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Tone and Mood PowerPoint Intro

VIEWS: 14 PAGES: 34

  • pg 1
									TONE AND MOOD   Ms. Wile
                          BELLRINGER

 Rewrite the following passage. Change the diction to make the narrator
  seem angry or frustrated about the situation:
 Today I walked to the park and saw a delightful puppy. It
  wanted to play fetch with me and continued to playfully
  nibble on my shoelaces until I joined the fun. Afterwards, the
  puppy went number 2 on my shoes and I chuckled with the
  owner about how puppies will be puppies. I never thought I
  was a dog person, but, who knows? Maybe I might just be
  soon. I could just eat it right up. I do think I would adore a
  dog.
                       TONE AND MOOD

We are comfortable identifying a person’s mood through his/her facial
 expressions, body language, etc.

Look at the following pictures; what “moods” do you think the subjects are
  feeling?
Now look at these next pictures… What do you think is each speaker’s
 tone?
 Did you find yourself using some of the same words to describe the
  “mood” pictures and the “tone” pictures?

 That’s okay. It works that way in literature as well. Sometimes you will
  read a text with a similar mood and tone, and sometimes the tone will
  be quite different from the mood and vice versa….
   Let’s explore the
differences in tone and
        mood…
             BOTH TONE AND MOOD CAN BE
               IDENTIFIED BY ONE-WORD
                   DESCRIPTORS…
Here are some common tone   Here are some common mood
words:                      words:
             BOTH TONE AND MOOD CAN BE
               IDENTIFIED BY ONE-WORD
                   DESCRIPTORS…
Here are some common tone   Here are some common mood
words:                      words:
 THINK ABOUT THE FOLLOWING
         SENTENCE:
Don’t use that tone with me!
 Which definition do you think best fits tone?

a)The feeling the reader gets him/herself from
  reading the author’s writing.
b)The author’s attitude toward their writing (i.e., the
  characters or the situation) and/or the audience
                             TONE CAN BE:

 Sujective:
   § based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions
 Objective: 
   § not influenced by personal feelings or opinions/factual
                            TONE CAN BE

 Formal:
  §   Vocabulary: high-level; business-like
  §   Organization of text: very structured; perhaps with subtopics
  §   Audience – usually 3rd-omnisicient (except for business letters)
  §   Sentences: syntax varies (s/cd/cx)
 Informal:
  §   Vocabulary – low-level; perhaps slang; dialogue
  §   Organization of text – more so narrative or note-like
  §   Audience – usually personal (more first or third-limited)
  §   Sentences – don’t vary as much in structure; mostly simple or compound
      sentences
THINK ABOUT THE FOLLOWING
        SENTENCE:
I am not in a good mood!
 Which definition do you think best fits mood?
a)the author’s attitude toward their writing (i.e., the
  characters or the situation) and/or the audience
b)The feeling the reader gets him/herself from
  reading the author’s writing.
      MORE ON TONE AND MOOD….
 Mood is the general, overall feeling that is
  conveyed to the reader.
 Some synonyms for “mood” could be
  “atmosphere” or “ambiance”
 To help identify the mood, imagine that you are all
  of a sudden in the story, or painting, or whatever
  piece of artwork. How would it feel to be part of
  the scene?
 Tone is usually more specific to a certain event,
  character, or idea .
 To help identify the tone, try to figure out how the
  author feels about what he/she is writing about.
NOW THAT YOU’VE GOT THE THEORY
           DOWN…
   We’re going to practice with real world
    examples!!!!
REAL WORLD EXAMPLES: POETRY
REAL WORLD EXAMPLES: ART
     REAL WORLD EXAMPLES: PASSAGE
      “NO TALKING!!!! There is too much noise in this class room. No one is allowed to
speak for the rest of the class period. If you do speak, I’ll write you up!!!!”
      Ms. Hensen had reached the breaking point. She had tried to be a reasonable and
sympathetic teacher, but the students only tried to manipulate her. She had tried to be a
motivating and positive teacher, but the students only listened to her when she screamed.
And now she was tired. Tired of the disrespectful, talkative class, she had decided she
would not allow any more opportunities for the students to misbehave. She had no
choices left; she would have to be mean.
      “Chop!” Ms. Hensen’s head whipped around; “who was that, and what did they just
say” she thought.
      “Chop!!!” Again, but this time from the other end of the classroom.
      “Chop! Chop! Chop!” The sound was coming from everywhere, from everyone – but
never from the student who Ms. Hensen was looking at.
      “Chop chop chop chop chop!!!!” Ms. Hensen’s face was turning red. She didn’t know
what to do. The students were revolting but she couldn’t even catch who was doing it.
      “CHOP!”
      “TIMBER!!!!!!!!!!!!” And with that, all the students fell out of their desks and onto the
floor.
      As the students laughed and congratulated themselves on their jobs well-done, Ms.
Hensen realized “they don’t respect anything I say.”
REAL WORLD EXAMPLES: POETRY
          “We Real Cool”
         Gwendolyn Brooks

          We real cool. We
          Left school. We

            Lurk late. We
         Strike straight. We

            Sing sin. We
            Thin gin. We

           Jazz June. We
             Die soon.
REAL WORLD EXAMPLES: ART
  REAL WORLD EXAMPLES: PASSAGE

Excerpt From Black Boy, by Richard Wright

That night in my rented room, while letting the hot water run over my
can of pork and beans in the sink, I opened A Book of Prefaces and
began to read. I was jarred and shocked by the style, the clear, clean,
sweeping sentences. Why did he write like that? And how did one write
like that? I pictured the man as a raging demon, slashing with his pen,
consumed with hate, denouncing everything American, extolling
everything European or German, laughing at the weaknesses of
people, mocking God, authority. What was this? I stood up, trying to
realize what reality lay behind the meaning of the words . . . Yes, this
man was fighting, fighting with words. He was using words as a
weapon, using them as one would use a club. Could words be
weapons? Well, yes, for here they were. Then, maybe, perhaps, I could
use them as a weapon? No. It frightened me. I read on and what
amazed me was not what he said, but how on earth anybody had the
courage to say it. . . .

								
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