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					Advanced Placement Psychology This course has been officially authorized by the College Board
Instructor: Satinder Brar Hawkins, Ed.D Phone: 562.425.7441 x 4567 Email: shawkins@lbusd.k12.ca.us Web Page: http://www3.lbusd.k12.ca.us:81/millikan/Teacher_folder/HawkinsS/index.html Text: Myers, David G. (2003) Psychology, 7th Edition. New York: Worth Publishers. Study Guide: Straub, Richard. (2007). Study Guide to Accompany David Myers Psychology. New York: Worth Publishers Summer Reading: Ramachandran, V.S. & Blakeslee, Sandra (1998). Phantoms in the Brain: Probing the Mysteries of the Human Mind. New York: Quill/Harper Collins Course Assignments, Activities, and Assessments for the Units of Study:  Tests (one test per unit) and regular daily quizzes  Reading/Study Guide Homework packets  Projects  PsychSim Tutorials (completed online)  Experiments  Video Clips  Daily agendas and homework information are available on the web page.

Following is the sequence and units of study for the AP Psychology course including overview of topics covered, major objectives, correlating textbook chapters, homework assignments, experiments, projects, PsychSim tutorials, and video support clips. I. Developmental Psychology A. Life-Span Approach B. Research Methods (e.g. longitudinal, cross-section) C. Hereditary-Environment Issues D. Developmental Theories E. Dimensions of Development 1. Physical 2. Cognitive 3. Social 4. Moral F. Sex Roles, Sex Differences Major Objectives:  Distinguish between the cross-sectional and longitudinal approach to the study of development  Discuss the controversy of nature vs. nurture in the field of development  Explain how conception occurs and the course of prenatal development

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Chart and explain the stages of Jean Piaget’s theory of development Chart and explain the stages of Erik Erikson’s theory of development Chart and explain moral development according to Lawrence Kohlberg Discuss the rationale behind Carol Gilligan’s criticism of Kohlberg’s research Examine the theories on effective parenting and attachment and impact of the research studies of Harry Harlow and Mary Ainsworth

Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 4—The Developing Person pp. 134-191 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Experiments: Conduct Piaget’s learning task experiments on a child between the ages of 4-10 Projects: Child Observation Field Work (p. 11 of syllabus) Illustrated Pop Up book (p. 12 of syllabus) PsychSims: Cognitive Development , Mind Reading Monkeys, and Helplessly Hoping Video Resource: The Children are Watching/ PBS Home Video Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Harlow’s Studies on Dependency in Monkeys, Testing Competency in Newborns, Reflexes of the Newborn, Object Permanence, Stranger Anxiety, Morelli’s Strange-Situation Task, Piaget’s Conservation Task, Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development)  Scientific American (Talkin’ Babies, Baby Body Sense, The Magic Year, A Change of Mind)  The Mind (Teratogen and Their Effects on the Developing Brain and Mind, Capabilities of the Newborn, Infant Cognitive Development, Social Development in Infancy, The Effect of Aging on Cognitive Functions) II. Personality A. Personality Theories and Approaches B. Assessment Techniques C. Self-concept, Self-esteem D. Growth and Adjustment

Major Objectives:  Identify and define the major approaches to psychology  Apply the major approaches to a character analysis in the movie Breakfast Club  Identify the major theorists and their theories in the field of personality  Explain and interpret various inventories used in assessing personality traits  Describe the Freudian/psychoanalytic view of the structure of personality  Explain Freud’s view of how defense mechanisms protect from anxiety  Chart and explain the various levels of Maslow’s hierarchy  Describe the humanist view of personality  Discuss concepts of external v. internal locus of control and learned helplessness  Categorize your own personality from the trait perspective Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 15—Personality, pp. 574-617 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Group Project: Illustrating Freud’s Defense Mechanisms Inventories: Shyness, Locus of Control, Big Five, Self Esteem, Self Actualizing Project: Character Analysis Using Schools of Thought (p. 17 of syllabus)

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Video Resource: The Breakfast Club III. Learning A. Classical Conditioning B. Operant Conditioning C. Cognitive Processes in Learning D. Biological Factors E. Social Learning Major Objectives  Differentiate between classical and operant conditioning  Describe the phenomena of learning including acquisition, extinction, spontaneous recovery, generalization, and discrimination  Describe the process of Pavlov’s classical conditioning experiments  Describe the process of operant conditioning including the process of shaping as researched by B.F. Skinner  Identify and give examples of the different reinforcement schedules  Differentiate between the impact of reinforcement vs. punishment on behavior  Explain the contributions of B.F. Skinner, John Watson, and E.L. Thorndike to the field of learning  Discuss the importance of cognitive processes and biological predispositions in conditioning  Describe Albert Bandura’s Bobo Doll experiments and the implications for social learning Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 8—Learning, pp. 308-341 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Experiments: Jumping Jack Clap, A Number Story, Salivation/Lemon Powder Project: Mini Posters on Classical and Operant Conditioning PsychSim: Operant Conditioning Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Pavlov’s Discovery of Classical Conditioning, Watson’s Little Albert, Thorndike’s Puzzle Box, B.F. Skinner Interview, Cognitive Maps, Bandura’s Bobo Doll Experiment) IV. Motivation and Emotion A. Biological Bases B. Theories of Motivation C. Hunger, Thirst, Sex, and Pain D. Social Motives E. Theories of Emotion F. Stress

Major Objectives:  Discuss the various theories of motivation  Discuss the physiological determinants of hunger, thirst, sex, and pain  Differentiate between physiological and cultural motivations for hunger  Define achievement motivation including intrinsic and extrinsic motivation

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Contrast theories of emotion proposed by James-Lange, Cannon-Bard, and SchacterSinger Describe the biological response to stress and current methods of treating stress Apply the use of Hans Selye’s stress inventory

Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 12—Motivation and Work, pp. 454-497, Chapter 13—Emotion, pp. 498-529, Chapter 14—Stress and Health. Pp. 530-573 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guides Inventories: Life Stress Analysis, Sternberg Triangular Love Scale, Maslow’s Hierarchy PsychSims: Hunger and the Fat Rat, All Stressed Out, Expressing Emotion Video Resource: Life is Beautiful Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Self Stimulation in Rats, Reading Non Verbal Communication, Ekman’s Studies on Facial Expressions of Emotion, Selye’s Stress Response Studies)  The Brain (Emotions, Stress, and Health)  The Mind (Phantom Limb Pain) V. Sensation and Perception A. Thresholds B. Sensory Mechanisms C. Sensory Adaptation D. Attention E. Perceptual Processes

Major Objectives:  Differentiate between sensation and perception  Define the concept of thresholds and the measurement of thresholds  Explain how the senses transducer energy for use in the nervous system,  Diagram the eye and explain the mechanism of transduction  Diagram the ear and explain the mechanism of transduction  Discuss the theories of color vision including opponent-process and Young-Helmholtz  Explain the place and frequency theories of pitch perception  Explain the Gestalt theory of perceptual organization  Explain how various perceptual illusions work Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 5—Sensation, pp. 192-229, Chapter 6—Perception, pp. 230-263 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Experiments: Opponent Process, the After-Image Effect Project: Create annotated diagrams of the ear and the eye, including information on how these two systems transduce energy PsychSim: The Auditory System, Visual Illusions Video Resources: The Art of Seeing, NOVA: Mysteries of the Senses series Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Muller-Lyer Illusion, Depth Cues)  The Brain (Visual Information Processing)

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VI.

States of Consciousness A. Sleep and Dreaming B. Hypnosis C. Psychoactive Drug Effects

Major Objectives:  Discuss the different forms of consciousness  Identify major sleep disorders  Describe the stages of sleep  Explain REM sleep and how it differs from non REM sleep  Discuss current and historical theories on the function of dreams  Discuss current theories on the function of sleep  Describe effects of narcotics, depressants, stimulants, and hallucinogens on consciousness Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 7—States of Consciousness, pp. 264-307 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide PsychSims: Your Mind on Drugs, EEGs and Sleep Video Clips:  Scientific American Frontiers (What’s in a Dream?)  The Brain (Sleep and Circadian Rhythms; Sleep: Brain Functions; REM Sleep and Dreaming)  The Mind (Alcohol Addiction: Hereditary Factors, Treating Drug Addiction: A Behavioral Approach) VII. Testing and Individual Differences A. Standardization and Norms B. Reliability and Validity C. Types of Test D. Ethics and Standards in Testing E. Intelligence F. Heredity/Environment and Intelligence G. Human Diversity

Major Objectives:  Summarize the history and origins of intelligence testing  Apply the formula to calculate IQ  Categorize the early theories of intelligence (general v. specific)  Contrast the theories of intelligence proposed by Howard Gardner, Robert Sternberg and Daniel Goleman  Explain the components of a normal distribution (bell shaped curve)  Contrast the extremes of intelligence  Distinguish between reliability and validity  Discuss the evidence for both genetic and environmental influences on intelligence  Discuss the controversy over intelligence tests

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Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 11—Intelligence, pp. 418-453 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Projects: Analyze a personal standardized test report, Standardize and evaluate validity and reliability of a mock test administered to the AP Psych classes PsychSim: Get Smart VIII. Abnormal Psychology A. Definitions of Abnormality B. Theories of Psychopathology C. Diagnosis of Psychopathology D. Anxiety Disorders E. Somatoform Disorders F. Mood Disorders G. Schizophrenic Disorders H. Organic Disorders I. Personality Disorders J. Dissociative Disorders Major Objectives:  Identify the criteria for determining and diagnosing abnormal behavior  Describe the use of the DSM-IV  Describe the symptoms and origins of mood disorders  Describe the symptoms and origins of personality disorders  Describe the symptoms and origins of dissociative disorders  Discuss different approaches (cognitive, behavioral, biological) on the origins of depression  Discuss the characteristics of and recent research on the origins of schizophrenia Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 16—Psychological Disorders, pp. 618-657 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Inventories: Post-Traumatic Stress, Taylor Anxiety, Zung Depression Scales PsychSim: Mystery Client Video Resources: Matchstick Men Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (The Schizophrenic Brain, The Mind of the Psychopath, Multiple Personality Disorder, Gender Identify Disorder, Mood Disorders)  The Brain (Multiple Personality, Aggression, Violence, and the Brain, The Frontal Lobes and Behavior: The Story of Phineas Gage, Schizophrenia: Symptoms, Autism)

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IX.

Treatment of Psychological Disorders A. Treatment Approaches 1. Insight Therapies, Psychodynamic/Humanistic Approaches 2. Behavioral Approaches 3. Cognitive Approaches 4. Biological Approaches (psychopharmacology/psychosurgery) B. Modes of Therapy (individual, group) C. Community and Preventative Approaches

Major Objectives:  Describe the various approaches to the treatment of disorders  Discuss the aims and methods of psychoanalysis  Discuss the approach to treatment of humanist psychologists  Describe the assumptions and goals of cognitive therapy  Describe various biological treatments for psychological disorders  Differentiate various modes of therapy such as one-on-one, group counseling, or family therapy  Generate a treatment plan of a common disorder from each of the various major approaches or perspectives on treatment Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 17—Therapy, pp. 658-693 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide PsychSim: Computer Therapist Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Schizophrenia, Treatment of Drug Addiction. Early Treatment of Mental Disorders, Electroconvulsive Therapy) X. Cognition A. Memory B. Language C. Thinking D. Problem Solving and Creativity

Major Objectives:  Describe the processes involved in encoding, storage, and retrieval of sensory input  Differentiate between procedural and declarative knowledge  Differentiate between controlled and automatic processing  Explain the different forms of memory such as semantic and episodic memory  Explain and apply the different heuristics and algorithms used to problem solve  Describe the structure of language  Discuss the role of language in thought  Explain the theories of language acquisition proposed by Lev Vygotsky, Noam Chomsky, and the behavioral school of thought

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Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 9—Memory, pp. 342-383, Chapter 10—Thinking and Language, pp. 384-417 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Experiments: Stimuli Comparison, Recall v. Recognition, Primary v. Recency, Chunking Effects on memory, Stimuli Comparison: Abstract v. Concrete, Over learning Project: Problem Solving Games PsychSim: Cognitive Development, My Head is Spinning, Iconic Memory Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Chomsky’s View of Language, Gleason’s Wug Test, Niesser’s Selective Attention Test, Aging and Memory, Clive Waring—Living Without Memory)  The Brain (The Locus of Learning and memory, Learning as Synaptic Change, Language and Speech: Broca’s and Wernicke’s Area)  The Mind (Infant Speech Sound Discrimination, Language Predisposition, Human Language: Signed and Spoken, The Bilingual Brain, Animal Language, Language Culture) XI. Social Psychology A. Group Dynamics B. Attribution Processes C. Interpersonal Perception D. Conformity, Compliance, Obedience E. Attitudes and Attitude Change F. Organizational Behavior G. Aggression/Antisocial Behavior

Major Objectives:  Discuss the study design, findings, controversies, and implications on the research of Solomon Asch, Stanley Milgram, and Philip Zimbardo  Discuss the role of attribution on judgment formation  Discuss the cultural, social, emotional, and cognitive factors that contribute to the persistence of stereotypes and prejudice  Discuss the role of the group on group polarization and groupthink  Discuss the issues related to attraction and aggression  Discuss altruism Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 18—Social Psychology, pp. 694-741 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Project: Replicate and conduct (on a small scale) an experiment from the field of Social Psychology Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Takooshian’s Psychology of Bystanders, Milgram’s Obedience Studies, Schacter’s Affiliation Experiment)

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XII. Biological Bases of Behavior *The various brain structures, neural transmissions, and imaging techniques are woven throughout all the previous units and are formally covered in this section A. Physiological techniques (i.e. imaging, surgical) B. Neuroanatomy C. Functional Organization of Nervous System D. Neural Transmission E. Endocrine System F. Genetics Major Objectives:  Compare the various techniques and equipment used in brain imaging  Describe the structure and process of functioning a neuron  Identify and explain the role of various neurotransmitters  Classify and explain the major divisions of the nervous system,  Describe the functions of the brain structures (thalamus, cerebellum, limbic system, hypothalamus, hippocampus, etc.)  Categorize and explain the different lobes and association areas of the brain  Explain the split brain studies Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 2—Neuroscience and Behavior, pp. 56-97, Chapter 3—The Nature and Nurture of Behavior, pp. 98-132 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Project: Create an annotated diagram of the brain PsychSim: Hemispheric Specializations Video Resource: The Secret Life of the Brain/The Teenage Brain: A World of Their Own/ PBS Video Clips:  Worth Publishers Digital Media Archives/Psychology (Neural Communication: Brain Structures, Brain Imagining)  The Brain (The Divided Brain)  The Mind (Unraveling the Mysteries of the Mind, The Placebo Effect: Mind-Body Relationship) XIII. History and Approaches *The approaches section is woven throughout all the previous units and is formally covered in this section A. Logic, Philosophy, and History of Science B. Approaches 1. Biological 2. Behavioral 3. Cognitive 4. Humanistic 5. Psychodynamic 6. Sociocultural 7. Evolutionary/Sociobiological

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Major Objectives:  Trace the historical development of the field of psychology  Identify the various schools of thought Textbook and Lecture: Chapter Prologue—The Story of Psychology, pp. 1-17 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide PsychSim: Psychology Timeline XIV. Research Methods *The design and methodology sections are woven throughout all the previous units and are formally covered in this section A. Experimental, Correlational, and Clinical Research B. Statistics C. Ethics in Research Major Objectives:  Compare different methods of conducting research (case study, survey, correlational, observational, and experimental)  Identify the components of an experiment (variables, sampling, independent and dependent variables  Compute the three measures of central tendency  Evaluate the limitations of the various methods of conducting research Textbook and Lecture: Chapter 1: Thinking Critically with Psychological, pp. 18-55 Homework: Myers Workbook Study Guide Projects: Design and Conduct Experimental and Observation Research (pp. 13-16 of syllabus) PsychSims: Descriptive Statistics, and What’s Wrong With This Study Video Clips:  Scientific American (Tackling a Killer Disease; Water, Water, Everywhere)

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Child Observation Project Your Name: _________________________________________________ Period _____ Name of Child ________________________ Age _____ years & _____ months

Directions: Conduct field work observing a child between the ages of 2.5 and 6.5 years old (be sure to get parental approval prior to beginning). Attach your notes to this cover sheet. This assignment is worth 40 points. Due: Friday, September 29. No late papers will be accepted. Method: Here are some common rules for conducting naturalistic observations with children. 1. Assume everything the child does has meaning. It’s all data so take complete notes of everything the child says and does, including gestures and facial expressions. 2. Report and record your observations without judging. Control your bias, attitudes, and opinions about children’s proper behavior. 3. Look at what the child does and how the child expresses their feelings. Remember that they are emotional and sometimes non-verbal human beings. 4. Note the time every 15 minutes so that you can record what the child did and for how long. Observations: 1. Sit down at a table with the child and 14 M & M’s. Make a row of 7 M & M’s, counting them out loud to the child as you do. Tell the child that this row is for him/her. Then make a second row, also counting, but this time spread them out so that the second row is considerably longer than the first one. Tell the child this second row is for you. Ask the child who has more. Record the answer. What can you assume about the child’s cognitive development based on his/her answers) 2. Take five pennies and five M&M’s. Put the pennies in a row where the child can see them. Keep the 5 candies in your hand out of sight. Tell the child s/he can buy some candy for a penny, asking the child to give you one of the pennies. Then give the child an M&M. Repeat this until the pennies are gone. Then ask the child “How many pennies do I have?” Record the answer. What does the child’s answer demonstrate about his/her cognitive development. 3. Get five strips of paper of varying lengths (2”, 4”, 6” 8”, 10”). Put them in a row, equally spaced, omitting the second and fourth strips. Give the child the omitted strips saying “I guess I left these out”, and ask him/her to place them in the proper position. When the child has done so, ask “why does it belong there?” What particular rule does the child follow? 4. Get two fat glasses and one tall glass. Fill the 2 short ones with equal amounts of water. Ask the child if they think the water level is equal in both and if they don’t agree, adjust the levels until they do. Then pour the water from one of the glasses into the tall glass. Ask the child which glass has more. Record the answer, making sure to notice hesitations, facial expressions, and gestures. What does the child’s answer tell you about their developmental stage in Piaget’s theory? Make sure that all your field work notes and answers to above questions are clear and legible.

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Development Pop Up Books Directions on how to create the pop-ups were given in class. Below are the pages you will complete, in the order that we will be doing them in class. Remember to write the pop up books as if you were creating a reading guide for students in the 7 th grade. Don’t just have terms and definitions—include descriptions that use your own words and way of describing information. In April, when we are studying for the AP test, this pop up book will be a good study guide on key concepts in this unit.

 2 Pages on Piaget—include information on Piaget’s cognitive development chart and the
following key vocabulary terms: assimilation, accommodation, egocentrism, object permanence, conservation, and schema

 2 Pages on Erikson—include Erikson's chart of Psychosocial Development. Make sure to
explain the various stages.

 2 Pages on Kohlberg—include Kohlberg’s moral ladder and an explanation of what
characteristics can be found at each stage. Also include Gilligan’s criticism of Kohlberg’s moral ladder.

 1 Page—introduction to include information on what Developmental Psychology entails  1 Page—conclusion  Cover
Pop Up Book Grading Rubric 50 points possible -2: information copied -2: missing page -2: incorrect, incomplete information -1: grammatical mistakes -2: ineffective graphic design Your Total:

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AP Psychology—Methodology Unit Designing and Conducting Research
Purpose: To give students a participatory experience in how psychologists and other scientists design and conduct research. Assignment: Create, conduct and write up two mini-research projects. One paper will be an experimental research, the other an observational research. Each is worth 50 points and will take the place of a unit final. Total possible points—100.

Paper 1: Experimental Research. 1. Begin by identifying an issue to study. Examples are the buying habits of students, their ideas on the presidential election, or their viewpoints on school. These are just suggestions. You are free to pursue an area of personal interest. Turn your idea into a research question. 2. Propose a hypothesis that can be tested and include an operational definition of what you are studying. 3. Conduct a literature review of a minimum of three sources. 4. Construct a survey or questionnaire on your topic to be given to a minimum of 10 people. 5. Design a method of random sampling. 6. Get approval for your study. 7. Administer the survey or questionnaire. 8. Analyze the results. Analysis should include statistical information such as mean, median, and mode. Draw up conclusions. 9. Write up your findings (instructions are later in this hand-out). Paper 2: Observational Research 1. Begin by identifying an issue to study. Examples are the buying habits of students, their ideas on the presidential election, or their viewpoints on school. These are just suggestions. You are free to pursue an area of personal interest. Turn your idea into a research question. 2. Propose a hypothesis that can be tested and include an operational definition of what you are studying. 3. Conduct a literature review of a minimum of three sources. 4. Get approval for your study 5. Find a field setting (such as a classroom, hallway, lunch area, shopping mall, etc.) and begin observations. Observations need to total a minimum of 50 minutes. These can be spread out over several days. Do not do all 50 minutes at one time. 6. Keep an accurate log of your fieldwork observations. 7. Analyze your findings by going over your field notes and coding information. Draw up conclusions. 8. Write up your findings (instructions are later in this hand-out).

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Writing Up Research When social scientists write up research they have standard formats. These vary slightly from field to field (i.e. education, social psychology, economics, history). However, there are some generalities. For your project, each paper should have the following components:

1. Introduction—background to your topic 2. Literature Review—This is where social scientists acknowledge the work of those who came before him/her and how s/he is building on that research. 3. Methodology—in this part you clearly explain how you conducted your research. This section should include the following: a. Research question b. Operational definitions c. Number of survey questions d. Survey return rates e. Where field work was conducted f. Who was observed g. How participants were selected 4. Site and Participants--One of the fundamental rules of social science and human subjects research is to protect the anonymity of your site and participants. Names, locations should be changed. 5. Findings—this is the section where you report your analysis. 6. Conclusion—this is where you draw conclusions based on your data. 7. Bibliography—APA (standard in field of psychology) or MLA format

Each paper should be typed, 12-point font, and double-spaced. Each should be three to four pages long. The first paper is due on: _____________________ (50 points) The second paper is due on: _____________________ (50 points) Aside from the reading in the textbook, this is the only homework you will have for the first two units of study. This assignment will serve as the final exam for the methodology unit. A scoring guide will be passed out. No late papers will be accepted.

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Scoring Guide: Experimental or Observational Research Name: Paper Title:  Experimental Research  Observational Research Introduction and Lit Review [15%] _____ 1. Hypothesis is clearly stated. [5%] _____ 2. Conceptual definitions of independent and dependent variables are articulated clearly. [5%] _____ 3. Literature review is complete and includes reliable, scholarly sources [5%] Method [15%] _____ 1. Operational definitions of independent and dependent variables are articulated clearly. [5%] _____ 2. Participant population is properly described (i.e., who they were, how many there were, how were they assigned to conditions). [5%] _____ 3.. Procedure of experiment is clearly and thoroughly described -- i.e., describe what you did, including information about the location, materials, measurement, etc. used in your experiment). [5%] Findings/Conclusions[15%] _____ 1. Describe and graph your results clearly. [5%] _____ 2. Link results to original hypothesis: (a) Did the results support your hypothesis? If so, list one possible alternative explanation for your results. If not, list one possible explanation for why this might have been the case; (b) What are some implications of your results (regardless of whether they did or did not support your original hypothesis)?; and (c) What new or modified hypotheses do your results suggest (regardless of whether they did or did not support your original hypothesis)? [7.5%] _____ 3. Creativity and depth of interpretation of results. [2.5%] Overall [5%] _____ Writing: proper grammar, spelling, & punctuation; orderly presentation of ideas; smoothness & economy of expression; and clarity. [5%] Date: Period:

_____ Total Points Earned

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Scoring Guide: Experimental or Observational Research Name: Paper Title:  Experimental Research  Observational Research Introduction and Lit Review [15%] _____ 1. Hypothesis is clearly stated. [5%] _____ 2. Conceptual definitions of independent and dependent variables are articulated clearly. [5%] _____ 3. Literature review is complete and includes reliable, scholarly sources [5%] Method [15%] _____ 1. Operational definitions of independent and dependent variables are articulated clearly. [5%] _____ 2. Participant population is properly described (i.e., who they were, how many there were, how were they assigned to conditions). [5%] _____ 3.. Procedure of experiment is clearly and thoroughly described -- i.e., describe what you did, including information about the location, materials, measurement, etc. used in your experiment). [5%] Findings/Conclusions[15%] _____ 1. Describe and graph your results clearly. [5%] _____ 2. Link results to original hypothesis: (a) Did the results support your hypothesis? If so, list one possible alternative explanation for your results. If not, list one possible explanation for why this might have been the case; (b) What are some implications of your results (regardless of whether they did or did not support your original hypothesis)?; and (c) What new or modified hypotheses do your results suggest (regardless of whether they did or did not support your original hypothesis)? [7.5%] _____ 3. Creativity and depth of interpretation of results. [2.5%] Overall [5%] _____ Writing: proper grammar, spelling, & punctuation; orderly presentation of ideas; smoothness & economy of expression; and clarity. [5%] Date: Period:

_____ Total Points Earned

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The Breakfast Club: Personality Assignment
Directions: Before the movie begins, use your text and your study guide to briefly summarize the six approaches used to analyze personality in the chart below. After you watch the whole movie, you will be asked to select one of the characters and describe his/her personality from each of these six perspectives. Psychoanalytic/Psychodynamic (text, p. 576; Review Guide p.206) Humanistic (text p. 587; review guide p. 210)

Cognitive (review guide p. 211)

Trait (text p. 591; review guide p. 213)

Social Learning/ Social Cognitive (p. 600; review guide p. 211)

Behaviorist (review guide p. 211)

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