Docstoc

Corporate Design PowerPoint-Templates - Smart Grid Research

Document Sample
Corporate Design PowerPoint-Templates - Smart Grid Research Powered By Docstoc
					          Distribution Automation
  Technical Background & Current Trends

                             Dan Murray
                        Siemens Energy, Inc.



                   Smart Grid Conference
         Rosen Shingle Creek Resort, Orlando, Florida
                     October 20-21 2011

Page 1         Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Topics


§ Overview of several Distribution Automation Applications
§ Technical Considerations when implementing DA Applications
   § Architectures
   § Sensors
   § Communications / Cyber security
   § Control Technologies

§ Other Considerations when implementing DA Applications
   § Current System Configuration (that is to say, your starting point)
   § Policies and Standards
   § Human Resources / Skill Sets
   § ROI / Budget

§ DA Implementation Strategies

Page 2             Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
    Distribution Automation Trends
    Example: CenterPoint Smart Grid Strategy




    Page Leveraging AMI and BPLSmart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Source: [1] 3                  Technologies at CenterPoint: Energy to Build the Intelligent Grid of the Future – Don Cortez
Select DA Applications


§ Fault Detection Isolation and Service Restoration (FLIR or FLISR)
  reduces the impact of outages.
§ Volt/VAR Control provides greater network efficiency through improved
  monitoring and regulation of power on distribution lines.
§ Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) reduces load during peak
  periods.




Page 4             Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Location Isolation and Service Restoration (FLIR or FLISR)
General Description


Fault Location, Isolation, and Service Restoration
 § Detects occurrence of a fault on a distribution feeder.
 § Determines the location of the fault between 2 switches or reclosers.
 § Isolates the faulted section between nearest switch and/or recloser.
 § Restores service to “healthy” portions of the feeder while maintaining
   safe loading limits on the second source.




Page 5             Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Detection Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR)
Typical Operation Today without FLISR




Page 6           Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Detection Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR)
Improved Performance using FLISR




Page 7           Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Detection Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR)
Benefits




                                                                                    Revenue per
                                                                                  Distribution Mile
                                                                                 § IOU       $62,665
                                                                                 § Muni      $86,302
                                                                                 § Coop      $10,565

                                                                              Source: 2006 RUS/EIA data



Source: [2] “Equipment for Feeder Automation - Recent Trends in Feeder Automation Seminar”
 Page 8                        Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21,
IEEE PES Miami Chapter Miami, Florida June 2, 2005, John McDonald, KEMA, Inc.2011
Volt/VAR Control
General Description


Volt/VAR Control provides greater network efficiency through improved
monitoring and regulation of power on distribution lines.
 § Regulation performed through coordinated use of cap banks and
   voltage regulators.
 § If DMS is used, then On Line Power Flow (OLPF) may help
   determine what control actions to take.




Page 9            Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Conservation Voltage Reduction
General Description


Conservation Voltage Reduction
 § Flattens the voltage profile across the feeder.
 § Allows monitoring of lowest voltage point to ensure it is above
   minimum acceptable voltage level.
 § Determines the necessary control actions to accomplish CVR.




Page 10            Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
   System Architecture
   NIST Smart Grid Conceptual Model – Detailed View




                                    Smart Grid Plan, NRECA CRN Smart Grid Regional Demonstration, Grant DE-OE-0000222
Source: [3] Interoperability and Cyber Security Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
   Page 11
Centralized vs. Decentralized Architecture
Overview


Centralized vs. Decentralized refers to where the switching logic
resides.




  Centralized at                         Centralized                      Decentralized
  Control Center                       at the Substation                  Peer-to-peer



Page 12            Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Centralized vs. Decentralized Architecture
Comparison


Consideration               Centralized                                 Decentralized

Cost              § DMS: Higher starting cost               § Lower starting cost

Complexity        § Greater time to implement               § Less time to implement
                  § DMS requires more                       § Most substation
Skills              advanced skills for                       engineering skills portable
                    implementation                            to DA applications

                  § Good starting position                  § Often used is SCADA can
                    with existing SCADA                       not be upgraded
Suggested Use
                  § Many feeders to be                      § Suitable for limited
                    automated                                 deployment (based on
                  § Many DA functions to be                   cost) or when “patching”
                    implemented                               system

Page 13          Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Detection Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR)
Components when using Peer-to-Peer Logic Approach


Decentralized Feeder Automation

 n   Better Performance                                      Municipals and Cooperatives
 n   Standardization                                         n Standardize on products
 n   Simplicity                                              n Available skills and expertise
 n   Lower Cost                                              n Cost-Driven
 n   Short Cycle business                                    n Small Annual Budgets (Short      Cycle)


Concept




              +             +                     +                     +
Switches        IED Family         Software               Wireless             Substation HMI (Option)
Page 14                 Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Detection Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR)
System Integration when using Peer-to-Peer Logic




              •   Automated Primary Switches/Reclosers
              •   Smart Controller
              •   High Speed Communication
              •   Communication Protocol (DNP / IEC 61850)
              •   Software Configuration Tools
              •   Smart Fault Detection Capability
              •   Smart Switching Logic




Page 15           Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Location Isolation and Service Restoration (FLIR or FLISR)
Benefits from Peer-to-Peer Approach

Problem: Keeping the lights on!
§ Reduce outage size and duration.
§ Locate faults faster with less driving time.
§ Reduce crew size to isolate and restore.
§ Reduce windshield time, particularly with
  long distribution lines.

Compelling Solution: Allows utilities to “do more with less”
§ Fast transfer scheme for critical load (e.g., hospital or industrial acct.)
§ Perform isolation and restoration faster than standard recloser and
  sectionalizer technology, and sometimes at a lower CAPEX cost.
§ Increase billing revenue through fewer and smaller outages.
§ Improve customer service – Resolve outages before customer calls.
§ Provide the ability to service a larger territory with fewer linemen.
§ Make use of adaptive settings for storm conditions to reduce SCADA
  operator work load.
Page 16             Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Fault Detection Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR)
Peer-to-Peer Example: A&N Electric Coop




Page 17          Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Communication Protocols
Comparison


Protocol                           Pro                                   Con

DNP 3.0
                  § 90% utilities using it                   § No object model
DNP over TCP/IP
                  § Relatively easy to use                   § No peer-to-peer
                  § Training classes available               § Limited security
                  § More utilities using it                  § More complex than DNP
                  § Contains object model                    § Interoperability issues
IEC 61850
                  § Native peer-to-peer                        remain but improving
                  § Future enhancements to                   § Engineering tools are
                     the standard to support                   average but improving
                     DG and comm to SCADA




Page 18           Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
   Telecommunication Options
   Commercial Carriers




Source: [4] “Smart GridNet” Architecture for Utilities. Alcatel-Lucent Strategic White Paper.
  Page 19                          Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Telecommunication Options
Direction of Wireless Technologies




Page 20          Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Communication Technology Deployment
Comparison


Deployment        Utilities owns network                     Carrier owns network

               § Full control over life cycle             § Little to no control
Control        § Full bandwidth following
                  storm event

               § Higher CAPEX cost                        § Generally lower CAPEX
Cost
               § Radio: One-time expense                    cost
                  of $1,000+ per node                     § On-going maintenance
                                                            cost

               § Radio: sight survey                      § Outsource expertise
Complexity     § Requires expertise
               § Usually the most secure                  § Can be reasonably
Security       § Requires expertise                         secured
                                                          § Outsource expertise

Page 21        Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
DA Implementation Strategies

            Project
                           Engineering
          Management




                            Production

                                              § Requirements planning
                                              § Evaluating your system starting
                                                position
                           System Test        § Cost / Benefits Analysis
                                              § Perform pilots and limited deployment
                                              § Implementation resources available
                                                  § NRECA website (architecture
                                                    framework and cyber security)
                             Support              § NIST


Page 22           Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
Questions?


                                              Dan Murray
                                              Marketing Manager
                                              Mobile: (408) 687-9134
                                              dan.murray@siemens.com




                           Thank you!



Page 23      Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011
References



§ [1] Leveraging AMI and BPL Technologies at CenterPoint: Energy to
  Build the Intelligent Grid of the Future – Don Cortez

§ [2] “Equipment for Feeder Automation - Recent Trends in Feeder
  Automation Seminar” IEEE PES Miami Chapter Miami, Florida June 2,
  2005, John McDonald, KEMA, Inc.
  http://www.ece.fiu.edu/docs/Seminar/John%20MacDonald/Equipment%20for%20Feeder%20Automation.pdf


§ [3] Interoperability and Cyber Security Plan, NRECA CRN Smart Grid
  Regional Demonstration, Grant DE-OE-0000222
  http://www.nreca.coop/press/NewsReleases/Documents/InteroperabilityCyberSecurityPlan.pdf



§ [4] “’Smart GridNet’ Architecture for Utilities,” Strategic White Paper,
  Alcatel-Lucent, 2007.

Page 24                     Smart Grid Research Consortium – October 20-21, 2011

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:5/3/2014
language:English
pages:24