Math Professional Development - wbrcmathpd - home

Document Sample
Math Professional Development - wbrcmathpd - home Powered By Docstoc
					Vocabulary

June 14, 2012
                 Vocabulary
9:45-11:30 Session 2

  § Vocabulary – A Common List

  § Vocabulary Strategies

  § Activities and Assessment
             A Common List
Common Core Math Vocabulary

Information and word lists combined Utah and 
Tennessee lists

• Tennessee list – Marzano’s research
• Utah list – Common Core State Standards
  Where can you find these lists?
Teachershare
     Math Vocabulary
           What is included?
vThe Academic Word Lists from Tennessee

vThe Word Wall Cards with Definitions and 
 Graphics from Utah (Grades K - 7)



vResearch, Teaching Ideas, and Activities
    Materials Currently Available for
      Young 5s through 4th grade
• The Word Wall Cards from Utah
• Integrated lists in Word Documents organized by 
  Common Core headings and grade levels
• Vocabulary Cards
  – 1st through 4th grade cards can be self-correcting
• Quizzes
  – Given a word bank, fill in the blank.
     •   1st grade (19 quizzes)
     •   2nd grade (19 quizzes)
     •   3rd grade (12 quizzes)
     •   4th grade (20 quizzes)
                    Extras
• SMART Notebook Activities that include all of 
  the math vocabulary words for the year for 
  grades 2 and 3.
  ØAsk me about “A Minute or a Miss”.

• SMART Notebook Page – Name Parts of an 
  Equation (grade 3)

• Gamemaker Games for K and 3 from Seth
      Works in Progress (if you see the 
                   need)
•   Complete the SMART Notebook Activities for K, 1, and 4
•   Complete the Gamemaker Games for 1, 2, and 4
•   Student Exemplars for Writing and Illustrating
•   Activity pages that can be used for practice and assessment in 
    other formats such as…
     Ø   multiple-choice
     Ø   matching
     Ø   labeling
     Ø   writing / illustrating with scoring rubrics
• Vocabulary Games
     Ø Blurt
     Ø Vocab on an Easel
     Ø Pictionary
           Go to Teachershare
• Show examples of the materials that are 
  currently available.



• Discuss priorities for additional resources.
The following ideas are from:
 Vocabulary Instruction for
Academic Success



by Hallie Kay Yopp, Ruth Helen Yopp, and Ashley 
Bishop
   Strategies for Teaching Words
Vocabulary instruction should involve:

• Learning words in rich contexts
• Repeated exposure and multiple opportunities to 
  use new words
• Exploring relationships among words
• Active engagement with words on the part of the 
  students
• A variety of practices
      (from the National Reading Panel (NICHD 2000))
        Strategies for Creating Word 
               Consciousness
1.   Word Walls
2.   Words of the Week
3.   Word Jars
4.   Word Journals
5.   Preview-Predict-Confirm
6.   Ten Important Words
7.   Word Charts
8.   Games
             Introducing Words
1.   Friendly Explanations (Pg. 124)
2.   Semantic Maps (Pg. 126)
3.   Frayer Model (Pg. 128)
4.   Concept of Definition Map (Pg. 131)
5.   Verbal and Visual Word Association (Pg. 134)
6.   Word Maps (Pg. 135)
7.   Semantic Feature Analysis (Pg. 136)
8.   Nonlinguistic Representations (Pg. 138)
9.   Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy (Pg. 138)
      Reinforcing and Extending 
       Understanding of Words
•  
              Using Words
1. Oral Presentations
2. Bookmaking and Other Written 
   Presentations
                 Word Walls
• Teachers identify words that serve particular 
  instructional purposes, record them on strips of 
  cardstock, and post them on a bulletin board in 
  alphabetical order.

• Teachers draw students’ attention to the words 
  by talking about them and inviting students to 
  use them in their written work.

* Variation: Phrase Wall – record powerful phrases 
            along with the source (Pg. 91)
               Words of the Week
• Select one or two words each week.

• “With enthusiasm and fanfare, the words are 
  introduced and explained at the beginning of the week, 
  and then teachers and students challenge one another 
  to use the words throughout the week – on the 
  playground, in the lunchroom, in the classroom, and in 
  their homes.” (Pg 92)

*Consider implementing a school wide Good Word! card system. 
Cards can be turned in for rewards such as line leader, chalkboard 
eraser…
                      Word Jars
Inspired by the book Donavan’s Word Jar by Monalisa 
DeGross (1998), this strategy involves depositing interesting 
words into a word jar.

• Students must find out what a word means before they can 
  put it in the jar.

• Periodically, the students dump the words from the jar and 
  talk about them. How do they sound? What do they mean? 
  Where did we hear them?

• They might use them in sentences, sort them, add them to 
  a word wall, or to their personal dictionaries.  (Pg. 93) 
              Word Journals
• Students record words in a daily word journal 
  and share why it is important.

• Writing should convey the students’ 
  understanding of the word and as well as 
  their efforts to make personal connections to 
  the word.
         Preview-Predict-Confirm
• The teacher shows the illustrations in a text – usually an 
  informational text – and asks the students to anticipate the 
  words the author may have used.

• Students share their predicted words along with their 
  reasons for selecting those words.

• Students are organized into groups of 3 or 4 and are given 
  20 to 40 small cards per group.

• Students record words related to the topic on the cards 
  and then organize the cards by category adding category 
  headings and possibly additional word cards. (continued)
Preview-Predict-Confirm continued
• The teacher asks the students to select three 
  words for discussion with the class:
  1. A word they think every group has
  2. A word they think no other group has
  3. A word that interests them
• The group records these words on 3 large cards.
• The words are displayed and the teacher leads a 
  discussion of the word choices, meanings, 
  relation to the topic, and why they were selected. 
  (Pg. 95-97)
                Ten Important Words
•   After introducing a text, the teacher asks the students to independently 
    read it and identify 10 important words.

•   Important words are ones that the students believe are key to 
    understanding the information shared by the author.

•   The students record their words on separate sticking notes.

•   The class makes a bar graph.

•   The teacher leads a discussion about the words, their selection, their 
    meanings, why they are important… 

•   The students independently write a single sentence summary of the 
    reading selection and share it with a partner or small group.

•   Variations: Revise initial selection of 10 important words.(Pg. 98-99)
              Word Charts


Words, meanings, and related symbols are 
recorded on a chart. 
                    Games
Educational Games that focus on words:
• Upwords, Balderdash, Boggle, Password, Scrabble, 
  Scattergories, Pictionary, Cranium, Syzygy

Games that can easily be adapted for math 
vocabulary:
• Jeopardy, Are You Smarter than a 5th Grader, 
  Tribond, Blurt, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, 
  Pictionary
          Friendly Explanations
• Student-friendly explanations use familiar 
  terminology to explain the meanings of words, as 
  well as how the word might be used and by 
  whom.

• Using everyday language, teachers share the 
  meanings and contextual information, including, 
  if appropriate, nuances or connotations that 
  make it clear how a word might be used.
                                Semantic Maps
   Semantic Maps are graphic organizers that 
   display the knowledge associated with a 
   concept.                                 put together 
                              combine                              equal groups

             Addition                                 Multiplication

  put together
                                        Computation


             Subtraction                                   Division

give away
                                                          separate equal 
                 take apart
                                                          groups
               Frayer Model
The Frayer Model offers a structure for 
providing friendly definitions of a word along 
with related characteristics, examples, and non-
examples.
      Concept of Definition Map
Students are taught the category to which a 
word belongs, characteristics of the word, and 
examples.
        Verbal and Visual Word 
             Association
This strategy requires students to think about a 
word in several ways and to record their 
thinking in boxes.



        target word           picture




        definition       personal connection
                 Word Maps
Students are asked to copy the “map” and 
complete it for various words.

•   Name the word.
•   Define it.
•   Provide an example sentence.
•   Tell what it is like.
      Semantic Feature Analysis
This strategy is used to show how words differ.
   Nonlinguistic Representations
• Information is stored in memory in linguistic 
  and nonlinguistic forms.

• When introducing vocabulary words some 
  nonlinguistic forms to consider are act it out, 
  draw, paint, sculpt, and pantomime.
Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy
• Students collect words that they deem 
  important and share them with the class.

• Words are selected from these collections to 
  study as a class.

• This strategy promotes student engagement 
  and can be motivating.
                 Word Sorts
Words sorts require students to sort words into 
meaningful groups.

• Open sorts are sorts in which the students 
  sort according to categories that are 
  meaningful to them.

• In closed sorts the structure is provided for 
  the students.
                 Content Links or Word Links
•   The teacher prepares a list of words related to a unit of study. The words 
    are written on separate cards and distributed one to each student.

•   Students circulate through the room to find a student with whom to link. 
    Discussing connections is encouraged.

•   The goal is to find a partner whose word is related to his or her own word 
    in some way.

•   After pairs are formed, students share the meanings of their words and 
    tell how they are related.

•   Students then break their links and find a new partner.

•   Variations: Link larger groups, find hierarchical groupings
                  Carousels

• Carousels are an effective way to provide and 
  reinforce definitional and contextual information.

• Carousels require the students to rotate around 
  the classroom – like a carousel – moving from 
  one posted vocabulary chart to another and 
  completing a task at each chart.

• Provide a short amount of time at each chart and 
  a signal to move to the next chart.
Carousels – Same Word, Different Task
• All students consider the same word and the 
  task at each chart is different.

• Chart task might include: definition, sentence, 
  synonyms, antonyms, picture, context, 
  graphic organizer
   Carousels – Different Words, Same 
                  Task
• A different word is posted on each chart.

• Each group draws a task card from a deck (i.e. 
  definition, sentence, picture, synonyms, antonyms, 
  connections, graphic organizer, examples…)

• Each group completes the same task from the card 
  that they drew for each of the different words on the 
  charts.

• Share the charts to conclude the activity.
Carousels – Different Words, Different 
                 Tasks
• Each chart has a different word that has been studied.

• At their first chart, every group writes a definition of 
  their word.

• At the second chart, every group reads the word and 
  the definition and then writes a sentence.

• At the next chart they might read the previous groups’ 
  work and write some synonyms.
       Carousel - Frayer Model
• Students complete the Frayer Model as they 
  do a carousel rotation
                  Linear Arrays
• Linear arrays, also known as semantic gradients, are 
  useful when students are learning adjectives and 
  adverbs for which there are scalar antonyms.

• Scalar antonyms are words that represent a range of 
  meanings including a neutral term such as hot, warm, 
  tepid, cool, and cold.

• Randomly distribute cards with the five scalar 
  antonyms. Have the students with the cards go to the 
  front of the room and have the class help arrange 
  them in order from one extreme to the other.
        Linear Arrays – in math
Greatest to Least / Least to Greatest
  Øwhole numbers
  Øfractions, decimals, percents
  Øunits of linear measurement
  Øunits of volume
  Øtemperatures
  Øpolygons by number of sides
         Ten Important Words Plus
 Using words from the 10 Important Word Activity, the 
 class continues with other selected tasks.
Task cards might include:
• Write other forms of the word   • Draw a picture
• Generate sentences,             • Act out the word
                                  • Share a real-life 
• List antonyms or synonyms
                                    connection
• Identify where you might        • Return to the text and 
   expect to hear this word
                                    find sentences with the 
• Find a dictionary definition      word
• Find multiple meanings          • Explain the meaning in 
                                    the sentences you find
           Oral Presentations
• Ask students prepare and deliver 
  presentations on a topic.

• Provide target words if necessary.

• Consider requiring visuals.
      Bookmaking and Other Written 
             Presentations
• Constructing books help students summarize or expand their 
  learning.
   Ø Types of books to consider: Alphabet books, How to books, Accordian 
     books, All about (topic)
• Writing Roulette is a strategy in which a teacher identifies 
  four or five words that students must use in a piece of writing. 
  Students in small groups begin writing, with the task of using 
  at least one of the target words in the first few sentences. The 
  teacher calls time and the students pass their papers to the 
  right and add to the writing on the paper received. The last 
  writer in each group reviews to make sure each target word 
  was used. Share.
• Consider Poetry

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:4/16/2014
language:Unknown
pages:46