Docstoc

NARRATIVE

Document Sample
NARRATIVE Powered By Docstoc
					Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

NARRATIVE

B. Introduction
This proposal requests funding to develop a training program for librarians, archivists and curators to learn how to create electronic finding aids as part of the processing workflow of archives and library special collections departments. At least 182 cultural heritage institutions collect archives and manuscripts in the state of Florida, but few citizens are aware of the wealth of documentary materials buried in the collections they hold. The Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) wishes to increase access to these hidden collections by hosting a central, Web-accessible database of guides to archival collections in Florida for the use of students, researchers and the general public. To create such a database, however, the information specialists in charge of these collections must understand how to describe them in a consistent manner and create electronic finding aids in a standard format. This one-year project will develop a training program tailored to curatorial staff. Specifically, it will train sixty people in three regional workshops, and it will create training materials, publish best practices guidelines for electronic archival description and union database submission, and establish staff expertise that can be used in future efforts. The project is a formal partnership between FCLA, the State Library & Archives of Florida, Florida International University (FIU), Florida State University (FSU), the University of Central Florida (UCF), the University of Florida (UF), and the Tampa Bay Library Consortium (TBLC). Other key participants include the Southeast Florida Library Information Network (SEFLIN). FCLA will coordinate the project as the lead organization, and therefore is described below. However, the resources and constituents of the other collaborators should also be considered as key to the success and influence of the proposal. 1. Where is the organization located geographically? The Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) is located in Gainesville, Florida, in Alachua County. FCLA serves the libraries of the public university system, which consists of ten universities, one college, twelve off-campus centers, seven agricultural research and education centers, and sixty-nine county cooperative extension programs located throughout the state. 2. How many staff does the organization have? FCLA has a Director and 41 full-time permanent staff positions, including 14 librarians, 23 programmers/technical staff, and 4 administrative positions. There are also 4.85 part-time or temporary FTE.
1

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

3. How many service outlets does the organization have? One. 4. How many registered borrowers does the organization have? None, as FCLA is not a library or lending institution. However, the libraries of the public university system of Florida together have approximately 400,000 registered borrowers. 5. What is the governance of the organization? FCLA is a Type-1 Center of the University of Florida. A Type-1 Center is defined as a Center, Institute or Bureau that “Transcends the University; involves more than one of the Schools in the State system.” FCLA directly serves all of the libraries of the public university system (960 full time staff, plus students and part-time employees) and indirectly serves the more than 200,000 students and 15,000 faculty of the system, in addition to the public who have free access to the library catalogs and digital collections provided by FCLA. The Director of FCLA reports to the Provost of the University of Florida. The FCLA Board consists of the Directors of the main libraries of the eleven universities in the state system. 6. What is the overall total budget of the organization? For 2004/2005, the total budget is $12,516,619, of which $5,560,530 is pass-through directly to the libraries or their vendors for equipment, content or services. The non-pass-through organizational budget is $6,956,089. 7. If there is any additional information to provide context for the project? FCLA’s mission is to provide automation services that assist the libraries of Florida’s publiclyfunded universities in meeting their teaching and research objectives for students and faculty. In recent years FCLA has expanded the boundaries of “automation services” to include support for the consortial purchasing of commercial electronic resources, the cooperative building of Webaccessible collections, and the facilitation of cross-institutional partnerships involving digital resources. As not all research materials of value to the universities reside in university collections, expansion of Web-accessible indexes, finding aids, and collections to non-university holdings is a natural extension of FCLA services. This project is being coordinated by FCLA in its role of facilitating multi-institutional partnerships to increase access to important content. However, the partner institutions and other contributors will actually play the major role in the success of this effort. The three partner institutions (FIU, UF, and UCF) are contributing experienced staff as Co-Trainers, who have major roles in

2

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

conducting the training workshops and providing subsequent support. The Co-Trainers, along with representatives from the other key contributors (TBLC, FSU, and the Florida State Archives) will constitute the Steering Committee, which has a critical role in the development of the curriculum and training materials, promoting the workshops, and evaluating outcomes. All participants have a serious interest in promoting the use of Web-accessible, standards-based guides to collections of primary source materials throughout the state.

3

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

4

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

C. LSTA OUTCOMES PLAN
Project Name: Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida Library: Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA)

Project Summary / Program Purpose: Opening Archives will offer training sessions and implementation support to Florida museum, library, and archives professionals on electronic archival description practices. The Lead Trainer will conduct 3, 2-day regional training sessions on the Encoded Archival Description (EAD) standard in Miami, Orlando, and Tallahassee. Follow-up consultations by phone, Internet, and site visit will be available to participating libraries on demand. 3 Regional Co-Trainers will be trained to provide local consultation and expertise for future endeavors, and participating institutions may increase access to their archival collections via submission to the union database of finding Aids, Archival Collections. A formal project Steering Committee consisting of members from partner agencies FCLA, FIU, FSU, UCF, UF, TBLC, and the State Library & Archives of Florida will guide the program by creating curriculum, Best Practice guidelines for union database submission, and publicity materials.

EVALUATION INPUTS
Lead Trainer Regional Co-Trainers Training Consultant Archival Education Consultant Training facilities Workshop Hosts (FSU, TBLC, SEFLIN) NoteTab Pro Software Laptop computer Archival Collections server Steering Committee Project partners (FCLA, FIU, FSU, UCF, UF, TBLC, State Archives)

ACTIVITIES
Planning & Development: Hire Lead Trainer Conduct needs assessment survey Develop EAD best practice guidelines Develop training curriculum Create EAD templates & stylesheets Create workbooks & sample finding aids Evaluate curriculum & tools Train regional co-trainers Publicize & schedule workshops Write mid-term report

OUTPUTS
3 regional workshops # participating institutions # participants trained # of EAD stylesheets created # templates created #workbooks created # EAD Best Practice Guidelines for Florida Institutions published # EAD training workbooks # workshop announcements posted/distributed # Regional Co-Trainers trained to train # survey answers received # follow up consultations

OUTCOMES 1. Librarians, archivists, and
curators learn to use technology that makes hidden archival collections available to the public via Internet.

INDICATORS
1A. #, or # and % increase in EAD finding aids created by participants following training 1B. #, or, # and % increase of EAD finding aids contributed to the Archival Collections union database. 1C. #, or, # and % of participants indicating they learned EAD archival description practices 1D. #, or, # and % of Regional Co-Trainers indicating they learned to teach others EAD practices

SOURCES / METHODS
1A. Source 1: Program participants 1A. Method 1: Survey 1B. Source 1: Archival Collections server 1B. Method 1: Data load log 1C. Source 1: Program participants 1C. Method 1: Survey 1C. Source 2: Staff 1C. Method 2: Attendance records 1C. Source 3: Staff 1C. Method 3: Training evaluations 1D. Source 1: Staff 1D. Method 1: Survey

2. Public uses technology to
get information on primary sources from Florida institutions

5

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Training & Support: Provide 3 regional workshops Provide follow-up email/telephone support to participants Provide on-site support visit to participants Provide follow-up technical support and/or consultation visits as needed Develop Archival Collections: Collect digital finding aids created by participants Populate union database (Archival Collections) Create collection home pages for participants Evaluation: Conduct trainee evaluations at end of workshops Conduct post-workshop assessments by trainers Consultant evaluation following first workshop Final survey of participants Collect Archival Collections server data Report results in mid-year and annual reports

# project finding aids accessed by public via Archival Collections #collection home pages created for contributing participants # email inquiries regarding Archival Collections contents # inquiries regarding collections at local institutions # EAD finding aids created by participants # EAD finding aids added to Archival Collections # Notetab Pro software copies distributed

1E. #, or, # and % increase in participants indicating they will integrate EAD into their local workflow 2A. #, or, # and % of people who access project finding aids via Archival Collections 2B. #, or, # and % of email inquiries regarding Archival Collections contents

1D. Source 2: Program participants 1D. Method 2: Survey 1E. Source 1: Program participants 1E. Method 1: Survey 1E. Source 2: Staff 1E. Method 2: Interviews 2A. Source 1: Archival Collections server 2A. Method 1: Server activity log 2A. Source 2: Archival Collections server 2A. Method 2: Reference query log 2B. Source 1: Program participants 2B. Method 1: Personal correspondence 2B. Source 2: Public/researchers 2B. Method 2: Reference query log 2C. Source 1: Program participants 2C. Method 1: Local departmental activity log

6

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

D. Need
Background The Guide to Florida Archives and Manuscript Repositories1 lists 182 governmental and cultural heritage organizations in Florida that collect archives and manuscript materials. These include special libraries, public libraries, college and university libraries, community colleges, city and county governments, state government and government agencies, historical associations, genealogical societies, museums, non-governmental agencies, state and federal parks, newspapers and church libraries. In the libraries of the public universities alone there are an estimated 28,898 linear feet of archives and manuscripts and 366,787 photographs. These unique collections of primary sources include letters, diaries, manuscripts, legal and financial records, photographs, maps, architectural and engineering records, artwork, scientific logbooks, sound recordings and artifacts like clothing and campaign buttons. In many cases they are the only extant documentation of human activities such as settling the land, building cities, governing and serving the people, practicing a profession, making art and changing the landscape. Most of these holdings are related to Florida but there are also extensive holdings on Caribbean and Latin America, the lives of great writers, great politicians, and countless other topics. Unfortunately, these materials are hard to find. The online Guide lists broad topical interests of repository institutions but does not describe specific collections. Some collections are cataloged in library catalogs. Enhanced Access to Special Collections, an LSTA-funded project in 2001/2002, created catalog records for 755 archival collections in the libraries of eight Florida public universities. These short, high-level descriptions are an invaluable awareness tool for library catalog users. However, to truly expose the wealth of resources in these collections, a lengthier, more detailed type of archival description is required. Highly structured collection guides, known as “finding aids”, provide this. Some finding aids exist only on paper while others are in formats that can be displayed on the Web. An Encoded Archival Description (EAD) is a finding aid encoded according to a standard developed by the Society of American Archivists. The big advantage of EADs is that, because they follow the standard, they can be stored, searched and displayed on the Web consistently with other EADs. A book may be held by hundreds of libraries. In contrast, archival collections of primary sources are unique and irreplaceable. For this reason, central, Web-accessible databases of EADs are considered the heart of many statewide digital library projects. For example, a central repository of EAD finding aids “represents the core of the Kentuckiana Digital Library Project,”2 and the Online

1

Compiled by the Special Collections Dept., University of Central Florida Libraries, 1999: http://www.lib.ucf.edu/SpecialCollections/GuidetoRepositories/FLguideCity.htm 2 Weig, Erich. “The KYVL Kentuckiana Digital Library Project,” D-Lib Magazine 8 (6). Accessed by Internet March 10, 2005 at http://www.dlib.org/dlib/june02/weig/06weig.html

7

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Archive of California is called a “core component” of the California Digital Library.3 Other statewide EAD collections include NCEAD (a part of NC ECHO), the Online Archive of New Mexico, Texas Archival Resource Online, and Virginia Heritage. The Enhanced Access to Special Collections project, in addition to cataloging hundreds of archival collections, also built a prototype union database and search system for EAD finding aids called Archival Collections.4 The project report concluded, “The possibility of a statewide collection of searchable online finding aids is transformative.”5 However, three years later, there are fewer than 100 EADs in the system, all but 7 of which are from the University of Florida. We believe these are the only EADs created by any institution in the state. Unmet needs of the target population If archival collections are so valuable, why are there so few EAD finding aids? Evidence indicates that lack of appropriate training is a major factor. The final report of the Enhanced Access to Special Collections project noted:
All participants agreed the ideal situation would be to integrate the creation of finding aids in EAD format with the archival processing of new collections. The two major barriers to this are lack of staff and lack of training. Participants agreed that any staff working on EAD narratives would require training similar to that given by the SAA [Society of American Archivists].

In January 2005, representatives of ten State University Libraries completed an informal survey identifying training needs related to the implementation of the EAD standard in the state. The survey results were not surprising, revealing that only three institutions had adopted the use of EAD to create finding aids and that all of the survey respondents desired training. When asked to describe the barriers to EAD creation, over 80% indicated a lack of basic EAD knowledge. The A*Census, a comprehensive nationwide survey of the archival profession funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, was conducted in May 2004. There were 103 responses from Florida, of which 36% were from academic institutions, 35% from some government sector, and 24% from other non-profit organizations. Asked about training needs, a full 25% listed EAD training as one of the topics Florida respondents would “most like to learn more about in the next 5 years.” When asked about barriers to participating in the training they desired, the most highly

3

Rinehart, Richard. “Museums and the Online Archive of California,” OAC Project Documents. Berkeley, CA: Published and available by Internet at http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/moac/standards/ A Publication of Archival, Library & Museum Materials (PALMM) project. Available by Internet at: http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/findaid. FCLA. LSTA EAD Pilot Project. Project files available by Internet at: http://susdl.fcla.edu/strucmeta/ead.html

4

5

8

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

ranked factors were travel and cost. On a scale from “no barrier” to “very much a barrier,” 60.7% of Florida respondents ranked distance above the midpoint and 57.5% ranked cost above the midpoint. Cost is apparently a factor because few employers cover the full cost of training; more than a quarter reported their employers pay no part of travel or registration fees for continuing education. This data is particularly meaningful in the context of available continuing education opportunities. The Society of American Archivists (SAA) offers a two-day training seminar in EAD creation, but it is normally offered only once or twice a year. In 2005/2006 the course is offered in Tucson AZ for a registration fee of $305 - $420 depending on the date of registration and whether the registrant is a member of the SAA. The cost of registration plus travel expenses would be prohibitive for all but the largest institutions, while the time lost from work may be doubled because of travel time. There are no programmatic training opportunities available to archivists in Florida. The Society of Florida Archivists (SFA) does not offer a continuing education program.

9

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

They note:
It is often difficult for smaller organizations who would like to participate to attend workshops that are too far from them geographically. SFA has a number of small historical societies and museums represented in its membership who would be benefit greatly from workshops on EAD training.6

In sum, of the 182 organizations known to hold archival collections, only three or four – the larger state universities – are creating EAD finding aids. If the A*CENSUS results are indicative, EAD training is desired by a quarter of archivists and archives staff in the state. Training opportunities are currently limited to a single program that requires out of state travel and expensive registration. Meeting these needs Opening Archives will establish an in-state continuing education program delivered in three regional workshops in calendar year 2006. With support from this grant and the volunteer efforts of Steering Committee institutions and regional co-trainers, a two-day training workshop will be delivered for a nominal registration fee of $25.00. Holding the workshops in regional populations centers in north, central and south Florida will minimize travel expenses and time lost from work. With 20 seats for hands-on training available at each workshop, sixty staff can participate in training in a single year. Assuming some institutions will send only one representative while others will send several, we estimate approximately thirty different organizations will benefit from this program in 2006. The quality of the training will be assured in several ways. The lead trainer will have a strong background in both archival processing and library technology. The training curriculum and materials will be vetted by a multi-institutional Steering Committee each member of which has experience related to archives, EADs, and/or continuing education. Two expert consultants, an educator and the trainer for North Carolina’s EAD program, will review both content and pedagogy, and the educator will help in the evaluation of the program. To the extent possible, content and examples will be tailored to Florida repositories and Florida collections. A thorough understanding of basic archival descriptive practices will not be assumed, but rather the training will incorporate principles of archival description and focus on description in the context of processing workflow. A statewide set of Best Practice Guidelines will be finalized prior to the workshops and these guidelines will be incorporated into the training program. Participants will see a demonstration of Archival Collections and learn how the EAD finding aids they create can be contributed to this database, and they will see the advantages that ensue. It is one thing to learn something in a hands-on classroom setting and another to apply the learning in real-life situations. Experience in the Enhanced Access to Special Collections project showed that

6

Flekke, Mary. Letter to Priscilla Caplan, March 7, 2005.

10

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

participants in the EAD pilot project experienced both theoretical and technical difficulties creating EAD finding aids for their own collections. The program proposed in Opening Archives includes follow-up activities to ensure that the training is not wasted but can and will be applied by archival repositories. The trainer and regional co-trainers will be available for personal, email and phone consultations, and a small number of site visits can be conducted when circumstances warrant. A widening circle of benefits In Florida today there is no state-wide union search system for archival collections in institutions of all types. The need for this can be illustrated by the case of Henry Nehrling, the father of the plant industry in Florida. The Florida caladium industry, which is worth millions in annual income, was built from Nehrling’s original caladium creations and reserve stock. He also discovered hundreds of exotic palms, bamboos, bromeliads, crinums, and other species. His letters about his work and research from 1886-1929 show a true passion for Florida and horticulture. Nehrling materials are important to understanding Florida’s growth and environment, as they document early agribusiness and the identification and preservation of many native plants. Those who wish to study Henry Nehrling, however, face a difficult task, as his papers are scattered throughout the state in collections held by public and private institutions of all kinds, including the University of Central Florida Libraries in Orlando, the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden Library in Miami, the Winter Park Public Library, Rollins College in Winter Park, the Orange County Regional History Center, and the privately held Koreshan Collection in Estero. Some day Archival Collections will be as important as online library catalogs have been to the research community. Expanding Archival Collections to include guides to holdings of memory institutions throughout the state will bring about amazing benefits including virtual access to fragmented collections like the Nehrling Papers. When manuscript librarians and archivists move their collections into the research mainstream, collections get used. Use garners recognition for the library or cultural institution. Recognition for collections helps to engender resources for managing current collections, for identifying and acquiring complementary collections and for coordinating collecting with other libraries. Library catalog records can point to EAD finding aids via URL links; finding aids can in turn link to digital versions of the items they describe. The future will enable transitionless searching and navigation across a complex information space containing catalog records, finding aids, and digitized original documents. The libraries and archives of Florida must begin to develop the tools to make this future a reality and to bring access to manuscripts and archives on a par with access to books. By training staff of archival repositories in standardized descriptive practices and giving them access to a union database of finding aids in Florida repositories, Opening Archives will ultimately enable greater use, collaborative collecting, and an understanding of the value of these unique materials for uses not yet imagined.

11

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

E. Inputs
Partners The Florida Center for Library Automation. FCLA serves the libraries of Florida’s publiclyfunded universities in meeting their teaching and research objectives through cooperative digital collection building and the facilitation of cross-institutional partnerships. FCLA currently hosts Archival Collections, an open, Web-accessible database of finding aids to state university archives and special collections. FCLA will make Archival Collections available to any institution in Florida who wants to contribute EAD finding aids. Priscilla Caplan, Assistant Director for Digital Library Services, FCLA, will serve as PI for the project and coordinate project activities. Megan Waters, Systems Librarian, FCLA, will serve on the Steering Committee. As project manager for Archival Collections, she will also facilitate contributions to the shared database and report Archival Collections server activity. Florida International University. The FIU Special Collections & University Archives department collects primary source materials relating to the history, ethnic diversity, arts, and economic development of south Florida for public research. FIU began using Encoded Archival Description (EAD) to provide access to collections in 2001, following the outcomes of the LSTA grant Enhanced Access to Special Collections. Annia Alfonso, Archivist, FIU, will be the Co-Trainer for the South Florida Region and will serve on the Steering Committee. University of Central Florida. The UCF Special Collections & University Archives Department serves as an instructional resource for university faculty and the public by providing access to unique personal and organizational papers on Orlando local history. Access to the collections is provided by Web-accessible finding aids and collection-level cataloging records. Liz Konzak, Archivist, UCF, will serve on the Steering Committee and act as regional Co-Trainer for the Central Florida Region. University of Florida. The UF Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, Smathers Libraries, supports the University’s academic programs and scholars worldwide with significant African, Asian, and Latin American Studies collections as well as rare books, manuscripts, university archives, and primary sources from the state’s preeminent Floridiana collection, the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History. John Nemmers, Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, UF, will serve on the Steering Committee and act as Regional Co-Trainer for the North Florida Region. Florida State University. The FSU Special Collections Department, University Libraries, houses rare, unique, and valuable published and unpublished materials, many of which pertain to the history of Florida and Florida State University. EAD has been a part of FSU manuscript

12

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

processing procedure for over four years. Lucy Patrick, Head, Special Collections, FSU, will coordinate the Tallahassee-based training workshop and serve on the Steering Committee. State Library and Archives of Florida. The Florida State Archives is the central repository for the archives of Florida's state government. It is mandated by law to collect, preserve, and make available for research the historically significant records of the state, as well as private manuscripts, local government records, photographs, and other materials that complement the official state records. Elisabeth Golding, Archivist Supervisor II, State Archives, will serve on the Steering Committee. Tampa Bay Library Consortium. TBLC’s mission is to “lead and encourage collaboration, resource sharing, staff development, and innovations to insure that the people of west central Florida receive excellent, up-to-date library services and have access to the world of information.” TBLC currently provides staff training to 93 member libraries serving approximately 3.8 million west central Floridians. TBLC staff will coordinate Tampa Bay participation in the Central Florida Regional training workshop. Charlie Parker, Executive Director, TBLC, will serve on the Steering Committee. Steering Committee 1 representative from each project partner will form a Steering Committee to guide project outputs and outcomes based on the needs and experiences of their local constituency. Members will have significant archival description and/or training knowledge. The Steering Committee will meet in person 3 times during Phase 1 of the project and by phone or Internet as needed. Lead Trainer Chuck Thomas will be hired by the project as the lead trainer. Mr. Thomas has a B.A. in history and ten years of experience as both an archivist and librarian. He has an MSLIS from the University of North Carolina and is currently in the Ph.D. program at Florida State University. He will provide input to the project Steering Committee, develop training materials, and conduct all regional training sessions and follow-up consultations. He will also promote project goals, methodology and outcomes at state and local archivists’ forums. Regional Co-Trainers 3 Regional Co-Trainers will work with the Steering Committee, Consultants, and Lead Trainer to develop their expertise in electronic archival description and become resources for further project implementation in their geographical area.

13

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

The Regional Co-Trainers are: South Florida Ft. Lauderdale, Miami, Palm Beach & the Florida Keys Annia Alfonso, Archivist, FIU Central Florida Tampa Bay, Orlando Liz Konzak, Archivist, UCF North Florida Tallahassee, Gainesville, Jacksonville John Nemmers, Descriptive & Technical Services Archivist, UF Training Consultant Katherine Wisser, Metadata Coordinator, NC ECHO, Duke University, brings seven years of special collections cataloging, metadata, facilitation, and cross-institutional collaboration experience to the project. Ms. Wisser will help the Lead Trainer and Steering Committee develop the training curriculum and supporting educational materials. Educational Consultant Elizabeth Yakel, Assistant Professor, Archives & Records Management, School of Information, University of Michigan will evaluate the project curriculum and training materials. She will also evaluate regional workshop outcomes and tools. Workshop Hosts & Training facilities Facilities will be provided by Florida State University (North Florida workshop), Tampa Bay Library Cooperative (Central Florida workshop), and the Southeast Florida Library Information Network (South Florida workshop). Training rooms will have a minimum of 20 seats with computers and adequate desk space to lay out training materials, for hands-on training of twenty participants per workshop. The Lead Trainer will have a computer, projector and screen. Laptop computer A Gateway M405 series or equivalent will enable the Lead Trainer to carry presentations, configured software, instructional materials, examples, and documentation from workshop to workshop, as well as to post-training consultations.

14

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

NoteTab Pro software NoteTab is an award-winning, highly customizable text editor that comes in three versions: Pro, Standard, and Lite. The project trainers will use the Pro version to develop EAD course templates. Project participants will use the freely available Lite version during hands-on training. Each institution sending one or more staff members to training will receive one copy of NoteTab Pro for institutional use to encourage EAD creation. Archival Collections Archival Collections is a Web-based system for search, retrieval and display of EAD-encoded finding aids. Cultural heritage institutions in Florida may contribute copies of their own finding aids to the Archival Collections server to increase access and enable search in a union environment.

15

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

F. Action Plan
The project will consist of two phases: 1) a six-month Planning and Development phase, and 2) a six-month Regional Training and Technical Support phase. During the first phase, the Steering Committee will develop curriculum and training tools, publicize and schedule workshops. During the second phase, three regional workshops will be held in North, Central, and South Florida. The Lead Trainer will provide follow up technical assistance to participants via telephone, Internet, and by site visit as requested. In addition, surveys will be conducted at the start and end of the grant period to identify training needs, to guide the development of the training curriculum, and to help evaluate the efficacy of the training program.

F1. Project Activities
1. Surveying Needs and Practice. Inputs: FCLA, Steering Committee, Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainers Outputs: Needs Assessment Survey As the first step in this project, the Steering Committee will conduct a formal needs assessment survey of all of the cultural heritage institutions likely to participate in the EAD training program. Specifically, the survey is intended to determine current methods for creating descriptive finding aids, the proportion of finding aids that are electronic and available via the Internet, and the need for training on basic archival descriptive practices. Based upon the results of the survey, the training program will be designed to fulfill the identified needs of the participants. At the onset of the project period, FCLA will hire the Lead Trainer, who will be employed at halftime (0.5 FTE) for the duration of the project. The Lead Trainer has an MLS degree and expert knowledge of metadata and the description of archival and manuscript collections using EAD. The responsibilities for the position include planning the training curriculum, developing best practice guidelines for EAD in Florida, presenting three regional workshops, and administering postworkshop technical support for participants. Three staff members employed by partner institutions will serve as Regional Co-Trainers, each contributing 0.10 FTE for the duration of the grant period. The Regional Co-Trainers will assist the Lead Trainer during workshops, will provide technical assistance to participants following the training, and will function as resource persons for archive staff and trainers in future years. Annia Alfonso, Archivist, FIU, will serve as the Regional Co-Trainer for South Florida. Elizabeth Konzak, Archivist, UCF, will serve as the Regional Co-Trainer for Central Florida. John
16

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Nemmers, Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, UF, will serve as the Regional CoTrainer for North Florida.
2. Establishing Best Practice Guidelines.

Inputs: Lead Trainer, Steering Committee, Regional Co-Trainers, EAD Training Consultant Outputs: Steering Committee meetings, Best Practice Guidelines published The first activity undertaken by the Lead Trainer will be to meet with the Steering Committee in October 2005 in order to plan project activities and to begin developing best practice guidelines for the creation of EAD finding aids in Florida. Also present at this meeting will be the Regional CoTrainers and consultant Katherine Wisser, Metadata Coordinator and EAD trainer for NC ECHO (North Carolina Exploring Cultural Heritage Online). The resulting Best Practice Guidelines for Creating Florida EAD Finding Aids will be used to ensure consistent statewide descriptive practices. The guidelines will be based upon a set of guidelines created during the earlier “Enhanced Access to Special Collections” project as well as best practices developed by RLG, NC ECHO, and the Online Archive of California (OAC). In addition, the guidelines will adhere to the new U.S. standard for the description of archival materials, Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS).
3. Tools and Resources for Training.

Inputs: Lead Trainer, Steering Committee, Regional Co-Trainers, EAD Training Consultant, Education Consultant, Notetab Pro software, Laptop computer Outputs: computer template XSL stylesheets, 70 workbooks, 70 sample finding aids, 70 exercises, Education Consultant evaluation Following the initial meeting, the Steering Committee, Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainers, and Training Consultant will work together to develop the tools and resources required in order to conduct the training workshops. The group will create a computer template used for the creation of EAD finding aids in the XML markup language. The University of Florida and the Florida State University already use NoteTab templates for the creation of EAD finding aids, which can be easily modified for use in this project. Other electronic tools created during the development period will be XSL stylesheets, which are used to transform EAD finding aids from XML format into other formats. One stylesheet will transform the XML finding aids into HTML syntax for publication on institutional Web sites. A second stylesheet will automatically transform the XML finding aids into MARC record format for contribution to online catalogs and bibliographic utilities. A third stylesheet will transform the XML finding aid into a version suitable for printing. In addition to the EAD template and associated stylesheets, the project group will also create the curriculum and teaching materials to be used in the regional workshops. The EAD Training Consultant, Katherine Wisser, will provide significant guidance in creating the training curriculum, as she has been instrumental in designing and implementing North Carolina’s successful EAD training program. The curriculum will be based, in part, on the results of the survey described
17

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

above. Teaching materials created during this period include instructional workbooks, sample finding aids, and workshop exercises. To ensure that the curriculum adequately covers EAD and archival descriptive practices, a second consultant will be asked to review and evaluate the program. Beth Yakel, an educator at the University of Michigan who specializes in description and access systems for archives, will serve as the Education Consultant. Both consultants will review and approve the curriculum and teaching materials prior to the training phase of the project.
4. Publicity Plan.

Inputs: Steering Committee, Workshop Hosts (TBLC, FSU, SEFLIN), Lead Trainer, Regional CoTrainers Outputs: # of posts to electronic mail lists, announcements on MLC and other websites, advertisements distributed at FLA. The Steering Committee will help the three workshop hosts (Tampa Bay Library Consortium, Southeast Florida Library Information Network and Florida State University) solicit participation from libraries, archives and historical societies. The committee will promote the EAD workshops through workshop schedules disseminated by the Multi-type Library Cooperatives (MLCs), announcements on the Web sites of partner institutions, and posts to the electronic lists of organizations such as the Florida Library Association (FLA) and the Society of Florida Archivists (SFA). In addition, one co-trainer will attend the FLA annual meeting in Spring 2006 to promote the training program.
5. Developing Co-Trainer Knowledge.

Inputs: Lead Trainer, Steering Committee, Regional Co-Trainers Outputs: Trainer self evaluation At the end of the first six months, following final approval of the Best Practice Guidelines and training curriculum by the Steering Committee, the Lead Trainer will train the Regional CoTrainers so that all trainers will have a similar knowledge of EAD. At the same time, the trainers will finalize training methodology and specify workshop responsibilities for each trainer.
6. Training Activities at Regional Workshops.

Inputs: Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainers, Workshop Hosts, Training Facilities Outputs: 3 workshops held in Tallahasee, Tampa, and Ft. Lauderdale, # participating institutions, participants, training materials distributed. The first of three regional workshops will be conducted in April 2006, with the second and third being held between May and July 2006. As the Society of Florida Archivists membership is our primary target for this training program, the Trainer and all Co-Trainers will attend the SFA Annual Meeting in Tallahassee, and the first regional workshop will be scheduled to coincide with this meeting. The TBLC and SEFLIN consortia will host the subsequent two-day workshops in Tampa and Ft. Lauderdale. It is anticipated that 20 individuals will attend each workshop, from 1020 institutions. During each regional workshop, the Lead Trainer will conduct the training and

18

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

group activities while the Co-Trainer for that region will move among the trainees monitoring their progress and providing individual assistance when needed. The structure and content of the workshops will depend on the stated needs of the participants, the suggestions of the consultants, and the decisions reached by the Steering Committee. However, each workshop will have the following elements:          General introduction to terminology to be used in workshop. Discussion of recommended archival arrangement and description practices. Explanation of the standard components of archival finding aids. Overview of the XML language as it is applied with EAD. Introduction to the EAD standard. Introduction to the Florida EAD best practice guidelines. Instructions for creating and validating EAD finding aids using NoteTab templates. Instructions for transforming EAD XML documents to other formats (e.g., HTML). Discussion of file management techniques.

Participants will review sample finding aids and will complete several exercises using these finding aids. Each finding aid will be created specifically for training purposes and will be based upon the Florida EAD best practice guidelines developed during the first six months of the grant period. The trainers will stress the importance of standard descriptive practices throughout the state and will encourage participants to adopt the Best Practice Guidelines at their institutions.    Ongoing Evaluation of the Training Curriculum. Inputs: Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainer, EAD Training Consultant Outputs: trainer self-evaluations, participant evaluation/comments,

Evaluation of the training curriculum will be integral to the success of the workshops. Following each workshop, participants will complete evaluation forms and provide comments, and the Lead Trainer and Regional Co-Trainers will discuss any changes that they would like to implement. In June 2006, after conducting the first workshop, the trainers will meet with the Training Consultant to evaluate the training methodology. Based upon the participant feedback and self-evaluation by the trainers, the structure and content of the workshops will be modified as needed.
7. Technical Support for Participant Implementation of EAD.

Inputs: Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainers, laptop computer
19

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Outputs: # follow up consultations by phone, Internet, or site visit After receiving training each participant will be encouraged to create EAD finding aids for their own collections. To support this activity, the Lead Trainer and Co-Trainers will provide technical support via telephone and e-mail. The trainers will function as an EAD help desk for the state of Florida during the project period. In addition to technical support, the trainers will provide assistance regarding the best practice guidelines and recommended archival description activities. Participants encountering significant difficulties integrating EAD creation into their own workflows can request an on-site training visit from the Lead Trainer. Based on the experience of the EAD Training Consultant, it is not anticipated that there will be a great demand for this training option. The majority of the problems encountered by participants can be solved using traditional telephone and e-mail support. We estimate about seven on-site consultation sessions will be needed. The Lead Trainer, after consulting with the Co-Trainers, will determine which cases require an on-site training session. Although the Lead Trainer will conduct these visits, the CoTrainer for each region will be informed of the activities and outcomes of the training session. Following the end of the project, the Regional Co-Trainers will serve as EAD experts for the state and will be available to provide assistance and additional informal training in their regions.
8. Developing the Archival Collections Database.

Inputs: FCLA, Archival Collections server Outputs: # cooperative collection home pages created, finding aids added to system, patrons accessing data from participating institutions, electronic mail queries One outcome of the 2001 LSTA-funded pilot project Enhanced Access to Special Collections was the creation of a union database for EAD finding aids, called Archival Collections. In the four years since the end of the 2001 grant, participating institutions have continued to contribute finding aids and FCLA has made several modifications to improve the system and the union database. The resulting Archival Collections system is available at http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/findaid. During the project period, FCLA will open this system to other contributors. Although Archival Collections is currently limited to contributions from the state universities, FCLA and partnering institutions are eager to see it develop as a collaboration between all Florida cultural heritage institutions with holdings of archives and manuscripts. Several memory institutions across the state have expressed an interest in contributing to this union database. One obvious benefit is that Florida citizens and researchers will have a gateway to archival collections across the state, with the ability to search across all finding aids. In addition, participating institutions will have to option to create collection home pages and sub-collections so that end-users can limit searches to single institutions or special groups of collections within each institution. Following the training period, participants contributing finding aids to a union database will receive support from FCLA to contribute their EAD XML files, create institutional home pages,
20

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

and define sub-collections as needed. Valid EAD finding aids can be contributed via e-mail or FTP, and contributors will not require any additional training.
9. Final Training and Implementation Survey.

Inputs: Steering Committee, Educational Consultant Outputs: follow up survey results, final evaluative report Approximately one month after the final workshop, in August 2006, attendees will complete and submit a follow up survey. Participants will indicate if they have created, or have attempted to create, EAD finding aids for their collections. They will evaluate any training and technical support they received subsequent to attending the workshops. In addition, the survey will repeat several questions asked of the participants at the start of the grant period, including:    Their current methods for creating descriptive finding aids. Their need for training on basic archival descriptive practices. Their knowledge of EAD.

The Steering Committee and the Educational Consultant will independently compare the results of this second survey to the results of the earlier survey in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the training. The Educational Consultant, with Steering Committee input, will write a final evaluative report for the project. One co-trainer will present the results of this survey, as well as other outcomes of the training program, at the Society of American Archivists annual meeting in August 2006.

21

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

F2. Action Plan Timeline
Date October 2005 Activity
Lead Trainer hired FCLA

Responsibility

Meeting to begin development of Florida EAD Steering Committee, Lead Trainer, best practice guidelines and plan future project activities. Regional Co-Trainers, and EAD Training Consultant

OctoberNovember 2005

Distribute survey to determine knowledge of participating institutions pertaining to archival description and EAD. Begin preparations for hosting and scheduling regional workshops.

Steering Committee

Steering Committee, Workshop Hosts (FSU, TBLC, SEFLIN) Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainers, Steering Committee, and EAD Training Consultant

November 2005 Develop curriculum. – February 2006
Create tools and training materials (style sheets, input templates, example finding aids).

Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainers, Steering Committee, and EAD Training Consultant

Announce workshop via organizational web sites, electronic mail, and annual meeting.

Steering Committee, Lead Trainer

February-March 2006

Evaluation of curriculum and teaching tools.

Education consultant and EAD Training Consultant

Final registration of participants and scheduling of workshops.

Steering Committee

22

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

March 2006

Final approval of curriculum, teaching tools, and best practice guidelines. Lead Trainer trains the Regional Co-Trainers.

Steering Committee

Lead Trainer

Create and submit mid-year report.

Lead Trainer and Steering Committee

Co-Trainer promotes training program at FLA annual conference.

Co-Trainer

April 2006

First regional workshop in North Florida (Tallahassee), to coincide with the SFA Annual Meeting.

Hosted by Florida State University. Training conducted by Lead Trainer with assistance from Co-Trainer for that region.

May-July 2006

Second and third regional workshops in Central and South Florida (Tampa and Ft. Lauderdale).

Hosted by TBLC and SEFLIN. Training conducted by Lead Trainer with assistance from Co-Trainer for each region.

June 2006 June-September 2006

Evaluation of the training content and structure. Technical support and follow-up on-site consultation visits, as needed.

Lead Trainer, Regional Co-Trainers, and EAD Training Consultant Lead Trainer and Regional Co-Trainers

Contribution of EAD XML finding aids to union database, Archival Collections.

FCLA (with contributions by participants and support from trainers) Lead Trainer & Steering Committee

August 2006

Final survey of participants to determine effectiveness of training and progress of EAD implementation.

August 2006 September 2006

Co-Trainer presents information about training program at SAA annual conference. Create and submit annual report.

Co-Trainer

Lead Trainer, Steering Committee, FCLA

23

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

F3. Sustainability
During the grant period, participants will develop the training curriculum, workshop resources, and computer tools used for the creation of EAD in Florida institutions. Once established, this training curriculum can be repeated in subsequent years by partner institutions, MLCs, or interested organizations. The training materials, such as sample finding aids, input templates, and training handouts, will be available on the Web to encourage the creation of EAD finding aids in Florida. Some of the MLCs not partnering in this grant have expressed interest in the training and may wish to offer similar training programs in the future. The co-trainers will become regional experts and can continue to offer assistance and provide informal training to individuals within their regions. Additionally, it is hoped that many of the participants receiving training during this grant will be become advocates who can continue to promote the use and knowledge of EAD in their institutions and regions. Some of the participants may become co-trainers for workshops in subsequent years. Participants can form local partnerships to increase electronic access to their archival collections. Also, the trainers and participants can continue to use and develop the EAD best practice guidelines, thereby promoting standard descriptive practices statewide. FCLA will continue to maintain the Archival Collections system as part of its ongoing operating budget. FCLA will encourage all types of libraries to share their resources so that the holdings of local institutions can be integrated into a statewide electronic network.

24

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

G. Budge Page & Narrative
G1. BUDGET LOCAL/STATE MATCH (Round all amounts to the nearest dollar. Add additional lines if needed to include all information in a section.) LSTA

SALARIES & BENEFITS (Position Title) (All salaries to be paid from federal or local sources) Lead trainer Co-trainer Co-trainer Co-trainer PI TOTAL SALARIES ……………………………………...

F.T.E.

0.5 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.05

$

22,500.00

$

-

$ $

-

$

22,500.00

$

18,944.00

CONTRACTUAL SERVICES (List each vendor) Training consultant (Katherine Wisser) Educational consultant (Beth Yakel) $ $ 800.00 800.00 $ $ -

25

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

SEFLN TBLC TOTAL CONTRACTUAL SERVICES …………………

$ $ $

250.00 250.00 2,100.00 $ $ -

LIBRARY MATERIALS (Include types of materials to be purchased) $ TOTAL LIBRARY MATERIALS .……………………… $ $ $ -

SUPPLIES (Specify) 70 workbooks NoteTab pro TOTAL SUPPLIES……………………………….…….. $ $ $ 233.55 600.00 833.55 $ $ $ -

TRAVEL…………………………….…………………..

$

7,389.68

$

-

26

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

EQUIPMENT (Equipment and furniture with a useful life of at least one year and a unit cost of $1,000 or more) Laptop computer for lead trainer TOTAL EQUIPMENT………………………………….. $ $ 1,184.00 1,184.00 $ $ -

OTHER (Specify) _________________________________________ TOTAL OTHER …………………………………………. $ $ $ $ -

TOTAL…………..………………………………………

$

34,007.23

+

$

18,944.00

=

$

52,951.23

NOTE: Match for all co-trainers salary + benefits are totaled on this line.

27

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

G2. Budget Narrative
Salaries & Benefits <snip> Contractual services Consultant Katherine Wisser at $500/day standard rate, 1 day Steering Committee meeting + .75 day review of training materials = $875. Consultant Beth Yakel at $500/day standard rate, 1.75 day evaluation = $875. Administrative fees to SEFLN and TBLC for providing training facilities, handling registrations, arranging catering, etc. for regional workshops = $250 per workshop. North Florida workshop will use Florida State University facilities at no fee. Supplies Training workbooks for workshop participants 40 pages, spiral bound, 70 copies = $233.55 (quote from Renaissance Printing). The free version of NoteTab will be used on workshop computers, but each institution sending staff to the workshop will get one copy of NoteTab Pro. Est. 30 participating institutions * $20 = $600. Travel Travel includes:   3 Steering Committee meetings in Gainesville, Tallahassee and Orlando; Trainer and co-trainer travel to workshops in Tampa, Ft. Lauderdale, and Tallahassee; Trainer site visits to the North Florida (2), Central Florida (2), South Florida (2), and West Florida (1) areas; One speaker to 2006 meetings of Florida Library Association and Society of American Archivists for 1 day; Trainer and co-trainers to Society of Florida Archivists for 3 days (full meeting).



Assumes Trainer is based in Tallahassee. Consultant Kathy Wisser attends first Steering Committee meeting. Overnight stay for trips of 200 miles or more; cost of same day meals and next day breakfast included for overnight stays. Mileage, hotel and meal costs taken from State of Florida travel rates.

28

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Travel Break Down To Gainesville for Steering Committee = $ 1264.97
From Miles / airfare Hotel Meals

Miami

350.00

100.00

44.00

Orlando

88.29

Tallahassee (2)

233.38

Tampa

105.30

RDU

200.00

100.00

44.00

To Tallahassee for Steering Committee = $784.83
From Miles / airfare Hotel Meals

Miami

300.00

100.00

44.00

Orlando

196.83

100.00

44.00

Gainesville (2)

233.28

Tampa

192.78

100.00

44.00

To Orlando for Steering Committee = $1285.20
From Miles / airfare Hotel Meals

Miami

187.11

100.00

53.00

29

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Tallahassee (2)

393.66

200.00

106.00

Gainesville (2)

176.58

Tampa

68.85

To Tampa for Training Workshop = $541.63
From Miles / airfare Hotel Meals

Tallahassee

192.78

100.00

40.00

Orlando

68.85

100.00

40.00

To Ft. Lauderdale for Training Workshop = $436.00
From Miles / airfare Hotel Meals

Tallahassee

250.00

100.00

44.00

Miami

42.00

To Tallahassee for Training Workshop = $252.64
From Miles / airfare Hotel Meals

Gainesville

116.64

100.00

36.00

From Tallahassee for Site Visits by Trainer = $1624.41
To Miles / airfare Hotel Meals

30

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Central Florida (2)

393.66

200.00

88.00

South Florida (2)

500.00

200.00

88.00

West Florida

154.75

2006 Annual conferences = $2877.46 placeholder
To From Transport Hotel Meals Registration

FLA Orlando

Gainesville

88.29

100.00

53.00

100.00

SSA Washington

Gainesville

280.00

150.00

58.00

325.00

FSA Tallahassee

Gainesville

116.34

200.00

80.00

80.00

FSA Tallahassee

Orlando

196.83

200.00

80.00

80.00

FSA Tallahassee

Miami

250.00

200.00

80.00

80.00

FSA Tallahassee

Tallahassee

80.00

31

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Equipment Laptop computer = Gateway M405 Series or equivalent; entry-level notebook with integrated wireless, optical drive, Windows XP.

32

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

H. Partnership Agreements

33

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

I. Certification of Credentials

34

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

J. Certificate of Status for Nonprofit Organizations

35

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

K. Letters of Support

36

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

L. Exhibits

37

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Archival Collections Search

38

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Online Finding Aid Example

39

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Close up of Contents List

40

Florida Center for Library Automation “Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida”

Sample EAD XML Code

41


				
DOCUMENT INFO