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Developing an Assessment Plan_ Grades 3–5 - Illuminations

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Developing an Assessment Plan_ Grades 3–5 - Illuminations Powered By Docstoc
					Exploring Mathematics
Through Literature
   Beth Skipper
   Teaching Children Mathematics
   Journal Editor
   National Council of Teachers of
   Mathematics
   Reston, Virginia
Today’s Agenda

    l Why  and how to use literature In
      mathematics
    l A sampling of math and literature ideas
    l Idea share
    l Wrap-up




2
Content Literacy

    “The ability to use reading and writing for
    the acquisition of new content in a given
    discipline.”
                     ~McKenna and Robinson




3
Content Literacy

    “The focus on having students learn
    information greatly influences the
    classroom model that many content area
    teachers develop. Some become
    dispensers of knowledge, while others
    integrate storytelling, and projects, and
    orchestrate activities….”
                               ~Laura Robb

4
Content Literacy

    “The focus on having students learn
    information greatly influences the
    classroom model that many content area
    teachers develop. Some become
    dispensers of knowledge, while others
    integrate storytelling, and projects, and
    orchestrate activities, but in a manner that
    does not deepen student understanding of
    the content.”         ~Laura Robb
5
NCTM Vision for School Mathematics

                       The full text of the
                   document is available to
                      NCTM members at
                   http://standards.nctm.org


                      Non-members can
                     register for 120-day
                         free access!



 6
Why Use Literature in Math?


    “Adults can foster children’s mathematical
      development by providing environments
      rich in language, where thinking is
      encouraged, uniqueness is valued, and
      exploration is supported.”
              Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, page 74




7
Why use Literature in Math?

    “When students can connect mathematical
    ideas, their understanding is deeper and
    more lasting. They can see mathematical
    connections in the rich interplay among
    mathematical topics, in contexts that relate
    mathematics to other subjects, and in their
    own interests and experience.”
                                   NCTM PSSM pg 64




8
Categories

    l Counting Books
    l Number Books
    l Storybooks
    l Concept Books




    Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
9   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
    Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Instructional Strategies




 Young, E., & Marroquin, C. L. (2006, March). Posing problems from children’s literature. Teaching
 Children Mathematics, 12, 362-366.
Additional NCTM Resources

              New Visions for Linking Literature
              and Mathematics

              Product Details
              Stock # 12777
              List Price $33.95
              Member Price $27.16




11
Selection Criteria

     l Mathematical   integrity
     l Potential for varied response
     l An aesthetic dimension
     l Racial, cultural, and gender
       inclusiveness




      Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. (2004). New visions for linking literature and mathematics.
12    Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English & National Council Teachers of
      Mathematics.
Evaluating Trade books




     Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
13   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Evaluating Trade books




     Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
14   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Evaluating Trade books




     Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
15   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Evaluating Trade books




     Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
16   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Evaluating Trade books




     Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
17   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Evaluating Trade books




     Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
18   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Evaluating Trade books




     Hellwig, S. J., Monroe, E. E., & Jacobs, J. S. (2000, November). Making informed choices:
19   Selecting children’s trade books for mathematics instruction. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 7, 138-143.
Why Use Literature in Math?




20
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab

     l Author:
        l   April Pulley Sayre
     l Illustrator:
        l   Randy Cecil
     l Standards                Addressed:
        l Number and Operations
        l Problem Solving




21       Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. 2009, September. Links to literature: Legs and
         more legs. Teaching children mathematics, 17, 80-89.
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab

     Materials:
       Paper, pencil and crayons


     Task:
       “I see 30 legs. Some of the legs belong to
       people and some of the legs belong to crabs.
       How many people and crabs do I see?”



22     Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. 2009, September. Links to literature: Legs and
       more legs. Teaching children mathematics, 17, 80-89.
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab




23
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab


     As I was scuba diving I looked down at
     the ocean floor. I counted 30 legs.
     Some of the legs belonged to crabs and
     some belonged to starfish. How many
     crabs and starfish did I see?




24   Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. 2009, September. Links to literature: Legs and
     more legs. Teaching children mathematics, 17, 80-89.
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab




25   Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. 2009, September. Links to literature: Legs and
     more legs. Teaching children mathematics, 17, 80-89.
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab


     Students can make a list of several other
     creatures with different amounts of legs
     and come up with their own creative
     problems.




26     Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. 2009, September. Links to literature: Legs and
       more legs. Teaching children mathematics, 17, 80-89.
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab

     1 = snail           6 = insect
     2 = person          7 = insect and a
     3 = person and a        snail
         snail           8 = spider
     4 = dog             9 = spider and a
     5 = dog and a snail     snail
         (or a starfish) 10 = crab



27
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab




28
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab




29
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab

     Free resources from the author!
      http://www.aprilsayre.com/2008/08/28/one
     -is-a-snail-worksheets/




30     Whitin, D. J., & Whitin, P. 2009, September. Links to literature: Legs and
       more legs. Teaching children mathematics, 17, 80-89.
Mailing May
     Author:
         l   Michael O. Tunnell
     Illustrator:
         l   Ted Rand
     Standard Addressed:
         l   Number and Operations
     Category:
         l   Storybook
      Shih, J. C., & Giorgis, C. (2204, February). Building the mathematics and
31    literature connection through children’s responses. Teaching Children
      Mathematics, 10, 328-333.
Mailing May

     Discussion:
       l   “How long do you suppose it took the train to travel
           75 miles to May’s grandmother’s house?”
       l    How much would it cost to mail May today?
       l    If May’s dad earned $1.55 per day, how much
           would he make in a week? A month? A year?




       Shih, J. C., & Giorgis, C. (2204, February). Building the mathematics and
32     literature connection through children’s responses. Teaching Children
       Mathematics, 10, 328-333.
Mummy Math

     Author:
        l   Cindy Neuschwander
     Illustrator:
        l   Bryan Langdo
     Standard Addressed:
        l   Geometry
     Category:
        l   Concept book

33
Mummy Math

     Materials:
       l   Real household solids such as soup cans,
           ice cream cones and boxes
     Task 1:
       l Students identify and name the solids that
         they read about in the story.
       l Students name the solids that they brought
         from home then sort them according to
         attributes.

34
Mummy Math

     Materials:
       l   Geometric nets (from Illuminations applet)
     Task 2:
       l Have students look at the geometric nets of
         various solids and see if they can figure out
         which solid they each represent.
       l Use the nets to construct the figures.




35
Mummy Math

     Examples of geometric nets:




36    mathworld.wolfram.com/Prism.html
Mummy Math




     Create your own geometric nets using the Illuminations applet,
                             Dynamic Paper.
                   http://illuminations.nctm.org/

37
One Inch Tall

     Author:
       l   Shel Silverstein
     Standard Addressed:
       l   Measurement
     Category:
       l   Poem




38
One Inch Tall

     Task 1:
         Discussion:
         lWhat obstacles might a person that is one-
         inch-tall face?
         lWhat advantages might a one-inch-tall
         person have?




39    Forrest, K., Schnabel, D., & Williams, M. E. (2006, November). Math by month:
      Mathematics and literature, anyone? . Teaching children mathematics, 13, 216-217.
One Inch Tall

     What does this poem have to do with ratio
     and proportion?
         l Compare a one-inch-tall person to yourself.
           How many times taller are you?
         l Name other objects that are proportionate to
           you and the one-inch-tall person.




40    Forrest, K., Schnabel, D., & Williams, M. E. (2006, November). Math by month:
      Mathematics and literature, anyone? . Teaching children mathematics, 13, 216-217.
One Inch Tall

     Task 2:
       l Create and display a poster-size cut-out of a
         giant pencil on the classroom wall.
       l Ask students what they might know about
         the person using this pencil.




41
One Inch Tall

     Discussion:
       l How tall was the person?
       l How much might this person weigh?

       l How big is his/her hand?

       l How big would a proportional piece of
         notebook paper be?




42
One Inch Tall

     What other guiding questions could you
     ask students during the oversize pencil
     activity?




43
Arithme-Tickle: An Even Number
of Odd Riddle-Rhymes
     l Author:
         l   Patrick Lewis
     l Illustrator:
         l   Frank Remkiewicz
     Standard Addressed:
         l   Number and Operations
     Category:
         l   Poem/Concept book
      Shih, J. C., & Giorgis, C. (2004, February). Building the mathematics and
44    literature connection through children’s responses. Teaching Children
      Mathematics, 10, 328-333.
Arithme-Tickle: An Even Number
of Odd Riddle-Rhymes
                                Early One Morning
                            The rooster crowed at 6:03,
                              The pig got up at 8:15.
                        What time did Farmer Ben awake?
                         If he woke up halfway between
                         The time the rooster and the pig
                         Got out of bed? Oops…I forgot!
                          Ben waited 15 minutes more-
                          Until he smelled the coffeepot!

     Shih, J. C., & Giorgis, C. (2004, February). Building the mathematics and
45   literature connection through children’s responses. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 10, 328-333.
Arithme-Tickle: An Even Number
of Odd Riddle-Rhymes
     Activity:
         l Students solve the riddles on the various
           pages of the book.
         l Own their own, students come up with their
           own riddles.
         l Students share their riddles with a partner or
           with the entire class, giving others an
           opportunity to solve it!


      Shih, J. C., & Giorgis, C. (2004, February). Building the mathematics and
46    literature connection through children’s responses. Teaching Children
      Mathematics, 10, 328-333.
Your Turn!

     Take a few minutes to come up with your
        own rhyme centered around concepts
      you are currently teaching your students.
       If you finish early, switch with a partner
          and solve! We will share aloud in 3
                        minutes!



     Shih, J. C., & Giorgis, C. (2004, February). Building the mathematics and
47   literature connection through children’s responses. Teaching Children
     Mathematics, 10, 328-333.
Illuminations Lessons and Units

     • Odd Man Out     • Magic Ten
     • Trying Out      • Egg Carton
       Tangrams          Designs
     • Baseball        • An Army of Ants
       Geometry        • Bean Salad
     • A “Beautiful”   • Making Tens
       Rectangle
     • Best Buy

48
Exploring Children’s Books




49
Idea Share




50
The Important Book
     Author:
        l   Margret Wise Brown
     Illustrator:
        l   Leonard Weisgard
     Standards Addressed:
        l   Communication
        l   Connections
     Category:
        l   Storybook


51
The Important Book
                                 The important thing about (a) ____________
                                                           Is that __________.
                                                                 It’s __________
                                                               You __________
                                                               You __________
                                                            It isn’t __________
                                                                 It’s __________
                                                            And it __________
                            But the most important thing about a __________
                                                      Is that _____________.




52   Brown, M. W. (1977). The important book. Harper Collins Publishers.
The Important Book

     Discussion:

       l   Use this discussion as a transition into the
           importance of a mathematics term or concept.




53
The Important Book

                    Your turn!
     Come up with a rhyme using a format
     similar to the format used in The
     Important Book to describe the
     importance of using literature to teach
     math. We will share our results in 3-4
     minutes!


54
Thanks!

     Thank you for all you do to help
         us achieve our goal!




55
Contact Information


              bskipper@nctm.org

       Bethsbookshelf.blogspot.com

     1906 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1502
       TEL: (800) 235-7566 | FAX: (703) 476-2970
                     www.nctm.org



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