AN ASPECT OF BUDDHISM ROUNDS OFF MY PSYCHOLOGY by paulbudds

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									     AN ASPECT OF BUDDHISM ROUNDS OFF MY
                  PSYCHOLOGY

                        Paul Budding


In my psychology each individual is their own private
psychological swirl of thoughts and feelings. This psychology
is separate from the external object. However they project
out their psychology and identify to various things anyway.
These attachments literalize/harden/concretize because the
individual artificially merges them with his or her
psychology. This is artificial because it’s impossible. The two
are separate but imagined as one and this imagining is
strong. (i.e., strong enough to cause all kinds of psychological
havoc, such as painful inevitable future dissociation).

So how does a person connect to things?

(S)he shouldn’t. Things must be allowed to come and go. You
should experience but not identify. This is the crucial
Buddhist side of my psychology. So for example I have just
practised it. I read posts on the International Association of
Jungian Studies (IAJS) website. The posts linked to a thread
I had started concerning the archetypal psychologist James
Hillman. Normally (in the past) I feel affects easily but not
at all here. Yet I still enjoyed reading it. Therefore the point
I am making is that you can enjoy without identifying. This
is not ‘world renouncing’ Buddhism. The point at which the
identification becomes too strong is when it has ‘painful
dissociation probability’. It is then that a psychological error
(against oneself) has been committed.
The Jungian side to me is for understanding others
projections, acting-outs, identifications, literalizations,
complexes/affects, possession. But for my own health the key
is… not to identify.

								
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