Translating Constructivism into Instructional Design_ Potential and by malj

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 16

									   Constructivism and 
  Instructional Design

  Are they compatible?

Summary and Presentation by 
     Anna Ignatjeva
                 Introduction
• Instructional designers use various theories.
• Constructivism has been dominant theory of 
  last decade.

• This presentation addresses the following: 
  – Basic principles of constructivism
  – Implications of constructivism on instructional 
    design
     Constructivism-an overview
• Constructivists believe that learners actively 
  create knowledge based on their own 
  experiences, goals and beliefs. 
• Concepts of “Teaching” and “Learning” not 
  synonymous.
• Knowledge cannot be transferred but only 
  constructed.
• Meaning is created by individual not imposed 
  on individual.
        Constructivism in video

    Click on the link below to learn more general 
    information about constructivism theory in 
    education
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F00R3pOXz
    uk
  Two groups of Constructivists

• Radical constructivists
• Non-radical or moderate 
  constructivists  
 Implications for Instructional Design
My research presents constructivism in terms of 
 three major phases of instructional design

  Analysis

  Development

  Evaluation
                  Analysis
• Traditional Approach- analyze who is the  
  learner, content and setting.
• Constructivist Approach- does not break 
  environment into traditional components; no 
  predetermined content or tasks. 
• Constructivists analyze learning environment 
  as whole and provide rich context to negotiate 
  meaning.
               Development
• Traditional Approach- set and achieve specific 
  performance objectives. 
• Constructivist Approach-no predetermined 
  content and objectives.
• Constructivists concentrate on student-
  centered, student directed, collaborative, 
  supported and cooperative learning.
            Development cont

There are 4 major strategies preferred by 
  constructivists in this stage

  1. Active Learning
  2. Authentic Learning
  3. Multiple Perspectives
  4. Collaborative Learning
                 Evaluation 
• Traditional Approach-evaluate the outcomes 
  and results of learning.
• Constructivists evaluate thinking process, 
  metacoginitive and reflective skills.
• Constructivist learners need to explain what 
  they have learned and make connection to 
  previous experiences.
                Challenges
• Pre-specification of knowledge

• Evaluation

• Learner Control

• Underlying philosophy not a strategy
  Solution based on Merrill’s second 
generation instructional design theory
 – Mental models are                 – But both of these can be 
   constructed by learners based       adapted to different contexts 
   on their experience                 separately, if needed
 – Each mental model may be          – There is class content that is 
   different, but their structure      appropriate for all learners
   is the same                       – When learning is active not 
 – Teaching authentic tasks in a       necessarily collaborative, an 
   context is desirable                individual learning is as 
 – But there is also need to           effective 
   teach abstractions that are       – Testing can be incorporated 
   taken out of context                and aligned with learning 
 – Subject matter and                  objectives
   instructional strategy are        – But other type of assessment 
   somewhat independent                is also possible (Karagiorgi & 
                                       Symeou, 2005 p.23).
             Technology tools
• Hypermedia, multimedia and Internet can 
  allow for non-linear learning with increased 
  learner control.
• Toolkits, coaching, scaffolding, role-playing 
  games, simulations, case studies, storytelling 
  promote active constructive learning.
• In the future micro worlds and virtual reality 
  can simulate authentic learning.
                 Conclusion
• Constructivism can become guiding 
  theoretical foundation of the future. 
• Two issues to consider: 
  – Moderate not extreme constructivism fits into 
    instructional design framework
  – Many new technologies can implement and 
    facilitate constructivist environments. 

  Go to Journal of Educational Technology and Society
   online to read more
   http://www.ifets.info/journals/8_1/5.pdf
                                        References
•   Gordon, M. (2009). Toward A Pragmatic Discourse of Constructivism: Reflections on Lessons from Practice. 
    Educational Studies, 45, 39–58. 
•   Karagiorgi, Y., & Symeou, L. (2005). Translating Constructivism into Instructional Design: Potentials and 
    Limitations. Educational Technology & Society, 8 (1),17-27.

•   Kafai, Y.,  & Resnik, M (1996). Constructionism in practice: Designing, thinking and learning in a digital
    world. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum.

•   Spiro, R. J., & Jehng, J. G. (1990). Cognitive flexibility and hypertext. In Nix, D. & Spiro, R. (Eds.), Cognition,
    education, multimedia, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum, 165-202.

•   Von Glasersfeld, E. (1995). A constructivist approach to teaching. In Steffe, L. P. & Gale, J. 
    (Eds.),Constructivism in education, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum, 3-15.

•   Neo, M., & Neo, T.-K. (2009). Engaging students in multimedia-mediated Constructivist learning – 
    Students’ perceptions. Educational Technology & Society, 12 (2), 254–266.

•   Kala, S. et. al (2009).et al. Electronic learning and constructivism: A model for nursing education. Nurse
    Education Today. Retrieved on October 12, 2009 from www.elsevier.com/nedt
 
Questions?

								
To top