Docstoc

Nursing at Michigan - SiteMaker

Document Sample
Nursing at Michigan - SiteMaker Powered By Docstoc
					Nursing at Michigan
Institutional Assessment for 
     Magnet Designation
       Margaret M. Calarco, PhD, RN
  Health System Clinical Quality Committee
              January 10, 2012
      Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
      Designation: Acknowledgements
• Sharon Smith, PhD, RN
• Leah Shever, PhD, RN
• Kathleen Moore, MBA
• Denise Kotsones, MSN, RN
Benchmarking Partners:
• Johns Hopkins – Karen Haller, PhD, RN
• Massachusetts General Hospital – Jeanette 
  Ives Erickson, MSN, RN, FAAN
• Clarian Health Partners – Linda Everett, PhD, 
  RN, FAAN
       Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
       Designation: Strategic Goals
Creating the future of health care through discovery 
• Create the ideal patient care experience
• Attain market leadership in key areas
• Generate margin for health system investment
• Translate knowledge into practices and polices that 
   improve health and access to care
• Engage in groundbreaking discovery and innovative 
   scientific collaboration
• Cultivate an interdisciplinary, continuous learning 
   environment learning environment
• Promote diversity, cultural competency and 
   satisfaction among faculty, staff and students
        Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
        Designation: The Value of Magnet Criteria
• Magnet represents top 5% of country’s hospitals  
  (391 hospitals are currently designated)
• Promotes quality in a milieu that supports 
  professional practice and  identifies excellence in the 
  delivery of nursing services to patients and families
• Provides a mechanism for the dissemination of “best 
  practices” in nursing services
• Reflects the presence of both organizational, as well 
  as nursing, excellence
• Criteria is based on evidence of a professional 
  practice environment
      Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
      Designation: The Value of Magnet Criteria
• Magnet standards serve as a framework for 
  structure, process, and ultimately outcomes for 
  excellence in patient care
• The principles of nursing engagement in 
  problem solving for quality and safety, 
  decision making, and autonomy in practice to 
  meet current demands in care are clearly 
  supported
• Magnet status reflects presence of both 
  organizational and professional excellence, 
  quality and safety
       Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
       Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
People 
• Increased RN retention and lower nurse 
  burnout 
     • (Aiken & Sloane, 1997)
• Decreased RN vacancy rate
     •  (McConnell, 1999; Upenieks, 2003; Jones & Gates, 
       2007)
• Decreased RN turnover rate
     • (Upenieks, 2003; Aiken & Sloane, 1997; Jones & Gates, 
       2007; Lacey & Cox, 2007)
                                                        (2009 American Nurses Credentialing Center)
            Institutional Assessment for Magnet Designation:  
            UMHS Vacancy Rates
UMHS Vacancy Rate
•    FY 2012 Q1 - 2.4 %
•    FY2012 Q2  - 2.1%
•    For calendar year (Jan1 to Dec 31 2011) our overall vacancy 
     rate was 4%


National Vacancy rate
•    The overwhelming majority of hospitals (85.4%) reported a 
     vacancy rate less than 7.5%.
•    Sixty-one percent have a vacancy rate of less than 5%
                                       (National Healthcare & RN Retention Report, 2011)
      Institutional Assessment for Magnet Designation:  
      UMHS Turnover rates

UMHS Termination  (Turnover) Rate
• FY 2012 Q1 - 2%
       § Voluntary Termination = 1.9%
       § Termination minus retirement = 1.6%
• FY 2012 Q2 -1.4%
       § Voluntary Termination   1.3%
       § Termination minus retirement = 1.1%
• FY 2011 - 6.9%
       § Voluntary Termination   6.4%
       § Termination minus retirement = 5.5%
                 Institutional Assessment for Magnet Designation:  
                 UMHS Vacancy and Turnover rates

National Turnover Rate
• Approximately 82% of US hospitals say their annual 
  RN attrition is between 1 and 20%, with an average 
  rate of about 14%

                (AACN website:  “ Nurse Turnover in Hospitals”   posted June 8, 2011)


•      Magnet Hospitals Vacancy rate – 3.64% vs non-Magnet 
       Hospitals – 8.1 – 16%  (UMHS - 4% with expansion)
•      Magnet Hospitals  Turnover  rate – 11.4% vs non-Magnet 
       Hospitals – 15 - 18%  (UMHS – 6.9%)
                                                                                             (Drenkard , et al.,  2010)
       Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
       Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
Service
• Increased patient satisfaction 
     • (Gallup, 2008)
• Increased RN satisfaction 
     • (Brady-Schwarz, 2005; Waldman, 2004, Gallup, 2008)




                                                        (2009 American Nurses Credentialing Center)
       Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
       Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
RN Satisfaction
• NDNQI Survey includes the PES-NWI along 
  with many other variables measuring 
  satisfaction
• Practice Environment Scale – Nursing Work 
  Index (PES-NWI) (Lake, 2011)
     • UMHS - PES – NWI overall composite score for all Inpatient Units  
       & the ED (2009) was 2.86
     • In various studies comparing  Magnet vs non-Magnet hospitals, 
       overall composite scores vary, but UMHS scores usually are better 
       than non-Magnet and slightly lower than Magnet in some studies, 
       with the most recent Magnet study reporting a composite score of 
       2.85 for a sample of Magnet hospitals  (Kelly, et al., 2011)
       Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
       Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
Quality 
• Decreased mortality rates 
     • (Aiken, 1994, 1997, 1999; Aiken, Smith & Lake, 1994)
• Decreased pressure ulcers 
     • (VA, 2004; Mills, 2008)
• Decreased ALOS 
     • (Aiken, Smith & Lake, 1994)

                                                       (2009 American Nurses Credentialing Center)
                   Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
                   Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
Quality 
• Decreased Falls 
               • (NDNQI, Dunton, et al, 2009)
• Patient Safety – improved communication 
               • (Hughes, Chang & Mark)
                                                                 



                                                                  (2009 American Nurses Credentialing Center)
         The Impact of Magnet Status on Patient 
         Outcomes (Goode, et. al. (2011) , JONA)
•   19 Magnet hospitals were compared to 35 non-Magnet 
    hospitals in the University Health System Consortium  using 
    the 2005 UHC operational and clinical database
•   Total HPPD and RN mix were compared along with outcomes 
    which included :
       • Mortality rates for CHF and MI
       • Failure to rescue
       • Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers
       • Infections
       • Postoperative sepsis  and post-op metabolic derangement
       • LOS
         The Impact of Magnet Status on Patient 
         Outcomes (Goode, et. al. (2011) , JONA)
•   With the exception of slightly better outcomes for pressure 
    ulcer prevention in Magnet hospitals, non-Magnet hospitals 
    demonstrated better outcomes on all other measures than 
    Magnet hospitals


•   Statistically better outcomes for postoperative sepsis, hospital-
    acquired infections, and postoperative metabolic derangement 
    were demonstrated by non-Magnet hospitals
         The Impact of Magnet Status on Patient 
         Outcomes (Goode, et. al. (2011) , JONA)
•   Total HPPD and RN skill mix were higher in non-Magnet 
    hospitals for general care units and RN skill mix was higher in 
    the ICUs for non-Magnet hospitals


•   General Care units in non-Magnet hospitals had on average 
    three 8-hour shifts and one 6-hour shift more RN hours per 
    week  than Magnet hospitals


•   Intensive  Care units in non-Magnet hospitals had on average 
    three 8-hour shifts and one 5-hour shift more RN hours per 
    week  than Magnet hospitals
         The Impact of Magnet Status on Patient 
         Outcomes (Goode, et. al. (2011) , JONA)
•   These staffing findings are consistent with other studies which 
    have demonstrated higher RN skill mix in non-Magnet 
    hospitals (Hickey, et. al., 2010)   and the impact of  RN hours 
    per patient day associated with decreased falls ( Lake, et. Al., 
    2010)


•   Few studies compare Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals on 
    patient outcomes and findings have been mixed


•   The authors of this study while surprised by the results, in the 
    end believe that this study adds to the evidence that “staffing 
    matters”
                   Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
                   Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
 
• US News and World Report Rating


• Leapfrog
                                                                 



                                                        
            US News and World Report Rating

1.   Johns Hopkins 
2.   MGH 
3.   Mayo
4.   Cleveland Clinic
5.   UCLA
6.   NY Presbyterian - No
7.   UCSF - No
8.   Brigham & Women’s - No
9.   Duke
10. U. of Pennsylvania
11. Barnes Jewish
12. UPMC (Shadyside  & St. Margaret)
13. U of Washington
                   Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
                   Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
US News and World Report Rating
• UMHHC analysis completed by Matt 
  Comstock  suggested we could increase our 
  ranking in each specialty by about two 
  positions and move our ranking in the Honor 
  Roll by two positions
                                                                 
           Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
           Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
US News and World Report Rating (Mott)
The weighted points by specialty for magnet status are as follows:
•   Cancer: 0.3
•   Endocrinology: 0.6
•   Gastroenterology: 0.5
•   Cardiology& Cardiac Surgery 0.7
•   Kidney: 0.3
•   Neonatology: 0.4
•   Neurosciences 0.6
•   Orthopedics: 1.2
•   Pulmonology: 0.8
•   Urology: 0.6
                Institutional Assessment for Magnet 
                Designation:  Potential “Benefits”
US News and World Report Rating (Mott)
In 2010 the addition of the above points in their category would 
have improved rankings in the following way:
•     Endocrinology: Up 2 spots (Would be tied for #24)
•     Cardiology& Cardiac Surgery: Up 1 spot (Would be #3)
•     Neonatology: Up 1 spot (Would be #21)
•     Orthopedics: Up 1 spot (Would be #12)
•     Urology: Up 3 spots (Would be #25)
•     No Movement  in Cancer, Gastroenterology, Kidney, 
      Neurosciences, and pulmonology
                                                                                             (Scott Marquette )
         Leapfrog Designation:
         NQF Safe Practice 9: Nursing Workforce
Implement critical components of a well-designed nursing 
workforce that mutually reinforce patient safeguards, including 
the following:
•    A nurse staffing plan with evidence that it is adequately 
    resourced and actively managed and that is effectiveness is 
    regularly evaluated with respect to patient safety.
•   Senior administrative nursing leaders, such as a Chief Nursing 
    Officer, as part of the hospital senior management team.
•   Governance boards and senior administrative leaders that take 
    accountability for reducing patient safety risks related to nurse 
    staffing decisions and the provision of financial resources for 
    nursing services.
•   Provision of budgetary resources to support nursing staff in the 
    ongoing acquisition and maintenance of professional 
    knowledge and skills.
          Magnet Designated Hospitals in 
          Michigan
391 Magnet designated hospitals nationally
•   Beaumont Hospital                                                     2009  
•   Bronson Methodist Hospital                                         2009  
•   Holland Community Hospital                                       2007  
•   Munson Medical Center                                                2006  
•   Oaklawn Hospital                                                     2009  
•   Sparrow Hospital                                                     2009  
•   Spectrum Health- Blodgett , Butterworth & DeVos     2009  
•   Northern Michigan Regional Hospital                          2011
•   VHS – Children’s Hospital                                           2008
•   VHS – Detroit Receiving & Huron Valley Sinai          2009
         The Magnet Journey to Excellence
• Phase One:           Gap Analysis and Follow-up
• Phase Two:     Submission of Application
• Phase Three:  Written Documentation 
• Phase Four:   Site Visit
• Phase Five:    Commission Vote
• Ongoing:         Interim reports after two years 
                             and full recertification process 
                             every four years
         The Magnet Journey:  Requirements

Additional NDNQI participation
•   Pediatric and Psychiatric nursing indicator collection and 
    analysis 
•   Nurse Satisfaction Survey across all areas
Designated Roles
•   Magnet Coordinator
•   Administrative support 
•   Data analyst and programmer
•   Additional staff time for data collection & preparation
       The Magnet Journey:  Requirements

Direct Magnet Expenses
• Magnet application fee and manuals– $4,200
• Appraisal fee (based on bed size) – $57,850
• Appraiser fees (4 day survey with 4 surveyors)  - 
  $29,600
• Travel costs of appraisers (hotel + airfare) – $10,000 
  (estimated)
• Document  review fees:  Team leader and three 
  reviewers – $8,500
Estimated Direct Magnet Expenses - $110, 150
       The Magnet Journey:  UMHS Overview

Three year journey - July 2012 – June 2015
• Timing related to Nursing negotiations is required
• Magnet requirements have significantly shifted from 
  process measures to outcome measures
• NDNQI and other nationally benchmarked 
  comparisons are required in all categories
• Most indicators require submission of two years of 
  data
• Unfair labor Practices (ULPs) need to be monitored 
  and may impact evaluation and/or designation *
• Requires significant focus across entire organization
       The Magnet Journey:  UMHS Overview

Three year journey - July 2012 – June 2015
• Must integrate the Magnet measures with the final 
  Michart and centricity planned abstraction of the final 
  list for meaningful use and other required data
• Must align any activities required for Magnet 
  preparation with the work being done in our 
  professional practice model development
      The Magnet Journey:  
      UMHS Estimated Expenses
Year One ( July 2012 – June 2013) 
• Major Activities
     • Establishing the infrastructure
     • Readiness assessment and gap analysis
     • Action plans to address gaps
     • Adding the required NDNQI component
     • Initial collection of evidence
• Estimated Expense - $583,941
      The Magnet Journey:  
      UMHS Estimated Expenses
Year Two ( July 2013 – June 2014 *) 
• Major Activities
     • Completion of evidence for submission
     • Review of documents (Magnet)
     • Participation in NDNQI
     • Mock Survey
• Estimated Expense - $584,708
• Negotiations year
      The Magnet Journey:  
      UMHS Estimated Expenses
Year Three ( July 2014 – June 2015) 
• Major Activities
     • Submit completed application after 
       ratification
     • Review of documents (Magnet)
     • Site visit
• Estimated Expense - $677,394
• Three Year Estimate – $1,846,044
      The Magnet Journey:  
      UMHS Estimated Expenses
Ongoing annual expenses
• $568,944

Recertification required every four years
• Annual expenses plus full certification 
  expenses
Comments & Questions

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3
posted:8/5/2014
language:English
pages:35