Docstoc

Course AP Psychology

Document Sample
Course AP Psychology Powered By Docstoc
					AP Psychology Syllabus – Potomac Falls High School Mrs. Kira Hoilman Course Objective: The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub fields within psychology. Students will also learn about the ethics and methods psychologist use in their science and practice. Student Objectives: Students will be able to: Analyze psychology as a science, including the techniques used and psychological perspectives. Demonstrate knowledge of the mind-body connection, including sensory processes & development. Explore thought, including learning, memory, cognition, and intelligence. Evaluate theories of personality, motivation, and emotion in development of self. Survey maladaptive behavior, stress, and adjustment. Connect the power of situation to individual behavior. Expectations: Since this class is the equivalent of a collegiate general psychology class, students will be expected to attend class regularly, prepared to discuss and expand on previously assigned topics. Emphasis will be placed not only on mastery of the content, but the student‟s ability to express their knowledge acquisition through the written medium. Students should be prepared to invest a significant amount of out of class time into class preparations. Grading: Students must understand that in AP class grades are more difficult to earn. There is an anticipated learning curve while students acclimate to a more rigorous type of class. Please do not expect to “be given” A‟s simply for trying. In an AP Psychology class, A‟s are earned through discipline and mastery of the class. Be patient with yourself and keep at it – you will surprise yourself with the skills you develop. Remember – while it is important to do well on the AP exam, it is even better to learn how to learn and to find value in the discipline you are exploring. Grades will be based on a straight point system with tests, projects, and writing assignments being worth more than homework. Participation will also be a factor. Tests/Quizzes: 33% Projects/Interactive Notebooks: 33% Homework/Participation: 33% Tests: To model the format of the AP Exam, tests will usually be one hundred multiple-choice questions to be completed in 60 minutes. You can also expect an essay on every test. All tests will be cumulative in nature, drawing on each previous unit. You should not expect to learn a chapter and forget it until the AP Exam. You will always be reviewing. Expect two-three tests monthly.

Projects: Interactive notebooks will be graded as quarter projects. In addition, there will be a number of smaller projects throughout each quarter to be completed outside of class. Quarter 1 – Brain Mobile Project Quarter 2 – Personality / Psychologist Research Paper Quarter 3 – Famous Psychologist Project Quarter 4 – Abnormal Psych Film Studies Project & Presentation Homework: Expect it every day. Most assignments are to be completed in the interactive notebook unless otherwise stated. Homework is relevant to class review discussion, reading quizzes, and Socratic Seminars. Be prepared! Participation: Be in class and prepared to contribute. Lectures will be geared toward enriching the content in the book. You are responsible for all aspects of a lecture even if they are not included in the text. Socratic Seminars will be conducted as means of enriching your understanding of the reading materials. All students are expected to verbally engage in this activity monthly. Main Topics: Advanced Placement Psychology uses the syllabus of the College Board Advanced Placement course as follows: Content % Goals on Exam Block Classes/Days Spent (multiple choice section) History of Psych, Scientific 2-4% 2 Method, Nature v. Nurture Research Methods 6-8% 3-4 Neuroscience & Biological 8-10% 5-6 Basis of Behavior Developmental Psychology & 7-9% 5 Language Sensation & Perception 7-9% 4-5 States of Consciousness 2-4% 3 Learning 7-9% 4 Thinking, Cognition, Language 8-10% 5 & Memory Intelligence, Testing & 5-7% 3 Individual Differences Motivation, Emotion, Stress & 7-9% 4 Health Theories of Personality 6-8% 3 Abnormal Psych 7-9% 4 Treatment of Psychological 5-7% 3 Disorders Social Psychology 7-9% 3

Review for the AP Exam in May Review sessions will be held in the mornings before school beginning in April and on one Saturday during 2nd Semester when students will take a practice test and receive a score. Schedules & dates will be announced in a timely fashion so that students can make arrangements and accommodations when necessary. This course provides one of the elective credits required for a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma in Virginia. Students will take the Psychology Advanced Placement Test in May in order to earn the .7 GPA advantage. **Please be sure to reference my introductory letter for more detailed information about my class policies, procedures and expectations.

AP PSYCHOLOGY Frequently Asked Questions: 1. Is this class hard?
Because this class is predominantly a science class (especially 1st Semester) and based on material that many students do not have background in, it is safe to say this class is rigorous. Students are expected to effectively read their books and come prepared to demonstrate their understanding through reading quizzes and class discussions. It is also expected that students will have notes prepared and homework questions answered in order to facilitate discussion and application of the content. Expectations are high and students must be willing to accept the challenges of a college level psychology class.

2. How much homework is involved?
The majority of work is completed in an interactive notebook, including preparatory essays for the AP Exam. There is an assignment due every class. It should normally take an hour and a half to complete. The homework typically consists of reading and analytically answering comprehension questions. Keeping up with the reading and understanding the text is imperative for success! Detail-oriented work is necessary for success on assessments. Approximately 4 hours of active reading, homework completion & studying each week. Some students may need to exert more energy & time into the completion of homework, especially studying for exams. Take-home exams and essays are assigned occasionally.

-

3. What do the tests look like?
Students are tested on every chapter. Each test mimics the AP exam in format. There will almost always be 100 multiple-choice questions to be completed in 60 minutes as well as 1 essay question to be finished in 25 minutes. All tests will be cumulative in order to continually review previously learned materials. During the 2nd semester, students have the option of correcting their mistakes to earn back points. This is not an option during the 1st semester because time is focused on skill building (reading, writing, & analyzing).

4. What is the pacing of material like?
This class is very fast paced due to the extensive curriculum designed by the College Board. A chapter is generally covered in 2-3 class blocks, resulting in a test every 3-4 class blocks. Attendance is crucial!

5. Are there any projects?
Typically there is one major project per quarter in addition to the summer assignment. (Quarter 1 – Brain Mobile, Quarter 2 – Research Essay, Quarter 3 – Famous Personality Essay, Quarter 4 – Film Studies/Group Presentation & Research Paper – Psychological Illness/Disorder) Students are given extra opportunities throughout the year, but do not rely on “extra credit” as a grade-saver because it is inconsistent.

6. Is there any opportunity for “extra credit”?
-

7. How can I improve my grade if I am unhappy with my performance?

-

The interactive notebook is a learning tool that can only help one’s grade if it is completed well. It is imperative that students focus on this year-long project consistently. The notebook will be collected every quarter for a project grade. This is not “fluff” or “busy work.” Graphic organizers, analytical vocabulary webs, psychological research articles and evaluative essays enhance one’s understanding of the material. These assignments are based on the expectations of the curriculum designed by the College Board. Additional learning/memory mechanisms such as hi-lighting, mnemonic devices, color/chunking, and the “method of loci” are expected to be included as well.

8. Is there a summer assignment and if so, how many hours should I expect to spend on it?
Yes. You will be issued a written assignment with a rubric before school ends in June. Pay attention to announcements and flyers regarding pick-up location & time. If you have questions, find Mrs. Hoilman. The assignment involves analytical reading & writing. You will be required to find scholarly / newsworthy articles that address the each of the nine broad topics of Psychology, write a summary of each article, and complete a 250 word self-evaluation. 6-12 hours of work is average for completion of the summer assignment. The assignment is worth one test grade in 1st quarter. DO NOT drop the class simply because you decided not to complete the assignment. Nobody fails AP Psychology because of a missing summer assignment!

TOP TEN TIPS FOR WRITING AN AP PSYCHOLOGY ESSAY: 1. Read the question TWO times. 2. Picture the grader‟s rubric. 3. Outline your essay in the exam booklet briefly! 4. Avoid writing an introduction or summary. 5. Write in a technical, concise manner. 6. Use specific psychology terms and concepts. 7. Budget your time wisely. 8. Pretend the grader is “stupid.” 9. If in doubt, write it down. If you experience a mental block and you think you have more to say, but can‟t get it together, skip some lines to return later (it‟s better than arrows or footnotes later, but these are better than nothing!). 10. Don‟t worry about writing a perfect essay: almost no one does! TOP FIVE THINGS NOT TO DO: 1. Do not restate the question in your essay 2. Do not suggest anything that might be misconstrued as unethical 3. Do not write everything you know on the topic, stay focused on the question 4. Do not spend a lot of time writing an introduction and a conclusion 5. Do not begin writing until you have a clue of what you are going to write (in other words, take a few minutes to plan a strategy – preferably in writing so you can refer back to it) Additional AP Psychology Exam Helpful Hints: Break-down: Section I: 100 multiple choice questions (70 minutes) Section II: 2 essay questions (50 minutes) Scoring: Multiple Choice: # correct – (1/4 x # wrong) Free response: Readers from universities and high schools around the world grade these each June. They use a set scale to grade the writings, and they basically check off each element as it occurs. Most are worth 10 points, but not all. Strategies: Multiple Choice: Hold it together. Be cool. Remember, the AP Exam is not like a regular quiz or test when you have to almost perfectly to get an A. If you get roughly 80% of the multiple choice questions and do well on the essays, then you can earn a 4 and even a 5. So, if you‟re finding every

fourth question to be hard, then you are most likely still doing well.

If you can eliminate two answers, guess. Try to infer what a term(s) means even if you don‟t recognize it. 10-12 questions on the test, you will not have seen anywhere in the text or heard from me at any point during the year. The rationale behind this is that someone who does exceptionally well on the test should be able to assimilate information together that they have the background knowledge

for, and they also will have researched beyond the demands of the class (i.e. reading the newspaper, searching for something on-line, etc.). Written: Grammar and essay structure are of LITTLE benefit to you here. Remember, this is a free response, not an essay. Things like introductory paragraphs, conclusion statements, etc. DON‟T GET YOU ANY POINTS (this is different from some AP Exams). Psychological knowledge does. Even if the question is written in list form, do NOT list your answer Write with ball-point pen (not felt-tip pen or pencil) - scratching out is acceptable. If you end up contradicting yourself later on in your writing, you will still get credit for a correct answer or statement. Write legibly. Remember, I AM NOT reading your penmanship. Human beings are scoring the written portion of the exam and if your answers are hard to read, you may not get a correct reading/scoring. Read the question twice before attempting to answer it. Do NOT try to re-state the question. Just answer it. Simply start writing. Creative writing ability does not add points. Each response question is weighted equally no matter the different in size between them. Explain all aspects of your answer. Assume that the reader knows little or nothing about psychology (even though they will b/c they teach it). Do NOT use statements such as “Milgram‟s study” having not explained it somewhere in your writing previously. You can go back and mention something in another portion, just to be sure to make some notation of this (arrow, asterisk, etc.) Embellishing will NOT get you any points. Because you think you know what color underwear Watson was wearing the day he did the “Little Albert” experiment will not compensate for points in any area of the question. Make sure that you address the question at hand, but any extraneous information will not count for you. The smart test taker knows she can‟t write an effective essay without understanding the question. She spends her first 1-2 minutes “working the question over”, pulling it apart to make sure she knows exactly what she is being asked to do (sometimes taking brief notes in the booklet and underlining important terminology in the question itself). She may even spend 3-4 minutes outlining the points she will make. She then counts up her points and sketches out the layout of the essay. She has now done the bulk of her essay without actually writing a work of it. She can then spend the next 15 minutes writing the essay whose framework she has already created. According to the College Board‟s published materials on the AP Psychology free-response questions, you are expected to do the following: Describe an overarching framework Be SPECIFIC in both your references to and discussion of psychological principles or problems Cite evidence and examples to illustrate your explanations. Clearly state the intent of your evidence (to support or contrast a claim) State your points clearly and DIRECTLY Write an introductory sentence that is NOT a repeat of the question.

Use psychological terms and proper names of theories, theorists, etc. Define all terms Support everything with an example or study, preferably from your coursework (but if you can only come up with a personal example, try it) Flag your examples with “For example…” Be sure examples are actually relevant. If you can‟t think of an example, skip a few lines and return. Use trigger words (“Most will agree that „time-out‟ is clearly an improvement over corporal punishment. However, attachment dysfunction can have far-reaching effects. For example…” – by using the word “however” you are introducing the change in direction of the paragraph and putting your example after that sentence makes it clear that your example is in contrast to a previous point) Use transitional phrases. (“Another important area to examine when considering the possible repercussions of the „time-out‟ is the cognitive development of children.” v. “Cognitive development of children comes in stages.”) Despite the fact that there is nothing inherently wrong with the second sentence the first sentence creates better flow – it‟s easier and more pleasant to read! Write a final closing sentence only – it should summarize your overriding theme. (“Thus, while time-out may have some benefits, the potential emotional scars it can leave behind should not be underestimated.”) Use as a high a level of vocabulary as is comfortable for you. Don‟t use too much slang or informal language; yet don‟t write in a way that will sound awkward and forced. Spell them correctly. If you can‟t spell a word, pick another word! Be clear, concise, and direct – NO FLUFF! The free response questions evaluate students‟ mastery of scientific research principles and their ability to make connections among constructs from different psychological domains (i.e. development, personality. Learning, etc.). Students may be asked to analyze a general problem in psychology (i.e. depression, adaptation, etc.) using concepts from different theoretical frameworks or sub-domains in the field, or they may be asked to design, analyze, or critique a research study. In the free response section of the AP Psychology Examination, students are asked to answer two essay questions. The question may require students to interrelate different content areas and to analyze and evaluate psychological constructs and, more generally, theoretical perspectives. Students are expected to use their analytical and organizational skills to formulate cogent answers in writing their essays. -The College Board

AP Psychology END-OF-YEAR Evaluation 1. What did you like most about the class? Explain.

2.

What did you like least about the class? Explain

3.

What would you recommend as a way to improve this class?

4.

What would you tell a friend s/he needed to do to be successful in this class?

5.

Name at least one thing we did or one topic we studied in class you enjoyed and explain why.

For the following statements circle the number indicating the strength of your feeling. 6. This was the most difficult class I have ever taken. Strongly Disagree -1 0 +1

Strongly Agree +2

-2

7. My quiz/test grades are appropriate for the amount of work I did to prepare for them. Strongly Disagree Strongly Agree -1 0 +1 +2 8. I would take another class from this instructor if the course fit my schedule or was a subject of interest to me. Strongly Disagree Strongly Agree -1 0 +1 +2 9. The interactive notebook was generally a strong learning, organizational, and review tool. Strongly Disagree Strongly Agree -1 0 +1 +2 10. I felt fairly confident on exam day going into the test. Strongly Disagree -1 0 +1 11. I felt good about my performance on the test after I finished. Strongly Disagree -1 0 +1

-2

-2

-2

Strongly Agree +2

-2

Strongly Agree +2

-2

Please use the space on the back to say anything you would like to say about the course or the instructor that couldn’t be addressed by the items above.

AP Psychology 1st Semester Exam
Hoilman 1. Professor McClure believes that young children are frequently able to make morally correct decisions because humans are endowed with an inborn knowledge of basic ethical principles. The professor’s belief is most consistent with the view of: a. Aristotle b. Plato c. John Locke d. Francis Bacon e. Democritus Research participants were asked to monitor and report their own immediate sensory reactions to differently colored objects. This research involved a technique known as: a. PRTR b. Behavior genetics c. Psychoanalysis d. Massed practice e. Introspection The unreliability of introspection contributed to the waning popularity of: a. Structuralism b. Pragmatism c. Empiricism d. Behaviorism e. Psychoanalysis In its early years, psychology focused on the study of _____, but from the 1920’s into the 1960’s, American psychologists emphasized the study of ____. a. environmental influences; hereditary influences b. maladaptive behavior; adaptive behavior c. unconscious motives; conscious thoughts and feelings d. mental processes; observable behavior e. mental illness; cognition Contemporary psychology is best defined as the science of: a. Conscious and unconscious mental activity b. Observable responses to the environment c. Behavior and mental processes d. Thoughts, feelings, and perceptions e. Maladaptive and adaptive behaviors Efforts to discover whether the intelligence of children is more heavily influenced by their genetic dispositions or by their home environments are most directly relevant to the debate regarding: a. Structuralism versus functionalism. b. Rationality versus irrationality. c. Observation versus introspection. d. Psychoanalysis versus associationism e. Nature versus nurture. The neuroscience perspective in psychology would be most likely to emphasize that behavior is influenced by: a. Environmental circumstances. b. Blood chemistry. c. Unconscious conflicts. d. Subjective interpretations. e. Rewards and punishments

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Which perspective would suggest that the facial expressions of emotion associated with lust and rage are inherited? a. Cognitive b. Behavioral c. Evolutionary d. Social-cultural e. Psychodynamic Which perspective is most relevant to understanding the impact of strokes and brain diseases on memory? a. Evolutionary b. behavioral c. psychodynamic d. neuroscience e. behavior genetics

9.

10. Professor Crisman believes that most women prefer tall and physically strong partners because this preference enhanced the reproductive success of our female ancestors. This viewpoint best illustrate the ____ perspective. a. Social-cultural b. Behavioral c. Cognitive d. Evolutionary e. Psychodynamic 11. Professor Lopez believes that severe depression results primarily from an unbalanced diet and abnormal brain chemistry. Professor Lopez favors a ___ perspective on depression. a. Neuroscience b. Social-cultural c. Psychodynamic d. Behavior genetics e. Cognitive 12. Mrs. Alfieri believes that her husband’s irritability toward her results from his unconscious feelings of hostility toward his own mother. Mrs. Alfieri is interpreting her husband’s behavior from a(n) ___ perspective. a. Evolutionary b. Behavioral c. Psychodynamic d. Behavior genetics e. Social-cultural 13. Although Paul seems bright and capable to his parents and friends, he has been failing in school. Paul agrees to speak with a psychologist, who suggests that his problems stem from internal processes such as unrealistic expectations and negative thinking. The psychologist’s view is typical of which of the following models of behavior? a. Psychoanalytic b. Humanistic c. Cognitive d. Sociobiological e. Behavioral 14. Mrs. Thompson believes that her son has become an excellent student because she consistently uses praise and affection to stimulate his learning efforts. Her belief best illustrates a ___ perspective. a. Behavior genetics b. Cognitive c. Neuroscience d. Psychodynamic e. Behavioral

15. In a written report of their research, psychologists specify exactly how anxiety is assessed, thus providing their readers with a(n): a. Hypothesis b. Independent variable c. Operational definition d. Standard deviation e. Confounding variable

16. The most distinctive characteristic of the experimental method is that it a. Studies a few people in great depth b. Studies subjects in their natural environment c. Is an efficient way to discover how people feel d. Seeks to establish cause-effect relationships e. Provides a chronological basis for reaching conclusions 17. A double-blind control is essential for which of the following? a. A study comparing the IQ test scores of children from different educational systems b. A study of relationships among family members c. An experiment to determine the effect of a food reward on the bar-pressing rate of a rat d. Assessment of a treatment designed to reduce schizophrenic symptoms e. A survey of drug use among teenagers. 18. The case study is a research method in which: a. A single individual is studied in great depth b. A representative sample of people are questioned regarding their opinions or behaviors c. Organisms are carefully observed in a laboratory environment d. An investigator manipulates one or more variables that might affect behavior e. A cross-section of the population is compared 19. The process of replication is most likely to be facilitated by: a. The hindsight bias b. The false consensus effect c. Illusory correlation d. Operational definitions e. The placebo effect 20. Jeff mistakenly assumes that everybody around him enjoys listening to country music just as much as he does. Jeff best illustrates: a. the false consensus effect b. the hindsight bias c. an illusion of control d. the placebo effect e. stereotyping 21. The function of dendrites is to: a. Receive incoming signals from other neurons b. Release neurotransmitters into the spatial junctions between neurons c. Coordinate the activation of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems d. Control pain though the release of opiate like chemicals into the brain e. Determine when additional hormones are required in the bloodstream 22. The speed at which a neural impulse travels is increased when the axon is encased by a(n): a. Association area b. Myelin sheath c. Endocrine gland d. Glial cell e. Synaptic vesicle

23. An action potential is generated by the movement of: a. Glial cells b. Hormones c. Vesicles d. Ions e. Neurotransmitters 24. Sir Charles Sherrington observed that impulses took more time to travel a neural pathway than he might have anticipated. His observation provided evidence for the existence of: a. Association areas b. Glial cells c. Synaptic gaps d. Interneurons e. Neural networks 25. Neurotransmitters are released from vesicles located in knoblike terminals on the: a. Dendrites b. Soma c. Axon d. Myelin sheath e. Nucleus 26. Schizophrenia is most closely linked with excess receptor activity for the neurotransmitter: a. Dopamine b. Epinephrine c. Acetylcholine d. Serotonin e. GABA 27. An undersupply of serotonin is most closely linked to: a. Alzheimer’s disease b. Schizophrenia c. Parkinson’s disease d. Depression e. Multiple Sclerosis 28. Epinephrine is to hormone as acetylcholine is to: a. Synapse b. Action potential c. Endorphin d. Neurotransmitter e. Glial cell 29. Botulin poisoning from improperly canned food causes paralysis by blocking the release of: a. Endorphins b. Epinephrine c. Acetylcholine d. Dopamine e. GABA 30. Messages are transmitted from your spinal cord to muscles in your hands by the ___ nervous system. a. Central b. Peripheral c. Parasympathetic d. Sympathetic e. Autonomic

31. Neural networks refer to: a. The branching extensions of a neuron b. Functionally interconnected clusters of neurons in the central nervous system c. Neural cables containing many axons d. Junctions between sending and receiving neurons e. Neurons that connect the central nervous system to the rest of the body 32. In order to identify which of Lucy’s brain areas was most active when she talked neuroscientist gave her a temporarily radioactive form of glucose and a(n): a. CT scan b. PET scan c. EEG d. MRI e. FMRI 33. Which of the following is a brain-imaging technique that produces the most detailed picture of brain structure? a. EEG b. MRI c. PET d. CT e. EMG 34. The part of the brainstem that controls heartbeat and breathing is called the: a. Cerebellum b. Medulla c. Reticular formation d. Thalamus e. Pons 35. The thalamus processes information for all of the following senses EXCEPT a. Smell b. Hearing c. Taste d. Vision e. touch 36. A brain tumor that results in obesity would most likely be located in the a. Left frontal lobe b. Base of the brain stem c. Area of the hypothalamus d. Reticular activating system e. Somatosensory cortex 37. Severing a cat’s reticular formation from higher brain regions causes the cat to: a. Become violently aggressive b. Cower in fear c. Experience convulsive seizures d. Lapse into a coma e. Become sexually preoccupied 38. Phineas Gage showed severe personality changes following an accident that damaged the a. Cerebellum b. Temporal cortex c. Hypothalamus d. Hippocampus e. Prefrontal cortex

39. The language disorder in which speech flows smoothly as a nonsensical “word salad” is: a. Broca’s aphasia b. Wernicke’s aphasia c. Apraxia d. The split-brain syndrome e. Brain lesion 40. Which of the following areas of the body has the largest number of sensory neurons? a. Back b. Foot c. Ear d. Lips e. Wrist 41. The experience of auditory hallucinations by people with schizophrenia is most closely linked with the activation of areas in their: a. Motor cortex b. Wernicke’s area c. Temporal lobes d. Hypothalamus e. Broca’s area 42. After he suffered a stroke, Mr. Santore’s physical coordination skills and responsiveness to sensory stimulation quickly returned to normal. Unfortunately, however, he began to experience unusual difficulty in scheduling his daily activities and solving simple problems. It is most likely that Mr. Santore suffered damage to his: a. Cerebellum b. Thalamus c. Hypothalamus d. Autonomic nervous system e. Association areas 43. Which of the following parts of the brain is most active in decision-making? a. Reticular formation b. Corpus callosum c. Hypothalamus d. Cerebral cortex e. Pituitary gland 44. After a severe hockey injury, Louis lost his ability to read, even though he could see well, speak fluently, and understand whatever others said. It is likely that his cortex was damaged in: a. The angular gyrus b. Wernicke’s area c. The frontal lobe d. Broca’s area e. Somatosensory cortex 45. The benefits of brain plasticity are most clearly demonstrated in: a. Children who have had a cerebral hemisphere surgically removed b. Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease c. Adults with aphasia d. Elderly stroke patients e. People free of any disease or brain damage 46. The human genome is the complete a. Set of human sexual characteristics regulated by the X and Y chromosomes b. Range of traits that contribute to reproductive success c. Sequence of nucleotides organized as coiled chains of DNA d. Sequence of DNA organized within the chromosomes e. Cascade of interactions between genetic predispositions and surrounding environments

47. Human genetic diversity consists of the variations in the sequence of our a. Nucleotides b. Synapses c. Memes d. Gender schemas e. Hormones 48. Evolutionary psychologists would be most likely to predict that a. Fathers are more protective of their children than mothers b. Mothers are more protective of their children than fathers c. People are the most romantically attracted to those who are the most genetically dissimilar to themselves d. Genetic predispositions have little effect on our social relationships e. Children are not likely to be abused by their biological parents 49. Men judge women as especially attractive if they appear __________ and women judge men as especially attractive if they appear __________. a. Mature; mature b. Youthful; youthful c. Mature;’ youthful d. Youthful; mature e. Successful; mature 50. A child’s temperament is likely to be a. Difficult to observe b. Stable over time c. A product of parenting style d. A reflection of their gender schemas e. Changing according to stages of development 51. For children from impoverished environments, stimulating educational experiences during early childhood are most likely to a. Facilitate the development of nucleotides b. Decrease their emotional attachment to their own parents c. Have no discernable effect on subsequent academic performance d. Prevent the degeneration of activated connections between neurons e. All of the above 52. It has been suggested that our sensitivity to peer influence is genetically predisposed because it has facilitated the process of human mating. This suggestion best illustrates a. Gender schema theory b. Freudian psychology c. Molecular genetics d. An evolutionary perspective e. Behavior genetics 54. A cluster of behaviors expected of those who occupy a particular social position is a a. Norm b. Role c. Schema d. Meme e. Culture 55. Gender identify refers to a. One’s biological sex b. The sense of being male or female c. The set of expected behaviors for males and females d. How masculine a boy is or how feminine a girl is e. A person’s identification with the parent of the opposite sex

56. Gender role refers to a. One’s biological sex b. The sense of being male or female c. The set of expected behaviors for males and females d. The sense of being homosexual or heterosexual e. How masculine a boy is or how feminine a girl is 57. Children’s English accents are more likely to be influenced by their _________ than by their __________. a. Teachers; parents b. Peers; parents c. Temperament; gender d. Society; gender e. Ethnicity; social environment 58. The practice of covering your mouth when you yawn best illustrates the impact of a. Genetic predispositions b. Roles c. Gender schemas d. Personal space e. Norms 59. Genetic influences on personality traits are most clearly highlighted by comparing __________ with __________, a. Identical twins raised together; identical twins raised apart b. Fraternal twins raised together; fraternal twins raised apart c. Identical twins raised together; fraternal twins raised together d. Identical twins raised apart; fraternal twins raised together e. Fraternal twins raised apart; fraternal twins raised together 60. Our selective exposure to those life experiences that are best suited to our unique temperaments best illustrates the interaction of a. Roles and norms b. Nature and nurture c. Schemas and memes d. Neural connections and maturation e. Gender and ethnicity 61. The smallest unit of meaning in a language are a. Phonemes b. Phenomes c. Morphemes d. Morphines e. Pheromones 62. In the Harlow study of emotional attachment, infant monkeys were placed in a cage and given both a “wire” mother and a “cloth” mother. Researchers then moved a bottle of milk from one mother to the other while introducing various stimuli to see if the monkey would form attachment to either of the “mothers.” In this experiment, the independent variable is a. The placement of the bottle of milk b. The “wire” mother versus the “cloth” mother c. The preference of the infants for the “wire” mother d. The preference of the infants for the “cloth” mother e. The preference of the infants for the source of milk 63. In the above example, the dependent variable is a. The placement of the bottle of milk b. The “wire” mother versus the “cloth” mother c. The various stimuli introduced to the infant monkeys d. The preference of the infants for the “cloth” mother e. The preference of the infants for the source of milk

64. All of the following are stages in the development of language that children of virtually every culture go through EXCEPT a. Babbling b. Grammatical speech c. Telegraphic speech d. One-word sentences e. Introductive speech 65. The rules that govern the placement of words and phrases in a sentence are called a. Semantics b. Grammar c. Syntax d. Phonemes e. Morphemes 66. Piaget proposed that children develop knowledge by a. Constructing reality out of their own experiences b. Participating in traditional learning environments c. Responding to physiological changes d. Modeling various cultural influences e. Drawing on genetically predisposed knowledge 67. 14-mont-old toddler is placed in an unfamiliar situation with the child’s mother, who then leaves the room for a time. When the mother returns, the child squirms and tries to get away from the mother when picked up, but also seems distressed when placed back on the floor. Mary Ainsworth would consider this evidence of which of the following? a. Hyperactivity b. Narcissistic personality type c. Resistant or ambivalent attachment style d. Avoidance e. Secure attachment style

68. Which Piagetian stage of cognitive development is characterized by mastery of conservation tasks? a. Sensorimotor b. Preoperational c. Concrete operations d. Formal operations e. Tertiary circular reactions 69. The rules of grammar are rules of a. Phonemes b. Morphemes c. Semantics d. Syntax e. Pragmatics 70. A baby looks under the sofa for a ball that has just rolled underneath it. According to Piaget, the baby’s action shows development of a. Conservation of mass b. Reversibility c. Object permanence d. Logical thinking e. Metacognition 71. Mary Ainswothr’s Strange Situation paradigm is typically used to test young children’s a. Ego strength b. Intelligence c. Reaction time d. Incidental learning e. Attachment

72. Noam Chomsky’s view of language proposes that a. There is an inherent language acquisition device b. Thinking is merely subvocal language c. Different levels of language ability are hereditarily determined d. Language acquisition can be explained by social modeling e. Language is learned principally through verbal reinforcement 73. The most well-adjusted and socially competent children tend to come from home where parents employ which of the following parental styles? a. Minimal supervision b. Authoritarian c. Authoritative d. Indulgent e. Permissive 74. Our readiness to learn walking at about age 1 represents the development of a. The cerebellum b. The cerebral cortex c. Object permanence d. Reflexive balance e. Sensorimotor skills 75. If research suggested that a prenatal mother’s use of an artificial sweetener caused harm to the fetus, the artificial sweetener would be considered a(n) a. FAS b. Forma of DNA c. Depressant d. Teratogen e. Neurotransmitter 76. The rooting reflex refers to a baby’s tendency to a. Withdraw a limb to escape pain b. Turn the head away from a cloth placed over the face c. Look longer at human faces than at inanimate objects d. Be startled by a loud noise e. Open the mouth in search of a nipple when touched on the cheek 77. Habituation refers to the a. Awareness that things continue to exist even when not perceived b. Decreasing responsiveness to a stimulus to which one is repeatedly exposed c. Adjustment of current schemas to make sense of new information d. Interpretation of new information in terms of existing schemas e. Biological growth processes that are relatively uninfluenced by experience 78. Four-year-old Karen can’t remember anything of the first few months of her life. This is best explained by the fact that a. The trauma of birth interfered with the subsequent formation of memories b. Most brain cells do not yet exist at the time of birth c. Experiences shortly after birth are a meaningless blur of darkness and light d. Many neural connection that underlie memories are only beginning to form shortly after birth e. Early memories are repressed 79. Mr. And Mrs. Batson can’t wait to begin toilet training their one-year-old daughter. The Batson most clearly need to be informed about the importance of a. Imprinting b. Habituation c. Fluid intelligence d. Maturation readiness e. Object permanence

80. The body structures that enable reproduction are the a. Primary sex characteristics b. Secondary sex characteristics c. Teratogens d. Sex-linked genes e. Gender schemas 81. According to Erikson, adolescence is to identity as late adulthood is to a. Integrity b. Autonomy c. Generativity d. Intimacy e. Trust 82. Sixteen-year-old Brenda questions her parents’ values but does not fully accept her friends’ standard either. Her confusion about twhat she really wants and values in life suggests that Brenda is struggling with the problem of a. Autonomy b. Identity c. Initiative d. Integrity e. Generativity 83. Physical abilities such as muscular strength, reaction time, sensory keenness, and cardiac output reach their peak during a. Late adolescence b. Early adulthood c. Puberty d. Late adulthood e. Middle adulthood 84. Alzheimer’s disease involves a deterioration of neurons that produce a. Dopamine b. Estrogen c. Acetylcholine d. Serotonin e. Epinephrine 85. Three-month-old Andrew was obviously startled by the first ring of the telephone, but with each subsequent ring he seemed to become less reactive. This best illustrates the process of a. Accommodation b. Assimilation c. Conservation d. Habituation e. Imprinting 86. Giulio’s bag of marbles is twice as heavy as Jim’s. If it takes 5 extra marbles to make Jim’s bag feel heavier, it will take 10 extra marbles to make Giulio’s bag feel heavier. This best illustrates: a. the opponent-process theory b. accommodation c. frequency theory d. sensory adaptation e. Weber’s law 87. Sensory adaptation refers to: a. the process by which stimulus energies are changed into neural impulses. b. Diminishing sensitivity to an unchanging stimulus c. The process of selecting, organizing, and interpreting sensory information d. Changes in the shape of the lens as it focuses on objects e. The heightening of one sense to compensate for a decrease in another one

88. The constant quivering movements of our eyes are necessary in order to: a. facilitate the process of accommodation b. illuminate the entire retina c. minimize sensory adaptation d. do all of the above e. enable the ganglion cells to efficiently fire 89. The process by which our sensory systems convert stimulus energies into neural messages is called: a. Accommodation b. sensory adaptation c. transduction d. parallel processing e. sensory interaction 90. The feature detectors identified by Hubel and Weisel consist of: a. nerve cells in the brain b. rods and cones c. bipolar cells d. ganglion cells e. olfactory receptor cells 91. The ability to simultaneously process the pitch, loudness, melody, and meaning of a song best illustrates: a. sensory interaction b. kinesthesis c. accommodation d. subliminal perception e. parallel processing 92. Of the four distinct skin senses, specialized receptor cells have been identified for the sense of: a. pressure b. pain c. warmth d. cold e. hot 93. The opponent-process theory is to our sense of color as the gate-control theory is to our sense of: a. pitch b. smell c. equilibrium d. kinesthesis e. pain 94. When there is a conflict between bits of information received by two or more senses, which sense tends to dominate the others? a. Hearing b. Vision c. Smell d. Touch e. none of the above; the senses work together as equal partners 95. The cocktail party effect provides an example of: a. perceptual constancy. b. Perceptual set. c. Selective attention. d. The phi phenomenon. e. Perceptual adaptation.

96. The principles of connectedness and closure best illustrate that: a. sensations are organized into meaningful patterns (Gestalt) b. perception is the direct product of sensation c. cultural experiences shape perception d. visual information is especially likely to capture our attention e. perceptual systems use the Geon theory to build a three dimensional world

97. Holding two index fingers in front of the eyes can create the perception of a floating finger sausage. This best illustrates the effect of: a. Convergence b. relative clarity c. retinal disparity d. interposition e. visual capture 98. The ability of newly hatched chicks to perceive depth best serves to support the views of: a. Locke b. Kant c. Freud d. Aristotle e. Watson 99. Which of the following cues do artists use to convey depth on a flat canvas? a. Convergence b. Continuity c. Interposition d. Closure e. all of the above 100. Which of the following cues is most essential to the perception of depth in the visual cliff? a. texture gradient b. interposition c. stroboscopic movement d. connectedness e. stereopsis 101. The sequentially flashing Christmas tree lights appeared to generate pulsating waves of motion. This best illustrates: a. Stroboscopic movement b. retinal disparity c. the phi phenomenon d. visual capture e. perceptual adaptation 102. Although college textbooks frequently cast a trapezoidal image on the retina, students typically perceive the books as rectangular objects. This illustrates the importance of: a. Interposition b. size constancy c. linear perspective d. shape constancy e. binocular cues 103. Of two identical horizontal bars in the Ponzo illusion, the bar that is ___ in the visual field appears to be ___ because it appears to be farther away. a. higher; shorter b. lower; shorter c. higher; longer d. lower; longer e. none of the above; the Ponzo illusion deals with arrows

104. Consciousness is to subconsciousness as ___ is to ___. a. monism; dualism b. serial processing; parallel processing c. narcolepsy; sleep apnea d. latent content; manifest content e. delta wave; alpha wave 105. Studies of daydreaming indicate that: a. for most people, daydreaming is a rare occurrence b. older adults spend more time daydreaming than do younger adults c. among college students, women’s daydreams have more athletic content than do men’s d. individuals who are prone to violence, delinquency, and foul language have fewer vivid fantasies e. none of the above, day dreams are insignificant in consciousness 106. Those who emphasize that mood fluctuations may be indicative of seasonal affective disorder are highlighting the importance of: a. the menstrual cycle b. dissociation c. REM sleep d. Biological rhythms e. Narcolepsy 107. False sensory experiences that occur in the absence of appropriate sensory stimulation are called: a. night terrors b. dreams c. psychedelics d. dissociations e. hallucinations 108. The rhythmic burst of brain activity that occur during Stage 2 sleep are called: a. alpha waves b. paradoxical sleep c. sleep spindles d. delta waves e. K complexes 109. Which of the following is a circadian rhythm? a. The ebb and flow of an individual’s emotions during a 24 hour period b. Jet lag experienced after an airline flight from Los Angeles to Tokyo c. A cycle of biological functioning that lasts about 25 hours with no light cues d. The series of five stages that people go through during a normal night’s sleep e. The systematic alternation between alpha waves and delta waves during the different sleep stages 110. Sigmund Freud referred to dreaming as the a. key to the kingdom b. place where the rubber hits the road c. royal road to the unconscious d. height of the sublime e. ego-defense mechanisms 111. REM sleep is called paradoxical sleep because: a. our heart rate is slow and steady, while our breathing is highly irregular b. we are deeply asleep but can be awakened easily c. our nervous system is highly active, while our voluntary muscles hardly move d. it leads to highly imaginative dreams that are perceived as colorless images e. internal and external states are in equilibrium

112. The human sleep cycle repeats itself about every: a. 30 minutes b. 90 minutes c. 2 ½ hours d. 4 hours e. 60 minutes 113. During a heated argument with his teenage daughter, Mr. Reid suddenly lapsed into a state of REM sleep. Mr. Reid apparently suffers from: a. Narcolepsy b. Insomnia c. sleep apnea d. REM rebound e. Sleepwalking 114. Mr. Oates always sleeps restlessly, snorting and gasping throughout the night. It is most likely that Mr. Oates suffers from: a. sleep apnea b. narcolepsy c. night terror d. insomnia e. sleep talking 115. Greg remembered a recent dream in which his girlfriend suddenly grabbed the wheel of his speeding car to prevent him from driving off the edge of a cliff. Greg’s therapist suggested that the dream might be a representation of the girlfriend’s frantic efforts to save the couple from sexual disaster. According to Freud, the therapist was attempting to reveal the ___ of Greg’s dream. a. REM content b. Circadian rhythm c. Latent content d. Manifest content e. EEG pattern 116. Evidence suggests that we consolidate our memories of recent life events through: a. Dissociation b. sleep apnea c. night terrors d. REM sleep e. Sleep cycles 117. Which theory suggests that dreams are mental responses to random bursts of neural stimulation? a. dissociation theory b. social influence theory c. activation-synthesis theory d. Freud’s dream theory e. Crick-McCarley Theory 118. Twenty-eight-year-old Theodore has an irrational fear of dogs. His therapist hypnotizes him and asks him to mentally relive his earliest childhood experience with a dog. The therapist is making use of: a. posthypnotic amnesia b. age regression c. retrograde amnesia d. temporal dissociation e. the hidden observer 119. In Hilgard’s studies of pain sensitivity, the hidden observer reported experiences typically associated with: a. the Freudian unconscious b. paradoxical sleep c. slow-wave sleep d. normal consciousness e. motivational conflict

120. The need to take larger and larger doses of a drug in order to experience its effects is an indication of: a. Withdrawal b. Dissociation c. Resistance d. Tolerance e. narcolepsy 121. The discomfort and distress that follow the discontinued use of certain drugs is called: a. Intolerance b. Narcolepsy c. Withdrawal d. Retraction e. dissociation 122. In large doses, alcohol is a ___; in small amounts, it is a ___. a. depressant; stimulant b. stimulant; depressant c. hallucinogen; depressant d. stimulant; stimulant e. depressant; depressant 123. Pavlov's research on classical conditioning was important because: a. it highlighted the role of cognitive processes in learning b. so many different species of animals, including humans, can be classically conditioned. c. it demonstrated an essential difference between animal and human learning. d. of all the above reasons. e. none of the above reasons, Pavlov's research is no longer relevant 124. Because Mr. Barron demonstrates appreciation only for classroom performance that is flawless, his students have become poor and unmotivated learners. Mr. Baron most clearly needs to be informed of the value of a. Generalization b. Modeling c. Shaping d. Latent learning e. Spontaneous recovery 125. Negative reinforcement is most clearly illustrated by which scenario? a. A student’s disgustingly sarcastic jokes cease when his roommate lends him some bash b. A campus “street dog” barks in appreciation when food handouts are given to him c. A child is spanked for sassing her parents d. A student earns the lowest grade on a test and is given an F e. A child is forbidden to watch television for a week 126. In a well-known experiment, preschool children pounded and kicked a large inflated Bobo doll that an adult had just beaten on. This experiment served to illustrate the importance of a. Negative reinforcement b. Punishment c. Classical conditioning d. Observational learning e. Spontaneous recovery

127. Makayla developed an intense fear of flying five years ago when she was in a plane crash. The fact that today she can again fly without distress indicates that her fear had undergone a. Spontaneous recovery b. Extinction c. Generalization d. Discrimination e. Acquisition

128. Receiving delicious food is to escaping electric schock as __________ is to __________. a. Positive reinforcer; negative reinforcer b. Primary reinforcer; secondary reinforcer c. Immediate reinforcer; delayed reinforcer d. Reinforcement; punishment e. Partial reinforcement; continuous reinforcement 129. Someone who contributes money to her church every Sunday donates according to a _____ reinforcement schedule. a. Fixed-interval b. Variable-interval c. Fixed-ratio d. Variable-ratio e. Partial 130. For several years Ruth played softball for the sheer enjoyment of the game. Her loss of intrinsic interest in playing after being recruited by a professional team for $100 a game best illustrates: a. The overjustification effect b. Spontaneous recovery c. Intermittent reinforcement d. Latent learning e. Respondent behavior

Name_____________________________

Film Studies – AP Psychology – 3 Qtr. Project
You will be conducting research analyzing a psychological illness or disorder in groups (3-5 people). Locate a movie or documentary that highlights your chosen topic. Each group member will earn an individual grade for writing an analytical research paper (4-6 pages in length). As a group you will earn a grade for your presentation (5-7minutes) that synthesizes the illness or disorder before we view the film. Presentations must include at least one visual – power point, overheads, handouts, poster, etc.

rd

Essay Rubric Not present
2 Essay Ideas & Content: 2 Development 4

Present but needs
Keep practicing 6 8

Good use

Mastery

4

6

8

accurately presents information (4-6 pages) uses details and descriptive terminology makes connections to the film – evaluates relevancy of scenes/characters, etc. uses good word choice, fluency, and voice chooses good transitions between paragraphs establishes and maintains a strong focus with well-organized paragraphs Bibliography: 2

4

6

8

correctly applies format minimum of three resources, including textbook Content & Format: 2

4

6

8

essay and bibliography are typed (double spaced for essay) or printed in black ink grammar, spelling, punctuation, transitions & word choice are strong

/24 x 5 =
Presentation/Film Rubric
Presentation: 2 4 6 8

/120

demonstrates clear and concise understanding of topic within 5-7 minute time period explains topic well – making references to previous knowledge/units studies and/or focus scenes interesting presentation with strong visual (power point, poster board, handout, overhead, etc.) specifically outlines or references movie’s connection to topic (introduce characters or specific scenes that clearly illustrate the psychological challenge/illness) Film Choice/Creativity: 2 4 6 8 highlights illness or abnormality appropriately and vividly

/16 x 3=

/48

TOTAL /168

AP PSYCHOLOGY Influential Personalities – 2nd Quarter Project Choosing a personality: Each of you will randomly choose a famous person who has greatly influenced the field of psychology. If you have already researched that person, you will choose an alternate. Designing a business card: One component of your assignment is to design a business card for your chosen person. Each business card must be on 8 ½ x 11” paper or cardstock & contain: NAME of person TITLE of person CONTACT INFORMATION (phone number & address) SYMBOL of person's practice or business s/he is representing SLOGAN/MOTTO - a catchy phrase reflecting that person's theory QUOTATION that represents the person's philosophy Be creative: Business cards are often the first impression one has of a professional. They should be colorful, organized, and attractive. You must persuade others you are right for the job! Essay: Write an essay no longer than 500 words. A general idea of how to format a three-paragraph essay: Your first paragraph should introduce the person. Include the time period that she or he conducted research, where that research was conducted, why the research was conducted or the hypothesis and/or theory of focus. Paragraph two should provide details regarding her or his accomplishments and research. What was the overall outcome of the research and what conclusions were made? The concluding paragraph should include information about how this person has influenced the field of psychology and the world today. Bibliography: You must have a minimum of three resources. Works Cited: You must have a minimum of two primary source quotations. Be sure to include these resources on your bibliography.

WRITING TIPS:

Know the difference between a Bibliography and a Works Cited page:

Have plenty of information before you write. You may not use all the information you collect, but the more
research you have done, the stronger your ideas and understanding of the topic will be.

Focus on details that matter. When writing a paper on Disney World, don't write about every ride. Rather, include
information about a particularly popular ride or a ride that got stuck.

Begin with a strong lead. Try to introduce your psychologist by discussing something you think is interesting. Use
your lead to hook your reader and foreshadow what is coming.

Use connecting words and phrases, called transitions. Transitions help the reader move from one idea to the next:
To To To To add information: In addition, Furthermore, For example conclude or summarize: As a result, Finally, In conclusion, In short, compare/contrast: In the same way, Similarly, On the other hand, However, show time: Next, Later, Then, After a while,

Endings are critical! It's your last chance to leave a good impression. How does your favorite book end? Be very
descriptive and don't repeat yourself. End with a bang!

Make your voice strong! Shape the writing to suit your inner voice by reading your paper out loud to yourself. Be

the expert on the topic and take a confident stand. If you believe something is interesting, make it interesting for the reader. i.e. Don't say…"There is a possibility that the new rule on skateboarding could prove to be a good idea in the minds of some people." (How uncertain can you get?!) Say…"The new rule on skateboarding will reduce injuries and keep students safe. " (That's voice that's conviction!)

Make strong word choices. Use a thesaurus to help. Avoid weak "to be" verbs such as is, are, was, or were.
i.e.

Alice was ten minutes late for breakfast. Alice huffed to the breakfast table ten minutes late, flung herself into her chair, and snagged Frosted Flakes. i.e. The wind was strong. The wind fumed and shrieked about the house, yanking at the loose shingles. Write fluent sentences. Read it aloud. Is it easy to read? Do you have to pause anywhere? If you do, take a second look and make some changes. Have someone read it to you. Listen carefully. Does the reader have an easy time or does she struggle? If so, you need to make a few changes.

Influential Personalities - RUBRIC Name__________________________

Not present
Development

Present but needs

Good use

Mastery

Keep practicing

2
Essay Ideas & Content: 2 4

4
6

6
8

8

accurately presents & analyzes information uses details to describe person and achievements including two primary source quotations uses good word choice, fluency, and voice, including psychological terms/vocabulary chooses good transitions between paragraphs establishes and maintains a strong focus with well-organized paragraph Business Card Design Skills/Creativity: 2 4

6

8

strong use of color demonstrates clear/concise understanding of the person includes all standards - name, contact info., title, symbol, slogan, quote hand-drawn/created on 8 ½ x 11” paper Bibliography: 2 correctly applies format minimum of three resources Content & Format: 2

4

6

8

4

6

8

business card is on 8 ½ x 11” paper essay and bibliography are typed (double spaced for essay) or printed in black ink content is psychologically-focused – including concepts, terms, & knowledge from previous units of study minimum of two primary source quotations

TOTAL:

/32 x 2 =

/64

Wilhelm Wundt Sir Francis Galton Ivan Pavlov B.F. Skinner Jean Piaget Harry Harlow Carol Gilligan Erik Erikson Albert Bandura Erich Fromm Robert Sternberg D.O. Sears & C. Hovland Zick Rubin Thomas Szasz Joseph Brady G. Stanley Hall Carl Jung

William James Sigmund Freud John B. Watson Abraham Maslow O. Hobart and Mollie Mowrer Martin Seligman Lawrence Kohlberg James Marcia Diana Baumrind Carl R. Rogers Alfred Binet Patricia Devine Chris Sizemore Virginia Satir H. Selye Robert Havighurst Daniel Levinson

Brain Mobile – 1st Quarter Project Design a mobile that illustrates both the anatomy and functions of the human brain. Your mobile should be on a clothes hanger and must be both factually and anatomically correct. Follow these directions to complete mobiles: 1. Ask a partner to trace your head (twice). These will be used as templates for your mobile. 2. Attach your two diagrams to a hanger to show both sides of the brain (you may want to hang them at different lengths so they are easier to see once they are hanging up) . 3. Identify each structure in the brain by choosing a different color to shade each structure. You may use patterns if you run out of colors or you may use colored paper. You will probably need to color on both sides of the brain because some structures may overlap or be difficult to identify amongst the others. 4. From each structure identified suspend the following information: a. Name of the structure on side 1 b. Function of the structure on side 2 5. Choose any ten structural suspensions and hang another string with the following information: a. Create a scenario that describes the symptoms of damage to this area. 6. You must identify all 17 structures from “The Brain” chart. 7. Be sure to use the exemplars from class and the rubric to guide the completion of the project.

Brain Mobile Rubric Name__________________________

Not present
Development

Present but needs

Good use

Mastery

Keep practicing

2
Ideas & Content: 2 4

4
6

6
8

8

accurately presents information – factually & anatomically uses details to describe damage scenarios

Design Skills/Creativity: 1 strong use of color & bold labels well-organized neat & easy to interpret Mechanics & Format: 2

2

3

4

4

6

8

spelling, punctuation, grammar, complete sentences 17 brain parts (name & function) 10 scenarios regarding damage

/20 x 3 =

/60


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:6160
posted:11/22/2009
language:English
pages:34