Pharmacology and the Nursing Process_ 4th ed. Lilley by hcj

VIEWS: 7 PAGES: 34

									Prof. Chichi Echezona-Johnson
        RNC, MSN, LL.B

 Life Span Considerations
Life Span Considerations
 •   Pregnancy
 •   Breast-feeding
 •   Neonatal and pediatric
 •   Elderly
Pregnancy
• First trimester is the period of 
  greatest danger for drug-induced 
  developmental defects
• Drugs cross the placenta by diffusion
• During the last trimester, the greatest 
  percentage of maternally absorbed 
  drug gets to the fetus
• FDA has implemented pregnancy 
  safety categories
Breast-feeding
• Breast-fed infants are at 
  risk for exposure to drugs 
  consumed by the mother
• Consider risk-to-benefit 
  ratio
Neonatal and Pediatric
Considerations: Pharmacokinetics

• Absorption
 ▫ Gastric pH less acidic
 ▫ Gastric emptying slowed
 ▫ Intramuscular absorption 
   faster and irregular
Neonatal and Pediatric
Considerations: Pharmacokinetics
(cont’d)
• Distribution
 ▫ The younger the person, the greater the 
   percentage of total body water
 ▫ Greater total body water means lower 
   fat content 
 ▫ Decreased level of protein binding 
 ▫ Immature blood-brain barrier—more 
   drugs enter the brain
Neonatal and Pediatric
Considerations: Pharmacokinetics
(cont’d)
• Metabolism
 ▫ Liver immature, does not produce 
   enough microsomal enzymes
 ▫ Older children may have increased 
   metabolism, requiring higher 
   doses than infants
Neonatal and Pediatric
Considerations: Pharmacokinetics
(cont’d)
• Excretion
 ▫ Kidney immaturity affects 
   glomerular filtration rate 
   and tubular secretion
 ▫ Decreased perfusion rate of 
   the kidneys may reduce 
   excretion of drugs
    Factors Affecting Pediatric
    Drug Dosages
• Skin is thin and permeable
• Stomach lacks acid to kill bacteria
• Lungs have weaker mucus barriers
• Body temperatures less well 
  regulated, and dehydration occurs 
  easily
• Liver and kidneys are immature, 
  impairing drug metabolism and 
  excretion
Methods of Dosage Calculation
for Pediatric Patients

 • Body surface area method
  ▫ Using the West nomogram
 • Always use weight in kilograms, not 
   pounds
 • Body weight dosage calculations
  ▫ Using mg/kg
           The Elderly
• Elderly: older than age 65
• Use of over-the-counter 
  medications
• Increased incidence of chronic 
  illnesses
• Sensory and motor deficits
• Polypharmacy
Physiologic Changes in the Elderly
             Patient
  •   Cardiovascular
  •   Gastrointestinal
  •   Hepatic
  •   Renal
   The Elderly:
  Pharmacokinetics
• Absorption
 ▫ Gastric pH less acidic
 ▫ Gastric emptying slowed
 ▫ Movement through GI tract 
   slowed
 ▫ Blood flow to GI tract reduced
 ▫ Use of laxatives may 
   accelerate GI motility
         The Elderly:
   Pharmacokinetics (cont’d)
• Distribution
 ▫ Lower total body water percentages
 ▫ Increased fat content
 ▫ Decreased production of proteins 
   by the liver, resulting in decreased 
   protein binding of drugs (and 
   increased circulation of free drugs)
            The Elderly:
      Pharmacokinetics (cont’d)
• Metabolism
 ▫ Aging liver produces fewer 
   microsomal enzymes, affecting 
   drug metabolism
 ▫ Reduced blood flow to the liver
           The Elderly:
     Pharmacokinetics (cont’d)
• Excretion
 ▫ Decreased glomerular filtration 
   rate
 ▫ Decreased number of intact 
   nephrons
              The Elderly:
        Problematic Medications
• Analgesics, including NSAIDs and 
  opioids
• Anticoagulants
• Anticholinergics
• Antidepressants
• Antihypertensives
• Cardiac glycosides (digoxin)
• Sedatives and hypnotics, CNS 
  depressants
• Thiazide diuretics
 Cultural, Legal, and Ethical 
      Considerations
                  U.S. Drug Legislation
Ø In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration -- 
  the FDA -- is granted the power to enforce some of the 
  laws, while the Drug Enforcement Administration -- 
  the DEA -- enforces those dealing with narcotics and 
  controlled substances.

Ø In the U.S., the U.S. Pharmacopeia/National
  Formulary (USP/NF) is the official book of drug 
  standards. Drugs that meet the standards set in this book 
  have the initials USP following their official names. 
U.S. Drug Legislation (cont’d)
• 1951: Durham-Humphrey 
  Amendment (to the 1938 act)
• 1962: Kefauver-Harris 
  Amendment (to the 1938 act)
• 1970: Controlled Substance Act
• Orphan Drug Act (1983)
• Health Insurance Portability and 
  Accountability Act (HIPAA) 
  (1996)
                  U.S. Schedules of Controlled Substances 
           Medical 
Schedule                        Abuse Potential                                  Examples
            Use
                         Very high, may lead to severe 
    I        No                                                heroin, marijuana, LSD, STP, peyote, hashish
                                 dependence.


                         High abuse potential. Severe             opium, morphine, meperidine (Demerol), 
   II       Yes            physical or psychological                 methadone, secobarbital, codeine, 
                                 dependence.                        amphetamines, cocaine, oxycodone


                      Less abuse than schedules I and II. 
                                                               Combined preparations, such as Empirin with 
   III      Yes       Moderate to low physical abuse, high 
                                                               codeine, Lortab, Fiorinal, Tylenol with codeine
                             psychological abuse.



                                                               phenobarbital, propoxyphene(Darvon), chloral 
                         Lower abuse than schedule III. 
                                                              hydrate, paraldehyde, chlordiazepoxide(Librium), 
   IV       Yes         Limited physical or psychological 
                                                                diazepam(Valium), flurazepam(Dalmane), 
                                  dependence.
                                                                                temazepam



                         Lower potential for abuse than 
                      schedule IV. Very limited physical or  medications for relief of cough or diarrhea, such 
   V        Yes
                         psychological dependence. A         as Robitussin AC or Lomotil.
                       prescription may not be required.
      Ethical Nursing Practice
• American Nurses Association (ANA) Code of 
  Ethics for Nurses
• International Council of Nurses (ICN) Code of 
  Ethics for Nurses
ØEvery state has its own nurse practice act. 
ØGenerally, nurses cannot prescribe or administer drugs without a
   healthcare provider's order. 

•In a civil court, a nurse can be prosecuted for giving the wrong drug or dose, 
omitting a drug dose, or giving a drug by the wrong route. Legal terms for these 
offenses are as follows:

•Misfeasance:  Giving the wrong drug or drug dose that results in the client's
                          death.
•Nonfeasance:  Omitting a drug dose that results in the client's death.

•Malfeasance:  Giving the correct drug but by the wrong route that results 
                          in the client's death.


 DO NOT CONFUSE WITH:
 •Beneficence    
 •Nonmaleficence
 Common practices related to the administration of controlled 
                       substances:

•Narcotics are kept in a double-locked cupboard, other controlled 
substances in a single-locked cupboard.
•Keys to the cupboards are carried by a nurse on duty. Only 
authorized personnel have access to the keys.
•Narcotics are given only under the direction of a physician or 
dentist.
•Controlled substances are accounted for on some type of record.
•The record includes the patient's name, physician's name, date, 
time, the drug, and the dose.
•Students must usually have their recordings cosigned by nurses.
•Records are also kept when narcotics are wasted. This act usually 
needs to be witnessed and cosigned by another nurse.
•Change-of-shift counts are done in most facilities.
An individual taking drugs has certain rights. Some
important ones are the right to:



•receive a total assessment before beginning drug therapy.
•receive information about a drug, its actions, and side
effects .
•know if a drug is experimental.
•consent to taking experimental drugs.
•receive drugs safely and painlessly when possible.
•obtain medications that are correctly labeled.
•avoid unnecessary drug therapy.
•refuse to take a medication.
Cultural Considerations
• Assess the influence of a 
  patient’s cultural beliefs, values, 
  and customs
• Drug polymorphism
• Compliance level with therapy
• Environmental considerations
• Genetic factors
• Varying responses to specific 
  drugs
Cultural Considerations (cont’d)
 •   Changing national demographics
 •   Influence of ethnicity and genetics
 •   Rapid and slow acetylators
 •   Examples of various ethnic groups found in 
     the U.S.
     ▫   Asian
     ▫   African American
     ▫   Hispanic
     ▫   Native American
           Cultural Assessment

• Health beliefs and practices
• Past uses of medicine
• Folk remedies

• Home remedies
• Over-the-counter drugs and treatment
• Herbal remedies
Cultural Assessment (cont’d)

•   Usual response to illness
•   Responsiveness to medical treatment
•   Religious practices and beliefs
•   Dietary habits

								
To top