School of Dentistry www.dentistry.unc.edu JANE A. WEINTRAUB by pengxuebo

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									School of Dentistry

www.dentistry.unc.edu
JANE A. WEINTRAUB, Dean

Professors
Roland R. Arnold, Immunology, Host-Microbial Biology
James D. Beck, Oral Epidemiology
Lyndon Cooper, Bone Cell Physiology, Implantology
Terry Donovan, Operative Dentistry and Dental Materials
Greg Essick, Dental Research Center
Eric Everett, Associate Dean for Research, Pediatric Dentistry
Richard Gracely, Endodontics
Janet Guthmiller, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Periodontology
H. Garland Hershey, Orthodontics
Harald Heymann, Operative Dentistry, Biomaterials
Ching-Chang Ko, Orthodontics
Jessica Lee, Pedatric Dentistry
John Ludlow, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
William Maixner, Neurobiology, Pain Perception and Modulation, Pain Management, Endodontics
Sally Mauriello, Dental Hygiene
Kenneth N. May Jr., Operative Dentistry
Valerie Murrah, Oral Carcinogenesis, Salivary Gland Malignancies
Steven Offenbacher, Inflammatory Mediators, Host Response, Periodontal, Systemic Diseases
Lauren Patton, Oral Medicine, Dental Ecology
Ceib Phillips, Assistant Dean for Advanced Education/Graduate Programs, Orthodontics
William Proffit, Orthodontics
Andre Ritter, Operative Dentistry
Emile Rossouw, Orthodontics
Gary Slade, Oral Epidemiology
John W. Stamm, Oral Epidemiology
Ronald P. Strauss, Medical Sociology and Health Promotion/Disease Prevention
Edward J. Swift, Operative Dentistry
Timothy Turvey, Consequences of Craniofacial and Maxillofacial Surgery
Donald A. Tyndall, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
Raymond P. White Jr., Oral Surgery Therapies
Aldridge Wilder, Clinical and Laboratory Dental Materials Research
Rebecca Wilder, Dental Hygiene
J. Tim Wright, Pediatric Dentistry
Mitsuo Yamauchi, Collagen Biochemistry, Physiology and Metabolism of Bone
Associate Professors
Silvana Barros, Periodontology
Alice Curran, Oral Pathology
Luda Diatchenko, Endodontics
Sylvia Frazier-Bowers, Orthodontics
Albert Guckes, Prosthodontics
Lorne D. Koroluk, Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics
Mark Kutcher, Oral Medicine
Glenn E. Minsley, Prosthodontics
Rocio Quinonez, Pediatric Dentistry
Eric Rivera, Endodontics
Rose Sheats, Orthodontics
John Sturdevant, Operative Dentistry
Jennifer Webster-Cyriaque, Oral Medicine, Dental Ecology
David Zajac, Craniofacial Disorders
Thomas Ziemiecki, Prosthodontics
Lee Boushell, Operative Dentistry
Andrea Nackley, Endodontics
Assistant Professors
Sompop Bencharit, Prosthodontics
Xi Chen, Dental Ecology
Ingeborg DeKok, Prosthodontics
Asma Khan, Endodontics
Tung Nguyen, Orthodontics
Anne Sanders, Dental Ecology
Clinical Professors
Ralph Leonard, Diagnostic Sciences and General Dentistry
Samuel Nesbit, Diagnostic Sciences and General Dentistry
Luis Pimenta, Dental Ecology
Enrique Platin, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
Michael Roberts, Pediatric Dentistry
Clinical Associate Professors
Jay Anderson, Oral Surgery
Carlos Barrero, Prosthodontics
George H. Blakey, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Anesthesia
Richard Eidson, Operative Dentistry
Carol Haggerty, Diagnostic Sciences
Robert Hollowell, Dental Ecology, Hospital Dentistry
Lewis Lampiris, Dental Ecology, DISC
Michael Milano, Pediatric Dentistry
Shannon Mitchell, Dental Ecology
Antonio Moretti, Periodontology
Vickie P. Overman, Dental Hygiene
Ricardo Padilla, Diagnostic Sciences
James Parker, Operative Dentistry
Glenn Reside, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Allen Samuelson, Dental Ecology
Douglas Solow, Diagnostic Sciences and General Dentistry
Margot Stein, Dental Ecology
Clinical Assistant Professors
Jennifer Brame, Dental Hygiene
Hong Chen, Endodontics
Derek Duggan, Endodontics
Ibrahim Duqum, Prosthodontics
Lynn Fox, Dental Ecology
Glenn Garland, Diagnostic Sciences and General Dentistry
Brent Golden, Oral Surgery
Matthew Hopfensperger, Prosthodontics
Lynne Hunt, Dental Ecology
Pei Feng Lim, Endodontics
Gustavo Mendonca, Prosthodontics
Andre Mol, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
Thiago Morelli, Periodontology
Amy Nguyen, Dental Hygiene
Jongbae Park, Endodontics
Jonathan Reside, Periodontology
Lynn Smith, Dental Assisting
Lisa Stoner, Prosthodontics
Peter Tawil, Endodontics
Karen Tiwana, Urgent Care
Research Assistant Professors
Eric Bair, Endodontics
Kimon Divaris, Pediatric Dentistry
Shad Smith, Endodontics
Inna Tchivileva, Endodontics
Professors Emeriti
Kent W. Healey
Phillip Hirsch
Graduate instruction in the School of Dentistry is offered in dental hygiene education, endodontics, operative dentistry, oral biology,
oral epidemiology, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics,
pediatric dentistry, periodontology, and prosthodontics and in the Curriculum in Oral Biology.
The specialty practice programs, endodontics, operative dentistry, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology,
orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, periodontology, and prosthodontics, are dual specialty certificate and master of science degree
programs. The minimum requirements for the certificate are prescribed by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American
Dental Association (CODA) and the respective specialty boards for the approved CODA specialties. The master of science degree is
conferred by the University of North Carolina Graduate School and requires the successful completion of required course work, oral
and/or written comprehensive examinations, a research project, and a thesis. Graduates who possess an appropriate degree and who
meet the requirements of The Graduate School are considered for admission. Enrollment for study in these specialty programs
requires approximately three years of residency. The curricula have been designed to permit maximum flexibility in preparation for
practice, teaching, and/or research, as well as to meet the educational requirements of the specialty boards.
Other advanced education programs available within the School of Dentistry include the dental hygiene education program, oral
biology, oral epidemiology, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. The oral biology and oral epidemiology programs lead to the doctoral
degree (Ph.D.) and require four or more years to complete. The dental hygiene education program spans two years and is a master of
science program designed to prepare dental hygienists for teaching, research, or corporate employment. The Oral and Maxillofacial
Surgery program is a six-year dual degree (M.D.) program with a certificate in oral and maxillofacial surgery
Information regarding admission, entrance requirements, and/or curricula of a specific advanced education program may be obtained
online at www.dentistry.unc.edu/academic or www.unc.edu/gradrecord/programs/dentistry.html.
Tuition and Fees
Tuition and fees are subject to change at any meeting of NC Board of Trustees and a yearly increase should be anticipated each year.
Tuition and fees apply for all years of study and training. Current tuition and fees for in-state and nonresidents may be obtained
online at www.unc.edu/ugradbulletin/finances.html. Required instruments, books, computers, and laboratory fees are determined by
each program. Tuition and fees are due at the time of registration.
Student loans are available on the same basis as for undergraduates. Additional information can be obtained online at
admissions.unc.edu/Aid_and_Scholarships/default.html.
Oral Biology
Oral biology is a highly translational, multi-disciplinary program of study that focuses on the growth, development, and pathologies of
the craniofacial complex and associated physiological structures, as well as the study of disease and healing mechanisms related to these
structures. The program has three concentrations:
• Host-Pathogen Interactions
• Pain Neurobiology
• Skeletal Biology and Extracellular Matrices
The discipline of oral biology applies and extends the concepts of immunology, embryology, physiology, cellular and molecular
biology, neurobiology, pharmacology, microbiology, and biochemistry to understanding the growth and development and pathologies
associated with the craniofacial complex and oral cavity. Attention in dental research and practice is now focusing on the dynamics of
oral disease and prevention and treatment at the earliest stages of development, including research on risk factors for disease as well as
the cellular and molecular events in disease pathogenesis. Molecular approaches for oral disease analysis and the complexity of disease
elements require advanced training in the discipline of oral biology. Modern biomedical research is also identifying systemic
relationships between oral conditions, health status, and diseases such as atherosclerosis, HIV, and cancer; the oral cavity also offers an
ideal model to study biological structures and cellular mechanisms important throughout the body and important in immune
response.
The Concentration in Host-Pathogen Interactions focuses on chronic inflammatory conditions and encompasses the study of
infectious diseases and host responses. This concentration focuses on the underlying pathologies associated with infectious diseases, as
well as the nature and regulation of host responses which result in acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, in order to develop
therapeutic approaches to the treatment of these conditions. The Concentration in Pain Neurobiology encompasses a translational
approach to study maladaptive pain conditions. This concentration integrates genetics, molecular biology, animal models,
psychophysical testing, neuroimaging, and clinical epidemiological approaches to better understand the mechanisms driving chronic
pain as well as to identify unique markers for diagnosis and treatment. The Concentration in Skeletal Biology and Extracellular
Matrices encompasses the study of the development, structure and function of mineralized and connective tissues. This program uses
basic, translational, and biomedical engineering approaches to the study of bone, tooth and connective tissue physiology, pathology
and repair.
Expertise and authority in these particular concepts are well-represented within the research and training qualifications of program
faculty located in numerous UNC programs and departments, including the School of Dentistry, School of Medicine, Lineberger
Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Neurosciences Center, the Center for Cystic Fibrosis, and the Center for AIDS Research.
Curricular requirements are based on training areas, with common core requirements for all students. Research interests and
qualifications will also determine course requirements. Research is a key element of the program, and students start laboratory
rotations during their first semester to allow maximum time for research involvement.
Admissions
There are two pathways for admission to the Curriculum in Oral Biology:
1) Direct Application to Oral Biology:
  Individuals (domestic or international) with a doctoral or biomedical professional degree, including DDS, DMD, MD or equivalent,
  should apply directly to the program through the UNC Graduate School: gradschool.unc.edu
2) Application through Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program:
  Individuals (domestic or international) without an advanced professional biomedical degree must apply through the Biological and
  Biomedical Sciences Program (BBSP): www.med.unc.edu/bbsp
Research Facilities
The Curriculum in Oral Biology graduate program is located in the North Carolina School of Dentistry. The central base for much of
the basic science research in the curriculum is in the Koury Oral Health Sciences Building with access to SEM/TEM microscopy,
tissue culture facilities, anaerobic microbiology support, ALAC-accredited animal facilities, computers and software for image
analyses/enhancement and finite element analyses, and a clinical research unit, which includes an eight-patient operatory. Biostatistical
assistance is readily available as well as medical illustration, photography, radiology, and grants management.
Financial Aid
Graduate research assistantships are awarded competitively for students accepted into the oral biology Ph.D. program. These
competitive assistantships provide support through program resources during the first year with health insurance, and may include a
special tuition rate for out-of-state students. Support for dissertation research (beginning in the student’s second year) is generally
made available by faculty mentors. Students are eligible for financial aid through The UNC Office of Scholarships & Student Aid.
International students are encouraged to contact the International Student & Scholar Services for resource contacts if financial aid is
needed.
Correspondence and information:
Cindy Blake
Graduate Program Manager
Oral Biology Ph.D. Program
School of Dentistry
5502 Koury Oral Health Sciences Building, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7455
Telephone: (919) 537-3230 Fax: (919) 966-3683
Web: www.dentistry.unc.edu.
Dual Degree Program in Oral Biology and Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.)
There is an opportunity for students who have an interest in pursuing both a Ph.D. degree in oral biology with The Graduate School
to simultaneously pursue a doctor of dental surgery (D.D.S.) degree in the School of Dentistry. This special program is a seven-year
program that allows the pursuit of both degrees simultaneously, and results in awarding of both the Ph.D. and the D.D.S. degree
upon completion of the requirements for both programs.
Applying for this dual degree program is an option when applying for either the oral biology graduate program or for the D.D.S.
program in the School of Dentistry. The applicant must indicate an interest in pursuing the dual degree program at the time of
application, and will be interviewed and accepted into the program as a dual degree student. The application deadline for this dual
degree program is November 1 (the deadline for the D.D.S. program). Students applying for the dual degree program must take either
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) OR the Dental Aptitude Test (DAT), but are not required to take both exams. All other
requirements for application to the dual degree program are identical to the application process for the oral biology graduate program.
Students not chosen to enter the dual degree program would still be eligible for admittance into either the D.D.S. program or the oral
biology graduate program through the regular application process.
Students accepted into the dual degree program will follow a specialized curriculum, which combines scientific and clinical training
with research activities designed to promote a career in academic dentistry. The first two years of the program will consist of basic
didactic courses in the Ph.D. program coupled with laboratory experiences, followed by a four-year period of the D.D.S.
comprehensive clinical care education and continued dissertation research. The final year(s) consists of completion of the Ph.D.
dissertation. Students who successfully complete the program will then be awarded both the Ph.D. and D.D.S. degrees at the
completion of the requirements for both degrees. Students who are not eligible or who choose not to complete both programsbut
rather pursue only the D.D.S. degree must apply to the D.D.S. program and be accepted through the regular application process.


Oral Epidemiology
The University of North Carolina offers a program leading to a Ph.D. degree in epidemiology under the cooperative auspices of the
School of Dentistry’s Department of Dental Ecology and the School of Public Health’s departments of Epidemiology and Health
Policy and Management. The strong, nationally recognized Department of Epidemiology at the Gillings Global School of Public
Health has a well-established doctoral program, and oral epidemiology has been taught as part of the Program in Dental Public Health
for many years. The integration of the wealth of resources in the three departments makes this program unique.
The goal of the oral epidemiology program is to provide students with the ability to identify, analyze, and predict changes in oral
diseases and conditions. These conditions include dental caries, oral cancer, oral mucosal lesions, periodontal diseases, craniofacial and
dentofacial anomalies, and systemic diseases that affect, and are affected by, oral health. Degree recipients will have the academic
foundation, advanced knowledge, and skills needed to conduct, interpret, and evaluate sophisticated epidemiologic investigations and
clinical research projects.
Information, including advice regarding application, is at
www.sph.unc.edu/epid.
Endodontics
The Department of Endodontics offers a three-year program leading to a certificate in endodontics and a master of science degree.
The program is designed to prepare candidates for careers in academics, research, or the clinical practice of endodontics, and for
certification by the American Board of Endodontics.
The endodontics graduate program involves an integrated study of biological sciences as they pertain to endodontics, development of
the clinical skills required in the broad area of the endodontic specialty, review of classic and current literature in endodontics,
teaching experience, research design and methodology, and the development and completion of a research project.
Application requires submission of the required transcripts and documentation to the Postdoctoral Application Support Service
(PASS) www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/pass/Pages/default.aspx by August 15th for the following summer class beginning
July 1. A personal interview is required for admission. After review by the program, applicants will be informed regarding application
to the Graduate School. Admission to The Graduate School is granted only after the department reviews and approves the application,
transcripts or prior academic work, letters of reference, and other credentials
The number of students is limited to three each year. Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology
The advanced dental education program in oral and maxillofacial pathology prepares qualified oral and maxillofacial specialists for
positions of responsibility in institutions of higher dental education, research, or in private practice. Students develop competence in
surgical oral pathology, acquire skills in the clinical management of patients with disorders of the head and neck, gain experience in
pathology laboratory management, and develop teaching and research skills for enhancement of an academic career. Upon completion
of the necessary requirements, each student is eligible for fellowship in the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology
and certification by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.
Applications for admission to the program are made online through the UNC Graduate School:
www.gradschool.unc.edu/students_prospective.html.
Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
The advanced education program in oral and maxillofacial radiology begins on July 1 of each year and extends for three years. The
primary goal of the program is to prepare specialists who are fully qualified in the clinical practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology
and to provide patient care, teach, and conduct research in an oral health care institution or to provide patient care in the private
practice setting.
The program includes training in radiological sciences (radiological physics, radiation biology, radiation protection, imaging science),
clinical sciences (intraoral, extraoral and cone beam CT imaging, radiographic interpretation of conditions affecting the oral and
maxillofacial region), medical sciences (oral and maxillofacial pathology, head and neck anatomy) and research sciences (research
design and biostatistics). Each graduate student develops an original research project as an integral part of the graduate program,
resulting in a written thesis. The program meets the eligibility requirements of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial
Radiology.
Applications for admission to the program are made online through the UNC Graduate School:
www.gradschool.unc.edu/students_prospective.html.
Stipends may be available depending on available resources.
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
The oral and maxillofacial surgery residency is a six-year program resulting in a specialty certificate in oral and maxillofacial surgery
and an M.D. degree from the UNC–Chapel Hill School of Medicine. The programs goals are to:
• Train the oral and maxillofacial surgery resident so he/she will be competent to practice a broad scope of oral and maxillofacial
  surgery; be knowledgeable concerning the theoretical basis, as well as clinical sciences of oral and maxillofacial surgery; and be
  qualified to become board certified in oral and maxillofacial surgery.
• Prepare oral and maxillofacial surgeons for a career in teaching, research, and/or practice in the specialty of oral and maxillofacial
  surgery.
The integrated dual degree program is structured such that the second and third years are spent obtaining the medical degree, which is
followed by a year (fourth) of general surgery. The remaining years are spent within the oral and maxillofacial surgery area.
The clinical experience is progressively graduated and includes a number of hospital service rotations at UNC Hospitals, Mission St.
Joseph Hospital, and the Durham VA Medical Center.
All residents are strongly encouraged to develop and/or participate in research projects during their residency. Elective time is
dedicated for research activities. The department is committed to the education of future educators and leaders of its specialty.
Application requires submission of the required transcripts and documentation to the Postdoctoral Application Support Service
(PASS) www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/pass/Pages/default.aspx by September 1 in order for an applicant to be considered
for the class that begins the following July. All candidates must register with the Postdoctoral Dental Matching Program, 595 Bay
Street, Suite 300, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C2 www.natmatch.com/dentres/
Operative Dentistry
The Department of Operative Dentistry offers a three-year program leading to an M.S. degree granted by the UNC–Chapel Hill
Graduate School. The program involves component areas of research, teaching, and patient care. The curriculum includes 1) general
core courses including topics in basic and clinical sciences, 2) courses in educational sciences, 3) a research component including
courses on research design and statistical methods, and 4) a clinical component in contemporary operative dentistry. A formal thesis
based on a selected research topic is required, including its defense before an examining committee. The department also requires a
comprehensive written examination.
The admission policy for graduate training in operative dentistry follows the regular requirements for admission to The Graduate
School. Applications for admission to the program are made online through the UNC Graduate School:
www.gradschool.unc.edu/students_prospective.html. All application materials should be submitted by December 1 for the class
beginning the program July 1 of the following year. The number of students is typically limited to two per class.
Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Orthodontics
The orthodontic postgraduate program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides a combined clinical experience in
orthodontics and a critical thinking and research experience that lead to a certificate in orthodontics and a master of science degree
conferred by the UNC Graduate School. Students in the advanced orthodontic education program are required to demonstrate
clinical and professional proficiency as well as complete the didactic and research components of the M.S. degree prior to graduation.
During the program’s first year, students participate in core courses, didactic and clinical seminars, and begin patient care. As the
program progresses, didactic seminars gradually are replaced by research participation, while clinical seminars continue and the volume
of patient care increases. All students must perform satisfactorily on oral and written comprehensive examinations to complete the
program successfully.
The Department of Orthodontics offers a 33-month program. Six residents begin the program each August. Students are
educationally qualified to take the written portion of the American Board of Orthodontics in the second or third year. The successful
completion of the research project is required for the receipt of the certificate in orthodontics as well as the M.S. degree.
Application requires submission of the required transcripts and documentation to the Postdoctoral Application Support Service
(PASS) www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/pass/Pages/default.aspx by September 1 in order for an applicant to be considered
for the class that begins the following August. All candidates must register with the Postdoctoral Dental Matching Program, 595 Bay
Street, Suite 300, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C2; www.natmatch.com/dentres.
A personal on-site interview is required and interviews are made by invitation of the department after reviewing applicants’ records.
Interviews are usually held in late October or early November. Once a student has matched through the Match program, the student
must apply to the UNC Graduate School in order to receive the requisite course credit to earn the master’s degree.
Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Pediatric Dentistry
The advanced education program in pediatric dentistry requires participation in both the centralized application and matching
services. Application requires submission of the required transcripts and documentation to the Postdoctoral Application Support
Service (PASS) (www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/pass/Pages/default.aspx) by September 3 in order for an applicant to be
considered for the class that begins the following July. All candidates must register with the Postdoctoral Dental Matching Program,
595 Bay Street, Suite 300, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C2; www.natmatch.com/dentres. A personal interview is required and
interviews are made by invitation of the department after reviewing applicants’ records. Once a student has matched through the
Match program the student must apply to The Graduate School. Please contact the program director for information regarding the
Graduate School application.
The department offers a graduate program in pediatric dentistry leading to the M.S., M.P.H., or Ph.D. degree. The minimum
program length is 36 months, beginning July 1 of each year. The program’s goal is to prepare the student for a career in academic
research, dental education, clinical practice, or public health. Developing leadership skills and training advocates for children’s health
is emphasized. For interested students, this program can be combined with other educational programs in the social sciences, basic
sciences, or allied health professions leading to an additional master’s degree, postdoctoral fellowship, an individual Dentist-Scientist
award, or a doctoral degree.
During the first year each student completes courses in research design and statistics. A protocol for the research project is completed
in conjunction with the course work during the first year. This project provides a background in the scientific method and scientific
writing. During the second year data are collected, and during the third year the thesis is written and defended. Under the direction of
leaders in many fields of research, research opportunities are available in a wide range of topics and can be undertaken in the School of
Dentistry, at a facility in nearby Research Triangle Park, or at a neighboring institution of higher learning. Numerous projects have
received national acclaim and have resulted in publications in dental literature. Hospital training is gained through the University of
North Carolina Hospitals. Graduate students are active members of the department’s teaching team during all years. Development of
leadership skills in the health profession is supported by externships at the local, state, and national levels.
Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Periodontology
The graduate program in periodontology is designed to prepare dentists to enter the clinical practice of periodontics or to assume
positions in academics and research. The program consists of a 36-month course of study leading to a certificate in periodontics and a
master of science degree. Alternative degree programs include a master of public health or a Ph.D. in oral biology. The curriculum is
devoted to the study of biological concepts and literature that encompass the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the
supporting and surrounding tissues of the teeth or their substitutes and the maintenance of the health, function and esthetics of these
structures and tissues. Clinical acquisition of skills in periodontology and implantology is a primary focus of the program. Resident
experiences include a combination of patient care, teaching, and research. Elective courses relating to areas of research interests are
available.
The admission policy for graduate training in periodontology follows the regular requirements for admission to The Graduate School.
Admission to The Graduate School is granted only after the department reviews and approves the application, transcripts of prior
academic work, letters of reference, and other credentials. All applications, transcripts, and letters of reference should be mailed to the
Postdoctoral Application Support Service (PASS) (www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/pass/Pages/default.aspx) by August 15
for the following summer class beginning July 1. A personal interview is required for admission.
The number of students is limited to three each year.
Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Prosthodontics
The admission policy for graduate training in prosthodontics follows the regular requirements for admission to The Graduate School.
Admission to The Graduate School is granted only after the application, transcript of prior academic work, letters of reference, and
other credentials are reviewed and approved by the appropriate committee. All applications, transcripts, and letters of reference should
be mailed to the Postdoctoral Application Support Service (PASS)
(www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/pass/Pages/default.aspx) by September 1 for the following summer class beginning July 1.
A personal interview is required for admission. The admission policy for the MS in prosthodontics follows the regular requirements
for admission to The Graduate School. Admission to The Graduate School is granted only after the application, transcript of prior
academic work, letters of reference, and other credentials are reviewed and approved by the appropriate committee.
The graduate program in prosthodontics is currently a 36-month course of study in fixed and removable prosthodontics, dental
implant prosthodontics, and maxillofacial prosthetics leading to a master of science degree. The primary goals of the program are to
prepare a student for clinical practice and/or a teaching and research career. The curriculum offers a broad educational experience in
clinical, research, didactic, and teaching activities. The program satisfies the formal training requirements of the American Board of
Prosthodontics for certification examination in prosthodontics.
A number of graduate courses from allied clinical and biomedical disciplines are available as electives for prosthodontic graduate
students. Though not required,elective courses are encouraged. Interest in electives (from within or outside the School of Dentistry)
should be discussed with the program director so that the core curriculum can be adjusted to accommodate the student’s needs.
Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Dental Hygiene Education
The primary objective of the dental hygiene education master of science program is to prepare well-qualified educators for dental
hygiene programs. At the successful completion of this program, the student should be able to 1) give evidence of having acquired
advanced knowledge and skills in one of the following minors: dental management/administration, biological sciences, oral pathology,
and clinical education, 2) develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary in the conduct of dental hygiene programs, 3) teach
courses in more than one dental hygiene field and 4) define their own problems from the present body of knowledge in dental and
dental hygiene education, solve the problems, and present their work in a scholarly fashion.
Credit hour requirements vary and are based on the individual background of the student and on the minor selected by the student.
Thirty-nine credit hours are required in the core (including thesis or research) and nine to 12 hours in the minor. The length of the
program is approximately two years. Minimum admissions requirements for the program include current licensure and a bachelor’s
degree from an accredited institution, and graduation from a dental hygiene program accredited by the Commission on Dental
Accreditation, American Dental Association. Work experience in dental hygiene education or dental hygiene practice is strongly
recommended.
Applicants must have a grade point average of B or better in the professional undergraduate curriculum. Three letters of
recommendation are required, as well as completion of an admissions questionnaire by the applicant. The course of study begins in
August of each year. An electronic application to the University can be obtained at
www.gradschool.unc.edu. For further information, contact the Director, Dental Hygiene Education Program, School of Dentistry,
CB# 7450, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450, (919) 966-8221.
Stipends are available depending upon available resources.
Core Courses Required of Graduate Students
in Dental Hygiene Education
DHED 715
DHED 720
DHED 730
DHED 736
DHED 760
DHED 837
DHED 860
DHED 993
DENG 701
DENG 702
DENG 703
Total of 28–33 credit hours in core curriculum
Additional courses are required for each minor as follows:
 Minors Credits
 Biological Sciences             12
 Clinical Education              9
 Management/Administration                 9
 Oral Pathology       11

								
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