Docstoc

Multimodality_ an introduction - LabSpace

Document Sample
Multimodality_ an introduction - LabSpace Powered By Docstoc
					Multimodality: an
  introduction
New ways of reading, new ways of writing

   
      ‘literacy teaching and learning needs to change 
      because the world is changing’ 
                                  Cope and Kalantzis. 2000: 41 
Why multimodality matters

• The future of reading and writing are closely interwoven 
  with the future of digital technologies.

• Children already know much about multimodal texts 
  from their home experiences. As teachers it is our 
  responsibility to build on these experiences and the 
  children’s knowledge of multimodality in the classroom.  
  This means we need to recognise the relationships 
  between different modes: text and image, sound and 
  gesture and use this in our teaching.

• Supporting children with reading, analysing and using 
  modes will enable them to develop literacy skills for 
  today and the future. 
Multimodality
Multimodality involves the complex 
 interweaving of word, image, gesture and 
 movement, and sound, including speech.  
 These can be combined in different ways and 
 presented through a range of media.

                   Bearne, E. And Wolstencroft, H. 2007
Multimodality
Mode – signs: sound, graphic material, print
Media – the manner of dissemination

A traffic sign as the medium
of communication and the red
border and the image inside
it as the mode.
Kress, G.1997
Medium of communication
• The computer: internet information and 
  software presentations

• Paper-based texts: picture books, magazines, 
  novels, information books

• Sound and visual media: radio, television, 
  videos, CDs and DVDs
Modes of communication
• Writing or print, including typographical 
  elements of font type, size and shape

• Images: moving and still, diagrammatic or 
  representational

• Sound: spoken words and music

• Gesture and movement
Key texts today
q Story books                 q Songs
q Picture books               q Paintings/ drawings
q Non-fiction books           q Texting
q Pop-up and lift the flap    q Animated films
  books (non linear)          q Live acted films
q Web pages and web logs      q Computer games
q Blogs                       q Console games 
q Advertisements              q Game manuals
q Newspapers                  q Logos
q Magazines                   q Card collections
q Comics
q Poetry 
Key texts today, a reflection
• Can you think of any other texts used by 
  pupils?

• Consider ways in which you have seen pupils 
  using these texts.

• How many of these texts do you currently use 
  in your classroom?
Multimodal texts can be paper based


http://www.boysintobooks.co.uk/primary/showtitle.php?i=978140
6303353
(click on thumbnail to see:
http://www.boysintobooks.co.uk/primary/img/cv/in/978140630335
3.jpg)




               Taken from Satoshi Kitamura’s Stone Age Boy.
• Look at the following examples of paper-
  based multimodal texts.  

• The texts are made up on a combination of 
  words, images and design layout.  They use 
  multimodal approaches to get their message 
  across.
                 Consider how each 
                   mode conveys 
                   meaning.
AWAITING IMAGE


                 How does the 
                   design add to 
                   the meaning?
• Your eye might have been drawn initially to 
  the images, to the image in the bottom right 
  hand corner.  You may then have browsed the 
  other images before using design features 
  such as the lines linking images to the related 
  text to draw your attention to the text...
• The page has a science fiction tone due to the 
  framing and use of screen digital type font. 
  Notice how the pictures and text are linked 
  together by lines and positioning on the page.
• The next screen is taken from a children’s 
  magazine National Geographic Kids

• What information is contained in the images? 
• What information is contained in the text?
• How does design support understanding and 
  add to meaning?
• How do the typeface, colour, font size and 
  variety add to the information?
         AWAITING IMAGE                           AWAITING IMAGE




Consider how each mode conveys a message.
                                            What does design add to the meaning?
• Now consider this example taken from BBC’s 
  Charlie And Lola magazine

• What information is contained in the images? 
• What information is contained in the text?
• How does design support understanding and 
  add to meaning?
• How do the typeface, colour, font size and 
  variety add to the information?
                           AWAITING IMAGE




Consider how each mode conveys a message.
                                            What does design add to the meaning?
Paper-based multimodal texts, a
reflection

• Reflect on the way you have seen paper-based 
  multimodal texts used in the classroom.  How 
  do you currently draw pupils’ attention to 
  multimodal aspects?

• How does this support the pupils’ learning?
• You must only look at the next slide for four 
  seconds... What do you remember?
See website: http://www.royal.gov.uk/
• What message was the most prominent?
• What mode was used to indicate this?

It is worth considering how texts are changing 
   over time – not only are there new types of 
   digital texts but a huge amount of book and 
   magazine texts use image, word, layout and 
   typography, often echoing on-screen texts.
Watch these adverts...
Adidas Advert: Little Red Riding Hood Chase 
  2008/9
Adidas Advert: Right Here Right Now 1999
Diadora Advert: 1983
Watch these adverts, reflection

• How are the modes of communication used in 
  each of the adverts?
• How have they changed over time?
The challenge for the classroom, a
reflection
• How do you use on-screen texts to support 
  your teaching of different text types?

• How do you plan for the children to design 
  and create on-screen texts?

You may wish to share these in one of the 
  discussions.  
The challenge for the classroom, a
reflection

• How far could the approaches and examples 
  in this presentation be used in your own 
  teaching?  What would you need in order to 
  do so?
Bibliography
• Bearne, E., and Wolstencroft, H. (2007) Visual Approaches to 
  Teaching Writing Multimodal Literacy 5-11. London: Paul Chapman 
  Publishing. 
• Bhojwani, P., Lord, B., and Wilkes, C. (2009) 'I know what to write 
  now' Engaging Boys (and Girls) through a Multimodal Approach. 
  Leicester: UKLA.
• United Kingdom Literacy Association/Qualifications and 
  Assessment Authority (2004) More than Words 1: More than 
  Words: multimodal texts in the classroom. London: QCA. This can 
  be accessed on: http://www.qca.org.uk
• United Kingdom Literacy Association/Qualifications and 
  Assessment Authority (2005) More than Words 2: Creating stories 
  on page and screen. London: QCA.  This can be accessed on: 
  http://www.qca.org.uk

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:4/16/2014
language:English
pages:26