Docstoc

Lecture 1_ Introduction to Thermodynamics

Document Sample
Lecture 1_ Introduction to Thermodynamics Powered By Docstoc
					               1st Law:  Conservation of Energy
Energy is conserved. Hence we can make an energy
balance for a system: Sum of the inflows – sum of the
outflows is equal to the energy change of the system




NOTE: sign of flow is positive when into the
system
UNITS:  Joules, calories, electron volts 
…
                     Types of Work
Electrical

      dW =  – f dq

Magnetic



Surface

    dW =  – s dA
Summary so far
                   Variables and Parameters
     System is only described by its macroscopic variables

Variables:  Temperature + one variable for every work term 
that exchanges energy with the system + one variable for 
every independent component that can leave or enter the 
system.
Parameters:  Quantities that are necessary to describe the 
system but which do not change as the system undergoes 
changes. e.g.  for a closed system:  ni are parameters
                 for a system at constant volume:  V is 
          parameter
Equations of State (Constitutive Relations):  equation 
between the variables of the system.  One for each work term 
or matter flow
          Example of Equations of State

pV = nRT:  for ideal gas
s= E e: for uniaxial elastic deformation
M = c H:  paramagnetic material
              Properties and State Functions

 U = U(variables)    e.g. U(T,p) for simple system

Heat 
capacity



Volumetric 
thermal 
expansion

Compressibility
    Some Properties Specific to ideal gasses

                            ONLY for IDEAL GASSES
  1) PV = nRT
  2)  cp - cv = R

   3)

Proof that for ideal gas, internal energy only 
depends on temperature 
                   The Enthalpy (H)

H = U + PV
   Gives the heat flow for any change of a simple 
   system that occurs under constant pressure



Example:  chemical reaction
Example:  Raising temperature under 
        constant pressure
                  Enthalpy of Materials
      is always relative

Elements:  set to zero in their stable state at 298K and 1 atm 
pressure




Compounds:  tabulated.  Are obtained experimentally by 
measuring the heat of formation of the compounds from the 
elements under constant pressure.
                   The Enthalpy (H)

H = U + PV
   Gives the heat flow for any change of a simple 
   system that occurs under constant pressure



Example:  chemical reaction
Example:  Raising temperature under 
        constant pressure
                  Enthalpy of Materials
      is always relative

Elements:  set to zero in their stable state at 298K and 1 atm 
pressure




Compounds:  tabulated.  Are obtained experimentally by 
measuring the heat of formation of the compounds from the 
elements under constant pressure.
            Entropy and the Second Law
There exists a Property of systems, called the Entropy 
(S), for which holds:



 How does this solve our problem ?
The Second Law leads to Evolution Laws


 Isolated 
 system
     Evolution Law for constant Temperature and 
                      Pressure




                            dG ≤ 0

G (Gibbs free energy is the relevant potential to determine 
stability of a material under constant pressure and 
temperature
                         Interpretation
  For purely mechanical systems:  Evolution towards minimal 
  energy.
  Why is this not the case for materials ?
        Materials at constant pressure and temperature can  
              exchange energy with the environment.
 G is the most important quantity in Materials Science


determines structure, phase 
transformation between them, 
morphology, mixing, etc.
         Phase Diagrams:  One component
Describes stable phase (the one with lowest Gibbs free 
energy) as function of temperature and pressure.
Water
                                  Carbon
Temperature Dependence of the Entropy
Temperature Dependence of the Entropy
                   What is a solution ?


SYSTEM with multiple chemical components that is mixed 
homogeneously at the atomic scale



   •Liquid solutions
   •Vapor solutions
   •Solid Solutions
               Composition Variables



MOLE FRACTION:  


ATOMIC PERCENT:


CONCENTRATION:


WEIGHT FRACTION:
               Variables to describe Solutions



G=G(T,p,n1,n2, …, nN)

                                      Partial Molar Quantity



       Partial Molar Quantity

chemical 
potential
Partial molar quantities give the contribution of a component to a property of the solution
                Properties of Mixing

Change in reaction:
XA A + XB B  ->  (XA, XB )
        Cu-Pd
Ni-Pt
Intercept rule with quantity of mixing
                  General Equilibrium Condition in Solutions



Chemical potential for a component has to be the same in all phases


                                                    For all components 
                                                    i

                                               OPEN SYSTEM


                                       Components have to have the 
                                       same chemical potential in system 
                                       as in environment
                                       e.g. vapor pressure
Example:  Solubility of Solid in Liquid
                     Summary so far



1)  Composition variables
2) Partial Molar Quantities
3) Quantities for mixing reaction
4) Relation between 2) and 3):  Intercept rule
5)  Equilibrium between Solution Phases
 Standard State:  Formalism for Chemical Potentials in Solutions




chemical potential of i in             effect of concentration
solution



             chemical potential of i in a standard state



Choice of standard state is arbitrary, but often it is taken as 
pure state in same phase.
Choice affects value of ai
                Models for Solution: Ideal Solution

An ideal solution is one in which all components behave Raoultian
Summary Ideal Solutions
Solutions: Homogeneous at the atomic level




                     Ordered solutions
Random solutions
                         Summary so far



1)  Composition variables
2) Partial Molar Quantities
3) Quantities for mixing reaction
4) Relation between 2) and 3):  Intercept rule
5)  Equilibrium between components in Solution Phases



  For practical applications it is important to know relation 
  between chemical potentials and composition
Obtaining activity information: Experimental
e.g. vapor pressure 
measurement
   vapor pressure pi*    vapor pressure pi



                        Mixture with 
  Pure 
                        component i in 
  substance i
                        it
        Obtaining activity information:  Simple 
                        Models

Raoultian 
behavior




Henry’s behavior



Usually Raoultian holds for solvent, Henry’s for solute at small enough 
concentrations.
Intercept rule
          General Equilibrium Condition in Solutions


Chemical potential for a component has to be the same in all phases


                                               For all components 
                                               i

                                           OPEN SYSTEM


                                    Components have to have the 
                                    same chemical potential in system 
                                    as in environment
                                    e.g. vapor pressure
Raoultian case and Real case
                               Review
• At constant T and P, a closed system strives to minimize its Gibbs free
  energy:  G = H ­ TS

• Mixing quantities are defined as the difference between the quantity of the
  mixture and that of the constituents.  All graphical constructions derived for 
  the quantity of a mixture can be used for a mixing quantity with appropriate 
  adjustment of standard (reference) states.
                   Review (continued)

   Some simple models for solutions can be me made:  Ideal 
   solution, regular solution.
   Many real solution are much more complex than these !



Regular Solution
                    The Chord Rule
What is the free energy of an inhomogeneous systems
( a system that contains multiple distinct phases) ?




CHORD RULE:  The molar free energy of a two-phase 
system as function of composition of the total system, is 
given by the chord connecting the molar free energy 
points of the two constituent phases
                 The Chord Rule graphically

With pure components                     Components are solutions



    A             B                          X Ba           X Bb

        overall composition is XB*             overall composition is XB*


G                                    G




0                                1   0                                 1
         X B*                                   X B*
                   XB                                    XB
            Regular Solution Model



w < 0             XB
        0                        1
             Regular Solution Model



w  > 0
         0          XB            1
    Effect of concave portions of G

0            X B*               1
    Single-Phase and Two-phase regions

0              X Ba   X B*        X Bb             1




     Single-                             Single-
                      Two-phase
     phase                               phase
               Two-phase coexistence

qWhen DGmix has concave parts (i.e. when the second 
derivative is negative) the coexistence of two solid 
solutions with different compositions will have lower 
energy.


qThe composition of the coexisting phases is given by 
the Common Tangent construction


qThe chemical potential for a species is identical in both 
phases when they coexist.
    Common tangent does not need to be 
               horizontal
0              X B*              1
        Temperature Dependence of Two-phase 
                       region
       DHmix                     DHmix               DHmix


         XB                        XB                  XB
0                     1   0               1   0                      1




    Low temperature       Intermediate            High temperature
                          temperature
Phase Diagram of Regular Solution Model 
              with w > 0

  T




      0         XB            1
Example:  Cr-W
Miscibility gap does not have to be symmetric
Lens-Type Diagram 
         Free energy curves for liquid and solid
        T > TBM > TAM                      TBM > T > TAM
G                                  G




    0                     1            0                       1
             XB                                XB
                  G




                                               TBM > TAM > T
                      0                    1
                              XB
  How much of each phase ?  - The Lever Rule

Since the composition of each phase is fixed by the common 
tangent, the fraction of each phase can be determined from 
requiring that the system has the given overall composition


                      ->  solve for fa and fb




The result is known as the Lever Rule
           Lever Rule

f a


      xa                xb
               x*




f b

      xa                xb
               x*
         In a two-phase region chemical potential is 
                          constant
     0           XB        1

G




     0           XB        1
mB
     Comparison between Eutectic and Peritectic

           Eutecti                  Peritecti
           c                        c
             L
 a                     b    a                      L

                                       b



Cooling:  L -> a + b        Heating: b  -> L + a
                                   Nucleation
                                         




(1) The structure of the liquid
 
Many small closed packed solid clusters are present in the liquid. These clusters 
would  form  and  disperse  very  quickly.  The  number  of  spherical  clusters  of 
radius r is given by
 


                                          
nr :  average number of spherical clusters with radius r.
n0: total number of atoms in the system.
DGr: excess free energy associated with the cluster.
 
(2) The driving force for nucleation
 
The free energies of the liquid and solid at a temperature T are given by
 
GL = HL­ TSL ­ and GS = HS­ TSS
 
GL and GS are the free energies of the liquid and solid respectively.
HL and HS are the enthalpy of the liquid and solid respectively.
SL and SS are the entropy of the liquid and solid respectively.
 
At temperature T, we have
 DGV = GL­ GS = HL­HS­T(SL­SS)  =DH­TDS,
 DGV: volume free energy. 
where DH and DS are approximately 
independent of temperature.
        For a spherical solid of radius r,
         


For a given DT, the solid reach a critical radio r*, when



  We get                         and




  If                          then,



                        and


When r < r*, the solid is not stable, and 
when r > r*, the solid is  stable.
The effect of temperature on the size of critical nucleation and the actual shape of a nucleus.  
(4) Heterogeneous nucleation
 
If a solid cap is formed on a mould,  the interfacial tensions balance in the plane of the mould 
wall,                                                                            or
                                                                              
gSL, gSM and gML: the surface tensions of the solid/liquid, solid/mould and mould/liquid interfaces 
respectively.
The excess free energy for formation of a 
solid spherical cap on a mould is
 
DGhet = ­VSDGV + ASLgSL + ASMgSM ­ ASMgML
 
Where VS: the volume of the spherical cap.
ASL and ASM: the areas of the solid/liquid and 
solid/mould interfaces.
 
It can be easily shown that, 
 
 
where 
(c) Nucleation rate and nucleation time as a function of temperature

  The overall nucleation rate, I, is influenced both by the rate 
  of cluster formation and by the rate of atom transport to the 
  nucleus, which are both influenced in term by temperature. 
  TTT diagram gives time required for nucleation, which is 
  inversely proportional to the nucleation rate.
Actual examples of TTT
diagram
 Nucleation in Solid

Interface structure
Coherency loss
                                        Homogeneous Nucleation




    (a) Homogeneous nucleation
    The free energy change associated with the nucleation process will have the following three 
    contributions. 
    1 . At temperatures where the b phase is stable, the creation of a volume V of b will cause a 
    volume free energy reduction of VDGv.  
    2.  Assuming for the moment that the a/b interfacial energy is isotropic the creation of an 
    area A of interface will give a free energy increase of Ag. 
 
    3.  In general the transformed volume will not fit perfectly into the space originally 
    occupied by the matrix and this gives rise to a misfit strain energy DGv, per unit volume of 
    b. (It was shown in Chapter 3 that, for both coherent and incoherent inclusions, DGv, is 
    proportional to the volume of the inclusion.) Summing all of these gives the total free 
    energy change as 
If we assume the nucleus is spherical with a radius r, we 
have 


 Similarly we have
 Nucleation at Grain Boundary

The excess free energy associated with the embryo at a grain 
boundary will be given by
DG = ­VDGv + Aabgab ­ Aaagaa 
Where V is the volume of the embryo, Aab is the area of a/b interface of energy gab created, and 
Aaa the area of a/a grain boundary of energy gaa destroyed during the process. 
     Fick I


It would be reasonable to take the flux across a 
given plane o be proportional to the concentration 
gradient across the plane:




  J: the flux, [quantity/m2s]
  D: diffusion coefficient, [m2/s]

       Concentration gradient,  [quantity /m-4]

  Here, quantity can be atoms, moles, kg etc.
Fick II: 
Solution to Fick II
•    Thin Film (Point Source) Solution




assume boundaries at infinity
  Measurement of diffusion coeffiecient




                                                                 x




If c versus x is known experimentally, a plot of ln(c) versus 
x2 can then be used to determine D.
Error functions
The final solution should 
be:
                  When x=0, the 
                  composition is always 
                  kept at c=c’/2




erf(-z)=-erf(z)
                    Diffusion Mechanis

 Interstitial mechanism   Self Diffusion with Vacancy
                                                        These are 
                                                        the two 
                                                        most 
                                                        common 
                                                        mechanism
                                                        s


Ring Mechanism                     Interstitialcy
    A Random Jump 
    Process




 
 
Diffusion by Vacancy mechanism
Effeect of temperature on diffusion
Effect of defect on diffusion

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:4/16/2014
language:English
pages:85