Barriers to Screening Mammography in an Urban Family by pptfiles

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 21

									     Barriers to Screening 
Mammography in an Urban Family
   Medicine Residency Clinic


                   Bonnie H. Kwok, MPH, MD (c)
   University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
 Wisconsin Health Improvement and Research Partnerships Forum
                       September 15, 2011
    Topics to be Covered 
•   Purpose
•   Background
•   Literature Review
•   Methods
•   Results
•   Discussion
•   Next Steps
               Research Goals
1) To evaluate the barriers to breast cancer screening by 
mammography

2) To measure the effectiveness of an outreach program for 
breast cancer screening at Wingra clinic

3) To identify “missed opportunities” for screening patients at 
Wingra clinic
                 Background
Breast Cancer
• Rank: 2nd leading cause of cancer death in US women
• Incidence: 230,480 (2011)¹
• Deaths: 40,970 (2007)²
• Recent changes: screening mammogram every 2 years for 
   women ages 50-74
• National screening rate: 71% (2008)³

                              ¹National Cancer Institute at NIH, ²CDC, ³CDC
                    Background
Wingra Clinic
• Urban family medicine residency clinic 
• FQHC in South Madison
• Diverse patient population
   •   Ethnically
        •   22.6% Hispanic/Latino
        •   22.1% African-American/Black
        •   6% Asian
   •   Geographically
Breast Cancer Screening in 2009 
 Percentage screened




                       Screening test
                Literature review
Literature search
• Papers published in PubMed from 2006-2010
• Search terms (MeSH and Keywords):
     • mammography, mammogram, delivery of healthcare, 
        quality improvement, preventive health services, barriers, 
        and screening 

Significant barriers at the patient, provider and structural levels
      Patient Barriers to Screening 
             Mammography
Variables
• Race/ethnicity
• Language
• Insurance
• BMI 
• Age 
• Family history of breast cancer 
• Smoking
                Provider Barriers 
Provider barriers
• Lack of time, training, skill, and awareness
• Lack of continuity with patient
• Financial barriers
• Cultural barriers
• Assignment of higher priority to other health concerns/competing 
  demands
• Physician fatigue
• Negative attitude about breast cancer screening and 
  mammography
 
Structural and Mammography-related 
               Barriers
 Structural barriers
 • Cost or lack of insurance
 • Failure to recall that patient is due for exam/lack of reminders
 • Poor documentation and charting within office
 • Lack of follow-up
  
 Barriers related to mammography
 • Patient reluctance/fear/anxiety
 • Challenges/delays to scheduling mammogram
 • Preparation by patients for procedure/adherence
 • Unpleasantness of procedure
 • Referrals (additional consultation)
 • Lack of direct access to mammography
                       Hypotheses
We hypothesize that:

1) Several demographic factors are associated with failure to receive services:
• Black, Hispanic, and Asian race/ethnicity
• Primary language other than English
• Insurance type (public and uninsured)

2) Outreach
• Those who receive outreach services are more likely to be screened

3) Missed opportunities
The likelihood of having a screening mammogram ordered is increased if:
• Seeing one’s own PCP 
• Provider receives a staff reminder in EMR
• Health maintenance visit 
                                       Methods
                           ~10,000 Wingra patients in UW HealthLink


                                                Inclusion criteria

                                          947                                            4
                    Excluded     1)   Female                     Excluded
35 no longer                                                                   1)   Breast cancer
                                 2)   Ages 50-74
Wingra                                                                         2)   Double mastectomy
                                 3)   Active Wingra patients
patients                                                                       3)   Hospice
                                 4)   Have a Wingra PCP
                                                                               4)   Diagnostic 
                                                                                    mammography
                                                                               5)   Deceased



                                      912 eligible patients
           “Not due” or “Due soon”                             “Overdue”




     512 (56.1%) Screened
                                                                     400 (43.9%) Unscreened
Results
Results
Percentage screened   Results




                       Insurance type
        Outreach and Missed 
            Opportunities
Telephone outreach to “overdue” and “due soon” patients
• 3 rounds of calls + 1 mailed letter
• Interpreter services available

Missed opportunities: 
Chart review of patient visits between May 9 – June 21, 2011
Visits n=142, Patients n=96
• Primary Care Physician
• Staff reminder
• Health maintenance visit
    Limitations  and Challenges
•   Quality of data
     • Small sample size for “Other” race/ethnicity (Asian, 
        American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and 
        other Pacific Islander)
        (n=65 screened, n=37 unscreened)
     • Loss to follow-up
•   Recent implementation of electronic ordering 
•   Limited time and support from research staff
•   Only 1 staff member to conduct all outreach calls
•   Residency clinic
                  Discussion
Key Points:
• Barriers – patient, provider, structural
    • Insurance – having no insurance or public insurance
    • Race/ethnicity – minorities

What I learned:
• Evidence-based guidelines for cancer screening 
• EMR data
• Clinical duties vs. research responsibilities
• Family medicine
    Keep Calm and Carry On

•   Analyze data from first round of outreach
•   Analyze “Missed Opportunities” data
•   Continue outreach 
•   Begin patient focus groups
     • Agree to getting a mammogram → 
       Mammogram scheduled → No show 
    Acknowledgements
• Kirsten Rindfleisch, MD
• Jon Temte, MD, PhD
• Wingra clinic staff 
   • Shereen Vakili
• UWSMPH Department of Family Medicine
   • Ron Prince
• Patrick Kwok, MFSA
                         Questions?

    Bonnie H. Kwok, MPH, MD (c)
    University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
    bkwok@wisc.edu



“Who ever thought up the word “mammogram”? Every time I hear it, I think I’m
         supposed to put my breast in an envelope and send it to someone.”
                                                                   Jan King

								
To top