Docstoc
EXCLUSIVE OFFER FOR DOCSTOC USERS
Try the all-new QuickBooks Online for FREE.  No credit card required.

sy27_may01_s12

Document Sample
sy27_may01_s12 Powered By Docstoc
					                                             Fluids in motion
l   Goals
    v Understand the implications of continuity for Newtonian 
      fluids
    v Distinguish pressure and force for fluids in motion
    v Employ Bernoulli’s equation




    http://boojum.as.arizona.edu/~jill/NS102_2006/Lectures/Lecture12/turbulent.html   Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 1
                  Pascal’s Principle: Example
l   Now consider the set up shown on right.   Case 1
     v Mass M is placed on right piston,
                                                          dA           M
               A10 > A1 = 2A1 
                                                                 P1
     v How do dA and dB compare?
                                                  A1
                                                                        A10

    v Equilibrium when pressures at P    
       (left & right) are equal and           Case 2

                                                            dB         M

                                                                 P2
                   P1 = P2 
                                                  A2
                                                                        A10
                   F1 / A1 =  F2 / A2 
         r (A1dA) g/ A1 = r(A2d2) g/ A2
                     dA  =  dB
                                               Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 2
                       Pascal’s Principle: Example 2

l    Now consider the set up shown on right                F
     v If Mass M is to be raised up a 
       distance h, how far must the level of                   dA           M
       the fluid in  the A1 piston drop?
                                                                     P
     vDVA1 + DVA10 = 0  (incompressible) 
                       h1 A1 =  h A10                 A1
                                                                             A10

                       h1 =  h A10 / A1 

    l    If F is constant notice that, W, the work done is


                           F h1 = mg h  

      Less force but more distance (ignores pressure variations)
                                                    Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 3
                  Fluids in Motion
l   Real flow vs. ideal flow
     v  non-steady    /  steady state
     v  compressible  /  incompressible
     v  rotational      /  irrotational
     v  viscous         /  frictionless




                                          Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 4
                     Types of Fluid Flow
l   Laminar flow
     v  Each particle of the fluid 
         follows a smooth path
     v  The paths of the different 
         particles never cross each 
         other
     v  The path taken by the 
         particles is called a 
         streamline
l   Turbulent flow
     v  An irregular flow 
         characterized by small 
         whirlpool like regions
     v  Turbulent flow occurs when 
         the particles go above some  
         critical speed
                                         Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 5
                       Types of Fluid Flow
l   Laminar flow
     v  Each particle of the fluid 
         follows a smooth path
     v  The paths of the different 
         particles never cross each 
         other
     v  The path taken by the 
         particles is called a 
         streamline
l   Turbulent flow
     v  An irregular flow 
         characterized by small 
         whirlpool like regions
     v  Turbulent flow occurs when 
         the particles go above some  
         critical speed
                                             Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 6
                             Continuity
l   The mass or volume per unit time of an ideal fluid moving past 
    point 1 equals that moving past point 2


l   Flow obeys continuity or 
    mass conservation
     Volume flow rate (m3/s)    
     Q = A·v    
     is constant along tube.



        A1v1 = A2v2

      Mass flow rate is just  r Q  (kg/s)
                                               Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 7
                     Example problem
l   The figure shows a water stream in steady 
    flow from a faucet.  At the faucet the 
    diameter of the stream is 1.00 cm. The 
    stream fills a 1000 cm3 container in 20 s. 
    Find the velocity of the stream 10.0 cm 
    below the opening of the faucet. 

    Q = A1v1 = A2v2

    Q = DV / Dt =1000 x 10-6 / 20 m3/s
    v1 = Q / A1= 5 x 10-5 / 0.25p x 10-4  m/s
    v1 = Q / A1= 0.64 m/s
    K2 = K1 +Dmgh= ½ Dmv12 + Dmgh
    v2 = (v12 + gh)½ = (0.642 + 9.8 x 0.1)½ =  1.2 m/s
                                            Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 8
     Ideal Fluid Model (frictionless, incompressible)

                                                                        A2
l Streamlines do not meet or cross
                                        A
                                        1


l Velocity vector is tangent to 
 streamline                             v1

                                                                        v2
l Volume of fluid follows a “tube of 
 flow” bounded by streamlines

l Streamline density is proportional to 
 velocity


                                             Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 9
                                 Exercise
                                Continuity
l   A housing contractor saves some 
    money by reducing the size of a 
    pipe from 1” diameter to 1/2”            v1                    v1/2
    diameter at some point in your 
    house. 


     v Assuming the water moving in the pipe is an ideal fluid,   
       relative to its speed in the 1” diameter pipe, how fast is 
       the water going in the 1/2” pipe? 



        (A) 2 v1     (B) 4 v1       (C) 1/2 v1      (D) 1/4 v1

                                                  Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 10
                               Exercise
                              Continuity
                                             v1                    v1/2



          (A) 2 v1    (B) 4         (C) 1/2 v1        (D) 1/4 v1
                      v1
l   For equal volumes in equal times then ½ the diameter implies ¼ 
    the area so the water has to flow four times as fast.

l    But if the water is moving 4 times as fast then it has 
                               16 times as much kinetic energy.  
 
l    Something must be doing work on the water 


                                                  Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 11
                              Exercise
                             Continuity
                                            v1                    v1/2



l   Experimentally we observe a pressure drop at the neck and 
    this can be recast as work (i.e., energy transfer)
 
               P DV = (F/A) (A Dx) = F Dx

                            v1           v1/2
       F1                                                                 F
                                                                          2

    F1  and F2 maintain the pressure in the tube as the water flows
                                                 Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 12
       Conservation of Energy for an Ideal Fluid
     W      = (P1– P2 ) DV = DK  

                                  2           2
                                                        P1                     P2
     W      = ½ Dm v2  – ½ Dm v1

                     
                        = ½ (r DV) v22 – ½ (r DV) v12

  (P1– P2 ) = ½ r v22 – ½ r v12

 P1+ ½ r v12 = P2+ ½ r v22 = const.

and with height variations (potential energy):
     Bernoulli Equation  à P1+ ½ r v12  + r g y1 = constant
       Smaller diameter implies a pressure drop
                                                        Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 13
    P0 = 1 atm       Torcelli’s Law (Bernoulli in action)

                     l    The flow velocity v = (gh)½ where 
d                       h is the depth from the top surface
                         P + r g h + ½ r v2  = const
d

          A      B                 A                         B
d
                         P0  + r g h +  0  = P0  + 0 + ½ r v2 

                                            2g h = v2

                                        
                                      d  =  ½ g t2
                                        
                                      t  =  (2d/g)½

                     x = vt = (2gh)½(2d/g)½ = (4dh)½ 
                                           Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 14
                Applications of Fluid Dynamics
l   Streamline flow around a moving 
    airplane wing
l   Lift is the upward force on the 
    wing from the air
l   Drag is the resistance
l   The lift depends on the speed of         higher velocity
    the airplane, the area of the wing,      lower pressure

    its curvature, and the angle 
    between the wing and the 
    horizontal                                            lower velocity
                                                          higher pressure
l   But Bernoulli’s Principle is not 
    applicable (open system) and air is 
    very compressible                 Note: density of flow lines reflects
                                         velocity, not density. We are assuming
                                         an incompressible fluid.
                                                      Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 15
                      Fluids: A tricky problem
l A beaker contains a layer of oil (green) with density ρ2 floating 
  on H2O (blue), which has density ρ3. A cube wood of density ρ1 
  and side length L is lowered, so as not to disturb the layers of 
  liquid, until it floats peacefully between the layers, as shown in 
  the figure.
l What is the distance d between the top of the wood cube (after 
  it has come to rest) and the interface between oil and water?

l Hint: The magnitude of the buoyant force 
    (directed upward) must exactly equal the 
    magnitude of the gravitational force 
    (directed downward). The buoyant force 
    depends on d. The total buoyant force 
    has two contributions, one from each of 
    the two different fluids. Split this force 
    into its two pieces and add the two 
    buoyant forces to find the total force
                                                  Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 16
                                  Fluids: A tricky problem
l A beaker contains a layer of oil (green) with density ρ2 floating 
  on H2O (blue), which has density ρ3. A cube wood of density ρ1 
  and side length L is lowered, so as not to disturb the layers of 
  liquid, until it floats peacefully between the layers, as shown in 
  the figure.
l What is the distance d between the top of the wood cube (after 
  it has come to rest) and the interface between oil and water?


    l Soln:
      Fb =  W1 = ρ1  V1 g = ρ1  L3 g 
           = Fb2 + Fb3
             = ρ2  d L        g + ρ3   (L-d) L2 g 
                         2




    ρ1  L  = ρ2  d  + ρ3   (L-d)  
    (ρ1   - ρ3 ) L  = (ρ2  - ρ3 ) d                    Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 17
                     For Thursday



• Read Chapter 15.1 to 15.3




                                    Physics 201: Lecture 27, Pg 18

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:2
posted:6/28/2014
language:English
pages:18