Docstoc

INTRODUCTION TO PRAGMATICS - More from yimg.com

Document Sample
INTRODUCTION TO PRAGMATICS - More from yimg.com Powered By Docstoc
					        INTRODUCTION TO 
          PRAGMATICS
• the study of language use
• the study of linguistic phenomena from the
  point of view of their usage properties and
  processes (Verschueren, 1999).
• the study of meaning in interaction (Thomas,
  1995)
The linguistic phenomena to be studied from the
  point of view of their usage can be situated at
  any level of structure. The question pragmatics
  asks is: How are the language resources used?
BRANCHES OF LINGUISTICS
• Phonetics and phonology – unit of 
  analysis?
• Morphology – unit of analysis?
• Syntax – unit of analysis?
• Semantics explores the meaning of 
  linguistic units, typically at the level of 
  words (lexical semantics) or at the level of 
  sentences or more complex structures 
         PRAGMATICS AND 
            PHONETICS
•   The  level  of  speech  sounds:  Most  speakers  of 
  languages  with  a  significant  degree  of  dialectal 
  variation, who have grown up with a local dialect 
  but who were socialised into the use of a standard 
  variety through formal education, will find that the 
  language  they  use  sounds  quite  different 
  depending  on  whether  they  are  in  their 
  professional context or speaking to their parents or 
  siblings. 
        PRAGMAATICS AND 
          MORPHOLOGY
• The  level  of  morphemes  and  words:  there  are 
  pragmatic  restrictions  on  and  implications  of 
  aspects  of  derivational  morphology.  Consider  the 
  derivational  relationship  between grateful and
  ungrateful or kind  and unkind.  The  reason  why 
  this  relationship  is  not  reversed,  with  a  basic 
  lexeme  meaning “ungrateful”  from which a word 
  meaning “grateful” would be derived by means of 
  the  negative  prefix,  has  everything  to  do  with  a 
  system of social norms which emphasises the need 
  for gratefulness and kindness.
PRAGMATICS AND SYNTAX
• At  the  level  of  syntax:  the  same  state  of 
  affairs  can  be  described  by  means  of  very 
  different syntactic structures:
• John broke the figurine
• The figurine was broken by John
• The figurine was broken
• The figurine got broken.
         PRAGMATICS AND 
            SEMANTICS
• At the level of word meaning (lexical semantics), 
  more than what would be regarded as ‘dictionary 
  meaning’ has to be taken into account as soon as a 
  word gets used. Many words cannot be understood 
  unless aspects of world knowledge are invoked. 
• E.g. topless district – it requires knowledge about 
  city  areas  with  high  concentration  of 
  establishments  for  (predominantly  male) 
  entertainment  where  scantly  dressed  hostesses  or 
  performers are the main attraction.
‘MEANING’ IN PRAGMATICS
• ‘I promise to be back early’ 
  means  a  promise  on  condition  a  future 
  action  is  involved:    ‘I’ll  come  back  early’ 
  (SEE the Speech act theory)
‘MEANING’ IN PRAGMATICS
• Meaning  is  a  triadic  relation  “Speaker 
  means Y by X”. E.g:
A: Shall we see that film tonight?
B: I have a headache.
The speaker means NO by saying I HAVE A 
  HEADACHE.
‘MEANING’ IN PRAGMATICS
   pragmatics = utterance meaning. 
• Utterance meaning consists of the meaning of the 
  sentence  plus  considerations  of  the  intentions  of 
  the Speaker (the speaker may intend to refuse the 
  invitation  to  go  to  the  film),  interpretation  of  the 
  Hearer (the Hearer may interpret the utterance as a 
  refusal,  or  not),  determined  by  Context  and 
  background knowledge.
‘MEANING’ IN PRAGMATICS
• pragmatics = meaning in context
• ! Meaning  is  not  seen  as  a  stable.  Rather,  it  is 
  dynamically  generated  in  the  process  of  using 
  language.  Also,  pragmatics  as  the  study  of 
  ‘meaning in context’ does not imply that one can 
  automatically arrive at a pragmatic understanding 
  of the phenomena involved just by knowing all the 
  extralinguistic  information,  because  ‘context’  is 
  not a static element.
                 TASK 1
Jacob:  Do  you  know  the  way  back  to  the 
  dining hall? We can go in my car.
 
Mark: Oh, I thought you didn’t know the way 
  to the campus.
Jacob: I thought you didn’t know!
                 TASK 2
What might be the functions of the following 
   utterances?
1. It’s hot in here.
2. Can you pass me the salt?
3. I’ll talk to you tomorrow.
4. It’s a beautiful day today.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:4/14/2014
language:Unknown
pages:12