TYPE GROUP TELEPRINTER TYPE SPEED (BAUD) REMARKS LIST OF AVAILABLE FREQUENCIES

WB1510 3-30 MHz AT80H 1.6-30 MHz Dipoles various

SIEMENS T100

50

OMNI

ARQ or UNPROTECTE D TLX AVAILABLE

3186, 3250, 3800, 4892 5930, 7623, 8190, 9480 Frequencies in common use 4067, 4553, 5080, 5800 6386.5, 7450, 8198, 8265 9106, 10049, 11255 12425, 14915, 17975

PITNEY BOWES 7100

GROUP III OKITEX TERMINA L

50

Used with SES Terminal

43

ANNEX VI AIRCRAFT LANDING FACILITIES IN USE BY THE BRITISH ANTARCTIC SURVEY All information in this Annex is to be found in the Antarctic Flight Information Manual (AFIM). AFIM is a document produced by the Standing Committee on Antarctic Logistics and Operations (SCALOP) of the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programmes. The Antarctic Flight Information Manual (AFIM) is produced at the request of the ATCM and is updated annually prior to the start of the Antarctic summer season. Please consult this document for a fuller description and additional details. 1. ROTHERA STATION GRAVEL RUNWAY (See AFIM) Position: ROTHERA - situated on the eastern coast of Adelaide Island in Laubeuf Fjord, lat. 67 34S, long. 068 08W. (Magnetic variation 21 East in 1980.) Height of runway above mean sea level: 3 metres. Nearest station: The runway is within the Rothera Station complex. Runway facilities: One runway designated 360/180 magnetic on true bearings 22/202. Length 900 metres. Width 45 metres. Surface of runway: Crushed gravel. Period of operation: Summer operation - October to March (by prior arrangement only). Ground facilities: Medical and fire fighting facilities available. Hanger space may be available for visiting aircraft by prior arrangement only. Snowblower available. Runway lighting and apron lights. PAPI at south end of runway. Hazard beacon on hanger. Grounded icebergs may obstruct runway thresholds. Taxiing guidance system: VHF with ground crew on 118.1 MHz. Base monitors 5080 kHz or 7775 kHz (USB), 1000Z - 0030Z. Call sign: ZHF 45, voice identification "Rothera Base". Ground/air communications: 5080 kHz as primary frequency with secondary frequency of 7775 kHz (all USB). Radio aids for navigation and approach: At all stations the main transmitters may be called upon to act as beacons (for information on transmitter equipment at each station see Annex V). At Rothera Point: NDB 310 kHz. 44

IDENT ROT.

45

2.

ROTHERA STATION SKIWAY (see AFIM) Position: ROTHERA SKIWAY - situated on the eastern coast of Adelaide Island in Laubeuf Fjord, lat. 67 34S, long. 068 07W. (Magnetic variation 21 ast in 1980.) Height of skiway above mean sea level: 900 feet. Nearest station: Rothera Station is about 5 km SSE of landing area on bearing 140 magnetic. Skiway facilities: One skiway designated 020/200 magnetic on true bearing of 041/221T. The skiway is marked by drums on its west side. Skiway is situated on bearing 320 magnetic at 3 nautical miles when over-head NDB. The skiway has a slight concave profile with the col in a mountain ridge at its southern end. Total marked length is 2.5 km. Surface of skiway: Unprepared snow. Period of operation: Summer operation - October to March. Ground facilities: At Skiway: No ground installations apart from pickets for aircraft, two small cabooses and windsock. Skiway and base VHF: capability 118.1 MHz Base monitors 5080 kHz and 7775 kHz (USB), 1000Z - 0030Z Call sign: ZHF 45, voice identification "Rothera Base". Ground/air communications: 5080 kHz primary frequency with secondary frequency 7775 kHz (all USB). Radio aids for navigation and approach: At all stations the main transmitters may be called upon to act as beacons (for information on transmitter equipment at each station see Annex V). At Rothera Point: NDB 310 kHz. IDENT ROT.

3.

FOSSIL BLUFF (See AFIM) Position: FOSSIL BLUFF, George VI Sound, lat. 71 20S, long. 068 16W. (Magnetic Variation 23.5 East in 1980) Height of skiway above mean sea level: 300 feet. Slope up to south. Nearest station: Fossil Bluff lies about 1.6 km NNW of landing area. Food and medical supplies at huts. Station normally manned October-February, with party reporting to Rothera Station.

46

Skiway facilities: The skiway is 1200 metres long and marked by drums on flags on the west of the skiway. The bearing is 330/150T. This landing area is an ice shelf in front of the hut and immediately on its western side is bounded by the steep-sided bluff. During summer with high melt conditions the strip may become unusable, being either a small lake or a hard frozen area of sharp-edged corrugations. Surface of skiway: Unprepared snow. Period of operation: Summer operation. Skiway can deteriorate due to heavy melt in mid-summer season. Ground facilities: HF link on 5080 USB to Rothera (minimum twice daily). Hand-held VHF capability 118.1 MHz when aircraft known in area. Radio aids for navigation and approach: Nil 4. HALLEY (See AFIM) Position: HALLEY, Brunt Ice Shelf, Coats Land, lat. 75 33.87S, long. 026 33.72W. The coordinates change due to the movement of the ice on which the station is located. (Magnetic variation 2ºW in 1988). Height of skiway above mean sea level: about 30 metres. Nearest station: Halley Station lies approximately 1100 metres SSW of skiway. The skiway is marked with drums and there are some radio masts in the vicinity. The highest antennae are 45 metres tall, and lie approximately 750 metres south of the station. Skiway facilities: One skiway on true bearing of 08/26T marked by single line of drums approximately 1200 metres long. Many other perimeter and guide drum lines in vicinity. Only land on south side of skiway drum markers. Surface of skiway: Unprepared snow. Period of operation: Summer operation. Ground facilities: HF 5080 USB, 7775 USB, Marine VHF Channel 16, Aero VHF 118.1 MHz. Call sign: ZHF 22, voice identification "Halley". Radio aids for navigation and approach: At all stations the main transmitters may be called upon to act as beacons (for information on transmitter equipment at each station see Annex V).

47

5.

SKY BLU Position: SKY BLU (Blue Ice Runway) lat. 74 52S, long. 071 34W (Magnetic variation 29ºE (1980)). Height of runway above mean sea level: 4500 ft. Nearest station: Sky Blu field camp adjacent to runway. Runway facilities: Runway designated 360/180. Surface of runway: Unprepared blue ice (minor grading). Period of operation: arrangement). November-February (Summer operation)(by prior

Ground facilities: No ground installations apart from two small cabooses and a windsock. All communications arranged through Rothera Station. HF and VHF 118.1 MHz on request. Radio aids for navigation and approach: Nil.

48

ANNEX VII NOTICE OF EXPEDITIONS TO THE ANTARCTIC NOT ORGANISED BY THE PARTY BUT ORGANISED IN, OR PROCEEDING FROM, THE PARTY’S TERRITORY (Private Expeditions) 1. UKAHT – Mrs Philippa Foster-Back c/o Rachel Morgan Kingcoed Farm Usk NP15 1ED Operations for 2006/2007 Season Operation of Port Lockroy (Historic Site and Monument No.61)

2. Saga Rose 2005 World Cruise - Saga Shipping Company The Saga Building Enbrook Park Folkestone Kent CT20 3SE Operations for 2006/2007 Season Tourist cruise on the vessel Saga Rose (Bahamas-registered) 3. Team N2i – Mr Henry Cookson 62a Hornton Street London W8 4NU Operations for 2006/2007 Season Private trek from Novolazarevskaya Base to the Pole of Inaccessibility

4. Noel Hedley Marshall

49

c/o BM BOX 3524 London WC1N 3XX Operations for 2006/2007 Season Private sailing visit to western Antarctic Peninsula on the vessel Sadko 5. Graham Land Expedition – Mr Stephen Brown Keepers Cottage Rumble Street Monkswood Usk Monmouthsire NP15 1QG Operations for 2006/2007 Season Mountaineering in Mount Bain/Slessor Peak region 6. British Schools Exploration Society – Mr William Taunton-Burnet BSES Royal Geographical Society 1 Kensington Gore London SW7 2AR Operations for 2006/2007 Season Reconnaissance for future educational visits 7. Arctic to Antarctic – Mr Michael Holland 66 Fitzwilliam Square Dublin 2 Republic of Ireland Operations for 2006/2007 Season Private sailing visit to western Antarctic Peninsula on the vessel Celtic Spirit

50

ANNEX VIII NOTIFICATION OF UNOCCUPIED UNITED KINGDOM STATIONS AND REFUGES IN THE ANTARCTIC 2006-2007 In accordance with Recommendation III-II of the III Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting (ATCM), the location and facilities available at unoccupied United Kingdom stations and refuges are noted below. All refuges are built on rock unless otherwise stated. No radio facilities are available at any of these stations or refuges. Any person who visits any of these stations or refuges, or uses any of the facilities, is requested to leave it closed. They are also requested to inform the Director of the British Antarctic Survey of the state of repair and of the facilities used as soon as possible. SOUTH ORKNEY ISLANDS Cape Geddes: 6041'S, 4434'W, on north coast of Laurie Island; established January 1946 and evacuated in March 1947. Accommodation for 4 people; no food or fuel. Occasionally used by other national operators as a field refuge. Last inspection by BAS personnel on 23 January 1992. Scheduled for demolition in March 2007. Shingle Cove: 6039'S, 4533'W, on beach in Shingle Cove, Iceberg Bay, Coronation Island; established May 1962. Accommodation for 2 people, food and fuel. Field refuge for Signy station. Last inspected January 1996. Scheduled for demolition in March 2007. Cummings: 6043'45"S, 4539'50"W, at Cummings Cove, Signy Island. Close proximity to Signy Research Station over the ice cap. Scientific field hut visited regularly by BAS personnel from Signy Station. Accommodation for 2 people; food and fuel for 2 personmonths. Foca: 6041'50"S, 4538'40"W, at Foca Cove, Signy Island. Close proximity to Signy Research Station on opposite side of the island. Scientific field hut visited regularly by BAS personnel from Signy Station. Accommodation for 4 people; food and fuel for 2 personmonths. Gourlay: 6043'50"S, 4535'05"W, on Gourlay Peninsula overlooking Rock Haven, Signy Island. Close proximity to Signy Research Station, 3 km overland. Scientific field hut visited regularly by BAS personnel from Signy Station. Accommodation for two people; food and fuel for 2 person-months. This hut will be demolished during the 2006/07 austral summer, and a new hut built at the same location. SOUTH SHETLAND ISLANDS Deception Island: 6259'S, 6034'W, at Whalers Bay, Deception Island; established February 1944 and evacuated during a major volcanic eruption in February 1969. Station buildings are now in a very dilapidated condition. However, the aircraft hangar remains standing and intact. Base buildings and hangar now designated as part of Historic Site and Monument No. 51

71 at the XXVI ATCM in 2003. Major clean-up of debris carried out in April 2004, along with the salvage of the wreck of a BAS Single Otter aircraft. A survey of the site will be undertaken as part of a wider heritage survey during the 2006/07 austral summer, to be lead by Dr John Shears of the British Antarctic Survey. ANTARCTIC PENINSULA: West coast of Graham Land Damoy: 6448'S, 6330'W, at Dorian Bay on west coast of Wiencke Island; established November 1975. Accommodation for 15 people; food for 4 person-years, but no fuel. Hut in good order. Visited by BAS personnel in March 2005 and leaking fuel drum removed. Port Lockroy: 6450'S, 6318'W, on Goudier Island, a small rocky island in a sheltered harbour on the west coast of Wiencke Island; established February 1944. Designated as Historic Site and Monument No 61 at the XIX ATCM in 1995. Accommodation for 6 people; base repaired and cleaned up by five-man team in February 1996. Since then the station has been opened for visitors and further work carried out during each summer season. The British Antarctic Survey has undertaken the conservation work with the guidance of the United Kingdom Heritage Trust and the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The operation of Port Lockroy was handed over to the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust in July 2006. Rasmussen Peninsula: 6515'S, 6406'W, at 9 m above sea-level, attached to mainland east of the Argentine Islands; established March 1984. Accommodation for 4 people; food, fuel and sleeping equipment, also mountain rescue equipment. Last inspected by BAS personnel in March 1991. Hut now used regularly by scientists and support staff from the Ukrainian Antarctic research programme operating from Vernadsky. Wordie House: 6515'05"S, 6415'15"W, on opposite side of Stella Creek to Ukrainian Vernadsky Research Station. Established in 1947 on the site of the 1937/38 British Graham Land Expedition hut. Accommodation for 4 people. In view of close proximity (0.75 km) to Vernadsky station it is not regarded as an emergency refuge and so does not hold food and fuel stock. Designated as Historic Site and Monument No 62 at the XIX ATCM in 1995. Last inspected by BAS personnel in March 2005. A survey of the site will be undertaken as part of a wider heritage survey during the 2006/07 austral summer, to be lead by Dr John Shears of the British Antarctic Survey. Detaille Island: 6652'S, 6648'W, on small rocky island at entrance to Lallemand Fjord, Loubet Coast; established February 1956. Accommodation for 10 people. The hut is habitable. Visited by BAS personnel in March 1997 when the hut was cleaned up and hazardous waste removed. Last visited by BAS personnel in March 2004. A survey of the site will be undertaken as part of a wider heritage survey during the 2006/07 austral summer, to be lead by Dr John Shears of the British Antarctic Survey. ANTARCTIC PENINSULA: Marguerite Bay

52

Blaiklock Island: 6733'S, 6714'W, on beach on west coast of Blaiklock Island, Bigourdan Fjord; established March 1957. Accommodation for 4 people; food and fuel. Used intermittently by BAS field parties from Rothera Research Station. Considered to be part of Horseshoe Island base and designated along with Horseshoe as Historic Site and Monument No. 63 at the XIX ATCM in March 1995. Last visited by BAS personnel in 1999. Lagoon Island: 6735'S, 6815'W, on small rocky beach on Lagoon Island, part of the Anchorage Islands; established November 1989. Accommodation for 4 people; food and fuel. Used regularly by field parties from Rothera Research Station. Horseshoe Island: 6748'S, 6718'W, in Sally Cove on north-west coast of Horseshoe Island; established 11 March 1955. Accommodation for 10 people; food and fuel. Used regularly by field parties from Rothera Research Station and occasionally by other national operators. Designated as Historic Site and Monument No 63 at the XIX ATCM in March 1995. A programme of renovation was carried out during March 1997. Last visited by BAS staff in 2005. A survey of the site will be undertaken as part of a wider heritage survey during the 2006/07 austral summer, to be lead by Dr John Shears of the British Antarctic Survey. Stonington Island: 6811'S, 6700'W, on small rocky island attached to glacier on mainland, Falličres Coast; established February 1946. Accommodation for 18 people; food. Generators. Buildings watertight and in reasonable condition. Clean-up by two-man team in February 1992 with removal of fuel, hazardous wastes and empty drums. Designated as Historic Site and Monument No 64 at the XIX ATCM in March 1995. Emergency repair work undertaken by two-man team during January 2003. Last visited by BAS staff in 2005. A survey of the site will be undertaken as part of a wider heritage survey during the 2006/07 austral summer, to be lead by Dr John Shears of the British Antarctic Survey.

53

ANNEX IX

ADVICE NOTE FOR CONSULTATIVE PARTIES TO THE ANTARCTIC TREATY PROJECTED USE OF RADIOCHEMICALS AND RADIONUCLIDES BY BRITISH ANTARCTIC SURVEY 2006-2007 SEASON

Research Worker

Base

Project

Radiochemical

Activity

Dr R Korb

JCR

Discovery 2010

Aqueous 14C as Sodium Bicarbonate

1100MBq

54

ANNEX X NOTICE OF PERMITS ISSUED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ANTARCTIC ACT 1994 a) Notice of permits issued for activities under Section 3 of the Antarctic Act 1994 (British Expeditions) Permit No. S3-01/2006: UKAHT c/o of Kingcoed Farm, Usk NP15 1ED, to operate Port Lockroy (HSM No.61). Valid between 15/10/2007 – 30/06/2007. Permit No. S3-02/2006: Saga Shipping Company Ltd of Kent, UK, to undertake a tourist cruise between 28/01/2007 – 03/02/2007. Permit No. S3-03/2006: The British Schools Exploration Society of the Royal Geographical Society, 1 Kensington Gore, London SW7 2AR, to conduct reconnaissance for future educational expeditions. Valid between 27/10/2007 – 23/11/2007. Permit No. S3-05/2006: Henry Cookson of 62a Hornton Street, London W8 4NU, to undertake a private trek from Novolazarevskaya Base to the Pole of Inaccessibility, valid between 28/11/2007 – 04/02/2007. Permit No. S3-06/2006: Noel Hedley Marshall c/o BM BOX 3524, London WC1N 3XX, to undertake a private sailing visit between 03/01/2007 – 08/02/2007. Permit No. S3-07/2006: Michael Holland of 66 Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland, to undertake a private sailing visit between 10/01/2007 – 28/02/2007. Permit No. S3-08/2006: Stephen Brown of Keepers Cottage, Rumble Street, Monkswood, Usk, Monmouthsire NP15 1QG, to undertake mountaineering in the Mount Bain/Slessor Peak region. Valid between 20/01/2007 – 10/02/2007.

b) Notice of permits issued under Section 5 of the Antarctic Act 1994 (British vessels, aircraft and hovercraft entering Antarctica) Aircraft Permit No. S5-02/2005: Issued to British Antarctic Survey authorising a fixed wing multiengine DHC-7 aircraft to enter Antarctica between 01/10/2006 – 15/04/2007. Permit No. S5-03/2005: Issued to British Antarctic Survey authorising five fixed wing multiengine DHC-6/7 aircraft to enter Antarctica between 01/10/2006 – 15/04/2007. Vessels

55

Permit No. S5-01/2006: Issued to James „Skip‟ Novak of 92 Satchell Lane, Hamble, Hampshire, UK to cruise the Antarctic Peninsula in the vessel Pelagic Australis between 31/12/2006 – 27/01/2007. Permit No. S5-02/2006: Issued to James „Skip‟ Novak of 92 Satchell Lane, Hamble, Hampshire, UK to cruise the Antarctic Peninsula in the vessel Pelagic Australis between 07/02/2007 – 28/02/2007. Permit No. S5-03/2006: Issued to Noel Hedley Marshall c/o BM BOX 3524, London WC1N 3XX to cruise the Antarctic Peninsula in the vessel Sadko between 03/01/2007 – 08/02/2007

c) Notice of permits issued under Section 6 of the Antarctic Act 1994 (Mineral resource activities). Permit No. S6-01/2006: Issued to Dr Raja Ganeshram of the University of Edinburgh, UK authorising collection of sediment cores between 01/10/2006 – 28/02/2007. Permit No. S6-02/2006: Issued to Mr Tom Spreyer of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK authorising collection of rocks and fossil fragments between 01/01/207 – 31/03/2007. Permit No. S6-03/2006: Issued to Dr Dominic Hodgson of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK authorising collection of rock samples between 01/11/2006 – 24/01/2007. Permit No. S6-04/2006: Issued to Dr Morag Ann Hunter of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK authorising collections of rocks and sediment cores between 01/01/2007 – 28/02/2007. Permit No. S6-06/2006: Issued to Dr Dominic Hodgson of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK to collect rock samples between 01/01/2007 – 04/02/2007. Permit No. S6-07/2006: Issued to Dr John Smellie of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK to collect rock samples between 01/10/2006 – 28/02/2007. Permit No. S6-08/2006: Issued to Professor Julian Dowdeswell of Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, UK to map and collect sediment cores and conduct geophysical surveying between 01/10/2006 – 28/02/2007. Permit No. S6-09/2006: Issued to Professor Jane Francis of Leeds University, UK to collect rock and fossil samples between 04/02/2007 – 12/03/2007. Permit No. S6-10/2006: Issued to Conor Joseph Ryan of the University of Brighton, UK to collect rock samples between 29/10/2006 – 28/11/2006. Permit No. S6-11/2006: Issued to Dr Teal Richard Riley of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK to collect rock samples between 29/10/2006 – 14/01/2007. 56

d) Notice of permits issued under Section 12 of the Antarctic Act 1994 (Interfering with flora and fauna). Permit No. S7-02/2006: Issued to Mr Richard Hall of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK to undertake biometric measurements of south polar skuas at Rothera Point and Anchorage Island between 01/10/2006 – 31/03/2007. Permit No. S7-03/2006: Issued to Mr Michael Dunn of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK to undertake counting, weighing and diet sampling of penguins, recover data loggers from penguins and perform mapping of penguin colonies at Signy Island between 01/10/2006 – 01/04/2007. Permit No. S7-04/2006: Issued to Dr Richard Phillips of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK to make biometric measurements, take blood samples and deploy data loggers on south polar skuas and Adelie penguins at Pointe-Geologie Archipelago between 01/12/2006 – 31/01/2007.

e) Notice of permits issued under Section 12 of the Antarctic Act 1994 (Introduction of nonnative animals and plants into Antarctica) None.

f) Notice of permits issued under Section 12 of the Antarctic Act 1994 (Entry into Protected Areas) Permit No. S9-01/2006: Issued to Mr Richard Hall of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK authorising entry into Rothera Point (ASPA 129) between 01/11/2006 – 30/10/2007. Permit No. S9-02/2006: Issued to Dr Dominic Hodgson, Dr Mike Bentley, Dr Steve Roberts, Mr Peter Fretwell, Ms Emma Watcham, and Mr Bruce Maltman of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK authorising entry into the below listed sites between 01/10/2006 – 31/01/2007: ASPA 150 ASPA 125 ASPA 151 ASPA 132 ASPA 112 ASPA 149 Ardley Island; Fildes Peninsula; Lion‟s Rump; Potter Peninsula; Coppermine Peninsula; Cape Shirreff.

Permit No. S9-03/2006: Issued to Dr Richard Phillips of British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK authorising entry into Pointe-Geologie Archipelago (ASPA 120) between 01/12/2006 – 31/01/2007. 57

g) Notice of permits issued under Section 12 of the Antarctic Act 1994 (Entry into a CCAMLR CEMP site) None.

58

ANNEX XI

WASTE MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR PERIOD 1 OCTOBER 2005 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2006
PART 1 GENERAL
Country: Waste Management Official: Job Title: Postal Address: United Kingdom Mr Rod Downie BAS Environmental Manager British Antarctic Survey High Cross, Madingley Road Cambridge, CB3 0ET, UK 01223 221248 01223 221427 rhd@bas.ac.uk

Telephone Number: Facsimile Number: Electronic Mail Number:

PART 2 TRAINING OF EXPEDITION MEMBERS
1) Is training given to expedition members on waste management: prior to leaving for Antarctica? Briefings given at annual introductory conferences for new personnel. while in Antarctica? Briefings and hands-on training given for on site procedures and equipment on board BAS vessels and at BAS research stations Written material available (i) BAS Waste Management Handbook (4th Ed. 2004) (ii) Station and field camp waste guidelines (iii) Notices on research stations and ships [Y] [ ] [Y] [ ] [Y] [ ]

2)

Are expeditions advised of any PVC products being provided?

[Y]

[ ]

The BAS discourages the use of PVC products and only uses them when there is no practical alternative. Details of products where the major constituent is PVC are supplied to each research station. 3) Are expeditions advised that pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non-sterile soil or polystyrene beads, chips or similar forms of packaging shall not be sent to Antarctica? [Y] [ ]

A section of the BAS Waste Management Handbook and the BAS Participants Handbook deals with prohibited products. The Logistics Purchasing Section of BAS makes every effort to prevent such products from being sent

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to Antarctica. The BAS packaging guidelines stipulate that polystyrene beads or chips must not be used as packaging material for goods being sent to Antarctica.

PART 3 WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR EACH FIXED SITE, FIELD CAMPS GENERALLY, AND FOR EACH SHIP.
1) Current and planned programmes for cleaning up existing waste disposal sites and abandoned work sites: Existing waste disposal sites and abandoned work sites i) Maintenance work carried out at Base A, Port Lockroy during 2004/05. Base operated by BAS with guidance from the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust and the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office. Minor restoration work and condition survey undertaken at Wordie House (Base F) in March 2005 Conservation Strategy for Whalers Bay (including British Base B) was adopted at ATCM XXVIII in June 2005

ii) iii)

iv)

Automated Geophysical Observatories A80, A81 and A84 will be demolished and removed during the 05/06 season, as well as redundant deep field fuel depots.
at Cape Geddes , (Lat. 60°41'S, Long. 44°34'W ), Laurie Island, South Orkney Islands during the 2006/07 season. Planning is underway for the demolition and removal of Station C The removal of the abandoned station at Detaille Island (Lat. 66 °52 'S, Long. 66 °48 'W ), Lallemand Fjord, Loubet Coast is under discussion with the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

v)

vi)

2)

Current and planned waste management arrangements, including final disposal: i) Biodegradable waste Sewage, wet food waste, bones and grey water are disposed of on-site and are not returned from Antarctica. A sewage treatment plant is in operation at Rothera. General non-hazardous waste Non-recyclable wastes are taken by BAS ships to the Falkland Islands where a contractor disposes of them properly and safely to landfill. Waste oils and fuel are also taken to the Falkland Islands and used as heating oil. Empty fuel drums produced by BAS are reused by the major fuel supplier on the Falkland Islands. Hazardous and recyclable wastes All hazardous wastes are returned to the UK where they are properly and safely disposed of by specialist contractors. Hazardous wastes are disposed of in a number of ways including high temperature incineration and controlled landfill. The UK Environment Agency is notified of all movements of BAS hazardous wastes when BAS vessels reach UK. Recyclable wastes, including paper, glass, cardboard, aluminium and steel, batteries, photo-chemicals and printer cartridges, are also returned to UK for recycling by specialist contractors. During 2004/05, BAS sent more of its waste for reuse or recycling than was sent to landfill. This is the first time that this has been achieved, demonstrating BAS’s ongoing commitment to reducing the amount of waste it sends to landfill.

ii)

iii)

3)

Current and planned arrangements for analysing the environmental effects of wastes and waste management:

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i)

Current environmental monitoring programme The incidence of marine debris at Signy. Monitoring of the sewage treatment plant at Rothera

4)

Other efforts to minimize any environmental effects of wastes and waste management: i) ii) iii) BAS tested a prototype AVTUR burning incinerating toilet at Rothera during 2004/05 season. Field trials will be undertaken at Sky-Blu and other deep field sites in 2005/06. Drum steam cleaning trials are planned for the 2005/06 season to determine whether empty fuel drums can be decontaminated on site for re-use. BAS is liaising with a local engineering company to develop a portable drum crusher that can be manually loaded onto, and powered by, a Twin Otter aircraft, for use at deep field fuel depots.

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