Docstoc

Comma example

Document Sample
Comma example Powered By Docstoc
					Commas
Grade 7
Objectives
•    You will be able to:
1.   Define and recognize dependent and independent clauses.
2.   Use commas correctly.
Take Out
•Binder with Paper
•Remember Cornell Note-taking method. 
Review - A Sentence must
have:
1.   ?
2.   ?
3.   ?
A Sentence must have:

1.   Subject
2.   Predicate
3.   Express a complete thought
What is a clause?
•A clause is a group of words that has a subject and a predicate. 
CLAUSES
•A clause is a group of words that has a subject and a predicate. 
•An independent clause expresses a complete thought and can 
stand alone as a sentence. 
•A dependent clause does not express a complete thought and 
cannot stand alone as a sentence. 
Commas
•   Indicates a PAUSE or CHANGE OF THOUGHT.


•   http://youtu.be/s3h42RWnCB0
Commas
• Comma example
• "Strong talented and natural writers have always been first of 
  all readers yet we often ignore the relationship” she says 
  going on to comment on the connection between reading and 
  writing termed simply if rather uncreatively “the 
  reading/writing connection” by the education community has 
  been investigated and examined only since the early 1980s. 
Commas
• Comma example answer
• “Strong, talented, and natural writers have always been, first 
  of all, readers, yet we often ignore the relationship,” she says, 
  going on to comment on the connection between reading and 
  writing, termed simply if rather uncreatively “the 
  reading/writing connection” by the education community, has 
  been investigated and examined only since the early 1980s.
•  
Rules for Commas
•       1. In a list of three or more items, place a comma after each 
        item except the last. 
    •      I am taking art, music, and gym class this semester. 
    •      Pat's favorite hobbies are bicycling, collecting unusual rocks, 
           and writing science-fiction stories. 

    GO TO PAGE 582

    CD 2-1vid
    CD2-2vid
Rules for Commas
•2. Place a comma before the conjunction in a compound sentence. 
   • Marcus ran like a track star to catch the bus, but he realized he was too 
     late as it drove off.

   • A compound sentence contains one or more independent clauses.

   • CD 2-2vid
Rules for Commas
•3. Place a comma after an introductory phrase or clause. 
   • Because he was so funny, Charlie was very popular with the other kids.
   • If you want to come along, be at the bus stop by 7:30. 
   • At last night's game, the gym was packed and the fans were rowdy. 
   • Realizing her error, the principal apologized to the student for accusing 
     him. 
   • When it rains heavily, our basement floods. 

   • GO TO PAGE 590
Rules for Commas
•However, don't put a comma after the main clause 
when a dependent (subordinate) clause follows it 
(except for cases of extreme contrast).
  • Incorrect: She was late for class, because her alarm clock was broken.
  • Incorrect: The cat scratched at the door, while I was eating.
  • Correct: She was still quite upset, although she had won the Oscar. 
    (This comma use is correct because it is an example of extreme 
    contrast)
Rules for Commas
•4. Use commas to set off a phrase describing a noun or pronoun if it 
is not necessary to the meaning of the sentence. 
   • Scarlett Johansson, my favorite actress in the whole world, has a new 
     movie coming out. 
   • If you deleted the phrase "my favorite actress in the whole world," the 
     sentence would still make sense. The essential meaning would not 
     change. 
   • Scarlett Johansson has a new movie coming out. 

   CD 2-4vid
   PAGE 586
Rules for Commas
•5. Use commas to set off parenthetical/interrupting expressions. 
   • Sometimes, writers interrupt their sentences with "side remarks" that 
     aren't necessary for the reader to understand the sentence. Set off 
     these remarks with commas. 
           • Cynthia is, believe it or not, planning to visit Antarctica next year. 
           • It's going to be 105° outside today, as a matter of fact. 
Rules for Commas
•Not every use of commas is covered by these rules. For example, you 
need to use them in dates and addresses, and to introduce some 
quotations. But the five rules just discussed will get you through most 
writing situations. 
Comma Video
•http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=C507D
65F-B012-4598-B082-
7AADE59F9B7A&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US
•http://school.discoveryeducation.com/homeworkhelp/english/englis
h_homework_help.html?campaign=DE
Comma Info & Quiz
•http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/commas.htm
Comma - Textbook
•Page 582

•http://youtu.be/N7L02tCNi0I
•(Dean Martin)
Comma Exercises
•http://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/3/5/15
The Semicolon
•Think of a semicolon as being a stronger break than a comma, 
but a weaker break than a period. 
The Semicolon
•Semicolons are used to separate two complete 
thoughts that are closely related. 
•If you have two or more closely related thoughts 
in one sentence, a semicolon may be the best way 
to connect the clauses containing those thoughts. 
•Be careful, though; each clause must be able to 
stand alone as a complete sentence. 
The Semicolon
If you use a conjunction to connect clauses, such as and, 
but, or, nor, for, or so, do not use a semicolon between the 
clauses. Use a comma instead. 

Correct: The rainstorm struck without warning, and 
everyone at the game got soaking wet. 

Correct: The rainstorm struck without warning; everyone at 
the game got soaking wet. 

Incorrect: The rainstorm struck without warning; and 
everyone at the game got soaking wet.
The Semicolon
•http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=5
C64FE13-AFBC-4C03-86DC-2971C89FE91C
Colon
•Use a colon when the second part of a sentence helps explain 
the first part. In this kind of situation, the colon is like a trumpet 
that signals an important announcement.
   • Megan's mom and dad had a big problem this morning: the 
     coffeepot was broken.
   • A colon also can be used to introduce a list.
   • I have three favorite ice cream flavors: fudge ripple, bubble gum, 
     and raspberry swirl.

   • http://school.discoveryeducation.com/homeworkhelp/english/e
     nglish_homework_help.html
Capital Letters
•Capital Letters are used for:
   • the directions North, South, East, and West when they refer to 
     sections of the country.
•For example:
   • We left the South and drove north toward home.
Capital Letters
•Capital Letters are used for:
   • the names of deities and sacred books.

•For example:
   •   Holy Spirit 
   •   Bible 
   •   Koran 
   •   Old Testament
Capital Letters
•Capital Letters are used for:
   • the principal words in titles (but not the articles a, an, or the;
     coordinating conjunctions; or prepositions unless they are the 
     first or last words).
•For example:
   • To Kill a Mockingbird
   • "The Willow and the Gingko"
Capital Letters
•Capital Letters are used for:
   • abbreviations of words that are capitalized.

   • For example:
       •   Mrs. 
       •   Dr. 
       •   Jan. 
       •   Ave.
Sentences
•A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete 
thought and has a subject and a predicate. 
•Begin a sentence with a capital letter, and end it with a 
punctuation mark.
Four Types of Sentences
1.        A declarative sentence makes a statement. Use a period 
at the end of a declarative sentence.
•Example:
   • Janelle is painting a picture of an imaginary place.
Four Types of Sentences
•2.      An interrogative sentence asks a question. Use a 
question mark at the end of an interrogative sentence.
   • Example:
      • Did she dream it up by herself?
Four Types of Sentences
•3.   An imperative sentence gives a command 
or makes a request. Use a period at the end of an 
imperative sentence. 
•Remember that the subject of imperative 
sentences is always you. However, the subject is 
"understood" and therefore does not appear in the 
sentence.
  • Example:
     • Think about all the uses for artwork.
Four Types of Sentences
•4.       An exclamatory sentence expresses strong feeling. Use 
an exclamation point at the end of an exclamatory sentence.
   • Example:
      • What fantastic places those are!
Text Pages
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3
posted:8/31/2014
language:Latin
pages:36