SECTION B Working for the by forrests

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SECTION B
HABITAT AND SPECIES ACTION PLANS B1.1 General B1.1.1 Action Plans include:- Priority habitats from the UK BAP (for which the UK has international obligations, those at especial risk, rare, and/ or important for species of conservation concern). - Habitats characteristic of Anglesey - Habitats important for Local Biodiversity Action Plan 'priority species' - Habitats which could become important for biodiversity conservation, given appropriate restoration. - Species with needs deemed to be better met with individual Action Plans, rather than only benefiting from relevant Habitat Action Plans. B1.1.2 First publication is only to be a start, and new habitat and species action plans are to be added in the future (see p. 26). B1.1.3 Specific action points, and other details within plans, have been through a process of consultation (see Appendix I). B1.2 Auditing. This is to be an ongoing process, calling for good communication between all parties. Lead bodies named for each HAP and SAP gather information on progress made with action points from key players as listed (and other parties that may also become involved in time). Key players give details to the lead body, which in turn updates records. This information can then be passed on to others as appropriate (e.g. at UK level). Following this pattern, information needed for formal audit reporting will be to hand at any given time. B1.3 Layout of Action Plans: TITLE Background notes. For species, legal protection, if any. Area/ sites: For habitats only:- relevant local sites with protection. Condition: General local notes for habitat action plans. Current Status: Local information for species action plans. Factors causing Decline/ issues: Current Action: Overall Objectives and Targets Proposed Action: (under four headings) Management and Protection Advisory Research/ Monitoring Education/ Awareness Implementation: Lead: The body which will keep track of progress on the action plan points, by all partner groups. Key players: the main partners and groups involved. Other groups may join. Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs:

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Those that are planned to be published in the second set of action plans are listed in italics, followed by „(Set 2) ‟. B1.4 How Can I/ We get Involved with Action Plan Points? Large bodies such as CCW and NWWT rightly have a key role in Biodiversity Actions. But what about others who may wish to play a part? There are some actions points which have particular potential for individuals, community groups, businesses and suchlike. to become involved. These are shown in habitat and species action plans by the word ‘Openings’ with the appropriate general groups given after. These are the main (though not the only) areas where most people who would like to get involved in working for our wildlife can do so. Call the county‟s Biodiversity Officer to talk about this; your own ideas can make a difference! B1.5 Choice of Habitats and Species for Anglesey’s Action Plan List Key for Choice: UKP = UK BAP Priority Listing LS = Locally Significant WU= Work/ Project Underway Habitats Why Chosen Ancient Hedgerows UKP Broadleaved Woodland Incl.UKPs, LS Lowland/ Coastal Heath UKP, LS Sand Dunes UKP, LS Coastal Saline Lagoons UKP, LS Coastal and Floodplain Grazing Marsh UKP, LS River and Stream Habitats LS Ponds LS Sea Cliffs and Rocky Shores LS Sandy Beaches LS Flower-rich Road Verges LS Species Red Squirrel Water Vole Otter Harbour Porpoise Pipistrelle Bat Bittern Song Thrush Great Crested Newt Shore Dock Petalwort Chough UKP, WU, LS UKP,WU, LS UKP, WU UKP UKP UKP, WU UKP UKP, LS UKP UKP WU, LS

Provisional Future Action Plans: Habitats: Reedbeds, Fens, Limestone Pavement, Seagrass Beds, Scrub, Lakes, Plantations, Field Edges Species: Corncrake, Skylark, Brown hare, Grey partridge, Barn owl, Geyer’s whorl snail, Marsh fritillary,
Southern damselfly, Medicinal leech, Floating water plantain, Three lobed water crowfoot, Slender green feather moss, Noctule bat, Lesser horseshoe bat B1.6 Abbreviated Names

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AONB - Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty AOP - Anglesey Otter Project ARSP - Anglesey Red Squirrel Project BDMLR - British Divers Marine Life Rescue BTO - British Trust for Ornithology CCW - Countryside Council for Wales CSCRP - Cross and Stratford Colour Ringing Project EA - Environment Agency Wales FE - Forest Enterprise GAT - Gwynedd Archaeology Trust HAP - Habitat Action Plan IACC - Isle of Anglesey County Council KWTC - Keep Wales Tidy Campaign. LNR - Local Nature Reserve LBAP - Local Biodiversity Action Plan MCS - Marine Conservation Society, North Wales MM - Menter Môn NAWAD - National Assembly of Wales Agriculture Department NNR - National Nature Reserve NT National Trust NWP - North Wales Police NWWT - North Wales Wildlife Trust RSPB - Royal Society for the Protection of Birds S 15 - Section 15 Agreements (management of SSSIs) SAP - Species Action Plan SSSI - Site of Special Scientific Interest

B2 HABITAT ACTION PLANS (HAPs)

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WOODLAND Large areas of the island were formerly woodland; most of this has been removed by human action over thousands of years. Today, the total area of broadleaf woodland, plantations and scrub on Anglesey is 3149 ha, or 4.4%, which compares with a Welsh figure of 15 %. BROADLEAVED WOODLAND The focus to be on so called „semi-natural‟ woodland, being broadleaved stands which do not obviously originate from planting. Both ancient and more recent stands can be included. These are the native trees, such as alder, ash, silver birch, elm, oak and rowan, as well as shrubs such as blackthorn and hazel. On Anglesey, durmast (sessile) oak and ash are the most common seminatural species (sycamore is common, but introduced). Broadleaved woodlands were formerly important for the red squirrel (before the spread of greys) and are home to important flora such as the bluebell. Whilst this HAP is general, reporting on actions is to take account of different categories of woodland, such as upland oakwoods, in line with UK BAP. Area/ Sites: There is about 1000 ha of broadleaved semi-natural woodland on Anglesey. Most is in the east and south, especially along the Menai Strait. Cadnant Dingle SSSI, Dingle LNR, Coed Cyrnol, Plas Newydd and other areas of Menai Strait. Condition: Many areas are declining due to increasing isolation (fragmentation) and loss of ground layer (uncontrolled grazing), invasive species, and neglect. Factors causing Decline/ Issues: - Loss of linking corridors - hedgerows and trees - between woods. - Grazing of ground layer stopping natural regeneration, either deliberately or due to neglect of boundary fencing. - Spread of invasive aliens such as rhododendron and laurel, which blanket the woodland floor. Current Action: # Menai Woodland Strategy Coed Cymru # Anglesey Red Squirrel Project. Menter Môn # Woodland Grants Scheme FC # Site management NWWT, NT # Existing ESA agreements. NAWAD Overall Objectives and Targets 1. To prevent further loss of semi-natural broadleaved woodlands (giving particular weight to conservation of ancient woodlands). To improve remaining areas, and enlarge native woodland cover. Linking of remaining fragments is high priority. 2. Ensure management of 75 % of remaining semi-natural woods over 3 ha by 2007 (including control of invasive alien species). 3. To increase the area of native woodland aiming for about 750 ha by 2007. Priority to areas near and between existing semi-natural woodlands, and linking fragments.

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Proposed Action: Management and Protection General principle for action is to instigate projects to link and buffer sites, and create new areas of semi-natural woodland. # Anglesey Woodland Strategy. IACC, Coed Cymru. # Community Woodlands formed as LNRs. Menter Môn, Communiity Councils, Openings - Community Action # Augment woodland area and between-woodland links in Menai Strait and Pentraeth - Marianglas areas. Coed Cymru, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners. # Safeguard Ancient Woodlands and restore river corridor woodlands (for example on farms, including IACC holdings, under Tir Gofal). IACC/ Tenants, NAWAD, CCW, Rural Care, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Restore broadleaved woodlands which have been intermixed with conifers. Coed Cymru, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners. # Consider action at sites noted as having potential for A55 Biodiversity Enhancement Project. IACC Advisory # Provide landowners with clear concise advice as to how to improve woodland management. Coed Cymru, NWWT Research/ Monitoring # Research map and aerial photograph database to identify best potential areas to instigate projects to both link existing woods and to create new areas of semi-natural woodland. Coed Cymru, Openings - Student Projects Education/ Awareness # Promote uptake of Tir Gofal Scheme by farmers. CCW, NAWAD # Encouraging use of native species of local provenance, and establishment through natural regeneration, where possible. Coed Cymru # Promote use of quality, local genetic stock native broadleaves (will help ensure that local genotypes are preserved and that trees are well suited to their environments). Coed Cymru # Promote woodland management methods which are of benefit both to biodiversity and economically. Seek to spread this message at all age levels - school to adult. Coed Cymru, NWWT # Publicise cases where both farming and biodiversity benefit. Coed Cymru Implementation: Lead: Coed Cymru Key players: Coed Cymru, FC, CCW, NAWAD, ARSP (Menter Môn), NWWT Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Ancient hedgerows Red squirrel, Otter (Set 2: Scrub, Noctule bat) ANCIENT HEDGEROWS

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Those hedges which existed before the Enclosure acts (passed mainly 1720 - 1840). Found throughout, but are particularly concentrated in the south and east of the island, and associated with old boundaries (such as parish, estate and farm boundaries), lanes, and trackways. They provide a valuable wildlife habitat and link corridors for fauna and flora (e.g. between woods). They can hold woodland species which may be otherwise extinct locally, and can form the last remnants of ancient woods felled in the past (where an ancient hedgerow formed the boundary to an ancient wood). They attract such species as pipistrelle bats, song thrush, red squirrels etc. They are also important landscape features. Earthen and stone banks (cloddiau) also support dense hedgerow vegetation and are included within this HAP. Area/ Sites: Most ancient parish boundaries and old estate boundaries are likely locations for ancient hedges. Also old roadside hedges and former drovers roads, often identifiable as “green lanes”. The east and south of the island is relatively more important for hedges, the north and west for earthen banks. Condition: Generally poor, with decline due to adverse environmental conditions and factors. Some protection under Hedgerows Regulations (1997). Factors causing decline/ Issues: - Inappropriate cutting regime - flailing, unlawful disturbance of nesting birds, stripping of earth bank vegetation cover leading to erosion. - Varying degrees of neglect. - Overgrazing (in bases of hedges). - Hedgerow removal to make larger fields for agricultural machinery. - Road widening / improvement. - Rise in nutrients (eutrophication) in hedge bottoms affects plant communities. Current Action: # Hedgerow Regulations. IACC # ESA Scheme (renewal of agreements only). NAWAD # Tir Gofal. CCW, NAWAD #Anglesey Hedgerow Survey to inform future action. Overall Objectives and Targets No further losses of ancient hedgerows on the island. Aim for favourable management of about 50 km of ancient hedgerow, at least, under Tir Gofal and other schemes, by 2007. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Identify and safeguard all ancient hedgerows on IACC farmholdings (incl. Tir Gofal option). IACC/ Tenants, CCW, NAWAD, Rural Care, Openings - Student Projects # Review council verge cutting policy in relation to hedgerows e.g. for nearness of cut to hedges and earthen banks, and time of cut. Consider changes to cutting regime. IACC. Consider action at sites noted as having potential for A55 Biodiversity Enhancement Project which prove to be ancient hedgerows.
#

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IACC. # Careful consideration in planning of road schemes. IACC # Target gaps made in ancient hedgerows during past road (and other) schemes. Openings - Farmers/ Landowners, IACC Advisory # Provide advice to landowners and farmers. CCW, NAWAD Research/ Monitoring # Survey a sample of hedgerows along ancient boundaries, noting species present and other quality indicators. GAT, Openings - Student Projects Education/ Awareness # Raise awareness of importance of ancient hedgerows for wildlife. Openings - Schools. # Promote uptake of Tir Gofal Scheme by farmers. CCW, NAWAD Implementation: Lead: IACC Key Players: CCW, NAWAD, IACC, Rural Care, GAT Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Broadleaved Woodland, Flower-rich road verges Red squirrel, Pipistrelle bat, Song thrush (Set 2: Field Edges - provis., Grey partridge)

LOWLAND AND COASTAL HEATH

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Dwarf shrub vegetation, often dominated by heather. Includes associated areas of grassland, bracken, scrub, mire and bare ground. May be dry or wet, with grades in between. Important habitat for chough, silver studded blue, marsh gentian, spotted rockrose, spathulate fleawort and lower plants. Area/ sites: Breakwater quarry, Mynydd Twr, Mynydd Bodafon. SSSIs: Tre Wilmot, Penrhoslligwy, Fedw Fawr, Mariandyrys, Bwrdd Arthur, Porth Diana, Cors Goch, Cors Erddreiniog, Craig Wen, Cors Castell, Bryn Offa, Trwyn Ifan, Ty Croes, Glannau Rhoscolyn, Point Lynas, Wylfa Head, Llanddona Common and others. Condition: Affected by overgrazing in some parts, lack of grazing in others. Loss and decline; almost half lost (about 950 ha) since 1940s. Much is within SSSI/ SAC and most coastal heath is within the AONB, where it is a major element of the landscape. Factors causing Decline/ Issues: - Abandonment of commons leading to scrub development. - Encroachment of improved land particularly threatens remaining areas of coastal heath. - Abandonment of clifftop by traditional graziers due to recreational use (perceived danger to stock). - Failure to burn due to concern expressed by neighbours. - Overgrazing leading to loss of dwarf shrubs. Current Action: # Wales Coastal and Lowland Heathland Strategy (in preparation). # Anglesey Heathland Strategy HLF project. # Management of Mynydd Twr (RSPB), Cors Goch, and Mariandyrus. (NWWT), Cors Erddreiniog and other SSSIs (CCW), Bryn Offa, Fedw Fawr (NT). # Existing ESA agreements. Overall Objectives and Targets To prevent further losses of heathlands. To safeguard and restore the most important and significant areas which do not currently have protection, aiming, if possible, for restoration of about 140 ha by 2007, as a contribution to the Welsh Coastal and Lowland Heathland Strategy. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # AHS (Anglesey Heathland Strategy); Programme of works under HLF Tomorrow's Heathland Heritage bid. # Consider action at sites noted as having potential for A55 Biodiversity Enhancement Project. IACC # Ensure adequate protection of existing SSSI sites etc. CCW # Listing of new SSSIs in relevant areas. CCW # Ensure suitable management of all heathland areas over 5 ha. CCW, NAWAD, Menter Môn, Openings - Landowners, Community Action. # Review management of IACC landholdings (smallholdings, Breakwater Country Park, Mynydd twr etc) to ensure management and restoration of heath (including Tir Gofal). IACC/ Tenants, CCW, NAWAD Advisory # Provide information and advice for owners and occupiers.

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CCW, NAWAD, IACC, NWWT, NT Research/ Monitoring # Ensure effective monitoring of a variety sites to understand changes and inform future decision making. CCW, NAWAD (ADAS), Openings - Student Projects # Review common land ownership, to identify free areas where IACC and partners might work towards LNR status. IACC, Openings - Community Action Education/ Awareness # Generally raise awareness of importance, especially for coastal areas. IACC/ AONB. # Promote uptake of Tir Gofal Scheme by farmers. CCW, NAWAD Implementation: Lead: CCW Key players: CCW, RSPB, IACC, NT, NWWT. Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Rocky Shores Chough (Set 2: Three-lobed crowfoot)

COASTAL AND FLOODPLAIN GRAZING MARSH

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Lowland areas sometimes flooded by rivers or streams. Variable mixtures of wet pasture and usually associated man-made drainage channels. Can be important feeding and breeding areas for distinctive birds, including snipe, lapwing and curlew, whilst the ditches often support interesting water plant and invertebrate communities. Water voles and otters use rivers, drainage channels and associated habitat. Is well-suited to wildlife, where there is still an ankle-high, tussocky sward. (Note: this does not cover salt marshes, which are flooded by the sea). Area/ sites: Overall, about 3200 ha, of which Malltraeth Marsh SSSI has about 1220 ha. Smaller sites include: Cors Goch - RSPB reserve, Afon Braint, Afon Bach Rhuddgaer, Afon Nodwydd (Pentraeth), Afon Alaw (Bodlasan Groes/ Bodlasan Fawr). Condition: Have suffered in recent years due to various changes. Factors causing Decline/ issues: - Increased stocking rates leading to trampling of bird nests and young birds. - Changes in the sward due to agricultural improvement. - More intensive drainage by machinery leading to lowered water levels, especially during spring and summer. - Eutrophication (nutrient enrichment) of watercourses - Watercourses are dependent upon regular cleaning to maintain early successional stages. - Spreading of agri-industrial waste (such as offal) on land. Current Action: # Tir Gofal and ESA Agri-environment schemes. # RSPB Malltraeth Marsh and Cors Goch reserves. # Some SSSI/ Section 15 agreements. # Anglesey Wetland Strategy (but scheme‟s status is now uncertain). Overall Objectives and Targets To safeguard remaining areas and promote appropriate management thereof. Seek to bring new areas of the island‟s (roughly) 3200 ha of this habitat under favourable management, aiming for about 600 ha by 2007. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Consider IACC land holdings potential (Tir Gofal agri-environment scheme). IACC/ Tenants, CCW, NAWAD # Promote Water Level Management Plans, retention of summer water levels, reduction of livestock in spring (favouring cattle before sheep). EA, CCW (S 15), NAWAD Openings - farmers/ landowners # Ensure appropriate management on RSPB reserves. RSPB Advisory # Offer advice to farmers and landowners on management. CCW, NAWAD

Research/ Monitoring # Monitor area under appropriate management.

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CCW # Monitor selected sites for quality of features such as ground-nesting birds and ground flora. CCW, RSPB Education/ Awareness # Promote uptake of Tir Gofal Scheme by farmers. CCW, NAWAD Implementation: Lead: CCW Key players: CCW, IACC, EA, RSPB, NAWAD, AWS, UCB Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: River and Stream Habitats Otter, Water vole, Bittern (Set 2: Reedbeds, Fen)

SAND DUNES

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Onshore deposition of sand has led to build-up of dunes, which are stabilised to varying degrees by plant growth, particularly marram grass. Movement of sand and fixing of dunes by plants are natural processes, both being needed to conserve the typical landscape of dunes and the intervening slacks or wet valleys. This environment is exploited by rare and unusual species adapted to these conditions. Area/ sites: Large systems at Newborough and Aberffraw. Dunes also at Rhosneigr, Valley, Tywyn Gwyn, Traeth Dulas and Red Wharf Bay. Condition: Newborough NNR. Newborough and Aberffraw both SSSIs, and proposed SAC. Dunes also included within part of Beddmanarch - Cymyran SSSI. Factors causing Decline/ Issues: - Planting of roughly half of Newborough site as conifer plantation led to loss of open dune areas and their wildlife. - (Newborough plantation) Lowering of watertable, and changes such as cliffing of some frontal areas. - Recreational erosion, notably at pressure points such as footpaths and car park sites. Control of parking at Aberffraw has reduced damage compared with 1970s. - Loss of traditional light grazing can lead to dense grassland or scrub development. - Overstabilisation of sand prevents early successional phases of development. - Pollution may be over-stimulating plant growth in some areas. Current Action: # Area known as „Abermenai to Aberffraw Dunes‟ is a Candidate Special Area of Conservation (SAC). # Newborough Forest management has increasing emphasis on recreation and conservation. # Forest Design Plan under review (Aug. 2001). Overall Objectives and Targets To ensure protection of sand dunes as functional systems, (with sand and water supply), capable of supporting natural associated species. To restore duneland under forestry plantation, aiming for about 100 ha of restored dunes by 2007. Longer-term aim is 300 ha to be restored by 2015. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Removal of plantation conifers from areas of Newborough, beginning with 100 - 200 metre wide strip inland, in frontal zone to allow natural shoreline development. FE # Pull back tree line on eastern edge by 200 - 300 metres to lessen effect on dune groundwater. FE # Possible review of management at Tywyn Aberffraw, to ensure grazing levels maintain the flora and fauna of this open dune system. Opening - Land Owner(s) Advisory -----------Research/ Monitoring # Monitor progress of restoration at Newborough, and use results for future planning.

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CCW # SAC/ SSSI feature monitoring. CCW Education/ Awareness # Ensure interpretive material at sites promotes conservation-friendly recreational enjoyment, e.g. by highlighting erosion risks of dune jumping. Also to explain management strategy. FE Implementation: Lead: CCW Key Players: CCW, FE, IACC/ Estate (Aberffraw) Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Sandy Beaches Shore dock (Set 2: Plantations, Skylark)

COASTAL SALINE LAGOONS

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Bodies of salty or brackish water partially isolated from the adjacent sea by a low lying barrier. Specialised insects and plants can be found within lagoons and around margins. Cemlyn Bay has one of the largest and most important Welsh saline lagoons. Area/ sites: Cemlyn Bay, approx. 25 ha lagoon. Cob Pools, about 6 ha (Newborough NNR). Condition: Favorable at Cemlyn, which is SSSI, SPA, AONB, NWWT Reserve (with NT), and candidate SAC. Cob Pool within Newborough NNR, SSSI, AONB and candidate SAC. Factors causing Decline/ issues: - Increasing severity of storms could breach shingle ridge more often, leading to rise in salinity (saltiness). - Control of Sluice/ water flow. - Pollution, such as sea-borne oil. - high rainfall can lower salinity, which can affect various species Current Action: # Management of Cemlyn as NWWT reserve # Cob Pools - managed by CCW # Management and monitoring in light of the Natural History Museum/ CCW survey (1998). Overall Objectives and Targets To safeguard and maintain biodiversity at Cemlyn and Cob pools, and seek to protect and enhance any other sites if present. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Maintain wardening, and protect from new public pressures (Cemlyn). NWWT # Managing hydrological regime at Cemlyn NWWT # Maintain management at Cob Pools site. CCW Advisory -----------Research/ Monitoring # Monitor effects of management. NWWT. # Monitor salinity (saltiness). Education/ Awareness -----------Implementation: Lead: NWWT Key players: NWWT, NT, CCW Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: -----------FURTHER LOCALLY SIGNIFICANT HABITATS

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RIVER AND STREAM HABITATS Rivers and streams, including their bankside vegetation. As well as providing a habitat for otters and water voles, rivers and their banks act as corridors for many species. Whilst not a listed habitat in themselves, rivers are of great importance to both habitats and species which are listed. Area/ sites: Rivers and streams total, under the definition main rivers used by EA, about 372 km in all; a further 26 km or so is classed as tidal main rivers, and another 32 km or so makes up the Menai Straits. Afon Ffraw is protected within the Tywyn Aberffraw SSSI. Part of Afon Cefni lies within Malltraeth Marsh SSSI. All rivers except lower Afon Cefni and Afon Goch, are of high water quality (EA). Condition: Widespread human influence; Most rivers were extensively deepened and often straightened during the 1950s and 1960s. N.B. EA has statutory responsibility for protection and quality of water resources. Factors causing Decline/ issues: - River deepening and straightening. - Removal of shoals, gravel, boulders, riffles and bankside vegetation. - Lack of floodplain functions. - Lack of dead wood in channels. - Pollution. - Poaching by livestock leading to bank collapse and sediment pollution. Grazing right up to waters edge leads to loss of natural bankside vegetation. - Culverting of smaller watercourses. Current Action: # Major intervention now limited to maintenance of present situation. EA # Some improvements by EA to river banks and peripheral wetlands. # Clean Rivers Project - for groups involved in looking after/ clearing litter on local rivers. KWTC # Anglesey Wetland Strategy (AWS, but scheme‟s status now uncertain). # Existing ESA agreements. NAWAD Overall Objectives and Targets To maintain and, where possible, take steps for the restoration of biodiversity value of rivers and streams, with restoration of river process and ecosystem functions. To aim for at least the following by 2007: - 20 km of new river/ stream fencing. - 10 km of new riparian (water course and edge) corridor creation. - 5 km river bed restoration (riffles - shallows- , boulders) - 2 km Cleaning of old meanders on the Cefni. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Development/ revision of local EA Plan (LEAP). EA. # River Restoration work: Meander, riffle (shallows), and bed restoration. Menter Môn, EA

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Promote further riverbank and off-line enhancement as opportunity allows. AOP/ Menter Môn # Favourable management of watercourse buffer zones under Tir Gofal (and ESA extension) agreements. CCW, NAWAD, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners. # Improvement of watercourse buffer zones on IACC smallholdings. IACC/ Tenants, NAWAD # Ensure coordination and agreement with other action points for habitats and species, such as semi-natural woodland - corridor creation, otter - habitat enhancement, and work under Anglesey Otter Project. EA, AOP/ Menter Môn, Coed Cymru
#

Advisory # Advice to landowners on management favourable to wildlife in buffer areas around water courses. CCW, EA, NAWAD, AOP/ Menter Môn Research/ Monitoring # Investigate original condition, levels, profiles and routes of rivers to inform river restoration action. EA, Menter Môn, Openings - Student Projects # Assess and consider options to restore bed levels, gravel beds, obstructions and meanders based on foregoing point, targeting rivers such as Braint, Crigyll and Alaw. Menter Môn, EA Education/ Awareness # Promote uptake of Tir Gofal Scheme by farmers. CCW, NAWAD Implementation: Lead: EA Key players: EA, CCW, Menter Môn, NAWAD, IACC, Coed Cymru, AOP Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Coastal and Floodplain Grazing Marsh Broadleaved Woodland Water vole, Otter (Set 2: Floating water plantain - provis.)

PONDS

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Permanent or temporary bodies of freshwater (<1 ha). Important for amphibians (mainly where fish are absent), dragonflies and other invertebrates, water plants and birds. Area/ Sites: Many small ponds in fields. OS maps and Phase 1 Survey. Lack of specific, detailed information. Condition: Generally declining, but lack of detailed local information. Factors causing Decline/ Issues: - Natural succession/ sedimentation, and lack of cleaning - Infilling/ dumping - Pollution - Introduction of fish - Invasive non-native plants e.g. Canadian pondweed, Australian water stonecrop, curly water weed. - Feeding of wildfowl Current Action: # Some landowners have restored old ponds and made new ones, but tendency to stock for fishery. # Ponds and scrapes made by EA alongside river schemes. # Anglesey Otter Project pond creation. Overall Objectives and Targets To safeguard ponds in all areas in good condition, aiming:# To rejuvenate about 50 existing ponds at least, by 2007. # To make at least 10 new ponds by 2007, to help make up for recent losses and natural succession. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Protection through uptake of Tir Gofal scheme. CCW, NAWAD, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners Encourage sensitive cleaning and rejuvenation of old ponds as a priority; including targeting of IACC smallholdings. IACC, NAWAD, Ponds for People, Openings - Community Action. # Consider action at sites noted as having potential for A55 Biodiversity Enhancement Project, and also schools. IACC, Openings - Community Action, Schools # Pond creation at suitable sites AOP/ Menter Môn, Openings - Community Action, Schools
#

Advisory # Promotion/ advice to householders for garden pond construction (maintenance etc.) with features beneficial to wildlife. NWWT, Ponds for People?

Research/ Monitoring # Competent surveying of remaining ponds, and their classification by area - based on underlying

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geology and species present etc. Openings - Student Projects # Survey of specific ponds proposed for conservation action. Ponds for People Education/ Awareness # Promote pond creation and study by schools as an educational biodiversity resource. Schools, IACC, NWWT # Raise awareness of threats of invasive non-native plants. EA Implementation: Lead: IACC Key players: EA, CCW, IACC, Green Schools, Ponds for People Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Water vole, Otter, Pipistrelle bat, Great crested newt (Set 2: Lakes, Reedbeds, Medicinal leech, Three lobed water crowfoot)

SANDY BEACHES

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Often very extensive. Important for intertidal flora and fauna. Strandlines, on upper parts of beaches, are important for wildlife. Sandy beaches offer breeding site for birds such as ringed plover, oystercatcher and formerly the little tern. Area/ sites: Include well known beaches such as Newborough, Lligwy and Aberffraw, but small less well known coves are also important. They are widely scattered around the island. Condition: Water quality improvements of late, but there is ongoing problem of unsightly seaborne rubbish. Factors causing Decline/ issues: - Pollution from dumping of waste at sea: sewerage, broken fishing gear, accidental spillage of oil, ships‟ rubbish. - Need to ensure natural sand supply and movement (affected by sand winning at sea etc). - Sea defences. - Recreational pressures - walkers‟ disturbance of birds. - Pressure to meet "blue flag" standard. Current action: # Many beaches wardened by IACC in summer, # Bylaws in existence. # Newborough NNR; CCW. # Regular beach cleans. IACC, Ecovert, MCS # Green Coast Award - for rural beaches with the highest water quality and high environmental management standards. KWTC # Coast Care - run in conjunction with Green Coast Award, where groups are encouraged to adopt a beach. KWTC # Sandflats found in Menai Straits/ Conwy Bay SAC and Anglesey Coast SAC; new „plans and projects‟ considered likely to have significant effects on SAC features now require appropriate assessment. Overall Objectives and Targets To maintain the biodiversity value of the island's beaches. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Continue to improve sewage treatment on and near Anglesey. EA # Develop a conservation-oriented green flag standard for biodiversity and people. IACC. # Review of wardening policy and bylaws, and strengthen/ enforce if deemed necessary. IACC. # Provide more medium-sized bins at beach sites for rubbish. Empty regularly. IACC. Advisory -----------Research/ Monitoring # Monitoring of rubbish cleaned from Ceibwr Bay beach.

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MCS Education/ Awareness # Campaign to make and keep beaches free of human rubbish (of which most is sea-borne). IACC, Schools. # Provision of information on problems. MCS Implementation: Lead: IACC Key players: IACC, CCW, EA, MCS, Welsh Water, Schools. Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Rocky Shores and Sea Cliffs, Sand Dunes Shore dock

SEA CLIFFS AND ROCKY SHORES

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Including shores with rocks, cliffs and/ or areas of gently sloping rock, rockpools and so forth. Lower parts are important for intertidal species. The upper zone often grades into heath. Cliffs can be important for nesting seabirds. Area/ sites: Found particularly on north and west coasts: Rhoscolyn, Trwyn Ifan, Llanddwyn; also Ynys Gybi. Important features in the makeup of the AONB. Ynys

Condition: Good overall, though upper sections suffer „squeeze‟ from adjacent land use (traditional management may be abandoned). Factors causing Decline/ issues: - Recreational pressures e.g. footpaths. - Pollution, both from discharges such as sewage and accidental spillages such as oil. - Major sea defences. - Agricultural impact to cliff edge: the abandoning of traditional grazing, dumping of silage and so forth. Current action: # IACC warden a number of beaches including some rocky sections. # RSPB reserve at South Stack manages cliffs including climbing restrictions during breeding season. # National Trust own some sections on North coast: Carmel Head, Llanbadrig, Fedw Fawr, Clegir Mawr, Porth. # Work on Marine Pollution Contingency Plan. IACC # Some areas covered by ESA agreements NAWAD # CCW management of Ynys Llanddwyn Overall Objectives and Targets To safeguard the habitat, with no loss of area or quality. Aim to extend appropriate management to about 4 km more of sea cliffs at least, by 2007. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Continue to improve sewage treatment. EA # Consider extending coastal zone inland, with open grazing in coastal field strip. IACC, NT. # Seek appropriate management under Tir Gofal scheme and S 15 agreements. NAWAD, CCW, RSPB, NT # Completion and running/ using of Marine Pollution Contingency Plan. IACC # Ongoing liaison with BMC on climbing. Advisory # Provide advice to landowners and other users. AONB

Research/ Monitoring # Monitor sensitive areas for effects over time.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Openings - Student Projects Education Awareness # Make information available to encourage safe use and enjoyment without damage to biodiversity. CCW, IACC. Implementation: Lead: IACC Key players: CCW, IACC, RSPB, NT, BMC. Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Sandy Beaches, Coastal and Lowland Heathland Chough

FLOWER-RICH ROAD VERGES

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Strips of grassland lying between roads and field boundaries (often walls or hedges). Sometimes with associated ditches. Many support interesting flora eg early purple orchids, which may be very prominent at certain times of year. Area: Widespread; surveys from 70s and early 90s. Condition: Poor to high quality, according to recent and past management. Nutrient enrichment from rain, salt, and spray drift may have helped lead to declines. Use of machinery for cutting can lead to loss of verge biodiversity. Factors causing Decline/ Issues: - Failure to remove cuttings, which smother many plants, and also adds too much nutrient to the soil. - Inappropriate cutting: Cutting too early, too short, or not at all; scalping of steep banks. - Herbicide spraying. - Flytipping. - Possible burying of verge beneath dense hedge clippings. Current action: # Arrangement between NWWT and IACC on management of specified lengths of road verge, with Menter Môn funding. Overall Objectives and Targets To ensure survival and restoration of road verge biodiversity without compromising road safety, aiming for at least 20 km of verges under restoration by 2007. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Broaden management agreement to cover further lengths of verge, in more areas. IACC, NWWT # Manage some areas such as banks at junctions and interchanges for traditional local flower-rich grassland. IACC # Review verge cutting policy in relation to biodiversity e.g. for rake-off of cuttings, nearness of cut to walls, steep banks, and hedges, and time of cut. Consider changes to cutting regime. IACC # Ensure that autumn cut is thorough. IACC # Consider action at sites noted as having potential for A55 Biodiversity Enhancement Project. IACC Advisory # Provide contractors with information about good practice eg. Removal of cuttings, not cutting too low. IACC, NWWT Research/ Monitoring # Identify areas with best potential for improvement, based on geology and soil type etc. NWWT, IACC # Use information from past surveys as a basis for future monitoring (as well as in policy review). IACC

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Education/ Awareness # Make information available to explain policy and cutting regime; to cover approach taken for road safety and biodiversity. IACC Implementation: Lead: NWWT, IACC Key players: NWWT, IACC, Menter Môn Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Ancient Hedgerows

B3 SPECIES ACTION PLANS (SAPs) PIPISTRELLE BAT

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Pipistrellus pipistrellus The smallest British bat: Length 4 cm, Wingspan about 20 cm. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status: Widespread, but now recognised as two separate species (further survey needed to determine where each is present). Issues - General loss of roost sites due to building renovation. - Loss of maternity roost sites through use of toxic timber preservatives. - Lessening of feeding areas (and insects) due to decline of wetlands, hedgerows and woodlands. Current Action: # CCW act as advisers on Wildlife and Countryside Act. # Gwynedd Bat Group monitoring some colonies. Overall Objectives and Targets Conserve existing populations and prevent decline. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Promote through development control and building control. IACC # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP Advisory # Advise landowners of presence and legal status. CCW, GBG # Promote advice to landowners builders and developers through development control and buildings inspectors. IACC # Provision of crime prevention advice. NWP Research/ Monitoring # Continue monitoring programme. GBG, CCW, Openings - Student Projects Education/ Awareness # Provide information to householders. IACC, CCW (building and planning officers) Implementation: Lead: CCW Key players: CCW, Gwynedd Bat Group. IACC Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Coastal and Floodplain Grazing Marsh, River and Stream Habitats, Ponds, Ancient Hedgerows, Broadleaved Woodlands RED SQUIRREL Sciurus vulgaris.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

This native species usually becomes extinct within about 15 years after arrival of the (North American) grey squirrel. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981). Current Status: One small population in Pentraeth Forest. Issues - Competition from the introduced grey squirrel, and the parapox virus which this species can carry. - Loss of genetic variation following population bottleneck in late 1990s when down to a few tens of animals at most. With less than 100 animals in the early 2000s, loss of genetic variation is likely to be still underway. - Fragmentation and destruction of habitat. Current Action: # Anglesey Red Squirrel project: Includes grey squirrel control campaign and community group Friends of the Anglesey Red Squirrels. ARSP - Menter Môn Overall Objectives and Targets To establish a sustainable population, with at least 200 adults. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Further grey squirrel control, and eventual eradication. ARSP - Menter Môn, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Improve make-up of conifer plantation for red squirrel through careful felling and replanting. FE # Promotion of woodland habitat and corridors with Anglesey Woodland Strategy. Coed Cymru, FE, ARSP - Menter Môn, CCW, IACC/ Tenants, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Consider the possibility of translocation from other areas, to boost gene pool, and also for recolonisation, if conditions allow. CCW, Openings - Student Projects # Appropriate law enforcement and action, if needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP Advisory # Give advice to woodland owners on management needs, especially in relation to greys. ARSP - Menter Môn # Provision of crime prevention advice, if needed. NWP Research/ Monitoring # Continue monitoring of both red and grey populations. ARSP - Menter Môn, CCW, Openings - Student Projects Education/ Awareness # Publicise achievements. ARSP Educate on importance of culling greys, at suitable time of year. ARSP - Menter Môn
#

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Implementation: Lead: Menter Môn, CCW Key players: ARSP - Menter Môn, CCW, FE, NWWT, Coed Cymru, Woodland Managers. Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Semi-natural Woodlands, Ancient Hedgerows (Set 2: Plantations)

WATER VOLE

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Arvicola terrestris Semi-aquatic burrowing rodent. About 20 cm in length. British population fell in many areas in 80s and 90s, as predatory mink range greatly expanded. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act (as amended). Current Status: Lack of detailed information, but quite likely widespread in suitable habitat, including ditches. Anglesey likely to be a stronghold for water voles, especially wetlands in the south and east of the island. Establishment of mink not confirmed, though some confirmed records. Issues - Water quality - Overgrazing and poaching of river banks. - Maintenance of wider river habitat and wetland zones. - Flood management. - Possibility of mink colonisation with resulting predation. - Habitat fragmentation. Current Action: # Collation of sightings by EA. # Island is a key water vole monitoring site for the UK BAP water vole group. # Monitoring island for mink, with trapping on mainland in Menai area and Snowdonia. EA, CCW. # Anglesey Water Vole Project, from 2001. Menter Môn # Existing ESA agreements. Overall Objectives and Targets To identify distribution and colonies. To safeguard the species on Anglesey. Aim to improve about 20 km of river and stream banks as water vole habitat by 2007. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Promote river corridor enhancement, including through Tir Gofal scheme (and extensions of ESA agreements). CCW, EA, NAWAD, Menter Môn, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners, Community Action # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP, EA Advisory # Advice to landowners on management and legal status (site visits, notes), with provision of crime prevention advice. EA, CCW, NWP, NWWT Research/ Monitoring # Survey of suitable habitats. Build up data base of distribution. Menter Môn, Openings - Student Projects # Monitor habitats for mink. CCW, Menter Môn Education/ Awareness # To be covered in Education Pack for mammals. Menter Môn

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Implementation: Lead: EA Key players: EA, CCW, NWWT, Menter Môn, NAWAD Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: River and Stream Habitats, Ponds Otter (Set 2: Lakes, Reedbeds, Fens)

OTTER Lutra lutra.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Can grow to over one metre long. This large carnivore can occur in a variety of habitats; rivers, lakes, seashore etc. Can range over large territories - 10 to 40 km of watercourse. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status: Recently reestablished naturally on Anglesey, though not known to have bred at time of writing. Issues - Pesticide and general pollution (sewage, slurry, lime runoff from fields). - Riverside habitat loss and degradation. - Overgrazing leading to poaching and loss of bankside vegetation. - Water quality (Afon Goch from Mynydd Parys). - Availability of resting and breeding sites. - Disturbance. Current Action: # Anglesey Otter Project with Menter Môn and EA. # Collation of sightings by Anglesey Otter Project. Overall Objectives and Targets To ensure stable population (breeding) in the long term. Aim to have recorded the species as breeding by 2007. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Carry out river restoration on at least parts of rivers, such as: Afon Cefni, Afon Nodwydd, Afon Crugyll, Inland Sea, Afon Alaw, Afon Cadnant, Afon Ffraw, Afon Braint, Afon Gwna. AOP/ Menter Môn, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Tir Gofal streamside corridor option. CCW, NAWAD, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners Possible future river restoration work to favour otters. EA, AOP/ Menter Môn, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP, EA
#

Advisory # Provide advice to fisheries/ landowners. EA, CCW, NWWT # Provision of crime prevention advice. NWP, EA Research/ Monitoring # Monitor for increase (including breeding), and indication of stability of population. AOP/ Menter Môn # Regular survey for distribution. AOP/ Menter Môn # Monitoring of all habitat improvements. AOP/ Menter Môn Education/ Awareness # To be covered in Education Pack for mammals, to encourage action by local community groups and so forth.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

AOP/ Menter Môn Implementation: Lead: EA Key players: AOP/ Menter Môn, EA, CCW, Tir Gofal. Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: River and Stream Habitats, Ponds, Sea Cliffs and Rocky Shores Water vole (Set 2: Reedbeds, Fen, Lakes)

HARBOUR PORPOISE Phocoena phocoena.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Small member of dolphin family which has declined in recent years. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status in Anglesey’s waters: Lack of data, but there may be several groups. Listing of Menai Strait and Conwy Bay as cSAC - candidate Special Area of Conservation. SAC status effectively applies whilst approval is awaited. Issues - Pollution (for example, plastic bags, abandoned fishing gear, mercury). - Disturbance by speed boats and jetskis. - Fishing techniques - the species can be a bycatch. - Oil/ gas exploration/ exploitation. - Freedom of movement over large area makes conservation less straightforward. - Possible (but unknown) effects from heated cooling water used at Wylfa Power Station. - Lack of baseline data to back long-term planning. Current Action: # Sightings/ strandings recorded: Dead: Marine Environmental Monitoring:- 01348 875000 Live : BDMLR, RSPCA. # Analysis of dead animals to give information relating to decline. # Planning for Menai Marine Nature Reserve. # Anglers‟ Code of Conduct # Information on the species from MCS kiosk, Bangor Pier. # DEFRA guidelines for seismic surveys in the gas and oil industry. # DETR guidelines for whale watching. # Review of EA consents and authorisations impacting Menai Straits/ Conwy Bay SAC. Overall Objectives and Targets To contribute to the conservation of this species within Anglesey waters. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Possible better management in the wake of CCW Sea Fisheries Policies (2001) and changes to EU Common Fisheries Policy. CCW. # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP, CCW Advisory # Production of a Code of Conduct for boat and jetski owners. MCS, CCW # Provide fishermen with advice and information on porpoise-friendly fishing methods. MCS # Provision of crime prevention advice. NWP Research/ Monitoring # To gather baseline data for the species - development of monitoring of sightings and strandings.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

MCS, Openings - Individuals/ Friends # Continue to undertake analysis of dead animals. MCS Education/ Awareness # School Projects to learn about our own member of the whale/ dolphin family, highlighting issues such as sea pollution. Schools, MCS Implementation: Lead: CCW Key players: CCW, MCS, WDCS, BDMLR Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: -------------

BITTERN Botaurus stellaris

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

A heron-like bird, the breeding males of which have a deep booming call. Usually only seen whilst hunting prey along reedbed edges. Has declined with loss of wetland, and particularly reedbeds. There are no Welsh breeding records since the end of the 70s. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status: Winter visitor only. Formerly breeding. Wintering numbers appear to be rising at managed sites. This action plan is closely connected to the Reedbeds HAP. Issues: - Loss and fragmentation of areas of reedbeds through drainage and succession. - Decline in reedbed habitat condition. - Water quality, fish populations Current Action: # AWS Reedbed restoration projects. # Extension RSPB reserves‟ reedbeds; Malltraeth Marsh and possibly Valley Wetlands. Overall Objectives and Targets # To reestablish as a breeding species, if possible by 2007. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Continue AWS projects (if possible). # Encourage options for reedbed creation under Tir Gofal agri-environment scheme. CCW, NAWAD, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP Advisory # Advise landowners on suitable management. CCW, NAWAD, (AWS) # Provision of crime prevention advice. NWP Research/ Monitoring # Monitor progress of restoration scheme for suitability of habitat and presence. RSPB, CCW, (AWS), Openings - Student Projects Education/ Awareness # Use in education publicity for reedbed restoration. RSPB, CCW, (AWS) Implementation: Lead: RSPB Key players: RSPB, CCW, NAWAD, (AWS) Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: (Set 2: Reedbeds, Fen) SONG THRUSH Turdus philomelos Popular songbird which has declined in some areas (e.g. SE England), probably as a result of a

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

number of agricultural changes. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status: Present, but detailed standing unknown. Issues: - Pesticide use - particularly slug/ snail pellets - Cutting of hedges in autumn, removing food sources (berries, insects). - Autumn sowing. - Some loss of habitat such as hedgerows. - Cat predation. Current Action: # Existing ESA agreements. Overall Objectives and Targets # As a minimum (depending on status), to preserve the present population and prevent future losses. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Promote favourable management through Tir Gofal and ESA schemes. NAWAD, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Some habitat (hedges, tree planting, scrub etc) from action at site(s) noted as having potential for A55 Biodiversity Enhancement Project. IACC. # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP Advisory # Include the species in advice on management of habitats etc. RSPB # Provision of crime prevention advice. NWP Research/ Monitoring # To establish the status of this species by survey for population numbers and possible trends, and so inform future planning. Openings - Individuals/ friends, Schools, Community Action, Student Projects Education/ Awareness # Learn about the species as part of school nature area work. Schools. Implementation: Lead: RSPB Key players: RSPB, CCW, NAWAD, Schools Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Ancient Hedgerows (Set 2: Scrub, Field Edges - provis., Grey partridge) GREAT CRESTED NEWT Triturus cristatus.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

At up to 15 cm in length, this is the largest British newt, and one of two known from Anglesey. Skin is dark and warty, with orange-yellow on belly. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status: The island is a Welsh stronghold of the species. As with other amphibians, the Menai Straits effectively isolate populations from the mainland. Present at Glantraeth SSSI (Newborough) and at Cors Erddreiniog, Salbri, Cors Clegyrog, Cors Goch, Valley and Newborough Forest and Warren. Very likely to be in other sites also. Issues: - Suitable habitat conditions, including absence of predatory fish and adequate land foraging area. - Deterioration and infilling of field ponds. - Development. - Possible loss of genetic variation in small isolated colonies. Current Action: # CCW collating records and monitoring population at Glantraeth. # A55 mitigation schemes/ translocations. Overall Objectives and Targets # Safeguard the species from losses. # Enhance population and distribution where possible. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Assess potential for habitat enhancement at Glantraeth, and a number of other sites. Take action on basis of assessment. CCW # Protection of sites through development control; identify known sites in Local Development Plan, taking account of Welsh Office Technical Guidance Note 5 for protection. IACC, CCW # Creation and restoration of farmland ponds. NAWAD, IACC, CCW, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Habitat from action at sites noted as having potential for A55 Biodiversity Enhancement Project. IACC, Openings - Community Action # Enhance ponds on IACC smallholdings. IACC/ Tenants # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP Advisory # Inform and advise landowners and occupiers of presence and protected status. CCW, IACC # Provision of crime prevention advice. NWP Research/ Monitoring # To establish fuller knowledge of distribution (collation of records). CCW, Openings - Student Projects # Monitoring of all important sites.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

CCW Education/ Awareness -----------Implementation: Lead: CCW Key players: CCW, FE, NWWT, NAWAD Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Ponds

SHORE DOCK Rumex rupestris A member of the dock family which is now very rare. Restricted to NW European Atlantic

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

seaboard. Similarity to other coastal docks make identification hard. Protected under Conservation (Natural Habitats etc) Regulations 1994 and Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status: Found in dune slack areas within plantation at Newborough Forest. Population is expanding, but isolated. Issues: - Isolation from normal shoreline location or open dune slack. - Overgrowth of dune slack areas. - Vulnerability of small isolated population. - Vulnerability of strandline to recreational pressure. Current Action: # Survey of other potential sites. # Management of existing location. Overall Objectives and Targets Safeguard the existing pockets of population (and any new discoveries). Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Target areas in Newborough Forest for dune restoration based on tree removal (see Plantations HAP). FC, CCW. # In some cases, possibility of consideration of translocation to suitable shoreline sites. CCW, FC. Advisory # Provision of conservation law advice (if needed). NWP Research/ Monitoring # Monitor Newborough population through all stages of management. CCW Implementation: Lead: CCW Key players: CCW, FE Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Sandy Beaches, Sand Dunes, Sea Cliffs and Rocky Shores

PETALWORT Petalophyllum ralfsii A light green liverwort up to one cm in width, and looking like a tiny lettuce. Grows on areas with damp open sand, where competition from higher plants is low. A rare species in the UK, known

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

from less than 30 sites. Largest known UK populations are on Anglesey. Included in Wildlife and Countryside Act (Schedule 8). Current Status: Widespread at Newborough Warren and Aberffraw dunes in wet dune slacks. Issues - Drying of dune slacks due to afforestation. - Lack of grazing at Aberffraw may be having adverse effects. - Fine balence between lack of disturbance, which may allow other plants to colonise, and possible loss from over-disturbance. Current Action: # Monitoring by CCW. Overall Objectives and Targets Ensure populations are safeguarded. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Consider reestablishing grazing at Aberffraw. Opening - Landowner(s) # Partial removal of conifer plantation at Newborough to: a) restore dune watertable levels b) encourage formation of new embryo dune slacks FC # To otherwise maintain dune water levels. # Appropriate law enforcement and action, if needed. NWP Advisory # Provision of conservation law advice. NWP, CCW Research/ Monitoring # Assess importance of grazing for the species. CCW Education/ Awareness # The species illustrates the sensitivity of dune ecosystems; can thus be used in educational material and publicity. CCW Implementation: Lead: CCW Key players: CCW. Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Sand Dunes, Sandy Beaches Plantations (Set 2) FURTHER LOCALLY SIGNIFICANT SPECIES CHOUGH Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

Distinctive crow with red beak and red legs. Feeds on ground on insects in low-intensity coastal farmland areas. Dependent on grazing for supply of dung invertebrates. Protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act. Current Status: About 36 pairs, mainly on North West coast of Anglesey (such as Wylfa), South Stack area, also Penmon - which amounts to about 20% of the Welsh total. Factors causing Decline/ Issues: - Extent and quality of foraging habitat. - Unintentional human disturbance - climbing, walking and bird-watching. - Egg collecting, and shooting. - Natural predators such as peregrine may affect roosts and fledging success. Current Action: # Habitat management at South Stack. RSPB # Chough Habitat Restoration Project. RSPB # Yearly Chough survey. RSPB, NT, CCW, NWWT # Cross and Stratford Colour Ringing Project (CSCRP) Overall Objectives and Targets To safeguard (and possibly increase) the chough population. Proposed Action: Management and Protection # Favourable management agreements through Tir Gofal scheme CCW, NAWAD, Openings - Farmers/ Landowners # Limit disturbance from access near nest-sites and roosts. RSPB, CCW, IACC, NT # Safeguard nest-sites and roosts from development. RSPB, CCW, IACC, NT # Review site management by partners, and improve as appropriate. RSPB, CCW, IACC, NT # Appropriate law enforcement and action as needed (crime prevention is priority). NWP Advisory # Advise graziers and farm advisory services of chough in their areas, and its importance RSPB, NAWAD, CCW, IACC, NT # Provision of crime prevention advice. NWP Research/ Monitoring # Keep up monitoring of breeding pairs RSPB, CCW, CSCRP Continue to gather information on feeding sites RSPB, CCW, NT, CSCRP # Restart two-yearly survey RSPB, CCW, NWWT, NT
#

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Education/ Awareness # Information leaflet for farmers/ land managers (ecology, habitat, conservation). RSPB, CCW Implementation: Lead: RSPB Key players: RSPB, NWWT, IACC, NT Main Links/ Common Interest with Other HAPs and SAPs: Lowland Heath, Sand Dunes (Set 2: Field Edges, Limestone Pavement, Brown hare, Skylark)

Section B4: Selection of Anglesey Species of Conservation Concern A list of some species which are either rare or threatened and/ or characteristic to Anglesey. Many of these species should benefit through various Habitat Action Plans as listed (see Key for

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Habitats).
Species Amphibians Common frog Common toad Palmate newt Reptiles Slow worm Common lizard Grass snake Adder Leatherback turtle Mammals Common dolphin Bottlenosed dolphin Risso's dolphin Grey seal Stoat Weasel Hedgehog Water shrew Common shrew Pigmy shrew Brown long eared bat Lesser horseshoe bat Birds Sandwich tern Roseate tern Common tern Arctic tern Razorbill Puffin Black guillemotClSh Rock pipit Common scoter Lapwing Redshank Shoveler Benefit from HAPs P P P

Hth, Sc RS, P Hth, Sc

ClSh BW BW BW RS BW BW BW BW SL SL SL, L SL, GMsh ClSh ClSh ClSh, GMsh GMsh, Hth, FE GMsh, Bch, ClSh Gmsh

Species Teal Cettis warbler

Benefit from HAPs L L

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Snipe Yellowhammer Curlew Stonechat Tree sparrow Quail Peregrine Kestrel Swallow Linnet Goldfinch PLANTS Species

GMsh, FE Hth, FE, AH GMsh, Bch, FE, Hth Hth, FE AH, BW, GFM Hth, FE, AH ClSh, Hth GMsh, Hth, ClSh, BW, FE GMsh, Hth, FE Hth, BW, HE Hth, BW, AH, FE

Benefit from HAPs ClSh SD SD SD SD SD SD SD ClSh ClSh SD ClSh, SD Bch SD SB SD SD ClSh SD SD

Maritime. Wild cabbage Seaside centaury Sea kale Dune hellborine Variegated horsetail Sea storks bill Musk storks bill Portland spurge Smooth cats ear Golden samphire Rock sea lavender Lax flowered sea lavender Maiden pink Upright chickweed Small adders tongue Rays knotgrass Round leaved wintergreen Birds foot clover Dwarf eel grass Sea heath. Early sand grass (M.Minima) Thrift (Sea pink) Dwarf rush Horsetails (2 species)

Wetland. Autumnal water starwort RS, L Narrow leaved marsh orchid F Welsh marsh orchid SD, F Six stamened starwort L Eight stamened starwort L Species Benefit from HAPs Needle spike rush Frogbit P, L P

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Pillwort P Fen pondweed F Hairlike pondweed L Marsh fern F Water mint P, L Sundew and butterwort. F Pennyroyal F Three-lobed water crowfoot P Heath Pale dog violet Hth Western gorse Hth Heathers Hth Marsh gentian Hth Greater broomrape Hth Woodland Narrow leaved helliborine Bluebell Grassland Poppies and yellow rattle Pale St John's wort Green winged orchid Mackay‟s horsetail Spring cinquefoil Ivy broomrape Dropwort Frog orchid Rock Lanceolate spleenwort Hoary rock rose Southern polypody Spotted rock rose Plt BW RV AH, Sc, LP LP LP ClSh LP LP ClSh LP Hth

Lichens Golden hair lichen Hth(?) A lichen - Cladonia fragilissima Mosses/ Liverworts Sea bryum A stonewort - Nitella fragilissima

Key to Habitats AH - Ancient Hedgerows BW- Broadleaved Woodland Hth - Lowland/ Coastal Heath

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SD - Sand Dunes GMsh - Coastal and Floodplain Grazing Marsh RS - River and Stream Habitats SL - Coastal Saline Lagoons P - Ponds ClSh - Sea Cliffs and Rocky Shores Bch - Sandy Beaches RV - Flower-rich Road Verges Provisional Future Habitat Action Plans: RB - Reedbeds F - Fens FE - Field Edges LP - Limestone Pavement SB - Seagrass Beds Sc - Scrub L - Lakes Plt - Plantations

Appendix I List of Individuals from Organisations Consulted for the LBAP From Lead Bodies:- Arthur Owen, Dewi Rowlands, Jim Woodcock, Martin Eaglestone, Alwena Hughes, Alun Owen, Jane Waltham, Dafydd Rowlands, Gareth Morris, Isle of Anglesey County Council

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Martin Gould, Forest Enterprise Rob Greig, Anglesey Otter Project Simon Hunt, Coed Cymru Carrie Lane, Environment Agency Alisdair Moralee, David Lamacraft, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds John Ratcliffe, Joanna Robertson, Julia Korn (c/o CCW), Aethne Cooke Countryside Council For Wales Hugh Knott, Rebecca Gwyn, R. Dafydd, Menter Môn Chris Wynne, Jane Rees, North Wales Wildlife Trust

Other Partners and Consultees:Ian Bonner, Botanical Society of the British Isles (BSBI) Sgt Pete Charleston, North Wales Police Tim Clarke, Keep Wales Tidy Campaign Mike Dolan, Farmers Union of Wales Richard Evans National Assembly of Wales Agriculture Department (NAWAD) Sue Evans, Country Land and Business Association Geraint George, Gareth Edwards Jones, University of Wales Bangor Jill Jackson, Kate Williamson, Nerys Davis, Gwynedd Council Dafydd Jaratt, National Farmers’ Union (NFU) Adrian Jones Conwy County Borough Council/ Cyngor Bryn Jones, Anglesey Office, The National Trust Ageliki Politis, British Trust for Conservation Volunteers (BTCV can undertake conservation work under contract). John Roberts, Gwynedd Archaeological Trust Richard Snow, Ponds for People Tony Andrews Welsh Water/ Dwr Cymru Drafting/ editing/ co-ordination: 1st Draft (1999): Rhys Davies and Euros Jones, formerly of IACC. (Comments obtained from a variety of individuals and organisations in the 1999 consultation). 2nd Draft/ Published document: David Cowley, Biodiversity Officer, IACC. We would like to thank all those who took part and helped shape this LBAP. Appendix II Contact Information Biodiversity Officer, David Cowley, Dept Planning and the Environment, Isle of Anglesey County Council, Llangefni. 01248 752470.

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

BTCV Cymru, Sherwood Offices, Ffordd Caergybi, Bangor LL57 2DP - 01248 354050 Coed Cymru, Simon Hunt, Dpt Planning and the Environment, Isle of Anglesey County Council, Llangefni, Anglesey. LL77 7TW 01248 752472 North Wales Wildlife Trust, High Street, Bangor, Gwynedd 01248 351541 Countryside Council For Wales, North West Office, Bryn Menai, Bangor, Gwynedd 385500 01248 355782 Environment Agency, Ffordd Penlan, Parc Menai, Bangor, Gwynedd 01248 670770 Forestry Commission, North Wales Conservancy, Clawdd Newydd, Ruthin, Denbighshire. LL15 2NL 01824 750492 01824 750492 Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Maes y Ffynnon, Penrhosgarnedd, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL57 2DW 01248 363800 01248 363800 Gwynedd Archaeological Trust, Garth Road, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL57 2RT 01248 352535 01248 370925 CADW Crown Building, Cathays park, Cardiff, CF1 3NQ 01222 500200 01222 826375 01248

CAIS, Countryside and Agricultural Information Service, c/o ADAS, Eden Court, Lon Parcwr, Business Park, Rhuthin, Denbighshire, LL15 1NJ 01824 707163 National Assembly of Wales Agriculture Department, The Old Welsh School, Alexandra Road, Aberystwyth SY23 1LD National Assembly of Wales Countryside Departmant, Cathays0 Park, Cardiff, CF1 3NQ. 01222 825111 01222 826375 The National Trust, Carneddau and Ynys Môn Property Office, Tan y Celyn, Nant Ffrancon, Bethesda,Gwynedd LL57 3LX Menter Môn, Bryn Cefni, Llangefni, Anglesey 01248 752450 01248 752490

Appendix III: Nature Conservation Legislation The National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 gave statutory powers to the Nature Conservancy Council the then official government agency devoted to wildlife conservation (now CCW), and also introduced the concept of SSSIs (section 4.7). The Countryside Act 1968 strengthened many of the powers given under the 1949 Act and imposed on every public body a duty to have regard to the desirability of conserving the natural beauty of the countryside. The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, amended by a further Act of 1985, established a statutory framework for the conservation of land important for wildlife and natural features, and the protection of endangered wild plants and animals. All birds, bats, reptiles and amphibians, along with many other species of animal and plant are given specific protection. Most species may not be killed or taken from the wild. The act contains measures to control the unauthorised release into the wild of certain non-native species, and the importation of biological material which is a potential host to pests and diseases. The Environmental Protection Act 1990 divided the Nature Conservancy council, into three country Agencies, including CCW, and provided further protection to SSSIs. The Planning and Compensation Act 1991 improved local authorities‟ abilities to safeguard conservation areas

Working for the Wealth of Wildlife

by strengthening their planning enforcement and development control powers. It also required structure, local and unitary development plans to include policies in respect of the natural beauty and amenity of the land. The Wildlife; countryside: The Conservation (Natural Habitats etc.) Regulations 1994 (SI 1994 no. 2716) transpose the requirements of the EC Habitats Directive into UK law. They build on the existing legislation for the protection of habitats and species listed in the Directive, and apply its considerations in respect of development and pollution control legislation. The Countryside and Rights of Way Act, 2000. Best known for introducing the concept of a right of access to the countryside, it also considerably strengthens the protection offered to Sites of Special Scientific Interest, as well as boosting the protection of our most protected species of animals and plants, to include acts of reckless behaviour. The act also requires all public bodies to have regard to the purpose of conserving and enhancing the natural beauty of our Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). The above legislation, as well as regulations governing air and water quality, and the land use planning system, are designed to enable the UK to address a number of international obligations. The ‘Bern’ Convention on the Conservation of European and Wildlife and Natural Habitats imposes obligations to conserve endangered habitats and species, and gives specific protection to migratory animals. The Birds Directive protects all birds, their eggs, nests and habitats. The latter also requires the designation of Special Protection Areas (SPAs) to safeguard internationally important sites for birds.

Feedback and Getting Involved
Comment and further consultation

As part of an ongoing process, you are invited to send comments on Anglesey‟s Local Biodiversity Action Plan. You may, for example, have ideas about specific work that could be undertaken in your area, or comments on habitat and species choices in later sets of action plans. Or you may be interested in getting involved in biodiversity action in your area. In either case please contact:The Biodiversity Officer, Dpt of Planning and the Environment, Llangefni. biodiversity@anglesey.gov.uk

01248

752470


								
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