Docstoc

chapter-4.ppt - urbstory

Document Sample
chapter-4.ppt - urbstory Powered By Docstoc
					Chapter 4: The Empire
      of Islam
 To the east in Mesopotamia, the grand city of 
    Baghdad arose. "It will surely be the most 
    flourishing city in the world," boasted the 
 caliph. To the west in Spain, an equally grand 
  city blossomed. "Do not speak to me of the 
  court of Baghdad nor of its magnificence...," 
  wrote a poet, "because there is no place like 
  Cordoba anywhere on this earth." As Muslim 
   influence spread from the Near East to the 
     Atlantic Ocean, these two cities became 
   centers of Muslim trade, art, and learning.
           Lesson 1: A Century of
                Expansion
    THINKING FOCUS
    How did the Umayyads unite the many lands and peoples of the Muslim 
    empire?

    KEY TERMS
n   empire
n   bureaucracy
n   emir
n   dissent

    Muslim soldiers from Arabia attacked Damascus, Syria, in A.D. 635. The 
    Persians and Byzantines had fought back and forth over the territory of 
    Syria for generations. Many inhabitants of Damascus helped the Muslims, 
    expecting their rule to be better than the previous rulers'.
     Expansion Under Umayyad
               Rule
n   The Muslim soldiers who fought the Byzantines 
    at Damascus helped to create an empire, a
    number of peoples or provinces ruled by one
    central authority. After capturing Syria, the 
    victorious Muslim armies went on to conquer 
    Mesopotamia in 637.
n   By the middle of the 600s, Persia fell to the 
    Muslims. The Muslim Empire then expanded 
    farther to the east by securing the lands that are 
    today known as Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, and 
    Pakistan.
           The Umayyads
n The Umayyads fought for Islam in these 
  eastern conquests. 
n After the assassination of the fourth 
  caliph, Muawiya had enough support to 
  take control of the empire in 661.  He had 
  many loyal followers.
The Great Umayyad Mosque in 
      Damascus (Syria)
          Moving the Empire
n Muawiya moved the capital from 
  Muhammad's home, Medina in Arabia, to 
  his own, more central city of Damascus 
  in Syria.  (this will not be the only move!) 
n Muawiya began the practice of appointing 
  a son as the next caliph. He founded a 
  tradition of continuous rule by one family. 
  The Umayyads ruled for 90 years.
     Westward Expansion
n Umayyads armies advanced west into 
  Africa. Soon the Berbers who lived along 
  the northern coast and the Sahara, 
  converted to Islam.
n In 711, with the help of the Berbers, the 
  Muslims moved northward across the 
  Strait of Gibraltar.
     Westward Expansion
n The Muslims were so determined to 
  conquer the Iberian Peninsula that upon 
  landing at Gibraltar, they burned all of
  their own boats. Retreat was not
  possible. 
n The conquest of Spain took seven years or 
  less. 
n Catholic Visigoths… mean to Jews and 
  Christians that did not agree with them.
                        Legend
  ██ Expansion under the Prophet Mohammad, 622-632
██ Expansion during the Rightly Guided Caliphate, 632-661
  ██ Expansion during the Umayyad Caliphate, 661-750
        Islamic Holy Sites.
   » Mecca (Makkah). The holiest place on 
   earth. Site of a building made by Abraham 
   and Ishmael. 
   » Medina. Muhammad is buried here. It 
   is the destination of the Hegira, his flight 
   from persecution. 
   » Jerusalem. Muhammad ascended to 
   heaven from this spot. Site of Jewish and 
   Islamic temples 
           Islam in France?
n Charles Martel and his army of Franks (the 
  hammer) defend what is now France.
n  Martel's troops stopped the Muslims at 
  the Battle of Tours in 732. This battle was 
  one of the most decisive in European 
  history. It determined that Europe would 
  be Christian and not Muslim. (pg. 80)
    Treatment of Non-Muslims
n many people in the lands under Muslim 
  rule converted to Islam and a Muslim 
  culture developed that included the 
  customs and traditions of non-Arabs.
n Christians and Jews had full religious
  freedom.  (but had to pay taxes jizya )
n   {all Muslims were required to pay zakat, the 2.5 percent 
    charity tax.}
n Were not allowed to serve in the Military 
    Jews in the Muslim World
n Their academies helped build Judaism as a 
 religion defined by the Torah (the Jewish 
 Bible), the rabbis (teachers), and the 
 synagogue (temple). By 500, scholars 
 had collected a vast amount of learning 
 about the Torah in a work called the 
 Talmud. This text became one of the great 
 cornerstones of Judaism. Sassanid and
 Christian rulers had persecuted Jews, but 
 Muslim rulers often protected them. 
                Government
n   Under Muawiya, the provinces were ruled by 
    emirs , or governors, appointed directly by the 
    caliph. 

n   bureaucracy, many different departments
    managed by workers appointed by the caliph or
    his representatives.

n   dissent , or disagreement (not tolerated)
          Umayyad Unity
n Common Language… Arabic got to learn 
  it.
n Common Coinage… needed in the US…
n Religious Architecture… Mosques 
  everywhere… made to the region.
   Gee, things are going so well, I wonder 
            what might go wrong?
Dinar… No, not Dinner!
    The Umayyad Downfall…
         (you knew it was coming.)

n Taxes… Just like Rome… Not enough 
  money coming in.
n making fewer new conquests… Not 
  taking in new land… 
       End of the Umayyads
n Some Muslims did not think they were 
  focusing enough on religion anymore… 
  turned to money and power.
n Some groups decided that this family 
  needed to go… time for a change.
n Would they leave Quietly?
                    Time to GO!
n   One such group, the Abbasids, was named after a 
    family headed by al Abbas. Some historians say that al 
    Abbas was an uncle of Muhammad. The Abbasids 
    started a successful rebellion against the Umayyad rulers 
    from their stronghold northwest of Persia, in a land 
    called Khurasan.
n   According to some accounts, one of the Abbasid 
    generals, Abdullah, invited 80 Umayyad leaders to a 
    banquet. While his Umayyad guests were eating, 
    Abdullah ordered his men to kill them. By 750, the 
    Abbasid family was able to gain control of the Muslim 
    Empire in the East.
                  Gone but…
n   Only one of the Umayyads, whose name was 
    Abd al Rahman, escaped from the Abbasids. 
    (jumped out a window and got to Spain!)
n   Now the Muslim state was split between two 
    ruling groups, the Umayyads in Europe and the 
    Abbasids in Asia and Africa. Unified rule was 
    over, but Muslim culture continued to grow.
                 End on lesson one…
The World in the 800’s
  Lesson 2: The Golden Age
  THINKING FOCUS
n How did the same wealth that powered 
  the Abassids power lead to their downfall?
  KEY TERMS
n calligraphy
n faction
      Under Abbasid Rule
n This new Abbasid Empire lasted from 750 
  to 1258. 
n One of caliph Abu Jafar al Mansur's first 
  actions was to move the capital of the 
  Muslim Empire from Damascus in Syria to 
  Baghdad in Mesopotamia… good farm
 land, allies and trade.
                     More…
n   The new culture that developed was Muslim, but 
    it was open to ideas from many different 
    countries and cultures, especially those of 
    Persia. However, the Arabic language continued 
    to be the vehicle of government, education, 
    poetry, and, of course, religion.
n   The empire was rich in the gold, silver,
    copper, and iron used in trade. Pearls from 
    the Persian Gulf and precious gems from other 
    Muslim lands were in great demand in the 
    Baghdad market.
Baghdad 
               Baghdad
n The Abbasids preserved and improved the 
 ancient network of wells, underground 
 canals, and water wheels. (Thanks Rome!) 
 Food production improved under the 
 Abbasids. Dates, rice, and other grains 
 flourished in the rich soil between the 
 Tigris and the Euphrates. In addition, the 
 Abbasids introduced new breeds of 
 livestock and hastened the spread of 
 cotton.
                  Trade
n Leather goods, textiles, paper, metalwork, 
  and perfumes were produced and sold in 
  the city. 
n There was no banking system (no Allah’s 
  way) but business people invested in long-
  distance trade, and goods were bought on 
  credit. 
             Abbasid Culture
n   Art and Design
n   Arabic lettering had a special significance
    for Muslims, because it was used to write
    down God's words as they had been given
    to Muhammad. Calligraphy , which means
    beautiful handwriting, flourished under
    the Abbasids. 
n   Most Muslim scholars agreed that creating 
    images of living things like humans and animals, 
    which have souls, is forbidden. 
 Bookmaking and Literature
n Many poets and writers from far away 
  flocked to Baghdad, where the caliph 
  welcomed them.
n They captured some Chinese and gave 
  them freedom in exchange for teaching 
  them how to make paper.
n Books will now be written & read in 
  Arabic.
   Science and Mathematics
n Muslim astronomers mapped the solar 
  system and believed, long before 
  Columbus' time, that the earth was round.
n Modern algebra ("the addition of one thing to another.“) is 
  based on explorations in mathematics in 
  the early 800s by one of the most famous 
  Abbasid mathematicians, al Khwarizmi. 
                 Medicine
n Doctors performed surgery on patients in 
  clean hospitals that were free to the 
  public. 
n Used Herbal medicines
n Diagnosed measles and smallpox (not large pox)
n Muhammad said Allah had a cure for 
  everything. 
n Next slide is from 1200’s… 
         A Divided Empire
n Tax money was increasingly important to 
  the caliphs because the Abbasids had lost 
  control of several important trade routes. 
  This hurt Baghdad's economy and led the 
  caliphs to increase taxes to support their 
  costly style of living. 
n Have you seen this story before????
       Factions and Revolt
n Factions   = opposing groups 
n The Fatimids broke away from the 
  Abbasids by the 900s and then migrated 
  into North Africa. By 969, they had 
  conquered most of North Africa and 
  claimed the city of Cairo as their capital.
n They thought they were moving away 
  from the life & teachings of Muhammad.
            Seljuk Turks
n 1055, Baghdad was conquered by 
  nomadic Turks from Central Asia, who 
  were descended from a warrior named 
  Seljuk.
n The Abbasid-Seljuk Empire continued for 
  200 years but received its death blow 
  when Baghdad fell to Mongol invaders 
  from central Asia in 1258. 
                 End of lesson 2
      Lesson 3: Islamic Spain
  THINKING FOCUS
n How did Muslim culture influence Spain?
  KEY TERM
n Legacy
  The Great Mosque of Cordoba, Spain, was 
  begun in 786 by Abd al Rahman. The 
  mosque, completed nearly 200 years later 
  in 976, was a religious, social, and 
  educational center.
The Return of the Umayyads
n Remember the guy that ran away from 
  the 80 person mass murder dinner?  
  (Rahman fled to Spain in 750)
n There were many Muslims in Spain, there 
  was no unified Muslim government.
n But who can bring them together?
     Uniting Muslim Spain
n By 756 Abd al Rahman was accepted as 
  their leader. 
n He establish an independent Muslim 
  kingdom. 
n He made the ancient Roman city of 
  Cordoba his new capital.
n He succeeded so well that until 1000, 
  there were few invasions.
    Strengthening Cordoba
n Abd al Rahman III from 912 to 961 
n Umayyad ruler of Spain to adopt the title 
  of caliph… Now a more powerful title.
n increased the strength of the army (slaves 
  to serve in his forces)
n Protection from Christians in the north and 
  Muslim rivals to the south.
         Glory of Cordoba
n the city attracted scholars and artists 
n The city's most famous attraction was the 
  Great Mosque, the largest of the city's 
  3,000 mosques. (pictured before)
               More Glory
n Europe's largest city with a population of 
  450,000 people 
n paved and lighted streets 
n public plumbing in 300 bathhouses 
n Over 100,000 shops 
n 60,000 richly decorated palaces with 
  gardens and fountains, public courtyards, 
  and broad avenues 
         A Center of Learning
n   Poetry and music thrived in Cordoba 
n   Cordoba was the cultural and intellectual center 
    of western Islam 
n   Thousands of books were brought to Spain. 
    From the 1100s on, Jewish and Christian 
    scholars worked with Muslims to translate these 
    works into Latin. 
n   late 900s, the largest of the 70 libraries in 
    Cordoba contained 500,000 volumes (well ahead 
    of Christian Monasteries of the time) 
    This love of learning was Cordoba's greatest legacy, or 
          gift, to cultures and civilizations of the future.

n   Hand copied up to 70,000 books a year
n   Thousands of men and women attended the 
    university and the law school at Cordoba 
n   Abbas Ibn Firnas constructed a pair of wings out 
    of feathers and a wooden frame and made an 
    attempt at flight. Later he went on to build a 
    famous planetarium with revolving planets in 
    Cordoba.
n   Hasdai ben-Shaprut was a Jew who served as 
    court physician, treasurer, and diplomat to Abd 
    al Rahman III. 
       A Golden Age for Jews
n   Under Romans and Christian Visigoths Jews 
    were persecuted, but under the Muslims in Spain 
    they flourished. 
n   Cordoba became a cultural center for Jews in 
    Western Europe.
n   Moses Maimonides was born in Cordoba in 1135  
    and became known as a doctor, lecturer, writer, 
    and a scholar-philosopher.
n   When Ferdinand and Isabella reconquered Spain 
    in 1492, they expelled all Jews.
          A City of Merchants
n   Cordoba was also a city of merchants. It 
    supported a great many workshops for 
    leatherwork, prayer carpets, ivory boxes, 
    and other handicrafts. Spanish leather goods 
    and textiles were in great demand throughout 
    Europe. Papermaking, brought from Baghdad, 
    was practiced here also.
n   Agriculture also flourished. Irrigation enabled 
    farmers to grow new and exotic crops such as 
    figs, almonds, cherries, bananas, and
    cotton. Over 4,000 thriving markets sold these 
    agricultural and manufactured products.
            The Loss of Spain
n   In 1085, the Spanish Christian ruler Alfonso VI 
    seized the Muslim city of Toledo, whose king 
    was friendly to the Christians. 
n   After the attack on Toledo, the rest of Islamic 
    Spain gradually fell to Christian soldiers. 
n   Cordoba fell to the Christian forces in 1236, 
    almost 500 years after Abd al Rahman had 
    established it as the capital of his empire. 
     1492 (what else happened?)
n   The Catholic kingdoms of Aragon and Castile 
    ruled northern and central Spain. When King 
    Ferdinand of Aragon married Queen Isabella of 
    Castile, their combined kingdoms had enough 
    power to expel the Muslims from Spain entirely. 
    In 1492, the forces of Ferdinand and Isabella of 
    Spain drove out the last Berbers.
n   Most refugees settled in North Africa, particularly 
    in Morocco where the Berbers had originally 
    come from in 711. Today, 98 percent of the 
    Moroccans are Muslim. The official language is 
    Arabic, but many people speak Spanish.
Today…
               The End?
n Imam   Madhi. 
 He is the twelfth imam who died and 
 disappeared in 878AD and was seen at a 
 well in Jamkaran, Iran in 947AD. He is 
 being kept alive by God and he is hidden. 
 He will return at the end of time to bring 
 justice to the world, riding to battle on a 
 white horse to prepare the way for the 
 coming of Isa (Jesus). 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:9/1/2014
language:English
pages:59