Docstoc

MSI - College of American Pathologists

Document Sample
MSI - College of American Pathologists Powered By Docstoc
					About these slides 
SPEC – Short Presentation in Emerging Concepts

• Provided by the CAP as an aid to pathologists to 
  facilitate discussion on the topic
• Content has been reviewed by experts at the 
  CAP, but does not necessarily reflect the official 
  opinion of the College of American Pathologists.
• Non-CAP material with identified copyright source 
  may only be copied or distributed under a license 
  (permission) from the copyright holder, or under 
  the doctrine of fair use.
• Version 1.0fc2, rev. 12/31/2013
Emerging Concepts in Colorectal 
            Cancer:
Hereditary Non-Polyposis Cancer
       (Lynch Syndrome) 


   Short Presentations in Emerging 
          Concepts (SPEC)
Colorectal Cancer:
Molecular Pathways
Molecular pathways in colon cancer
 What value is there in recognizing MSI-H 
 colorectal tumors?

1. Prognosis
2. Response to chemotherapy
3. Screen for Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC)
Prognostic significance of MSI-H in sporadic 
CRC




                            Gryfe,R et al, NEJM 2000; 342:69-77
Tumor Microsatellite-Instability Status as a Predictor of Benefit 
from Fluorouracil-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Colon 
Cancer
 Ribic, C.R., et al. New Engl J Med 349:247-57 (2003)
Colorectal Cancer:
Molecular Pathways
Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC)
• HNPCC – Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colon Cancer
   – Historically:
       • Lynch Syndrome I – restricted to colon
       • Lynch Syndrome II – colon and extracolonic sites


• Accounts for 3-4% of all colon cancers
• Accounts for 15-20% of MSI tumors

• Inherited predisposition to many different cancers, 
  including colon cancer
Lynch Syndrome: Cardinal Features
 • Autosomal dominant inheritance

 • Gene penetrance for CRC of 85-90%
    – Develop CRC at an early age - 45 yrs
    – Most CRC (70%) proximal to splenic flexure
    – Multiple CRC’s common - synchronous and 
      metachronous
    – Prognosis better than sporadic CRC
    – Associated pathologic features

 • Increased risk for other malignancies
Lynch Syndrome:
Extracolonic Tumors

 Site                  Features
 Endometrium           Second most common
 Stomach               Older generations
 Small bowel           Risk 25X in HNPCC
 Hepatobiliary tract   5% risk
 Ureter and pelvis     14-20% risk
 Skin                  Muir-Torre Syndrome
 Pancreas              Trend for increase
 Brain                 GBM in some HNPCC (Turcot’s)
 Hematologic           Case reports
 Soft tissue           Case reports
 Larynx                Case report
Lynch Syndrome: 
Cumulative cancer risk in LS carriers by age 
70
Site of tumor                Finnish population (%)     HNPCC families (%)

Colon/rectum                          1.6                         82

Endometrium                           1.3                         60

Stomach                               0.8                         13

Ovary                                 1.3                         12

Bladder, ureter, urethra              0.7                         4.0

Brain                                 0.9                         3.7

Kidney                                0.8                         3.3

Biliary tract, gallbladder            0.2                         2.0

                                  Aarnio M, et al, Int J Cancer 1999; 81:214-218.
Lynch Syndrome:
Cumulative cancer risk by age 70

By age 70, the risk for endometrial cancer 
 exceeds that of colon cancer:

  Site               Incidence by age 70 in 
                     women
  Endometrium        60%
  Colon              54%


                    Aarnio, M et al, Int J Cancer 1999; 81:214-18
Lynch Syndrome:
Pathological features of colorectal cancer

 •   Poor differentiation
 •   Increased signet cells
 •   Medullary features
 •   Peritumoral lymphocyte infiltration
 •   Crohn’s like reaction
 •   Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL’s)
How to recognize Lynch Syndrome
• Amsterdam Criteria
  – Clinical guidelines for when to suspect Lynch 
    Syndrome


• Bethesda Guidelines
  – Guidelines for when to do MSI testing


• Screen all new colon cancers?
Lynch Syndrome - Amsterdam 
Criteria II (1999)
 • At least three family members with a Lynch Syndrome-
   associated cancer, two of whom are first-degree 
   relatives.
 • At least two generations represented.
 • At least 1 individual younger than 50 years at diagnosis.
 • FAP should be excluded.
 • Tumors should be verified by pathologic examination.



                      Vasen et al, Gastroenterology 1999;116:1453-56
  Revised Bethesda Guidelines for testing 
  colorectal tumors for MSI - 2004
Tumors from individuals should be tested for MSI in the following 
   situations:
1. Colorectal cancer in a patient less than 50 years of age.
2. Presence of synchronous, metachronous colorectal, or other HNPCC 
   associated tumors, regardless of age.
3. Colorectal cancer with the MSI-H histology diagnosed in a patient less 
   than 60 yr.
4. Colorectal cancer diagnosed in one or more first-degree relatives with 
   an HNPCC-related tumor, with one of the cancers being diagnosed 
   under age 50 yr.
5. Colorectal cancer diagnosed in two or more first- or second-degree 
   relatives with HNPCC-related tumors, regardless of age.


                      Umar, et al., J Natl Cancer Inst 2004; 96:261-8
Lynch Syndrome:
Mismatch repair gene mutations

 Gene             Frequency in HNPCC

 MSH2             ~39%

 MLH1             ~32%

 PMS1             Rare

 PMS2             ~14%

 GTBP/MSH6        ~14%

 Other            ?
 Immunohistochemistry
 for MMR Protein Expression


 MLH1                                  MSH2




 MSH6                                 PMS2




Loss of expression
   Due to mutation      Lynch Syndrome
   Due to methylation   Sporadic MSI CRC
Universal screening
Recommendations from the EGAPP Working Group: 
  genetic testing strategies in newly diagnosed individuals 
  with colorectal cancer aimed at reducing morbidity and 
  mortality from Lynch syndrome in relatives

Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Working Group




                                       Genetics in Medicine 11:35-41 (2009)
Significance of Lynch Syndrome

1. The patient is at risk for other cancers 
   and needs appropriate surveillance.
2. The patient’s relatives will also be at 
   increased risk if they carry the same 
   mutation, and will need appropriate 
   surveillance.
3. Relatives can be tested to determine their 
   risk, and level of surveillance.
Summary
• MSI-H tumors account for about 20% of all colon 
  cancers.
• Lynch Syndrome tumors account for 15 - 20% of MSI-H 
  colon cancers, and about 4% of all colon cancers.
• MSI-H colon cancers are biologically distinctive in their 
  behavior.
• MSI testing should be performed if indicated by 
  Bethesda Guidelines.
• MSI testing can be performed on fixed tissue.
• Patients with MSI-H tumors are candidates for genetic 
  counseling and further genetic testing.
Selected Resources


Lynch HT, et al. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma and 
    HNPCC-like families: problems in diagnosis,m surveillance, and 
    management. Cancer .2004 ;100:53-64.

EGAPP Working Group. Recommendations from the EGAPP Working 
   Group: genetic testing strategies in newly diagnosed individuals with 
   colorectal cancer aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality from Lynch 
   syndrome in relatives. Genet Med. 2009 ;11(1):35-41.

Vasen HF, Blanco I, Aktan-Collan K, et al. Revised guidelines for the clinical 
    management of Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC): recommendations by a group 
    of European experts. Gut. 2013;62(6):812-823.
   Additional Free Resource for CAP Members 
   NOTE:  please remove this page before 
   presenting.
    CAP Member Exclusive: CAP Pathology Resource Guides
    Focused on a specific hot-topic technology, these
    comprehensive guides highlights current resources, select
    journal articles, as well as CAP and non-CAP educational
    opportunities. And don’t miss the “Insights From Early
    Adopters” section in each guide to gain perspective from
    pioneering colleagues.
    AVAILABLE NOW:
    • Molecular Pathology (single gene test, small panel)
    • Genomic Analysis (large panel, exome, genome)
    Learn more: go to cap.org and type Pathology Resource Guides in the 
       “search” field located at the top of your screen.
“An outstanding overview
of basic materials,
including the technology                                          “Extremely well done,
and links to a number of                                          of high practical and
individuals and centers                                           educational value.”
that can assist.”

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:3/23/2014
language:English
pages:24