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					                            Section 1 Review
  1. A government is
        –   (a) the institution through which a society makes and enforces its public policies.
        –   (b) a collection of people.
        –   (c) always democratic.
        –   (d) the organization representing farms and industries.



  2. A state has the following four
    characteristics:
        – (a) population, territory, sovereignty, and government.
        – (b) sovereignty, a perfect union, welfare, and territory.
        – (c) people, places, force, and divine right.
        – (d) justice, defense, liberty, and domestic tranquility.
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                                   2      3                        Chapter 1, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1. In a democracy,
        – (a) independent states form an alliance.
        – (b) supreme political authority rests with the people.
        – (c) those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.
        – (d) the rule by a few, select individuals regulates the will of the people.



  2. The United States government has the
    following characteristics:
        – (a) confederate, parliamentary, and dictatorship.
        – (b) unitary, presidential, and democracy.
        – (c) federal, presidential, and democracy.
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                           1             3                            Chapter 1, Section 2
                              Section 3 Review
  1. All of the following are basic notions found in
    the American concept of democracy EXCEPT
          –   (a) a recognition of of the fundamental worth and dignity of every person.
          –   (b) a respect for the equality of all persons.
          –   (c) the rule of government by a single individual.
          –   (d) an acceptance of the necessity of compromise.


  2. In a free enterprise system, the means of
    capital are owned
          – (a) by private and corporate entities.

          – (b) by government agencies.

         – (c) by only the agricultural sector.
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                             1       2                                   Chapter 1, Section 3
                            Section 1 Review
  1. All of the following are basic concepts of
    government brought to the colonies by English
    settlers EXCEPT
        (a) the need for limited government.
        (b) the need for a representative government.
        (c) the need for an autocratic government.
        (d) the need for an ordered social system.


  2. Which of the following was not one of the
    rights granted in the Magna Carta?
        (a) The right to private property.
        (b) The right to a trial by jury.
        (c) The right to freedom of religion.
        (d) The right to undergo due process of the law.
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                                  2       3      4         5      Chapter 2, Section 1
                           Section 2 Review
  1. The Declaration of Independence was
    signed in
        (a) 1765.
        (b) 1776.
        (c) 1781.
        (d) 1787.


  2. The Stamp Act of 1765 was a law enacted by
    the British that
        (a) increased the colonists’ taxes.
        (b) was repealed by the Magna Carta.
        (c) the colonists ratified one year later.
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                           1            3      4      5          Chapter 2, Section 2
                            Section 3 Review
  1. The government set up by the Articles of
    Confederation had
         (a) the power to make treaties and build a navy.
         (b) a bicameral congress.
         (c) separation of powers.
         (d) a President to carry out its laws.


  2. Which of the following was a weakness of
    the Articles of Confederation?
         (a) Congress could not make treaties.
         (b) Congress could not borrow money.
         (c) The States did not agree to obey the Articles.
         (d) Congress could not lay or collect taxes or duties.
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                           1      2              4      5          Chapter 2, Section 3
                             Section 4 Review
  1. The first national government for the United
    States was
        (a) the First Continental Congress.
        (b) the Second Continental Congress.
        (c) the Articles of Confederation.
        (d) the Constitution of the United States.


  2. The Constitutional Convention in
    Philadelphia involved delegates from each of
    the following states except
        (a) Maryland.
        (b) Rhode Island.
        (c) New York.
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                            1       2      3              5          Chapter 2, Section 4
                            Section 5 Review
  1. The debate over the ratification of the
    Constitution was won by the
        (a) Anti-Federalists.
        (b) Whigs.
        (c) Federalists.
        (d) Tories.


  2. The temporary capital of the United States
    where Congress met in 1789 was
        (a) Washington, D.C.
        (b) Philadelphia.
        (c) New York.
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                            1      2      3      4                  Chapter 2, Section 5
                            Section 1 Review
  1. Article II of the Constitution establishes the
    powers of the
        (a) executive branch.
        (b) legislative branch.
        (c) States.
        (d) judicial branch.


  2. The principle of popular sovereignty asserts
    that the
        (a) government should be divided into three branches.
        (b) monarch is the supreme ruler.
        (c) means of production should be owned by the proletariat.
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                                  2     3                       Chapter 3, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1.    A formal amendment
        (a) changes the Constitution by passing laws.
        (b) changes the written language of the Constitution itself.
        (c) allows States to secede from the United States.
        (d) none of the above.



  2.    Many of the basic rights of citizens are constitutionally guaranteed in
        (a) English common law.
        (b) the Declaration of Independence.
        (c) the Magna Carta.
        (d) the Bill of Rights.


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                           1              3                        Chapter 3, Section 2
                             Section 3 Review
  1. An informal amendment can be established
    by
         (a) actions taken by the President.
         (b) custom.
         (c) key decisions of the Supreme Court.
         (d) all of the above.


  2. An executive agreement is
         (a)   a promise from the President to the legislature.
         (b)   a pact made by the President directly with the head of a foreign state.
         (c)   a decision made by the President and his cabinet members.
         (d)   the contract the President signs when he accepts the office.
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                             1      2                              Chapter 3, Section 3
                           Section 1 Review
  1. The expressed powers granted to the
    National Government are found
        –   (a) in the Constitution.
        –   (b) in the Declaration of Independence.
        –   (c) in common law.
        –   (d) in State constitutions.

  2. The reserved powers
        – (a) are granted by the Articles of Confederation.
        – (b) are powers granted to only local governments.
        – (c) are those powers that the Constitution does not grant to the National
          Government and does not, at the same time, deny to the States.

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                                 2      3                      Chapter 4, Section 1
                             Section 2 Review
  1. The Constitution requires the National
    Government to provide all of the following to
    the States EXCEPT
        –   (a) a republican form of government.
        –   (b) protection from invasion or internal disorder.
        –   (c) a national health care system.
        –   (d) respect for territorial integrity.



  2. An example of cooperative federalism is seen in
        – (a) admitting new States.
        – (b) federal grants-in-aid.
        – (c) the Supreme Court.
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                            1               3                            Chapter 4, Section 2
                             Section 3 Review
  1. The Full Faith and Credit Clause guarantees that
    in most cases
         –   (a) a State will recognize the laws, documents, and court rulings of another State.
         –   (b) States will provide for consumer credit cards.
         –   (c) a State will be able to supercede the laws of the Constitution.
         –   (d) States can ignore the laws and regulations of the other States.


  2. States can charge higher tuition rates for State
    universities to out-of-State residents under the
         –   (a) Full Faith and Credit Clause.
         –   (b) extradition clause.
         –   (c) Privileges and Immunities Clause.
         –   (d) Northeast Dairy Compact.
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                            1      2                                     Chapter 4, Section 3
                            Section 1 Review
  1. A political party can be
        –   (a) principle-oriented.
        –   (b) issue-oriented.
        –   (c) election-oriented.
        –   (d) all of the above.



  2. Political parties fulfill all of the following
    functions EXCEPT
        – (a) acting as watchdog.
        – (b) informing and activating supporters.
        – (c) supplying all campaign funding.
        – (d) governing by partisanship.
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                                      2   3     4       5         Chapter 5, Section 1
                              Section 2 Review
  1. When Democrats and Republicans cooperate
    with one another, they are acting in a
    way.
        –   (a) strange
        –   (b) pluralistic
        –   (c) bipartisan
        –   (d) typical


  2. The outlook of the two parties could be
    described as
        – (a) “too little, too late.”
        – (b) “middle of the road.”
        – (c) “a day late and a dollar short.”
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                              1          3      4      5              Chapter 5, Section 2
                              Section 3 Review
  1. The nation’s first two parties were
         –   (a) the Democrats and the Republicans.
         –   (b) the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists.
         –   (c) the Democratic-Republicans and the Republican-Democrats.
         –   (d) the Federalists and the Republicans.


  2. The Republican Party dominated the
    presidency from
         –   (a) 1932–1968.
         –   (b) 1860–1932.
         –   (c) 1800–1860.
         –   (d) 1783–1800.
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                           1      2              4      5              Chapter 5, Section 3
                             Section 4 Review
  1. Types of minor parties in the United States
    include all of the following EXCEPT
        –   (a) ideological parties.
        –   (b) single-issue parties.
        –   (c) regulatory parties.
        –   (d) splinter parties.

  2. Ross Perot, who ran as a third-party
    candidate in 1992 and 1996, falls into which
    minor party category?
       – (a) single-issue party
       – (b) splinter party
       – (c) economic protest party
       – (d) none of the above
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                            1       2     3             5              Chapter 5, Section 4
                             Section 5 Review
  1. Where did the decentralized structure of the
    two major parties originate?
        –   (a)   with the Fourteenth Amendment
        –   (b)   popular opinion demanded decentralization
        –   (c)   the Federalist nature of the government
        –   (d)   all of the above


  2.All of the following are factors in the present,
    weakened state of parties EXCEPT
        – (a) split-ticket voting.
        – (b) changes in the technology of campaigning.
        – (c) scandal surrounding national conventions.
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                             1     2     3      4                     Chapter 5, Section 5
                            Section 1 Review
  1. Suffrage in the United States
        (a) has been gradually extended to more and more citizens.
        (b) is granted to property owners only.
        (c) is granted to only women.
        (d) has gradually lessened the number of eligible voters.



  2. The minimum voting age in the United States
    today is
        (a) 21 years of age.
        (b) 25 years of age.
        (c) 18 years of age.
        (d) 16 years of age.
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                                  2       3      4                 Chapter 6, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1. The three universal requirements States use
    for a person to be eligible to vote are
        (a) residence, gender, and income.
        (b) citizenship, property ownership, and gender.
        (c) citizenship, residence, and age.
        (d) income, employment, and age.



  2. The 24th Amendment forbids the use of
       (a) poll taxes.
       (b) alcohol.
       (c) literacy tests as a means of voter qualification.
       (d) the death penalty.
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                           1              3      4                 Chapter 6, Section 2
                            Section 3 Review
  1. The Fifteenth Amendment
         (a) protects the voting right of adult male citizens of every race.
         (b) gives women the right to vote.
         (c) forbids denying any citizen under the age of 18 the right to vote.
         (d) calls for members of the U.S. Senate to be elected directly by the people.


  2. Which piece of Civil Rights legislation was
    the most effective and influential?
         (a) The Civil Rights Act of 1957
         (b) The Civil Rights Act of 1960
         (c) The Civil Rights Act of 1964
         (d) The Voting Rights Act of 1965
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                           1      2              4                 Chapter 6, Section 3
                            Section 4 Review
  1. The reason why most nonvoters do not vote
    is
        (a) they are too ill.
        (b) they believe that their vote will not matter.
        (c) they are not officially United States citizens.
        (d) they are unexpectedly out of town on election day.


  2. Voters’ choices are affected by
        (a) their income and occupation.
        (b) their education.
        (c) their religious and ethnic background.
        (d) all of the above.

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                           1      2       3                        Chapter 6, Section 4
                            Section 1 Review
  1.    The practical reason behind establishing a bicameral legislature was
        –   (a) the necessity to find compromise between the New Jersey and Virginia plans.
        –   (b) the need to mimic existing British institutions.
        –   (c) a desire to break from all tradition.
        –   (d) requirements set by the British monarchy.



  2.    Special sessions of Congress
        – (a) are called by the President to deal with some emergency situation.
        – (b) are called whenever a senator filibusters.
        – (c) are never called.

        – (d) are used to handle the everyday business of Congress.

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                                  2       3      4                 Chapter 10, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1. Members of the House of Representatives
    are elected for
        –   (a) two-year terms.
        –   (b) six-year terms.
        –   (c) four-year terms.
        –   (d) five-year terms.


  2. The Constitution requires a member of
    Congress to be
        – (a) an inhabitant of the State from which he or she is elected.
        – (b) a property-owning male.
        – (c) a natural-born citizen.
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                           1             3     4                   Chapter 10, Section 2
                             Section 3 Review
  1. Senators are elected for
         –   (a) two-year terms.
         –   (b) eight-year terms.
         –   (c) four-year terms.
         –   (d) six-year terms.


  2. The Senate is a continuous body, meaning
    that
         –   (a) Senators must continually reside in Washington, D.C.
         –   (b) all of its seats are always up for election every six years.
         –   (c) it never adjourns.
         –   (d) all of its seats are never up for election at one time.
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                            1        2             4                    Chapter 10, Section 3
                           Section 4 Review
  1. Which of the following is a major role of
    members of Congress?
       –   (a) law enforcement
       –   (b) servant of their constituents
       –   (c) serving in the military
       –   (d) researching court cases


  2. The franking privilege allows members of
    Congress to
        – (a) purchase as many hot dogs as necessary while in office.
        – (b) mail letters and other materials postage-free.
        – (c) vote on legislation.
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                           1      2      3                       Chapter 10, Section 4
                            Section 1 Review
  1. The Constitution grants all of the following
     powers to Congress EXCEPT
        –   (a) the expressed powers.
        –   (b) the inherent powers.
        –   (c) the monarchical powers.
        –   (d) the reserved powers.


  2. Strict constructionists favored Congress
     exercising
        – (a) only the expressed powers and those implied powers necessary to carry out
        –     the expressed powers.
        – (b) unlimited power.
        – (c) only the powers granted to it by State constitutions.
        – (d) powers granted to Congress through acts of the President.
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                                  2       3      4      5          Chapter 11, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1. Which of the following is a limit on
    Congress’s power to tax?
        –   (a) only being allowed to tax for private purposes
        –   (b) not being allowed to tax imports
        –   (c) apportioning all direct taxes equally among the States based on population
        –   (d) only being allowed to tax businesses


  2. The commerce power gives Congress the
    right to
        – (a) regulate interstate and foreign trade.
        – (b) establish proceedings for bankruptcies.
        – (c) practice deficit financing.
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                           1              3      4      5              Chapter 11, Section 2
                             Section 3 Review
  1. The process by which a citizen of one country
    becomes a citizen of another is known as
         –   (a) acquisition.
         –   (b) copyright law.
         –   (c) eminent domain.
         –   (d) naturalization.


  2. All of the following are part of Congress’s war
    powers EXCEPT
         –   (a) the power to provide and maintain a navy.
         –   (b) the power to raise and support armies.
         –   (c) the power of eminent domain.
         –   (d) the power to discipline the military.
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                            1      2              4      5             Chapter 11, Section 3
                            Section 4 Review
  1.    The basis for the implied powers of Congress is found in
        –   (a) the Necessary and Proper Clause.
        –   (b) the Implied Clause.
        –   (c) the Articles of Confederation.
        –   (d) the Supremacy Clause.


  2.    The Supreme Court upheld the idea of implied powers in its ruling in
        – (a) Marbury v. Madison, 1803.
        – (b) Dred Scott v. Sandford, 1857.
        – (c) McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819.

        – (d) Ex parte Milligan, 1866.


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                           1      2       3             5              Chapter 11, Section 4
                             Section 5 Review
  1.    All of the following are nonlegislative powers of Congress EXCEPT
        –   (a) selecting the President if no candidate receives a majority in the electoral college.
        –   (b) nominating Cabinet positions and Supreme Court justices.
        –   (c) approving executive branch appointments.
        –   (d) proposing amendments to the Constitution.


  2. Which of the following series of events is correct for the impeachment of a
       government official?
        – (a) The Supreme Court holds hearings, the House votes to impeach, a trial is held in the
          Senate.
        – (b) The Senate holds hearings, the Senate votes to impeach, a trial is held in the House.
        – (c) The House holds hearings, the House votes to impeach, a trial is held in the Senate.
        – (d) none of the above.


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                             1       2      3       4                    Chapter 11, Section 5
                            Section 1 Review
  1. As commander in chief, the President
        (a) is the leader of all the nation’s armed forces.
        (b) initiates legislation.
        (c) is the director of the government.
        (d) represents the citizens of the United States abroad.



  2. In order to become President, a citizen
    needs to be at least
        (a) 25 years old.
        (b) 35 years old.
        (c) 45 years old.

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        (d) 30 years old.

                                  2       3      4      5          Chapter 13, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1. Who is in line for presidential succession
    following the Vice President?
        (a) the First Lady
        (b) the Speaker of the House
        (c) the president of the Senate
        (d) the Secretary of State


  2. Which constitutional amendment provides
    for presidential succession?
        (a) the 25th Amendment
        (b) the 26th Amendment
        (c) the 22nd Amendment
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                            1             3      4       5              Chapter 13, Section 2
                            Section 3 Review
  1. Which year’s election paved the way for
    changes in the electoral college?
         (a) 1800
         (b) 1792
         (c) 1804
         (d) 1812


  2. Which amendment to the Constitution
    modified the electoral college to avoid electoral
    ties for the office of President?
         (a) the 11th Amendment
         (b) the 5th Amendment
         (c) the 9th Amendment
         (d) the 12th Amendment
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                           1      2              4      5              Chapter 13, Section 3
                            Section 4 Review
  1. More than half of the presidential primary
    States hold only a
        (a) caucus.
        (b) winner-take-all primary.
        (c) preference primary.
        (d) nominating convention.


  2. A party’s formal statement of its basic
    principles and views is called the party’s
        (a) plank.
        (b) primary.
        (c) constitution.
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                           1      2      3             5              Chapter 13, Section 4
                                Section 5 Review
  1. Which of the following is a possible flaw of the electoral college system?
        (a) Electors are not bound to cast their electoral vote for the party they represent.
        (b) A candidate can fail to win a majority of electoral votes
        (c) A candidate can win the popular vote but lose the electoral vote.
        (d) All of the above.
  2. The proportional plan for electoral college reform suggests that
        (a) electors are chosen by State legislatures.
        (b) candidates receive a share of a State’s electoral votes correlating to his or her share of the
            State’s popular vote.
        (c) electors are chosen based on congressional districts.
        (d) the candidate that wins the popular vote automatically receives 102 electoral votes.



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                                1   2       3       4                    Chapter 13, Section 5
                              Section 1 Review
  1. The Executive Article of the Constitution is
        –   (a) Article I.
        –   (b) Article II.
        –   (c) Article IV.
        –   (d) Article V.



  2. The two views of presidential power are
    mostly centered on
        – (a) the extent of powers the President may act with.
        – (b) the President’s relationship to the electorate.
        – (c) constitutional amendments curtailing presidential power.

        – (d) none of Magruder’s
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                                  2       3      4                 Chapter 14, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1. The President is commanded to execute the
    provisions of federal law by
        –   (a) acts of Congress.
        –   (b) the oath of office and another constitutional provision.
        –   (c) the Supreme Court.
        –   (d) the electoral college.


  2. Which of the following government officials
    is not appointed by the President?
        – (a) Supreme Court justices
        – (b) Cabinet members and their top aides
        – (c) Speaker of the House
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                           1              3      4                     Chapter 14, Section 2
                            Section 3 Review
  1. A treaty is
         –   (a) the power to build a navy and other armed forces.
         –   (b) a formal agreement between two or more sovereign states.
         –   (c) recognition of a foreign government by the President.
         –   (d) a condemnation of a foreign government by the American people.


  2. When acting as head of the nation’s armed
    forces, the President is filling the role of
         –   (a) commander in chief.
         –   (b) chief legislator.
         –   (c) head elector.
         –   (d) president pro tempore.
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                           1      2              4                     Chapter 14, Section 3
                           Section 4 Review
  1. A presidential veto of legislation can only be
    overturned by a
       –   (a) two-thirds vote in both houses of Congress.
       –   (b) two-thirds vote in the Senate.
       –   (c) two-thirds vote in the House.
       –   (d) three-fifths vote in both houses of Congress.


  2. Reprieves and pardons are both examples of
    the President’s
        – (a) appointment power.
        – (b) wartime powers.
        – (c) ordinance power.
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                          1       2      3                         Chapter 14, Section 4
                            Section 1 Review
  1. The Bill of Rights was ratified
        –   (a) with the Constitution.
        –   (b) in 1791.
        –   (c) in 1833.
        –   (d) in 1964.



  2. The 14th Amendment includes the
        –   (a) Bill of Rights.
        –   (b) Due Process Clause.
        –   (c) rights of an accused person.
        –   (d) all of the above.


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                                   2      3     4                 Chapter 19, Section 1
                            Section 2 Review
  1. The Establishment Clause and the Free
    Exercise Clause protect
        –   (a) freedom of petition.
        –   (b) freedom of assembly.
        –   (c) freedom of religion.
        –   (d) all of the above.



  2. The Lemon Test evaluates
       – (a) if a car has manufacturer’s defects.
       – (b) what aid is appropriate to give parochial schools.
       – (c) when it is appropriate to salute the flag.
       – (d) all of the above.
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                           1              3      4                     Chapter 19, Section 2
                            Section 3 Review
  1. Sedition means
         –   (a) the practice of espionage.
         –   (b) exercising treasonous practices.
         –   (c) attempting to overthrow the government by force.
         –   (d) blatant industrial espionage.


  2. The most regulated form of communication
    is
         –   (a) symbolic speech.
         –   (b) commercial speech.
         –   (c) radio and television broadcasts.
         –   (d) motion pictures.
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                            1      2                4                  Chapter 19, Section 3
                            Section 4 Review
  1. The freedom to assemble and petition
    includes
        –   (a) the right of association.
        –   (b) the right to trespass on private property.
        –   (c) the right to demonstrate without prior notice.
        –   (d) all of the above.


  2. The government has the right to regulate
    the
        – (a) timing of a demonstration.
        – (b) content of a demonstration.
        – (c) manner of a demonstration.
        connect to the of a demonstration.
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                           1      2       3                            Chapter 19, Section 4

				
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