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									COMMUNITY COUNSELING

 STUDENT HANDBOOK




    School of Education & Human Services
              2807 N. Glebe Road
          Arlington, VA 22207-4299
                (703) 284-1620



              Revised March, 2006




                    Page 1
                        Community Counseling
                            Student Handbook
                     Marymount University
                   Master of Arts in Counseling
This handbook has been prepared to provide a summary of the things you may find valuable
to know during your work at Marymount. Please note that the official rules and regulations
of the University, as well as degree requirements, are found in the Marymount University
catalog. You should read the catalog, as it provides this information in complete detail. In
the case of any discrepancy between information in this handbook or any other publications
and the catalog, information in the catalog takes precedence.

The University also reserves the right to expand and/or delete program requirements when
needed. Changes often take place to meet the requirements of the Council for the
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP) and the Board of
Professional Counselors of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The department will make every
attempt to inform students of changes in the policy and procedures. However, students are
responsible for reviewing the Handbook annually for changes.




                                    Revised March 2006




                                          Page 2
                                                                 Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................................................................4
    ABOUT MARYMOUNT .................................................................................................................................................4
THE MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNITY COUNSELING PROGRAM .......................................................5
    HISTORY OF THE COMMUNITY COUNSELING PROGRAM ............................................................................................5
    MISSION ......................................................................................................................................................................5
    PROGRAM OBJECTIVES................................................................................................................................................5
    COUNSELING STUDENT PROFILE ................................................................................................................................6
    EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT SUCCESS .....................................................................................................................6
       Academic achievement..........................................................................................................................................6
       Personal growth and self-awareness....................................................................................................................6
       Ethical and professional behavior........................................................................................................................7
       Helping to ensure program quality.......................................................................................................................7
ACADEMIC TRAINING.............................................................................................................................................9
    THE CURRICULUM ......................................................................................................................................................9
      Counseling Curriculum ........................................................................................................................................9
      Research Requirement ........................................................................................................................................10
    CREATING A PROGRAM OF STUDY ............................................................................................................................10
      Course Load and Full-Time/Part-Time Status ...................................................................................................10
      Transfer Hours....................................................................................................................................................11
      Continuous Registration .....................................................................................................................................11
      Graduation..........................................................................................................................................................11
CLINICAL TRAINING .............................................................................................................................................12
    PRE-INTERNSHIP PRACTICUM ...................................................................................................................................12
      Pre-requisites for the practicum .........................................................................................................................12
      Practicum Components.......................................................................................................................................12
      Practicum Placement Process:...........................................................................................................................12
      The Practicum Seminar and Student Evaluation................................................................................................13
    THE CLINICAL INTERNSHIP .......................................................................................................................................13
      Internship Requirements.....................................................................................................................................14
      Internship Placement Process: ...........................................................................................................................14
PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.......................................................................................12
    PERSONAL GROWTH .................................................................................................................................................15
    PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS .................................................................................................................................15
ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND EVALUATION PROCESSES.........................................................................17
    ACADEMIC STANDARDS ...........................................................................................................................................17
      University Standards ..........................................................................................................................................17
    EVALUATION OF STUDENT PROGRESS ......................................................................................................................17
      Academic Evaluation ..........................................................................................................................................17
      Professional Development Evaluation ...............................................................................................................18
      Periodic Progress Review...................................................................................................................................18
      Grievance Procedures following Periodic Progress Reviews............................................................................19
      Practicum and Internship Evaluations ...............................................................................................................20
      Resolving Clinical Placement Problems ............................................................................................................20
      Serious Clinical Placement Problems ................................................................................................................20
      Appeal of Remediation or Dismissal ..................................................................................................................21



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LIFE AFTER MARYMOUNT ..................................................................................................................................22
    LICENSING AND CERTIFICATION ...............................................................................................................................22
    JOB SEARCH ..............................................................................................................................................................24
       Resources for Job Searches ................................................................................................................................24
    WHAT ABOUT DOCTORAL WORK? ...........................................................................................................................24
    OBTAINING REFERENCES ..........................................................................................................................................25
UNIVERSITY SERVICES.........................................................................................................................................26
    ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT ..........................................................................................................................................26
    PERSONAL COUNSELING SERVICES ..........................................................................................................................26
    STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS ..............................................................................................................................26
    CAREER COUNSELING SERVICES ...............................................................................................................................26
    LIBRARY SERVICES ...................................................................................................................................................27
    INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SERVICES ...........................................................................................................................27
    COUNSELING LAB .....................................................................................................................................................28
    EMAIL AND LISTSERV ...............................................................................................................................................28
    COMPUTER SUPPORT ................................................................................................................................................28
    COPYING SERVICES ..................................................................................................................................................29
    FINANCIAL AID .........................................................................................................................................................29
    HOUSING...................................................................................................................................................................29
    THE CONSORTIUM .....................................................................................................................................................29
APPENDIX A: CONTACT INFORMATION .........................................................................................................31
    FACULTY CONTACT INFORMATION ..........................................................................................................................31
    FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS .............................................................................................................................31
APPENDIX B: PERIODIC STUDENT REVIEW PROTOCOL...........................................................................32
APPENDIX C: ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF POLICIES AND PROCEDURE………………………………33




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                                            INTRODUCTION

W      elcome to Marymount University and to the Master of Arts in Community Counseling program.
       We look forward to getting to know you and to helping you achieve your academic and career
goals. While you are here you will have many opportunities to develop both personally and
professionally.

      We hope that you will take advantage of the opportunities Marymount provides. Sometimes busy
adults focus on outcomes i.e. getting that degree, and neglect the process of learning and developing.
Take the time to get to know your professors, your peers and yourself. Go hear some guest speakers and
find out about your professional organizations. Get involved! This degree isn’t just about checking off
requirements and getting a diploma at the end. It is so much more. Becoming a counselor is a life-
altering and life-enhancing process. It may be difficult, frustrating, exciting, fun and stressful (sometimes
all at the same time!) but it is almost never dull. Like counseling itself, the more of your energy and
focus you can give to your learning, the more you will end up receiving. We are here to challenge,
encourage and witness your personal and professional growth.

      This handbook has been written to help you attain your personal, professional and educational goals
at Marymount University. Please read this handbook carefully and refer back to it when you need
clarification. This handbook outlines degree requirements, what to do when problems arise, where to go
for help and more. We hope that this handbook is beneficial, and if there’s something you think is missing
or unclear you’ll let us know. Thanks for coming – we’re glad you’re here.


ABOUT MARYMOUNT

         Marymount University is an independent university with an approximate enrollment of 2,300
    undergraduates and 1,600 graduate students. It was founded as a women’s college in 1950 at the
    suggestion of Bishop Peter L. Ireton of Richmond and with the energetic effort of Mother Gerard Phelan.
    Thirteen freshmen entered the first year, and nine of them comprised the first graduating class in 1952.
    In 1960, the institution was incorporated as Marymount College of Virginia.

          Until 1972, Marymount offered only the associate’s degree. In 1973, it became a senior college
    offering the bachelor’s degree in more than 20 fields. In 1979, graduate programs leading to the
    master’s degree were added. The first male students were admitted to graduate study in 1972. In 1986
    the institution responded to its changing student profile by becoming coeducational at all levels and
    changing its name to Marymount University.

         Today Marymount offers classes on the main campus, at Ballston and at the Loudoun Center, as
    well as in many off-campus sites. Marymount University is a member of The Consortium of
    Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Other members include American University,
    Catholic University, Gallaudet University, George Mason University, George Washington University,
    Howard University, Mount Vernon College, Trinity College, the University of the District of Columbia,
    and the University of Maryland at College Park. Eligible students from Marymount may take approved
    courses and use library facilities at member institutions. Marymount is accredited by the Southern
    Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).



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    THE MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNITY COUNSELING PROGRAM

HISTORY OF THE COMMUNITY COUNSELING PROGRAM

        The Master of Arts in Psychological Services program was started in 1987. From an initial
enrollment of approximately 25 students, it has grown to over 150 students, and another track (School
Counseling) has emerged from it. In 1998, the program was expanded to 48 hours and renamed the
Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology. In 2003, the program was granted full accreditation by the
Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Activities (CACREP) and renamed the Master of
Arts in Community Counseling. In 2002, a dual Master of Arts track in Community Counseling and
Forensic Psychology was added, as well as new degree programs in Pastoral Counseling.

       The program is located in the Department of Counseling, part of the School of Education and
Human Services (SEHS), which also offers programs through the Departments of Education and
Sociology/Criminal Justice. There are fifteen full-time faculty members in the Psychology Department,
and approximately 20 adjunct professors drawn from local practitioners.


MISSION

         The mission of the Community Counseling program is to prepare graduates to function as
effective counselors in a wide variety of settings. Performing successfully as a counselor requires
graduates to integrate theoretical and research-based knowledge with therapeutic skills and personal
characteristics to form an ethical, professional and caring counselor or school counselor. By providing
students with the knowledge and skills recognized as important for counselors by the Council for the
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP) and the Board of Professional Counselors
of the Commonwealth of Virginia, the program seeks to prepare graduates for success in the clinical,
consultative and administrative tasks they will encounter in the community.


PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

    The following program objectives have been developed from the overall mission statement. These
objectives are the basis upon which the program is evaluated.

    Upon graduation, the successful student will be able to:

 Display a command of the knowledge base required for professional counselors: normal and
  abnormal individual psychology; tests and measurement, research methods and designs, human
  growth and development; career development; counseling theory; diagnosis and treatment. Students
  must display the ability to apply these skills within a multicultural environment.

 Conduct an effective individual counseling session and effectively co-lead a counseling group.

 Apply ACA ethical principles and professional standards within the counseling field.

 Conduct a literature search using computerized methods, and organize and integrate findings into a
  well-written paper using APA style.

 Demonstrate the ability to accept supervision, collaborate with others, and communicate effectively


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    with peers, professors, clients, and supervisors.

 Gain an understanding of the current trends in the job market, self-marketing strategies, and
  networking strategies through the practicum and internship seminar.

 Demonstrate cultural awareness and the ability to function effectively in a multicultural environment


COMMUNITY COUNSELING STUDENT PROFILE

         Marymount students have varied backgrounds and experiences. Some have an undergraduate
background in psychology and wish to develop their expertise in counseling. Other students with
different undergraduate majors and job experiences are interested in making the transition to a counseling
career. A number of our students are already working in counseling settings and enroll in the program to
increase their knowledge and skills and to enhance their opportunities for promotion. What they all share
is an interest in providing counseling services to people in need.

        Three types of students take courses in the program:

 Degree-seeking students: students who have been admitted into the graduate program in Community
  Counseling or School Counseling.
 Non-degree students: students who wish to take a few courses at Marymount but who have not
  determined to seek a degree. These students are limited to 12 credits and one semester and may not
  take PS 522, PS 523, PS 597 or PS 599.
 Certificate students: students who have a master’s degree from a program in counseling or a closely
  related field, and who are taking additional course work for certification, licensing, or professional
  development.


EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT SUCCESS

     At this point, you may be wondering what will be expected of you now that you’re here. The faculty
has three fundamental expectations for you. We expect you to maintain ongoing commitments to
academic achievement, to personal growth and self-awareness, and to ethical and professional behavior.
These qualities are not only necessary for your success as a student in this program; they are also vital for
your success as a counselor.

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
        The depth and breadth of the curriculum reflect the high expectations we have for academic
achievement. Of course, we expect that you fulfill all course requirements, but we also encourage you to
extend yourself, to challenge yourself by pursuing knowledge and skills beyond the minimal course
requirements. In fact, we emphasize that a commitment to learning should continue long after you have
earned your diploma. Life-long learning is essential for keeping abreast of new developments in the field
and for refining your counseling skills.

PERSONAL GROWTH AND SELF-AWARENESS
         Throughout your career at Marymount, from your admissions interview to the graduation
ceremony, you will have many opportunities for personal growth and greater self-awareness. It is up to
you to take advantage of these opportunities. For example, you will be receiving feedback from your
instructors, supervisors, advisor, fellow students, and clients. In every instance, you have the chance to be
open to their observations, reactions and suggestions. Counselors in training are like parachutes--they


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work best when they're open.

        You will find that the most important discoveries you make here--the greatest learning
experiences you have--take place when you are truly open to look at yourself. The many videotapes you
will watch, the extensive feedback you will hear, and the countless occasions of introspection you will
experience can help you tremendously in knowing your most important tool as a counselor - yourself.

ETHICAL AND PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOR
         Counseling is based on more than knowledge, skills and self-awareness. it is also based on values.
These values include honesty, integrity and respect for the rights of others. In your courses, you will be
expected to display the highest standards of academic integrity, including appropriately using the works
of others, ensuring that work done for each course is independent and does not repeat work done for other
courses, and honoring the Marymount Honor Code. Whenever you are unsure about what conduct is
authorized or unauthorized in a course, you are strongly urged to ask your instructor to amplify. You will
also learn the NBCC and ACA Ethical Standards for counselors and will be expected to follow them in all
situations. Failure to adhere to the highest ethical and professional standards will result in significant
sanctions, which may include having a clinical placement terminated, failing a course, or being dismissed
from the program.

HELPING TO ENSURE PROGRAM QUALITY
          The Department of Counseling engages in on-going assessment and improvement of the
Community Counseling program. We want to ensure that your courses are of the highest quality and that
the curriculum is meeting program goals and objectives.
          In addition to our own internal discussions, members of the full-time Counseling faculty believe
that it is vital to have many sources of feedback on the program and information on the needs of our
graduates. Thus, we survey the adjunct faculty and internship site supervisors on a regular basis, and have
formed an Advisory Council made up of members of the community who work in or with social service
agencies. We gain valuable data from all these sources.

         One of our most important sources of feedback on how we’re doing is from our students. As a
result, we have developed several procedures to get your feedback and suggestions regularly. These
include

               Student evaluations: These confidential end-of-course evaluations are processed and
                returned to the professor after the course ends. They are reviewed by the Dean and the
                Counseling chairperson. These evaluations play a large role in evaluating faculty
                teaching effectiveness. We strongly encourage you to complete them in a thoughtful and
                honest way.

               Internship focus group or survey: During the second semester of your internship, you will
                be asked to participate in a focus group and/or to complete a survey. We will ask you
                questions about what we’re doing well, what we could do better, and how well you feel
                our program is meeting its stated goals.

               Internship and Practicum evaluation: All interns will complete a form evaluating the
                quality of their practicum and internship experiences.

               Alumni Survey: About a year after you graduate, we will contact you, asking you about
                what parts of the program you have found most valuable in your career so far, and what
                additional educational experiences you would recommend. We also include a brief



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    employer survey, which we ask you to give to your employer. This is not an evaluation
    of you, but is a way to assess your employer’s opinion of the training you have received
    from us. The alumni and employer surveys are particularly important to us, since they
    reflect your “real world” experiences, so we hope you will make the effort to return them
    to us.

   Student Advisory Board: The Counseling Chairperson convenes an advisory board of
    current graduate students to identify issues of concern, and areas for program
    enhancement.




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                                     ACADEMIC TRAINING

THE CURRICULUM

        The Community Counseling program curriculum has been designed to meet the goals and
objectives of the program, while allowing you the maximum amount of flexibility to meet your individual
educational objectives.

        Graduation requirements are detailed in the University Catalog. Students are subject to the
requirements of the Catalog for the semester when they first matriculated into the program as a degree-
seeking student.

COMMUNITY COUNSELING CURRICULUM
     A total of 48 graduate credits are required for graduation.

        Core Course Requirements:
              PS 500 Research and Evaluation
              PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology
              PS 502 Foundations of Community Counseling
              PS 503 Advanced Developmental Psychology
              PS 510 Survey of Testing and Assessment
              PS 517 Neuropsychological Issues, Treatments and Assessments
              PS 520 Theories of Counseling
              PS 522 Counseling for Individuals
              PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques
              PS 530 Career Development Counseling
              PS 536 Advanced Counseling: Theories & Techniques
              PS 551 Psychology of Cultural Differences
              PS 597 Practicum
              PS 599 Internship (6 credits)

        One elective chosen depending on student goals and interests.
                       Electives may be selected from the graduate Counseling offerings or MGT 520
               (Applied Organizational Behavior). Counseling courses numbered above 600 require
               permission of the instructor or a Master’s degree. If you are seeking licensure, it is
               recommended to take PS 509 after PS 524, since these are required for the LPC in VA,
               MD, and the District of Columbia. Consult with your advisor to determine what is best
               for your particular situation and your future professional goals.

        Prerequisites
                       PS 501, 502, and 520 must be taken either prior to enrolling in PS 522, or
                  concurrently with it. PS 522 (Individual Counseling) should be taken prior to or
                  concurrently with PS 523 (Group Counseling). This sequence must be completed
                  prior to PS 597 (Practicum) with the exception of PS 523, which may be taken
                  concurrently with the practicum. Starting Fall 2006, PS551 is a pre-requisite to
                  PS597.

                       Prior to starting the internship, students must have completed the following
                  requirements: PS 501, PS 502, PS 520, PS 522, PS 523, PS551, PS 597 and 30 of the



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                   48 hours of the curriculum. PS 522, PS 523, PS 597 must be completed with a grade of
                   B or better. PS 536 is designed to be taken while the student is completing their
                   internship, since it focuses on advanced counseling techniques.

RESEARCH REQUIREMENT
        In addition to the academic coursework required above, all students are required to obtain
practical research experience. Students satisfy this requirement by submitting documentation of at least
20 hours of research assistance while they are enrolled as degree-seeking students. Faculty members post
descriptions of their research assistance needs on the Department Of Counseling website. Students
should contact faculty with whom they wish to work and arrange a mutually agreeable plan of work.
Upon satisfactory completion of work hours, the faculty member will sign off on a research report form
and place it in the student’s folder. Students may choose to work with one or more faculty members, and
may also work on projects at their practicum or internship sites with permission of the Counseling faculty.


CREATING A PROGRAM OF STUDY

         Once you have been admitted to the program, you will receive information regarding new student
orientation, and you will be able to register for your first semester. At the mandatory orientation meeting,
you will learn about the program, meet other new students and the faculty. Sometime during your first
semester, you and your faculty advisor must arrange an individual meeting to plan your program of study.
We attempt to offer courses at times which are convenient for both our day and evening students, and we
pride ourselves on being as flexible as we can be without compromising the quality of the program. We
also make every effort to offer classes in sequence. However, we cannot offer each course every semester,
particularly at the Loudoun campus. As a result, you will want to plan your program of study carefully.

         Attendance at the mandatory Orientation is required by the completion of 18 credit hours. You
will not be permitted to register past 18 credits if you have not attended an orientation. Orientations are
held, at a minimum two times per year. Your plan of study, licensure information, program and review of
Student Handbook will be completed during the orientation.

        You should also examine the internship timeline carefully. You will need to start looking for your
internship well ahead of time; at least one full semester before you anticipate being ready to begin your
internship. We encourage you to speak with the Coordinator of Clinical Experiences early in the process.

          If you have special needs or concerns, or just aren’t sure when to take a particular course, talk to
your advisor. You are not required to see your advisor prior to registration, however most students find
that meeting with their advisor on a regular basis can help them avoid mistakes and maximize their
experience while here at Marymount. In addition to planning a program of study, your advisor can help
you clarify your professional goals, and give you guidance on what academic and professional learning
experiences will best help you reach them.

        Your official graduation requirements are the ones listed in the catalog for the semester for which
you are admitted as a degree-seeking student. In the case of any conflict between what is in that catalog
and what is in this handbook or webpage, the catalog takes precedence.

COURSE LOAD AND FULL-TIME/PART-TIME STATUS
        The average full-time course load is three or four courses per semester. The average part-time
course load is two courses per semester. However, many students find themselves taking one, two, or
three courses in a given semester, depending on their other obligations.



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         The internship requires two full semesters of clinical experience at your internship site. During
the internship, we advise you to take as few other courses as possible, especially if you have other work
or family obligations.

TRANSFER HOURS
        You may transfer up to 12 graduate hours into your required 48 hours, if they are taken prior to
your being accepted into our program as a degree-seeking student.

        You may transfer up to two courses from other institutions after you are accepted as a degree-
seeking student into the required 48 hours, providing that you are not transferring over 12 hours total.
However, certain restrictions may apply. You should consult with and receive written permission from
your advisor prior to taking courses at other institutions after you are accepted as a degree-seeking student
at Marymount.

        Requests to transfer in equivalents for the following CORE CACREP courses (PS 500, PS 502,
PS 503, PS 510, PS 530, and PS 551) must be reviewed by the Course Review Committee to determine if
the courses meet CACREP and departmental equivalencies. You need to attach a copy of your transcript
and syllabus of the completed course to the appropriate Substitution Request Form located in the Main
Office.

       In any case, you may not include transfer credits for PS 522 (Individual Counseling), PS 523
(Group Counseling), PS 597 (Practicum) or PS 599 (Internship).

CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION
        Candidates for a degree are expected to maintain continuous registration until all degree
requirements are satisfied. By failing to register for one semester or more (not counting summers),
you break registration and must reapply. Moreover, your degree requirements will become the
requirements listed in the catalog for the semester when you commence taking classes again.

         If you do not plan to take courses in a fall or spring semester, you should submit a continuous
registration form with a $30.00 payment to the registrar's office. This ensures that you are still considered
a degree-seeking student in our program. Continuous registration may be maintained for a maximum of
two semesters (not counting summer).

GRADUATION
       You must file an official Degree Application with the Registrar at the beginning of your final
semester. Check with the University catalog or website for the exact due date.

        You should also meet with your advisor prior to the beginning of your last semester, especially if
you have not been meeting with him or her regularly, to ensure that you have met all the requirements for
graduation as set out in the catalog of the semester you matriculated. It is your responsibility to ensure
that you meet all graduation requirements. Your advisor is here to assist you, but he or she is not
responsible for making the final decision about what courses you take.




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                                     CLINICAL TRAINING

PRE-INTERNSHIP PRACTICUM

         The practicum is a one semester, entry-level placement designed to provide students with
experience in a mental health treatment setting. For successful completion of the practicum students must
complete a total of 180 hours on-site. These hours are accumulated on site under the supervision of a
licensed mental health professional (if available), attendance in the weekly practicum class under the
supervision of University staff, and during weekly one-hour individual sessions. This experience provides
students with first hand knowledge of many DSM-IV-TR diagnoses. This exposure allows students to
correlate clinical diagnoses with the etiology of the disorder and the current medication and therapy
techniques that are routinely employed with each population.

PRE-REQUISITES FOR THE PRACTICUM
    Successful completion (final grade of B or better) of the following courses:

       PS 501 Psychopathology
       PS 502 Foundations of Community Counseling
       PS 520 Theories of Counseling
       PS 522 Individual Counseling
       PS 551 Psychology of Cultural Differences (Beginning Fall 2006)
       Co-requisite: PS 523 Group Counseling

PRACTICUM COMPONENTS
Your practicum placement will lasts for one full semester. It includes:
    Attaining a total of 180 hours on-site, which to includes:
    40 hours of direct client contact obtained through individual and group experience.
    One hour of supervision per week on-site. Supervision by a licensed individual is preferred.
    Completing requirements for PS 597 including weekly class attendance and group supervision.
    1 hour of individual supervision per week with University faculty member.
    Students may attain their practicum experience by working in a variety of clinical modalities.
       Practicum experience is available in; private practice, outpatient programs, day treatment
       programs, residential and inpatient hospital settings.
    Students must secure private malpractice insurance prior to being placed at their practicum site.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT PROCESS:
    Be familiar with the practicum section in the Community Counseling Student Handbook
    Attend the mandatory graduate practicum information meeting: The Practicum Information
      Meetings are held each semester. This meeting is where you will learn the process for enrolling in
      the Practicum course and your responsibilities. You are required to attend the Practicum
      Information Meeting the semester prior to enrolling in the Practicum course (you will not be able
      to enroll without attending the mandatory meeting). Information about the date and time for each
      meeting is distributed on the student list-serve, and posted in the Education and Human Services
      hallway. Bring a copy of your academic transcript with you to the Practicum Information
      meeting.
    You will need to submit a current resume to the Coordinator of Clinical Experiences by the
      practicum application deadline (30 days prior to the start of the semester).


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       You will be required to schedule and complete an interview at your potential practicum site. This
        is a professional interview and you should be professionally prepared when meeting your
        potential site supervisor. This would include: appropriate dress, a current resume, and a schedule
        of the days you will be available during the semester to complete your on-site practicum
        requirement hours.
       Complete and return the Practicum Contract Request Form to the Coordinator of Clinical
        Experiences after you have completed your interview and have been offered placement from the
        organization.
       One week after turning in your Request Form, contact the Coordinator of Psychology Clinical
        Experiences to pick up your contract.
       Complete the student information on the second page of the contract.
       Have your site supervisor complete the second page of the contract.
       Return the original contract to the Coordinator of Psychology Clinical Experiences.
       Register for PS 597.
       Students are required to tape/video counseling sessions for the University group supervision
        class.

THE PRACTICUM SEMINAR AND STUDENT EVALUATION
         PS 597, the practicum seminar, meets weekly and provides an environment designed to support
students through the practicum experience and expose students to various professional issues. Students
are evaluated by their practicum professor and their on-site supervisor on their ability to interact
appropriately with staff, patients and peers, their receptiveness to supervision, and their knowledge and
skills as beginning level counselors. Those who complete the practicum with a grade of B or better are
eligible to apply for their internship coursework when they have completed at least 30 credit hours in the
program. Students who receive a grade of B- will be evaluated by the faculty and decisions regarding
remediation will be made on a case by case basis. Students who receive below a B- for the practicum are
not eligible for internship until they have successfully completed another practicum experience or other
requirements as outlined in the handbook section titled clinical evaluation.


THE CLINICAL INTERNSHIP

     The capstone of your clinical training is the internship. The internship is an eight month (2 full
semesters), 600 hour clinical experience providing direct services to clients under the supervision of a
licensed professional. The internship provides you with a unique opportunity to grow both personally and
professionally. You will have the opportunity to use your clinical skills in combination with your
educational knowledge in both individual and groups settings. You will also be afforded the opportunity
to observe “seasoned” professionals in the counseling field.

     You can choose your internship from a wide variety of agencies that provide counseling services to
the community, including; private practice, outpatient treatment programs, intensive outpatient programs,
residential treatment, inpatient hospital settings, crisis counseling and community agencies.

      You will also attend the Marymount Internship Seminar (PS 599) with other Marymount interns
once a week during your internship for group supervision. This seminar provides you with an opportunity
to learn about the variety of services provided at other agencies, the opportunity to reinforce skills and
knowledge learned in class, skills in case conferencing, and a support-group environment.




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INTERNSHIP REQUIREMENTS
    600 total hours over two consecutive semesters
         o 20 hours per week on site throughout each semester
         o 40 hours per semester (approximately) in PS599 Internship (University Group
             Supervision)
    150 total individual counseling hours
    Minimum 6 group sessions per semester as a facilitator or co-facilitator (12 total groups)
    Minimum of 240 hours of client contact overall
    Minimum of one hour per week on-site clinical supervision
    Supervisor must be licensed
         o In Virginia and the District; LPC, LCSW, LSATP, Licensed Clinical
             Psychologist/Psychiatrist
         o In Maryland: LCPC, LCSW, LSATP, Licensed Clinical Psychologist/Psychiatrist
    Your site must allow you to audio or video tape client sessions
    Students must have the contract in place prior to the beginning of the semester
    Students are expected to establish an affiliation with an appropriate professional association (ie.
      ACA)
    Students must have private malpractice insurance

INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT PROCESS:
    Read the internship section of the graduate student handbook
    Attend the mandatory Internship Information Meeting. This meeting is held each semester.
      Information regarding all aspects of your internship is disseminated at this time. Students are
      required to attend the Internship Information Meeting one semester prior to enrolling in the
      Internship course. Information about the date and time for each meeting is distributed on the
      student list-serv, and posted in the Education and Human Services hallway. Please be sure that
      you are registered with the list-serve.
    Secure or renew private malpractice insurance
    Contact, interview and select an internship site
          o Make sure the site can accommodate your requirements
    Complete and return the Internship Contract Request Form to the Coordinator of Psychology
      Clinical Experiences
    One week after turning in your Request Form contact the Coordinator of Psychology Clinical
      Experiences to arrange a date to pick up your completed contract
    Complete the student information on the second page of the contract
    Have your site supervisor complete the second page of the contract
    Return the contract to the Coordinator of Psychology Clinical Experiences
    Register for PS 599, 1st semester




                                                Page 15
                 PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
        Your development as a counselor will not and cannot happen solely as a result of classroom
experiences or even your practicum and internship placement. It will also require you to actively join the
counseling profession, and begin to participate in the professional development activities that we hope
will mark your career as a counselor in an on-going way.


PERSONAL GROWTH

        Because we believe that being a client can help a counselor trainee both personally and
professionally, we regularly encourage students to participate in activities that lead to their personal
growth.

         One of the best ways for trainees to become aware of personal issues that can impact on their
performance as counselors is to obtain personal counseling for themselves. This service is available, to a
limited extent, at Marymount’s Counseling Center, and with community practitioners. There are several
ways to locate a counseling professional. The National Board for Certified Counselors maintains a list of
certified counselors through their on-line referral system at www.nbcc.org. The Yellow Pages, referrals
from your clergy, friends, family or your advisor are all potential sources of information on where to find
a counselor.

         Similarly, trainees are strongly encouraged to participate in a variety of psycho-educational
and/or counseling groups, or attend AA/NA or other 12-step meetings. This will greatly add to your
ability to perform as a group worker after graduation.

         You may also wish to participate in professional development workshops, attend conferences, do
research, and/or become involved in extra-curricular activities during your study at Marymount. You may
wish to join Chi Iota Sigma, the Counseling Honor Society, or Psi Chi, the Psychology honor society.
We also encourage you to attend our Distinguished Speakers in Psychology lecture series. Marymount
also offers Summer Institute courses on a variety of topics. Summer Institute courses may be taken either
for credit or for Continuing Education Units (CEUs).


PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

        American Counseling Association: The national professional organization with which our
        program affiliates is the American Counseling Association. Membership applications are
        available on their website www.counseling.org. In almost fifty years of advocacy for the
        counseling profession, ACA has grown to nearly 60,000 members. Its many divisions reflect the
        breadth of opportunity in the counseling profession. You are sure to find one that matches your
        interests. We strongly recommend that students become student affiliates of the ACA.




                                                  Page 16
National Board for Certified Counselors: NBCC is the largest credentialing body for
counselors. NBCC established and monitors a national certification system for the counseling
professionals, identifies counselors who have met certification requirements, and maintains a
register and referral program for Nationally Certified Counselors. The NCE-GSA is given during
your 1st semester internship. With endorsement from the faculty and in meeting the eligibility
requirements, students may apply to take the NCE, offered at Marymount University in April and
October.

State and Local Associations: Our state association is the Virginia Counselors Association
(VCA) and its relevant divisions. A yearly conference and a yearly graduate student research
conference are good forums for students to begin their professional associations. Our local
affiliate, the Northern Virginia Licensed Professional Counselors Association (NVLPC) meets
monthly, and can be an excellent way to network with other professionals and get involved in
professional development and advocacy.

The Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors of Maryland hosts an annual conference in the
Fall and co-hosts an annual conference in the Spring with the marriage and family therapists.
Maryland also passed the Licensed Graduate Professional Counselor, LGPC credential by
completion of a master’s degree in counseling and successful completion of the NCE.




                                       Page 17
           ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND EVALUATION PROCESSES

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

        Academic policies of the University are detailed in the Academic Policies section of the current
University catalog. Whenever you are in doubt regarding program requirements, please read the graduate
catalog or see the department chair or Associate Dean.

UNIVERSITY STANDARDS
        Marymount University requires that you maintain a B average in all courses you take the
University. Failure to maintain a B average or receiving a grade of F in a course will result in your record
being reviewed by the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee. The committee has the authority
to impose sanctions including placing you on academic probation, or dismissing you from the University.

ADDITIONAL DEPARTMENTAL ACADEMIC STANDARDS
      In addition to these standards, the Psychology Department adds the following ones:

   You must receive at least a B in PS 522 and PS 523 before you will be permitted to take the practicum or
    internship class. If you have a B- or lower, you will be reviewed by the clinical faculty (see periodic
    progress review guidelines). All students must receive permission of the clinical faculty to continue to
    practicum or internship. They may require remedial experiences prior to your taking the internship.

   If you receive more than two grades lower than a B- in courses you take while a matriculated student in
    the program. You may be dismissed from the program.

   Concerns regarding acceptable clinical, professional, and ethical standards of behavior throughout the
    program will be reviewed by the clinical faculty (see periodic progress review guidelines).

   You must demonstrate acceptable professional and ethical standards of behavior throughout the
    program.



EVALUATION OF STUDENT PROGRESS

        The goal of the Community Counseling program is to produce highly knowledgeable, competent,
self-aware and ethical professionals. Course grades reflect your performance in classes designed to
increase your knowledge, refine your counseling skills, enhance your self-awareness, and confirm your
commitment to ethical behavior.

ACADEMIC EVALUATION
         Grades in core and elective courses will be based on your academic performance, as measured in
a variety of ways, including tests, papers, presentations, and class participation. Your classroom
behavior, including professionalism, respect for others and personal integrity also influences your grades.
If you believe that a course grade is inaccurate or that an instructor is not teaching the material in the
syllabus, you first should discuss the problem with your instructor. If the issue is not resolved to your
satisfaction, make an appointment to discuss it with the Psychology Chairperson. If the matter is still not
resolved to your satisfaction, you may make a written appeal, which will be reviewed by the Psychology
Faculty as a whole. You may also file a grievance as described in the University catalog.


                                                  Page 18
Note: If an issue or concern emerges during the course, you should address it immediately, rather
than waiting until the course is over.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT EVALUATION
         The goal of Marymount's graduate counseling program is to prepare students for jobs as
counselors in community agencies. We believe that becoming an effective counselor requires many
things, including solid academic knowledge, clinical skills, ethical behavior, professional demeanor,
appropriate personal characteristics, and emotional readiness to perform clinical duties. We take seriously
research that indicates that persons who are not personally ready to counsel others can do more harm than
good.

         To this end, students in this graduate program will participate in training experiences that are
designed to enhance their growth as a person and professional. Students will be expected to actively
participate in such training activities, which will require your honest emotional involvement, e.g., role
plays and training groups. Students who are unsure whether such activities might be inappropriate for
them due to their personal circumstances should address these concerns with their advisor or another
member of the faculty during the admissions process or whenever they arise.

         A number of quantitative and qualitative methods will be used to evaluate student progress in
non-academic areas, such as behavioral ratings of skill demonstrations, portfolio reviews, and peer
ratings. They will also include the subjective clinical judgment of students’ supervisors, instructors, and
peers.

PERIODIC PROGRESS REVIEW
         Each semester, the Psychology faculty meets to evaluate all students’ academic progress and
professional development. (Appendix B contains the protocol used by the faculty for these reviews.) We
consider not only your academic performance, but also your personal characteristics, such as maturity,
judgment, emotional stability, sensitivity to others, and self-awareness, that affect your ability to be an
effective counselor. Most of our students do well in the training and make satisfactory progress. In some
cases, the faculty may decide to send a student a letter of commendation to recognize outstanding
achievements. If the faculty identifies a problem during the periodic review, including failure to maintain
a B average, receiving a grade of B- or below in PS 522, PS 523, PS 597 or PS 599; or evidence of
personal difficulty which has the potential to negatively affect their capacity to function as a counselor,
the student will be notified by letter. The student will be required to meet with their advisor and/or other
program faculty to address the situation. Students may be required to do one or more of the following:

   Meeting with your advisor. Your advisor meets to share with you the concerns of the faculty, giving
    specific examples of the difficulties that have been observed. Your advisor then invites you to
    collaborate in assessing the severity and nature of the problem, exploring strategies to resolve it, and
    developing a written agreement specifying the steps for remediation. Remediation steps may include
    taking a remedial course, repeating a course, entering counseling, or taking a leave of absence. The
    faculty will review your progress at the next review meeting. It is your responsibility to keep faculty
    informed of progress in remediation.
   Meeting with a faculty team. If the problem is a critical or continuing one, a team of faculty members
    may be appointed to meet with you. At this meeting, the team presents specific information and
    concrete examples regarding its concerns, the steps needed for remediation, and the time frame
    allowed for resolving the problem. The team and you then develop a written contract clearly stating
    the goals and the strategies for achieving these goals.
   Transition out of program. If students enter the remediation process and fail to make adequate
    progress in resolving problems that significantly impair their potential for academic success or


                                                 Page 19
    counseling effectiveness, then the Psychology faculty may consider a recommendation for your
    withdrawal from the program. The advisor or faculty team will recommend academic, vocational, and
    personal counseling to you to deal with this transition. If the change of study is to another program in
    the department, we assist you in following the Graduate School's protocol for changing your program
    of study.
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES FOLLOWING PERIODIC PROGRESS REVIEWS
         A grievance is an actual or perceived cause for protest or complaint arising out of some perceived
or actual harm. This harm is allegedly due to some action taken by the University or member(s) of the
University community during the student review process. This alleged action has the impact of imposing
on the individual’s legal rights, or has the impact of imposing on an individual’s right to pursue an
education in his or her chosen field.

        The guidelines below are to be used within the Psychology Department to enable any graduate
student who disagrees with his or her periodic student review to resolve the initiating problem effectively.
These procedures are intended to ensure that the Psychology Department conducts a thorough and
consistent inquiry into each student grievance. The procedures should aid graduate students and the
department faculty representatives in arriving at just resolutions.

1. Informal Inquiry: Any graduate student who believes that his or her student review/evaluation
   reflects a capricious, arbitrary, or prejudiced academic evaluation should meet with their advisor.
   This communication can be either in writing or in person. This step must be taken prior to any formal
   procedure is taken (see Formal Inquiry procedures). At this time, the student, the advisor and the
   Chair or Assistant Chair of Psychology discuss evaluation findings/recommendations to explore
   possible resolutions. If no satisfactory resolution is achieved and the student wishes to appeal, he or
   she should indicate this in writing to the Psychology Chairperson. This written communication will
   initiate a formal inquiry into the student evaluation.

2. Formal Inquiry: The formal inquiry is initiated when a student forwards a written letter to the Chair
   of the Psychology department. The student initiating the formal inquiry must indicate in this letter the
   grounds on which the grievance is being made.

       The Department Chair will meet with the student, the instructor and other faculty members
        relevant to the case to attempt to resolve the appeal at the department level. The student will
        present his/her issues relevant to the evaluation process. The faculty member forwarding the
        student name for evaluation will again present his or her concerns.
       After consultation with all parties, the Chair of Psychology will provide a written response
        recommending a resolution to the problem within 20 working days of the formal meeting date.
        The recommended resolution must be consistent with University policy.
       If one of the parties is not satisfied with the resolution at Step 2, she/he should notify the Dean of
        Education and Human Services in writing, within ten days of receiving the Department Chair’s
        decision. Upon receiving such notification the Dean or his/her representative, shall meet with the
        student and the Department Chair to discuss the issue. The Dean may, as he or she feels
        necessary, request that others be present as will help him or her to arrive at a fair and informed
        decision. Within twenty working days of this meeting, the Dean shall issue a decision. It is
        recognized that under extraordinary circumstances, this deadline may not be met; then all parties
        should be notified of the delay.
       If the student is still not satisfied, he or she may bring the concern to the Office of Academic
        Affairs. The decision of the Vice President for Academic Affairs regarding the issue or issues of
        concern is final (see Marymount University Catalog for more information regarding student
        grievance process).


                                                  Page 20
PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP EVALUATIONS
        Because of the subjective nature of clinical skills training and the necessary input from on-site
supervisors in the evaluation process, practicum and internship clinical evaluations are handled separately
from the periodic review process.

        The American Counseling Association’s code of ethics puts forth guidelines for the training of
students as counselors. Section F.2.h of the Code of Ethics states:

        Counselors do not endorse students or supervisees for certification, licensure, employment or
        completion of an academic or training program if they believe students are not qualified for the
        endorsement. Counselors take reasonable steps to assist students or supervisees who are not
        qualified for endorsement to become qualified.

         In accordance with the ACA Code of Ethics faculty members cannot endorse any student, or
allow a student to complete the training program when they believe the student is not qualified to do so.
Thus, the faculty is entrusted with the responsibility of evaluating the quality and competency of students
to practice as counselors. Because we take our role as gatekeepers seriously we closely supervise and
evaluate student performance in clinical experiences. Therefore, it is imperative that students understand
that their performance in clinical experiences is evaluated on academic knowledge, clinical skills, ethical
behavior, professional demeanor, appropriate personal characteristics, and emotional readiness to perform
clinical duties. While most students perform well in clinical experiences, on occasion a student will have
difficulty in their Practicum or Internship.
RESOLVING CLINICAL PLACEMENT PROBLEMS
         When Marymount personnel become aware of a problem during a student’s clinical placement,
the faculty supervisor will contact the student and the site supervisor and arrange a meeting. The purpose
of this meeting is to establish what has happened, and whether it is appropriate for the student to continue
in the placement. This meeting often results in the student continuing in their placement, usually
following stipulations agreed upon in the meeting. These stipulations could include:

                    Individual counseling
                    Extra supervision
                    Repeating or taking a recommended course
                    Engaging in a volunteer experience
                    Other stipulations as warranted by the situation

         The Marymount faculty supervisor will maintain a record of this meeting and its outcomes as part
of his or her PS 597 or PS 599 documentation.

        Occasionally, problems occur during clinical placements due to the site being unable to meet
Marymount requirements, or to other issues beyond the student’s control. If the Marymount supervisor
and the Coordinator of Psychology Clinical Experiences agree that it is not in a student’s best interest to
remain in a placement, the student will be assisted in located a new placement.
SERIOUS CLINICAL PLACEMENT PROBLEMS
         In cases of such severity that the student has been or is in danger of being dismissed from the
clinical placement and/or the program, or if an initial meeting between the site supervisor, student and
Marymount faculty supervisor reveals issues too serious to deal with in that format, the Psychology
Chairperson will arrange a meeting on campus involving the student, site supervisor, the coordinator of



                                                 Page 21
clinical experiences, the student’s advisor and the chair of the department.
         The purposes of this meeting are to review the issue, to give all parties the opportunity to discuss
their concerns and to explore remediation options. When possible, a remediation plan will be developed
during this meeting. If this is not possible, the Marymount faculty reserves the right to develop an
appropriate remediation plan to present to the student within one week of the meeting. The remediation
plan is designed to assist the student in correcting the deficits that led to dismissal or threat of dismissal
from the clinical experience. The decision to dismiss a student from a placement is made by the
placement, in conjunction with Marymount personnel. Decisions to dismiss are almost always due to
unethical or unprofessional conduct on the part of the student.

        Students dismissed or in danger of dismissal from their clinical experiences may be required to do
any of the following:
                 1.   Withdraw from the class (students will receive a failing grade for the course).
                 2.   Complete remedial course work designed to address the problem.
                 3.   Take a leave of absence to address the concerns that precipitated the problem.
                 4.   Enter personal counseling to assist them in addressing the personal issues that
                      contributed to their clinical problem.
                 5.   Repeat a course to gain additional skills or knowledge relevant to the problem.
                 6.   Engage in relevant volunteer experience prior to re-enrolling in a clinical course.
                 7.   Other stipulations as warranted by the situation.

         Within one week of the meeting or the faculty’s final decision, whichever occurs later, students
will be given a written document describing their required remediation along with a timeline for
completion. The student’s advisor will work with the student to make sure the remediation plan is
implemented successfully and will remain the student’s point of contact during remediation. If the student
is required to take a leave of absence, they must file for continuous registration during their absence.
Upon successful completion of the remediation plan the student will be allowed to pursue a new site for
the clinical experience. Failure to complete a remediation program within the specified timeline will
result in dismissal from the program, unless the student can document exceptional conditions warranting
an extension. Timelines will be extended in the event of a student appeal. If a student is dismissed from a
clinical placement, completes a remediation plan, pursues a new placement and is once again dismissed
from the placement, he or she will not be allowed to attempt to complete the clinical experience at a third
site. In these instances, the student may be terminated from the program or may be given the option of
completing a non-clinical degree.

APPEAL OF REMEDIATION OR DISMISSAL
         Every effort is made to respect the rights of all parties and due process is followed in these
difficult matters. If a student wishes to appeal a decision regarding remediation or retention in the
program, they should initiate a formal inquiry by notifying the Dean of the School of Education and
Human Services in writing as described in the Grievance Procedures Following Periodic Reviews section
above.




                                                  Page 22
                                   LIFE AFTER MARYMOUNT
 So, what now? Where do Marymount graduates go and what do they do with their hard-won degrees?
 What’s next?

 Our graduates work in a number of different types of jobs. These include:

    Counselors in substance abuse centers, hospitals, rehabilitation programs and clinics
    Crisis intervention counselors
    Family, group and individual counselors
    Residential directors for shelters and homes for mentally retarded children and adults
    Counselors for working with emotionally disturbed/learning disabled youth
    Case managers
    Vocational trainers and counselors
    Employee assistance counselors
    Some of our students go on to doctoral work, either right after graduation or (more commonly) after
     several years working in the field



 LICENSING AND CERTIFICATION

         Becoming licensed or certified as a counselor is a goal of many of our graduates. There are
 several different credentials that you can obtain.

          The NCC: Becoming a Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC) means that you have successfully
passed an examination (the NCE or National Counselor’s Examination). The NCC does NOT mean you
can practice independently in any state. Many states (all but Virginia and Texas) use the NCE as part of
the qualifying examination in the state licensure process. Because of our CACREP-accredited status,
Marymount students are eligible to take the NCE immediately on graduation from the program. It is to
your advantage to do this while all of the content areas are fresh in your mind. Students who are permitted
to take the NCE will be waived the 2-3 years post masters experience requirement and upon receiving a
passing score may use the credential of NCC. In addition, The Counselor Preparation Comprehensive
Examination (CPCE) is administered to students in their first semester internship. This exam follows the
format of the NCE very closely. Using it allows the faculty to gain an objective view of the knowledge
level of students in the program and allows you to gauge your strengths and weaknesses as you prepare for
the exam. You can learn more about the NCE and the NCC by visiting the NBCC website, www.nbcc.org.

          State Certification/Licensure: Certification and/or licensing requirements vary from state to
 state. To find out the requirements for any state, go to the NBCC website (www.nbcc.org). In Virginia,
 individuals with a Master’s degree in Community Counseling can become Licensed Professional
 Counselors (LPC), which allow them to practice independently. For students interested in working in the
 substance abuse field the State of Virginia now offers licensure as a Substance Abuse Treatment
 Practitioner (LSATP). Having a license is not necessary to work as an agency counselor, since a majority
 of positions in human services settings do not require one.

         The LPC requires:

1. 60 graduate semester hours of work in eleven specified content areas.
   The content areas required for licensure as a professional counselor in Virginia are listed below.


                                                  Page 23
   Following the stated content areas are the Marymount University courses that should satisfy them.
   This determination has been made based upon the experiences of our graduates applying for licensure.
   Note that a single course may satisfy more than one content area.

                   Theories of human behavior, learning and personality
                        PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology
                        PS 503 Advanced Developmental Psychology

                   Theories of counseling and psychotherapy techniques
                        PS 520 Theories of Counseling

                   Counseling and psychotherapy
                       PS 522 Counseling for Individuals
                       PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques

                   Abnormal behavior
                       PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology

                   Group dynamics, theories and techniques
                       PS 520 Theories of Counseling
                       PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques

                   Appraisal, evaluation and diagnostic procedure
                        PS 500 Research and Evaluation
                        PS 510 Survey of Testing and Assessment

                   Career development
                        PS 530 Career Development Counseling

                   Professional identity, function and ethics
                        PS 502 Foundations of Community Counseling

                   Supervised practicum or internship
                       PS 599 Internship (NOTE: The 600 hours of internship will be counted towards
                       licensure, if either your Marymount supervisor or your agency supervisor is an
                       LPC.)

                   Substance abuse theory and counseling
                       PS 509 Substance Abuse

                   Family Dynamics and family treatment modalities
                       524 Family Dynamics and Counseling Techniques

2. Four thousand hours of documented, supervised work experience.
   (Due to CACREP accreditation, up to 900 hours of PS 599 can be applied towards the 4000 clinical
   hours required in Virginia). The use of practicum and internship hours towards licensure vary from
   state to state.
        o The four thousand hours of supervised experience can be paid or volunteer experience, but
            must be clinical counseling experience.
        o In order to count these hours you must be working under clinical supervision. The Virginia
            Licensure Test Application Packet contains the form you will need to register your


                                                Page 24
           supervision.

3. Achievement of a passing score on the Virginia licensing exam.

Many Marymount students complete the 48 credits for the degree, find a full-time supervised work
experience and accumulate the required hours and the additional 12 academic credits while working. This
way, the course work and required experience would be completed at about the same time. Courses can be
taken at Marymount or elsewhere.

Remember: The Virginia Board of Professional Counselors makes a final determination on applications
for licensure. For more information on licensure requirements in Virginia and other states, go to the
NBCC web site at: http://www.nbcc.org/index.htm.


JOB SEARCH

The types of settings that utilize the skills developed in this program are many and varied. A recent
sample of employment opportunities obtained from the Washington Post employment section found a
number of positions for counselors in substance abuse centers in hospitals and clinics, crisis intervention
workers, family, group and individual counselors, residential directors for shelters and homes for mentally
retarded children and adults, counselors for working with emotionally disturbed/learning disabled youth,
case managers, vocational trainers, and employee assistance providers. The settings included private
offices of clinicians, private and public clinics, group homes and shelters, and local, state, and federal
agencies. The majority of these positions were not seeking a licensed person. Additionally, numerous
school guidance counseling positions in public and private school systems are available, especially at the
elementary level, to individuals in the School Counseling track.

RESOURCES FOR JOB SEARCHES
        The Ballston Career Placement Center has a number of resources for job searches, including job
postings and agency contact information. In addition, they can assist with resume preparation and
interviewing skills. Contact Suzanne Harvey at Suzanne.Harvey@marymount.edu or (703) for more
information.

        You may also wish to keep a copy of your credentials on file with Marymount. The Marymount
Career Placement Center can give you further information on this as well.

       The best resource for job searches is your ability to network with faculty and other students in the
program, and the counselors, supervisors, and other students in your internship.


WHAT ABOUT DOCTORAL WORK?

         We designed the Community Counseling program to create a degree that not only provides its
graduates with skills that they can immediately apply, but also provides them with a solid educational
background should they decide to continue their education beyond the master’s level.. Graduates of our
program have been successfully admitted into doctoral programs. Most of our students are interested in
practitioner-orientation doctoral programs such as the Psy.D. For those interested in training counselors,
supervisors and teaching the close adherence of our program to CACREP standards ensures that our
students are well prepared to enter Counselor Education doctoral programs (usually Ed.D.). If you are
interested in exploring doctoral study, please contact your advisor.



                                                 Page 25
OBTAINING REFERENCES

        In most cases, a faculty member who knows you and your work is happy to serve as a reference
for you. However, if for any reason a faculty member cannot give you a positive endorsement, he or she
reserves the right to deny your request for a reference. In such cases, the faculty member will discuss the
refusal with you. Once a faculty member has agreed to write you a recommendation, be prepared to give
them an accurate resume, an unofficial transcript and a description of the position you are seeking, along
with any other information that will help them write a strong, informative letter.

        Finally, a faculty member can offer an endorsement only for positions for which your program
has prepared you to assume, and for the academic abilities and clinical skills that he or she has had an
opportunity to directly assess. Again, the faculty member will discuss this matter with you.




                                                 Page 26
                                     UNIVERSITY SERVICES

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT

        Your primary point of contact for academic advisement is your faculty advisor. You are assigned
an advisor who is a member of the full-time clinical faculty. You must meet with your advisor and
complete a program of study during your first semester at Marymount.

        Faculty advisors guide and assist students during orientation and are available for consultation
with students at regular office hours each week. In addition, you can contact your advisor via email. Only
your assigned advisor can review your file. Contacting faculty members or the Chair will only delay the
advising process.

Please note! It is your responsibility to stay in contact with your advisor.

         After your first semester, there is no requirement that you see your advisor prior to registering for
classes. It is wise, however, to check in with your advisor regularly. He or she can provide information on
the best sequencing of classes, the type of internship experience that might prove most beneficial, and
guidance about career preparation.


PERSONAL COUNSELING SERVICES

        Personal counseling services assist students with problem solving, improving academic
performance, vocational assessment, stress and time management, and similar needs. Counseling is
available to all students by request through the Center for Counseling and Career Services, Student Health
Service, Campus Ministry, and the Vice President for Student Services.


STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

         Marymount University is pledged to upholding the principles of the Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA). If you have special needs that require accommodations, please contact Disability Support
Services (DSS) at (703) 284-1605, located on Main Campus in Gerard Hall. They will provide you with
a Faculty Contact Sheet, which you should share with faculty members at the beginning of the semester
so that appropriate accommodations can be arranged.


CAREER COUNSELING SERVICES

            Career counseling is available at the Ballston Career Center (BCC), which is a part of the
Center for Counseling and Career Services (CCCS). The BCC provides graduate students, alumni, and
undergraduate students studying at the Ballston Campus with professional assistance in planning and
conducting the job search and long-range career planning. It also maintains files on recruiting
organizations and employment opportunities and refers students to a network of alumni in their field.

        BCC workshops assist students and alumni in preparing resumes and in developing contacts with
prospective employers. The BCC's Ballston Career Connections newsletter is devoted to career
information and tips on conducting an effective job search. Extensive career related periodicals, books,
and audio-visual aids are available in the Center’s library, the Ballston Library, and in the McCarthy


                                                  Page 27
Graduate Reading Room in the Reinsch Library.

       The Center’s coordinator is Suzanne Harvey at 284-5960. The hours of operation are Mon. &
Wed. 9 AM - 8 PM, Tues., Thurs., and Friday 9 AM - 6 PM.


LIBRARY SERVICES

The Reinsch Library offers:

       A collection of more than 187,000 volumes
       1,048 journal titles with access to more than 1,000 more journals through more than 60 databases
       More than 60 online information resources – many of which are full-text -- available on or off
        campus 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to currently enrolled students, faculty and staff
       Membership in the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC), which allows students to
        use the collections of American University, The Catholic University of America, Gallaudet
        University, George Mason University, The George Washington University, The University of the
        District of Columbia and Trinity College (affiliate). Since WRLC institutions share an online
        catalog of all collections, loan requests can be made online and delivered to the student’s home
        institution or via the Internet.
       Access to materials from Northern Virginia Community College and the Arlington, Alexandria,
        Fairfax, Falls Church, Loudoun, and Prince William public libraries with a Marymount ID
       Interlibrary loan
       Library research instruction
       Reference assistance in person, by appointment, by phone (703-284-1649), by email
        (library@marymount.edu), and by virtual reference (during selected hours)
       Internet access on all public computers
       Group study rooms
       Black and white photocopiers and a public scanner
       Access to the Marymount network for laptops
       Microform readers and printers



INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SERVICES

        The Instructional Media Center provides information technology support and media services by
appointment to Marymount students. The IMC offers a multimedia lab, graphic arts capabilities, and
video production.

        Students may use audiovisual and video (AV/TV) equipment in the Center to reinforce learning
and to complete academic assignments made by the faculty. Some lab materials are available to students
on a walk-in basis. Audiovisual materials are noted in the Library on-line catalog.

        Students may arrange in advance for the use of AV equipment for special classroom projects.
Use of the Production Studio for live videotaping of special projects or presentations is prearranged
through the IMC Director or the Production Coordinator.

         The multimedia lab provides access to multiple forms of computer-based instruction and access
to the Internet.


                                                Page 28
COUNSELING LAB

          A small counseling lab is located in Rowley Academic Center. The lab consists of two
individual counseling rooms and one group room. Each room is equipped with a video camera and video
recording equipment. Counseling lab rooms may be reserved in the SEHS Main Office. Students are
responsible for ensuring that the rooms are secure (doors locked, lights off) when they leave, and must
report any malfunctioning or missing equipment to the SEHS office staff as soon as possible. Office staff
or clinical faculty can demonstrate use of the equipment.


EMAIL AND LISTSERV

         You can apply for a free email account while you are a student at the University. This account
allows you to send and retrieve email from any computer with a modem – at home, work, or at the
University. You can exchange email with other students and faculty, and your email provides full Internet
email capability, allowing you to exchange email with anyone in the world who has an Internet email
account. We strongly recommend that you obtain and use an email account if you do not already
have one. Electronic communication is the preferred way of informing students of upcoming events,
changes, and keeping in touch with your fellow students and your professors. The department maintains a
listserv of all current counseling and school counseling graduate students called counselgrad. All
students must sign up for the listserv. To sign up, go to http://phoenix.marymount.edu/cgi-
bin/lyris.pl?enter=counselgrad&text_mode=0&lang=english and request membership. (There is also a
link on the Graduate Psychology web page.) This listserv is used to announce events, deadlines, schedule
changes and updates, job and internship opportunities, etc. You can’t afford to miss it!


COMPUTER SUPPORT

        You will be expected to master basic uses of electronic technology such as using email, accessing
information from the Internet, and using productivity tools such as word processing, spreadsheet and
presentation software. Marymount provides a variety of services to help you do this.

LAB AVAILABILITY: There are four computer labs are located on the Main Campus and three on the
Ballston Campus. Six of these computer labs are equipped with PCs and one with Macintoshes. All lab
computers are connected to the Marymount network and provide access to various software applications,
Internet utilities, and library resources. UNIX hosts are accessible form any networked computer. Laser
printers and scanners equipped with OCR software are also available.

       Current Marymount ID’s are required for use of computer labs. For current lab hours, check the
Information Technology Support Center web site at http://www.marymount.edu/telcom/itsc/.

TRAINING: The ITSC also offers a wide variety of training sessions for new and experienced users. For
a listing of available seminars and the current schedule, check the web site above.

USER OBLIGATIONS: All users are expected to adhere to University policies related to use of Marymount
computers, access to the Internet and other services provided through Marymount resources.




                                                Page 29
COPYING SERVICES

        Copying machines are located in the Reinsch Library. You may use a venda card or money in the
machines. The card allows students to photo copy material for 10 cents a page. If you use cash, the cost is
15 cents per page. See Library Information Desk for more details.


FINANCIAL AID

        Various types of financial assistance are available to full-time students; more information may be
obtained from the Financial Aid Office (703) 284-1530 or on their website at
http://www.marymount.edu/financialaid/graduate.html.

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS: A limited number of graduate assistantships are available with the
School of Education and Human Services and in other Marymount units. Contact the Financial Aid office
for more information.


HOUSING

          Due to space limitations, on-campus housing is only available to undergraduate students who
     are 21 or under at the time they first become residents."

          The residence life office maintains listings of off-campus housing, and will soon have this
     information on their web-site.


THE CONSORTIUM

       Marymount University is a member of The Consortium of Universities of the Washington
Metropolitan Area. Other members include the American University, The Catholic University of
America, Gallaudet University, George Mason University, The George Washington University, Howard
University, Mount Vernon College, Trinity College, the University of the District of Columbia, and The
University of Maryland at College Park. Eligible students from Marymount may take approved courses
at member institutions.

Note:
Be sure to see your advisor prior to taking courses from consortium institutions, as certain restrictions
apply to the courses you can take.

        ELIGIBILITY AND REQUIREMENTS
   Students must be degree seeking students in good academic standing. Students enrolled at
    Marymount on a non-degree basis are not eligible. You may not enroll in consortium courses during
    the semester you expect to graduate.
   Students must obtain a signed permission slip that includes the signatures of the advisor, the School
    Dean, and the Consortium Coordinator.
   The course is acceptable as determined by the visited institution.
   The course is acceptable to Marymount. The course must not be offered concurrently at Marymount
    University.



                                                 Page 30
   A maximum of four hours of courses may be taken via the Consortium for credit toward Marymount
    University after you are a matriculated student.
        REGISTRATION PROCEDURES
   Determine the course you wish to take. Schedules for all institutions are available in the Registrar’s
    Office.
   Obtain a permission slip from the Registrar’s Office.
   Obtain the signature of your School Dean and return the permission slip to the Registrar’s Office for
    the signature of the Consortium Coordinator and Consortium Seal.
   Show the buff-colored copy of the permission slip to the professor of your class. This legitimizes
    your enrollment at the visited institution. Keep the permission slip for you personal records.
   Withdrawals from Consortium courses must be reported at once to the Consortium Coordinator in the
Registrar’s Office.

    All Consortium students are subject to the visited institution’s academic and social rules, regulations,
and policies.

       TUITION AND FEES
       Marymount Consortium students pay the Marymount tuition rate to the Marymount Student
Accounts Office. Credits taken through the Consortium are counted toward full-time/part-time status at
Marymount for the purposes of Financial Aid.

         Any attendant fees (lab, books, study materials) are to be paid by the student to the visited
institution. Refunds for Consortium courses follow the Marymount refund schedule.

         GRADING AND CREDIT
         Grades for Consortium courses are sent to Marymount’s Registrar’s Office by the visited
institution. They are recorded as Marymount University credit and calculated into the Marymount
University cumulative grade point average.

         Grades are recorded onto the Marymount University grade report and transcript as soon as they
are received. In some cases, this will be after regular Marymount credit has been posted. In such cases,
students will receive updated grade reports and transcripts.

         Consortium credits are converted to Marymount University semester credits and count toward
full-time/part-time status at Marymount University. Likewise, grades, if necessary, are converted to the
nearest Marymount University equivalent.

Payment for consortium credits is due at the time of registration.




                                                  Page 31
                                 APPENDIX A: CONTACT INFORMATION


FACULTY CONTACT INFORMATION

Name                              Phone                  Email
Dr. Bernstein                     (703) 284-1663          robert.bernstein@marymount.edu
Dr. Edward Cannon                 (703) 284-5713          Edward.cannon@marymount.edu
Dr. Clump, Chair                  (703) 284-1628          michael.clump@marymount.edu
Undergraduate Psychology
Dr. Maureen Christian             (703) 526-6807          maureen.christian@marymount.edu
Dr. Davis, Coordinator School     (703) 526-6822          tamara.davis@marymount.edu
Counseling Program
Dr. Doll                          (703) 526-6821          jason.doll@marymount.edu

Dr. Fawcett                       (703) 284-1661          brenda.fawcett@marymount.edu
Dr. Garofalo, Coordinator
                                  (703) 284-3822          michele.garofalo@marymount.edu
School Counseling Program –
Loudoun Campus
Dr. Gulyn                         (703) 284-1630          linda.gulyn@marymount.edu
Dr. Jackson-Cherry,               (703) 284-1633          lisa.jackson-cherry@marymount.edu
Chair, Department of
Counseling, Coordinator,
Counseling & Pastoral
Counseling Programs
Loretta Lukic, MA, LSATP,         (703) 284-3823          loretta.lukic@marymount.edu
NCC
Coordinator of Clinical
Experiences
Dr. Lesko, Dean,SEHS              (703) 284-1624          wayne.lesko@marymount.edu
Dr. Lindahl, Forensic             (703) 526-6825          mary.lindahl@marymount.edu
Psychology Coordinator
                                  (703) 284-1634          carolyn.oxenford@marymount.edu
Dr. Oxenford
Dr. Westerman                        (703) 284-1659           delores.westerman@marymount.edu
To contact adjunct faculty, please contact the SEHS office at 284-1620
FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS

Name                             Phone
SEHS Main office                 (703) 284-1620
SEHS Fax                         (703) 284-1631
Registrar                        (703) 284-1520
Graduate Admissions              (703) 284-5901
Library                          (703) 284-1533
Bookstore                        (703) 284-1614
Financial Aid                    (703) 284-1530




                                                   Page 32
       APPENDIX B: PERIODIC STUDENT REVIEW PROTOCOL

A student review will be conducted once each semester

Prior to each review the Assistant Chair of the Psychology Department will circulate a
list of current graduate students and copies of student review forms to all full-time
faculty, clinical staff and adjunct professors.

Full time faculty, clinical staff and adjunct professors are asked to review the list of
students and complete a student review form detailing concerns about any graduate
student. All students are reviewed each semester. Any student on the list but not having
concerns raised by faculty or clinical staff are considered reviewed without further action.
Students are reviewed with further action when a concern is raised by a committee
member or adjunct faculty.

The Assistant Chair will collect those forms from adjunct professors for use in the student
review.

Committee members will bring completed forms to the review


Review Process:

Student Review Committee consists of:
       Dean or Associate Dean, School of Education and Human Services
       Psychology Chairperson
       Clinical Experiences Coordinator
       Full-time Clinical Psychology Faculty

Prior to review:
        Each member of the committee having concerns about a student will complete a
        review form for use in student review

Review Procedure:
      Assistant Chair, School of Psychology will present cases submitted by adjunct
      professors
      Committee members will present cases

Information will be presented:
       Person raising concern
       Place in program (1st semester, 2nd semester, Practicum, etc.)
       Nature of problem

Disposition:
       A decision will be rendered on each review


                                         Page 33
           Acknowledgment of Policy and Procedures for
          Community, School, and Pastoral Counseling Programs
                        Marymount University

As a student accepted into the Marymount University Community Counseling, School
Counseling or Pastoral Counseling program, I understand and agree to abide by the
policies and procedures outlined in this document.

1.      I understand that I will be expected to demonstrate academic, personal,
interpersonal, and professional competencies appropriate for counselors-in-training.
Failure to attain and demonstrate these competencies may result in the issuance of a
letter of warning, requirement to repeat courses, requests to participate in
individual counseling, additional supervision, other additional requirements, or
leave of absence, or dismissal from the program

2.     As a counselor-in-training I understand that I am expected to learn, apply,
and adhere to the ethical codes and standards that govern the counseling profession.
I understand that I am expected to demonstrate competency in professionalism,
knowledge of skills, and appropriate interactions with peers and faculty. My
performance in these areas will be evaluated by faculty based upon my academic
and interpersonal performances.

3.      I understand that my self-growth will be encouraged by faculty through the
use of experiential learning techniques. Self-disclosures are common in experiential
learning but will not be factors in grading or successful completion of coursework.
However, should my disclosures indicate impairment or potential harm to clients,
self, or others I understand the faculty will use this as part of the review of my
overall academic and clinical growth. The faculty may recommend remediation
actions, leave of absences, or dismissal from the program.

4.      I understand I will be reviewed once per semester, at a minimum, by the
Counseling Faculty. If I demonstrate academic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, or
professional deficiencies I will be notified of these concerns and an individual plan
of action taken in accordance with the policies outlined in the Student Handbook.

5.     I understand I must complete a program of study prior to the completion of
12 graduate credits. I understand I must complete 24 credits prior to enrolling in
PS597 and 30 credits prior to enrolling in PS599. I understand I will be denied
placement if I have not met these requirements,

6.     I understand that I will be required to attend a mandatory practicum and
internship, meeting the semester prior to enrolling in PS597 or PS599. It is my
responsibility to make necessary arrangement to attend these meetings. I
understand if I am unable to make these mandatory meetings, my enrollment may
be delayed.



                                       Page 34
7.      I understand the Counseling programs utilize outside schools and community
agencies as sites for practicum and internship placements. The Internship
Coordinator is responsible for assisting me in a placement; however, it is my
responsibility to progress through the interview process and be accepted by a site.
It is not the University or Coordinator’s responsibility to find me a placement if I
am not able to progress. I am ultimately responsible for securing a site.

8.      If I am dismissed from my placement, I understand my faculty supervisor
and/or Internship Coordinator will request a meeting with the placement site
however, I understand this request may not be approved by the site. Further, I will
not hold the University or its representative responsible for this lack of due process.
If this occurs, I understand the policies and procedures will be followed as outlined
in the Student Handbook.

9.    I understand the Community and School Counseling programs are
CACREP-accredited and the department will make curricular changes in
accordance with CACREP recommendations or requirements. If changes occur, I
acknowledge this may change my program of study and that I may have to make
changes to meet CACREP-accreditation standards.

10.     I understand that I will not be licensed upon completion of this program nor
does the program suggest meeting all the licensing requirements. The program will
attempt to make every change to meet licensing requirements as it related to
academic course requirements. It is my responsibility to keep up with changes in
State licensing requirements and meet these requirements independently from
Marymount.

11.     I understand the Student Handbook with which I was admitted may be
revised to reflect program, accreditation, and/or licensing revisions. I understand
that I should follow the revised additions of the Handbooks and that it is my
responsibility to determine if there have been revisions to the Handbook and request
a new copy. If I choose to follow the requirements under the Student Handbook
which I was admitted, I may not meet accreditation and/or licensing changes and
will not hold the University responsible for my decision. I understand this decision
may affect my eligibility for meeting licensing/accreditation requirements. Further,
I understand I must abide by only one Handbook if revisions are made.

My signature verifies that I have received a copy of the Student Handbook and the
policies and procedures of the program have been reviewed with me. I understand
the conditions of the guidelines set forth in this form and I agree to abide by the
guidelines outlined in his document, university catalogue, and program guidelines.


_______________________ _______________________ __________ ____________
Print Student Name      Student Signature       Date        Program




                                       Page 35

								
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