Population Genetics by pptfiles

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 115

									Population Genetics

    Hardy Weinberg 
      Equilibrium
6.1  Mendelian Genetics in 
       Populations:

The Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium Principle
         Population Genetics
• Population genetics is concerned with the 
  question of whether a particular allele or 
  genotype will become more common or less 
  common over time in a population, and Why.

• Example: 
  – Given that the CCR5-D32 allele confers immunity to 
    HIV, will it become more frequent in the human 
    population over time?
Predicting Allele Frequencies

   Populations in Hardy-Weinberg 
             equilibrium
              Yule vs. Hardy
• What are the characteristics of a population that 
  is in equilibrium or another words, not evolving.

• Yule thought that allele frequencies had to be 
  0.5 and 0.5. for a population to be in equilibrium.

• Hardy proved him wrong by developing the 
  Hardy-Weinburg equation.
              Punnett square
• 60 % of the eggs 
  carry allele A and 
  40% carry allele a

• 60% of sperm carry 
  allele A and 40% 
  carry allele a.
             Sample problem
• In a population of 100 people, we know that 
  36% are AA , 48% are Aa, and 16% are aa.
           AA
• Determine how many alleles in the gene 
  pool are A or a.

  – Each individual makes two gametes....
  – How many A alleles are in this population’s gene 
    pool? _____ 120 (36*(2)+48)
  – How many a alleles?  _____(16*(2) +48)
                          80                                     
What percent of the alleles are A or 
               a ? 

120 / 200 = .6 or 60% A ; or 
.6 = frequency of allele A

80 / 200 = .4 or 40% a ; or 
.4 = frequency of allele a 
• Creating the Hardy-
  Wienburg equation is 
  a matter of combining 
  probabilities found in 
  the Punnett square.
      Combining Probabilities
• The combined probability of two 
  independent events will occur together is 
  equal to the product of their individual 
  probabilities.
  – What is the probability of tossing a nickel and 
    a penny at the same time and having them 
    both come up heads?

     • ½  x  ½  =  ¼ 
      Combining Probabilities
• The combined probability that either of two 
  mutually exclusive events will occur is the 
  sum of their individual probabilities.  When 
  rolling a die we can get a one or a two 
  (among other possibilities), but we cannot 
  get both at once.  Thus, the probability of 
  getting either a one or a two is 

     • 1/6  + 1/6  =  1/3
Calculating Genotype Frequencies




• We can predict the genotype frequencies  by 
  multiplying probabilities.
  Hardy-Weinburg equation
Genotype Frequencies
Zygotes     Allelic frequency   Genotype frequency


 AA             (p)(p)                 p2

 Aa             (p)(q)
                                      2pq
 aA             (q)(p)

  aa            (q)(q)                 q2

 Genotype frequencies described by           
                  
         p2+2pq+q2=1.0
                  
    The relationship between allele
       and genotype frequency

• Let original  A  frequency be represented by 
  p and original a frequency be represented 
  by q
• Since there are only two alleles possible for 
  this gene locus, The frequencies of A and a 
  must equal 1.0
• Therefore, p + q =1.0
Sample: calculating genotype 
frequencies from allele frequencies? 
If a given population had the following allele frequencies:
    allele frequency (p) for A of 0.8
    allele frequency (q) for a of 0.2

Determine the genotype frequencies of this population?


AA   0.64               Aa 0.32             aa    0.04

AA = p2 ; Aa = 2pq ; and aa = q2 as follows…
AA                       aa
We can also calculate the frequency of alleles from 
the genotype frequencies.

 When a population is in equilibrium the 
 genotype frequencies are represented as..

                    P2 + 2pq +q2

 The allele frequency can therefore be calculated 
 as follows.

 A = p2 + ½(2pq)       and      a = q2 + ½(2pq)
Examining our example again we see 
  that if we use the frequencies we 
   calculated for each genotype….

         p2            2pq           q2
    0.64 AA     .32 Aa      .04 aa
   A = p2 + ½ (2pq)
   A=.64 + ½ (.32)
   A = 0.8

   and since q = 1-p ; then a = 1-(0.8 ) a = 0.2
These rules hold as long as a 
 population is in equilibrium.


   Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium 
   describes the conclusions and 
   assumptions that must be present 
   to consider a population in 
   equilibrium. 
     Hardy Weinberg Conclusions
1.   The allele frequencies in a population will not change 
     from generation to generation. 
       You would need at least 2 generations of data to 
       demonstrate this.
2.   If the allele frequencies in a population are given by p  
     and q then the genotype frequencies will be equal to
      p2; 2pq ; q2. 
       Therefore if 
       AA can not be predicted by p2
       AA
       Aa cannot be predicted by 2pq and 
       aa cannot be predicted by q 2
       aa
       then the population is not in equilibrium
  There are 5 assumptions which must be 
    met in order to have a population in 
                equilibrium
1. There is no selection.  In other words there 
   is no survival for one genotype over another
2. There is no mutation. This means that none 
   of the alleles in a population will change over 
   time. No alleles get converted into other forms 
   already existing and no new alleles are 
   formed 
3. There is no migration (gene flow)New 
   individuals may not enter or leave the 
   population.  If movement into or out of the 
   population occurred in a way that certain 
   allele frequencies were changed then the 
   equilibrium would be lost
Exceptions to Hardy Weinberg cont. 


 4. There are no chance events  (genetic drift) 
    This can only occur if the population is 
    sufficiently large to ensure that the chance of 
    an offspring getting one allele or the other is 
    purely random. When populations are small 
    the principle of genetic drift enters and the 
    equilibrium is not established or will be lost as 
    population size dwindles due to the effects of 
    some outside influence 
 5. There is no sexual selection or mate
    choice  Who mates with whom must be 
    totally random with no preferential selection 
    involved. 
     Problem #6 on page 219
• Go to your text page 219 and answer 
  question number 6. 
• In humans, the COL1A1 locus codes for a 
  certain collagen protein found in bone.  The 
  normal allele at the locus is denoted with S.  A 
  recessive allele s is associated with reduced 
  bone mineral density and increased risk of 
  fractures in both Ss and ss women.  A recent 
  study of 1,778 women showed that 1,194 were 
  SS, 526 were Ss, and 58 were ss.

• Are these two alleles in Hardy-Weinberg 
  equilibrium in this population?
• What information would you need to determine 
  whether the alleles will be in Hardy-Weinberg 
  equilibrium in the next generation?
           Problem approach
• Check that conclusion #2 holds 
  – First figure genotype frequencies from the data 
    (percentages)
  – Then from the data, count the actual A alleles in the 
    population and the actual a alleles in the population.
      What are their frequencies?
• Then calculate the predicted genotype 
  frequencies of Hardy Weinberg and compare to 
  actual numbers.
The genotype frequencies are: 
 SS =1194/1778 = .67   Ss= 526/1778 = .30   ss=  58/1778  = .03

  Calculate allele frequencies from genotype frequencies
2914/ 3556 S  alleles  = 0.82  S frequency  or .67+1/2(.30) = 0.82  
642 / 3556   s alleles  = 0.18   s frequency or .03 + ½ (.30)=0.18
    If the population is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the allele
    frequencies should predict the genotype frequencies. 
 SS genotype frequency would be (0.82)2 , = 0.67; 
 Ss frequency would be 2 (.82) (.18), = 0.30;
 ss frequency would be (0.18)2 , = 0.03.

  These numbers almost exactly match the measured 
  genotype frequencies - so this population may be in Hardy-
  Weinberg equilibrium
  However, what also must we 
      know to be sure? 
• We would need to check in future 
  generations to make sure that the allele 
  frequencies are not changing.
• So here we confirmed conclusion #2 but 
  have not yet verified conclusion#1. 
                           Example
                                                     80
Initial frequencies   15 B1B1   50 B1B2   15 B2B2
                                                    total
                              Example
                                                                     80
Initial frequencies     15 B1B1         50 B1B2        15 B2B2
                                                                    total

Calculate genotype 
frequencies
                      15/80 = .1875   50/80 = .625   15/80 = .188
                              Example
                                                                      80
Initial frequencies     15 B1B1         50 B1B2        15 B2B2
                                                                     total

Calculate genotype 
frequencies
                      15/80 = .1875   50/80 = .625   15/80 = .188

Calculate allele 
                          B 1=                           B 2=
frequencies in the    15+1/2(50)/80                  15+1/2(50)/80
population
                          = .5                           = .5
                                   Example
                                                                                   80
 Initial frequencies       15 B1B1            50 B1B2            15 B2B2
                                                                                  total

Calculate genotype 
frequencies
                        15/80 = .1875       50/80 = .625       15/80 = .188

Calculate allele 
                            B 1=                                  B 2=
frequencies in the      15+1/2(50)/80                         15+1/2(50)/80
population
                            = .5                                  = .5

Can we predict the     (Frequency of B1)2     2(B1 B2)       (Frequency of B1)2
genotype frequency 
from the allele 
frequency?                (0.5) 2 = .25     2(.5)(.5) = .5      (0.5) 2 = .25
                                     Example
                                                                                     80
 Initial frequencies         15 B1B1            50 B1B2            15 B2B2
                                                                                    total

 Calculate genotype 
 frequencies
                          15/80 = .1875       50/80 = .625       15/80 = .188

 Calculate allele 
                              B 1=                                  B 2=
 frequencies in the       15+1/2(50)/80                         15+1/2(50)/80
 population
                              = .5                                  = .5

Can we predict the       (Frequency of B1)2     2(B1 B2)       (Frequency of B1)2
genotype frequency 
from the allele 
frequency?                  (0.5) 2 = .25     2(.5)(.5) = .5      (0.5) 2 = .25



Allele frequency does 
                         Population is not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium
not predict genotype 
frequency.                       because it violates conclusion 2
      Using the Hardy-Weinberg 
    equilibrium with more than two 
                alleles
• In a population of mice, coat color is determined 
  by 1 locus with 4 alleles: A, B, C, and D.  The 
  possession of an A allele confers black coat 
  color with another A allele, or a D allele.  If a B 
  allele is present with an A allele then coat color 
  is brown, and if C is present with and A allele, 
  coat color is grey.  All other phenotypes are light 
  tan.  Given that the frequencie of the A, B, and C 
  alleles are .05, .4, and .3, respectivelly, what are 
  the phenotpic frequencies of black, brown, grey 
  and light tan mice when the population is in 
  Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?
   Adding Selection to the Hardy-
        Weinberg Analysis 
• How do you know if a population is responding 
  to selection. 
  1. Some phenotypes allow greater survival to 
      reproductive age.  
                         -or-
  2. Equal numbers of individuals from each 
      genotype reach reproductive age but some 
      genotypes are able to produce more 
      viable (reproductively successful) offspring.
    If these differences are heritable then
      evolution may occur over time.  
              Caution

• most phenotypes are not strictly the 
  result of their genotypes. 
• Environmental plasticity  and 
• interaction with other genes may also 
  be involved.  
• not as simple as we are making it here.
We will look at two possible effects of 
natural selection on the gene pool


1. Selection may alter allele frequencies or 
   violate conclusion #1

2. Selection may upset the relationship 
   between allele frequencies and genotype 
   frequencies.  Conclusion #1 is not 
   violated but conclusion #2 is violated.
An example of what we might 
     see happen to allele 
  frequencies when natural 
      selection is at work
Let B1  and B2  = the allele frequencies of the 
initial population
with frequencies of B1  = .6  and  B2  = .4 




• After random mating which produces 1000 
  zygotes we get: 
                      Selection Example
Initial frequencies
                       360 B1B1   480 B1B2   160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4
                            Selection Example
Initial frequencies          360 B1B1   480 B1B2   160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of      100%       75 %       50 %
offspring leads to 
                             survive    survive    survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
                            Selection Example
Initial frequencies          360 B1B1   480 B1B2   160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of      100%       75 %       50 %
offspring leads to 
                             survive    survive    survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
 number surviving              360        360        80       800 total
                            Selection Example
Initial frequencies          360 B1B1   480 B1B2   160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of      100%       75 %       50 %
offspring leads to 
                             survive    survive    survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
 number surviving              360        360        80       800 total

The genotype 
frequencies of mating 
individuals which              .45        .45        .10
survive is 
                              Selection Example
Initial frequencies            360 B1B1   480 B1B2   160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of        100%       75 %       50 %
offspring leads to 
                               survive    survive    survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
 number surviving                360        360        80       800 total

The genotype 
frequencies of mating 
individuals which                .45        .45        .10
survive is 
Using the genotype               B1 =       B2 =
frequencies, calculate 
the allelic frequencies in 
the new  population 
                              Selection Example
Initial frequencies            360 B1B1      480 B1B2   160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of         100%         75 %       50 %
offspring leads to 
                                survive      survive    survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
 number surviving                 360          360        80       800 total

The genotype 
frequencies of mating 
individuals which                 .45          .45        .10
survive is 
Using the genotype                B1 =
frequencies, calculate 
the allelic frequencies in    .45+1/2(.45)
the new  population             = 0.675
                              Selection Example
Initial frequencies            360 B1B1       480 B1B2       160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of         100%           75 %          50 %
offspring leads to 
                                survive        survive       survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
 number surviving                 360            360           80       800 total

The genotype 
frequencies of mating 
individuals which                 .45            .45           .10
survive is 
Using the genotype                B1 =            B2 =
frequencies, calculate 
                              .45+1/2(.45)   1/2(.45)+0.10
the allelic frequencies in 
the new  population             = 0.675         = 0.325
                              Selection Example
Initial frequencies             360 B1B1         480 B1B2      160 B2B2   1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of          100%            75 %          50 %
offspring leads to 
                                 survive         survive       survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
 number surviving                  360             360           80       800 total

The genotype 
frequencies of mating 
individuals which                  .45              .45          .10
survive is 
Using the genotype                 B1 =             B2 =
frequencies, calculate 
                               .45+1/2(.45)    1/2(.45)+0.10
the allelic frequencies in 
the new  population              = 0.675          = 0.325
                              an increase of   a decrease of
                                   .075            .075
                               Selection Example
Initial frequencies               360 B1B1            480 B1B2        160 B2B2     1000 total
B1= 0.6;  B2 = 0.4

differential survival of            100%               75 %             50 %
offspring leads to 
                                   survive            survive          survive
reduced numbers of 
some genotypes
 number surviving                    360                 360              80       800 total

The genotype 
frequencies of mating 
individuals which                    .45                 .45             .10
survive is 
Using the genotype                  B1 =                B2 =
frequencies, calculate 
                                .45+1/2(.45)       1/2(.45)+0.10
the allelic frequencies in 
the new  population               = 0.675             = 0.325
                               an increase of      a decrease of
                                    .075               .075
                              Thus, conclusion #1 is violated because the allele frequencies 
                              are changed; we are not in equilibrium. The population is 
                              evolving!
     Creating an equation that allows for 
                  selection

•   First, we analyze the population on the basis of 
    the fitness of the offspring.

•   Fitness (w) is defined as the survival rates, or 
    percentage of individuals which survive to 
    reproduce.

•   We can use the fitness (w) of each genotype to 
    calculate the average fitness of the population
            Fitness formulas
               MEAN FITNESS

• If :
  w11 = fitness of  allele #1 homozygote 
  w12 = fitness of the heterozygote
  w22 = fitness of  allele #2  homozygote 
mean fitness of the population will be described by the
formula:


         ŵ = p2w11 + 2pqw12 + q2w22 
     For our previous example

• B1= 0.6 and B2 = 0.4 and
     fitness of B1B1 = 1.0 (100% survived)
     fitness of B1B2 = .75 ( 75% survived)
     fitness of B2B2 = .50 (50% survived)
• Figure the mean fitness now.
     For our previous example

• B1= 0.6 and B2 = 0.4 and
     fitness of B1B1 = 1.0 (100% survived)
     fitness of B1B2 = .75 ( 75% survived)
     fitness of B2B2 = .50 (50% survived)
• Figure the mean fitness now.
• ŵ= (.6)2(1)+
     For our previous example

• B1= 0.6 and B2 = 0.4 and
     fitness of B1B1 = 1.0 (100% survived)
     fitness of B1B2 = .75 ( 75% survived)
     fitness of B2B2 = .50 (50% survived)
• Figure the mean fitness now.
• ŵ= (.6)2(1)+(2(.6)(.4)(.75)) +
      For our previous example

• B1= 0.6 and B2 = 0.4 and
     fitness of B1B1 = 1.0 (100% survived)
     fitness of B1B2 = .75 ( 75% survived)
     fitness of B2B2 = .50 (50% survived)
• Figure the mean fitness now.
ŵ= (.6)2(1)+(2(.6)(.4)(.75)) + (.4)2 (.5) = .80
We can also use the fitness to 
calculate the expected frequency of 
each genotype in the next 
generation.  We can do it the long 
way, if  we know actual numbers 
OR……. 
  B1B1  =  P2w11
                   ŵ 
  B1B2  = 2pqw12
                   ŵ 
  B2B2  = q2w22
           ŵ 
We can also use the fitness to calculate 
the expected frequency of each allele 
in the next generation. 


  B1 = p2w11+pqw12   B2 = pqw12+q2w22
                ŵ             ŵ
Finally, we can calculate the change (D) in 
the frequency of B1 or B2 directly as follows:  


  Δ B1 =  Δp =    p (pw11+qw12 – ŵ)
                          ŵ


   Δ B2 =  Δq = q (pw12+qw22 – ŵ)
                         ŵ
           In class problem 
• Go back to problem # 6 on page 219.  
  Taking this current population that you 
  have already analyzed, figure out what the 
  new genotype and allele frequencies will 
        genotype               frequencies
  be if the fitness of these individuals is 
  actually as follows: 
•  SS individuals 0.7 ; Ss individuals 1.0 and 
  the ss individuals 0.8. 
We calculated S = .82 and s = .18   
                                                              We know 
and the fitnesses are w11(SS)=.7; w12(Ss)=1; w22(ss)=.8       this to start
     ŵ = p2w11 + 2pqw12 + q2w22 
    ŵ= (.82) 2 (.7) + 2(.82)(.18)(1.0) + (.18)2 (.8)
       ŵ = .470 + .295 + .026 = .791

     B1B1  =  P2w11        ; SS = (.82)2(.7) / .791  = .595
               ŵ 
     B1B2  = 2pqw12        ;Ss = 2(.82)(.18)(1.0) / .791 = .373
                      ŵ 
     B2B2  = q2w22
                           ;ss = (.18)2(.8) / .791 = .032
              ŵ 
       2
 B1 = p w11+pqw12    S = (.82)2(.7) + (.82)(.18)(1.0) =  .78       
          ŵ                                    .791




            2
B2 = pqw12+q w22    s = (.82)(.18)(1.0) + (.18)2(.8) = .22 
              ŵ                              .791
So…… B1B1  =   .595          B1B2 =   .373               B2B2 = .032


                               and

    B1  =     .78                   B2 =  .22



      Is this population in equilibrium? 

     Have the allele frequencies changed? 
     Can we predict the genotype frequencies from the 
     allelic frequencies? 
Experimental confirmation of 
  loss of Hardy Weinberg 
         equilibrium
Fruit fly experiments of 
 Cavener and Clegg 
• Worked with fruit flies having two 
  versions of the ADH (alcohol 
  dehydrogenase) enzyme, F and S. (for 
  fast and slow moving through an 
  electrophoresis gel) 
• Grew two experimental populations on 
  food spiked with ethanol and two control 
  populations on normal, non-spiked food. 
  Breeders for each generation were
  picked at random. 
             random
• Took random samples of flies every few 
  generations and calculated the allele 
  frequencies for AdhF and AdhS 
Figure 5.13 pg 158
• Control populations showed no consistent 
  change in the frequency of the alleles 
• AdhF showed a rapid and consistent 
  increase in the experimental populations 
Can we identify which equilibrium 
assumption is being violated? 
 • only difference is ethanol in food 
    migration?  
    random mating?
    drift?
    mutations? 
 • If we eliminate the other factors...
         Must be selection for the fast form of gene. 
                 selection
 • Indeed studies show that AdhF form breaks down 
   alcohol at twice the rate as the AdhS form.
 • Therefore offspring carrying this allele are more fit and 
   leave more offspring and the make-up of  the gene 
   pool changes. 
       Cavener and Clegg 
  demonstrated that selection 
pressure can lead to changes 
 in allele frequencies in just a 
         few generations
 A second selection scenario
• Selection may upset the relationship
  between allele frequencies and
  genotype frequencies.
• Conclusion #1 ( allele frequencies do
  not change) is not violated but
  conclusion #2 (that we can predict
  genotype frequencies from allele
 frequencies) is violated.
 Genetic variation for resistance to 
    kuru in a Fore population
• Kuru is a fatal neurological disorder that is 
  caused by the misfolding of a prion protein in 
  neurological tissue.
•  Humans contract the disease by eating 
  contaminated tissue.
• Symptoms start with shivering and trembling and 
  lead to staggering and trouble talking and 
  swallowing to coma and death.
 Genetic variation for resistance to 
    kuru in a Fore population
• The greatest outbreak of kuru occurred in the 
  1950’s in the Fore people.  They practiced ritual 
  funereal cannibalism.
• Researchers wanted to know whether certain 
  genotypes were more susceptible than others.
• They looked at 2 different alleles for the encoded 
  protein that was responsible for the disease. 
   – One allele contained Met at position 129 while 
     the other contained a Val at the same position.
   Genotypes of the survivors
• Researchers surveyed a population of 30 
  females who had eaten dead relatives and 
  yet survived the kuru epidemic without 
  getting sick.
• The numbers of individuals with their 
  genotypes were as follows:

  – Met/Met   Met/Val   Val/Val
         4        23         3
Do these numbers deviate significantly 
       from H.W. equallibrium?
  – Met/Met     Met/Val   Val/Val
         4          23         3
1.  Calculate the allele frequencies.
  Met     (8+23) =0.52
             60

  Val     (23+6) =0.48
             60
2. Calculate the genotype frequencies 
    expected under the Hardy-Weinberg 
    principle.
  – Met/Met       Met/Val       Val/Val
      (.52)2      2(.52)(.48)   (.48)2

    = .27               =.5     = .23
3. Calculate the expected number of 
    individuals of each genotype under 
    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.
     Met/Met         Met/Val           Val/Val
     (.27)(30)       (.5)(30)          (.23)(30)
        = 8            = 15               = 7

  These numbers are different from the ones that 
     were actually observed in the population.
       = 4             =  23             = 3
     Is the difference statistically 
              significant?
• Is it plausible that the difference between 
  the expected and observed values arose 
  by chance?
• Our null hypothesis is that the difference is 
  simply due to chance.
                    Chi-square
4. Calculate the test statistic using Chi-square.
       2    (observed – expected)2
      c =S
                   (expected)


  c2 = (4-8)2 + (23-15)2 + (3-7)2 = 8.55
           8           15          7

Is the value 8.55 statistically significant or could it 
   reasonably have occurred by chance?
5. Determine whether the value of the test 
    statistic is significant.
•        Look up the value of 8.55 in the table of “Critical values of 
         the chi-square distribution”.
     –      To use this table we need to calculate the degrees of freedom (df) 
            for the test statistic.

         df = number of classes  –  number of independent values.

           There are three classes: the number of genotypes.

           We calculated two values in determining the expected 
           values: the total number of individuals, and the 
           frequency of the Val allele
                   df = 1 
• The critical value for most research studies is P
  = 0.05.
  – This means that there is a 5% chance that are null 
    hypothesis is correct. 
  – Any P value less than 0.05 means that we reject our 
    null hypothesis.


• Our  c2 value of 8.55 has a P value of .0034.

• Therfore we reject our null hypothesis that the 
  difference between the expected and the 
  observed is simple due to chance events.
What pattern of allele frequency 
changes might be caused by selection

• If selection is acting, does the rate of 
                                   rate
  evolution of a particular allele depend 
  on whether it is….
    dominant or recessive?

    heterozygote or homozygote? 
Natural Selection is most potent as an 
        Selection
evolutionary force when selection acts on 
evolutionary force
recessive alleles which are common and the 
recessive alleles
dominant form is relatively rare.

 • Dawson’s Flour beetle example 
 • Studied a gene locus that had a wild 
   type (+) allele and a lethal allele. 
 • +/+ or +/L are normal L/L is lethal. 
 • Two experimental populations 
   composed of all heterozygotes +/L; (+ = 
   0.5 and L =0.5). 
 • Expected populations to evolve toward 
   lower frequency of the L allele. 
Results showed that the 
recessive lethal did 
drop rapidly at first but 
slowed down over 
successive generations. 



    WHY?
 In each succeeding generation all LL
 are lost and ++ makes up a greater
 proportion of the survivors.

With each new generation there are
less and less homozygous lethals for
selection to act on and the lethal allele
hides in the heterozygotes
                                 Summary
•   Dawson showed that dominance and allele frequency interact to
    determine the rate of evolution when acted on by selection

• when a recessive allele is common and there is a great difference in
  fitness between the phenotypes then evolution is rapid because 
  both the recessive and dominant phenotype are well represented for
  selection to act on. 
                   on.
• Example if A= .05  a= .95

    –       AA                       Aa                 aa
         (0.05)2            2(0.05)(0.95)            (0.95)2
    =
          .0025                    =.095             = .9025

         Almost 10 % in the population have the dominant phenotype, while 90 % have 
         the recessive phenotype

     Thus if the two phenotypes differ in fitness there will be a change in
         allele frequency
                            Summary
• If recessive allele is rare and the dominant allele is
  common, evolution is slow.
• Example if A= .95  a= .05

     –    AA                       Aa                 aa
          (0.95)2         2(0.95)(0.05)             (0.05)2
     =
           .9025                 =.095              = .0025

•   Approximately 100% of the population has the dominant phenotype.

•   Even if the phenotypes differ greatly in fitness, there are so few of the 
    minority phenotype that there will be little change in allele frequencies 
    in the next generation.
Selection on Heterozygotes and 
         Homozygotes
Selection on Heterozygotes and 
Homozygotes 
• Normally in a recessive/ dominant gene, 
  the fitness of the heterozygote will be 
  equal to that of the dominant homozygotes 
• Also, it is possible for the heterozygotes to 
  have a fitness intermediate to the two 
  homozygotes.  (incomplete dominance)
• Thirdly we may find Heterozygote
  Superiority or Inferiority 
Scenario #1 from Mukai and Burdick
        Fruit fly experiment 
• Studied a gene in which 
    ·  Homozygotes for one allele are 
       viable (VV)
  · Homozygotes for the other allele are 
       not viable and lethal. (LL)
• Started with all heterozygotes to establish 
  a new population (each allele =.5)
• Predict the frequency of V after 15 
  generations.
                 The experiment

  -After several generations 
  equilibrium was reached at 
  .79 frequency for the viable 
  allele
  -This means that the lethal 
  allele was at a frequency of  
  0.21! 

How could this be?  
               be
To further test these results, Mukai and 
Burdick did a second experiment...

-This time the population 
    began with a frequency 
    of  .975 of  V allele.
- Expected the population to 
    eliminate all lethal 
    alleles and fix the viable 
    allele at 1.0. 
-However, Same equilibrium 
    around a frequency of 
    .79 was reached for 
    viable allele! 
This is a case of Heterozygote superiority
or overdominance (also called heterosis) 
• There is some advantage to the 
  heterozygote condition and the 
  heterozygote actually has a superior
  fitness to either homozygote.
• Example in humans is sickle cell anemia, 
• Leads to the maintenance of genetic 
  diversity = balanced polymorphism
 Can also have Heterozygote inferiority
 or underdominance 
• Where the heterozygote condition is 
  inferior to either of the homozygotes 
• What do you predict would happen
  here?
• Leads to fixation of one allele in the 
  population, while the other is lost. 
• Either allele may be fixed depending on 
  conditions and beginning frequencies of 
  each allele in the gene pool. 
 Example from G.G. Foster’s work with 
              Fruit flies
• Looked at 
  chromosome 
  differences where 
  different chromosome 
  forms behave like 
  single alleles.
• In meiosis compound 
  chromosomes may or 
  may not segregate. 
    Only certain chromosomal; 
    combinations will lead to viable zygotes


A                +


                        Which of these combinations 
B            +          would give viable offspring? 



C        +


D       +
      What is the evolutionary 
              impact?
• Leads to a loss of genetic diversity 
• Although if different alleles are fixed in 
  different populations can help maintain 
  genetic diversity among populations 
              SUMMARY 
• When one allele is consistently favored it 
  will be driven to fixation 
• When heterozygote is favored both alleles 
  are maintained and at a stable equilibrium 
  (balanced polymorphism) even though 
  one of the alleles may be lethal in the 
  homozygous state.
Frequency-Dependent Selection
• Evolution can be effected by the frequency 
  of a particular phenotype in the population.
        Frequency-dependent
              selection 
• The Elderflower orchid
  example in book
• Population’s allele 
  frequencies remain at or 
  near an equilibrium but it is 
  due to the direction of 
  selection fluctuating 
• First one allele is favored 
  and then the other 
• Population fluctuates 
  around an equilibrium point 
    The favored allele fluctuates 
             because
• Bumblebees visit yellow and purple flowers alternately
• The least frequent phenotype is visited more often and 
  receives more pollination events.
• In subsequent generations this color becomes more and 
  more frequent until it becomes the dominant color.
• Once this happens then the same color becomes less 
  frequently visited and  the other color becomes favored. 
• Oscillation between the two colors continues and the 
  favored allele alternates over time around some mean 
  equilibrium value. 
End of Selection Effects
          Effects of Mutation
• Mutation is the source of all new alleles 
• Mutation provides the raw material on 
  which selection can act 
Hardy Weinberg and Mutation 
• Mutation alone is a weak or nonexistent 
  evolutionary force 
• If all mutations that happened, occurred in 
  gametes so that they would be immediately 
  passed on to their offspring  and ….
• the rate of mutation were high, say  Aàa at a 
  rate of 1 in 10,000 per generation. 
• then the rates are very slow as shown in
  figure 5.22 
Figure 5.23  pg. 183
Mutation and Selection 

In concert with selection, mutation 
  becomes a potent evolutionary 
               force.
 Richard Lenski and colleagues 
      working with E. coli 
• Used a strain of E. coli that cannot exchange 
  DNA (conjugation) so the only possible source of 
  genetic variation is mutation.
• Showed steady increases in fitness and size 
  over 10,000 generations in response to a 
  demanding environment. (little over 4 years)
• However, increases in fitness occurred in jumps 
  when a beneficial mutation occurred and then 
  spread rapidly through the population 
Figure 5.25 pg 185
 Mutation –Selection Balance 
• Most mutations are deleterious 
• Selection acts to eliminate them 
• Deleterious Mutations persist because 
  they are created anew over and over 
  again
• When the rate at which they are formed 
  exactly equals the rate at which they are 
  eliminated by selection the allele is in 
  equilibrium. = mutation-selection
  balance 
    Intuition tells us that ...
• If the mutation is only mildly deleterious and 
                          mildly deleterious
  therefore selection against it is weak; and 
             selection               weak and
• Mutation rate is high then 
  Mutation           high
• The equilibrium frequency of the mutated allele 
                                              allele
  will be relatively high in the population.
                                 population
• If, on the other hand, there is strong selection
  against a mutation (the mutation is highly 
  against
  deleterious) and the mutation rate is low then 
                                          low
• Equilibrium ratio of the mutated allele will be
  low
                  Example 
• Spinal muscular atrophy, second most common 
  lethal autosomal recessive disease. Selection 
  coefficient is .9 against the disease mutations.
• However, 1 in 100 carry a disease causing allele 
  in Caucasians 
• Research shows that the mutation rate for this 
  disease is quite high 
• Mutation selection balance is proposed 
  explanation for persistence of mutant alleles.  
             Cystic Fibrosis 
• Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal 
  autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians 
• Mutation-selection balance alone cannot 
  account for the high frequency of the allele = .02 
• Appears to also be some heterozygote 
  superiority involved 
• Heterozygotes are resistant to typhoid fever 
  bacteria and have superior fitness during typhoid 
  fever epidemic.
                   Cystic Fibrosis
•   Pier and his colleagues have found, in 11 European countries, an 
    association between the severity of typhoid outbreaks and the 
    frequency of the delta-F508 allele (the most common loss-of-
    function mutation) a generation later.

•   Salmonella typhi bacteria manipulate their host cells, causing them 
    to express more CFTR protein on their membranes.


•   Pier et al. engineered cells homozygous for functional CFTR alleles, 
    homozygous for a common loss-of-function allele, and heterozygous 
    for the two. The loss-of-function homozygotes were virtually 
    impervious to invasion by typhus-causing bacteria; heterozygotes 
    were more vulnerable, but accumulated 86% fewer bacteria than did 
    the dominant homozygotes.
                             Quiz 1.


Multiply Choice question: Mark all the choices that are correct.

1.   Which of the follow describes a population that is at equilibrium yet 
    has an allele that is lethal.  The selective advantage enjoyed by the 
    lethal allele when it is in heterozygotes exactly balances the obvious 
    disadvantage it suffers when it is in homozygotes.

      A homogenization across populations
      B  haplodiploidy
      C heterozygote superiority
         D overdominance

								
To top