Docstoc

DIABETES MELLITUS IN CHILDREN

Document Sample
DIABETES MELLITUS IN CHILDREN Powered By Docstoc
					DIABETES  MELLITUS  IN 
 CHILDREN: CLINICAL 
FEATURES, DIAGNOSTICS 
   AND TREATMENT

As. Prof. Sakharova Inna. Ye., MD,PhD 
   Diabetes mellitus  (DM) - a 
 metabolic  disorder  of  multiple 
 etiologies  characterized  by  chronic 
 hyperglycemia  with  disturbances  of 
 carbohydrate,  fat  and  protein 
 metabolism  resulting  from  defects  in 
 insulin  secretion,  insulin action,  or 
 both (WHO, 1999)
    Destruction  of b-cells  of  islet  of 
   Langerhans  cause  an  absolute 
   deficiency  of  insulin,  leading  to         
   type  I  diabetes  mellitus  (insulin-
   dependent  diabetes  mellitus,  DM 
   type 1).
• 10% of all DM cases Insulin deficiency
• Juvenile onset
• HLA DR 3+4 associations:
o 53% of people with type I diabetes have one
  DR3 and one DR4, with one of these coming
  from each parent.
o Only 3% of people without diabetes have this
  DR3/DR4 combination.
•   4 genes thought to be important
•   30 - 50% concordance in identical twins
•   Positive family history with 10%
•   Associated with other autoimmune
    diseases 
    Clinical classification of DM type 1.

Severity     Glycemic     Complications
              control
- Mild     - Ideal          - Acute
           - Optimal         
- Moderate - Suboptimal - Chronic
           - High risk for 
 - Severe  the life
            DM severity criteria

•   Mild form 
-   Absence of ketoacidosis in anamnesis
-   Absence of micro- and macroangiopathies
-   Treatment consists of diet, physical 
    exercises, phytotherapy (it’s enough for 
    ideal glycemic control maintaining)
           DM severity criteria

• Moderate form
- In anamnesis – ketoacidosis (I-II stages)
- Presence of diabetic retinopathy I st., 
  diabetic nephropathy  I-III st. or diabetic 
  arthropathy I st.
- For achievement of ideal glycemic control 
  is necessary to use insulin, or oral drug 
  therapy or combination of both
           DM severity criteria

• Severe form
- Non stable course of the disease (frequent 
  ketoacidosis cases or coma in anamnesis)
- Presence of different chronic 
  complications
- Patients need permanent insulin 
  injections
   Clinical criteria of glycemic control
Ideal    Optimal        Suboptimal High risk for the 
                                   life

Symp-    Symptoms       Polyuria,      Poor vision, 
toms     are absent,    polydipsia,    painful seizures, 
of DM    but            poor           growth and sexual 
are      sometimes      weight         development 
absent   can be         gain. Can      retardation, 
         mild           be episodes    angiopathies, skin 
         hypogly-       of severe      infections, 
         cemia          hypogly-       episodes of severe 
                        cemia          hypogly-cemia
                Laboratory criteria
                 of glycemic control
Glucose,  Ideal        Optimal     Subopti     High risk 
(mmol/L)                           mal         for the life

Fasting      3,6-6,1    4,0-7,0      > 8,0         > 9,0
glycemia
After food   4,4-7,0   5,0-11,0    11,0-14,0      > 14,0
glycemia
Night        3,6-6,0   Not < 3,6   < 3,6 or      < 3,0 or 
glycemia                            > 9,0         > 11,0
HbAlc, %     < 6,05      < 7,6      7,6-9,0       > 9,0
 The main evident signs of the DM type 1:
ü hyperglycemia
- glucose uptake by cells decreased
- glucose utilisation by cells decreased
ü glycosuria
ü polyuria
- excessive urine production
- blood glucose levels exceed the rate of
   glomerular filtration by the kidneys
- glucose appears in the urine and acts as an
   osmotic diuretic
üpolydipsia
- due to dehydration
üpolyphagia
- excessive eating
- hypothalamic control of appetite has
  insulin sensitive transport systems
üweight loss
üfatigue and weakness
        Diagnostic  criteria:
• A random blood glucose level greater than 
  11,1 mmol/l (i.e.>200 mg/dl), which is 
  verified on a repeat test, is sufficient to
  make the diagnosis of DM
                       or 
•  Fasting blood glucose > 6,1 mmol/l (>110 
  mg/ dl) (fasting is no food for > 8 hours), 
  which is verified on a repeat test, is
  sufficient to make the diagnosis of DM
  Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)


  Obtain a fasting blood sugar level, then 
  administer per os glucose load (1.75 g/kg 
  for children [max 75 g]). Check blood 
  glucose concentration again after 2 
  hours. 
           Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)
  Diagnosis         Time of     Glucose level (mmol/L)
                   checking
                               Whole blood       Plasma
Diabetes          Fasting          ³  6,1          ³ 7,0
mellitus
                  In 2 hours       ³ 11,1         ³ 11,1
Impaired         Fasting           < 6,1           < 7,0
Glucose
                 In 2 hours    ³ 7,8 <  11,1   ³ 7,8 <  11,1
Tolerance (IGT)
Impaired Fasting Fasting       ³ 5,6 < 6,1     ³ 6,1 < 7,0
Glycaemia (IFG):
                 In 2 hours        < 7,8           < 7,8
           Laboratory studies:

• Blood glucose (glycemic profile). Blood
  glucose tests using capillary blood samples,
  reagent sticks, and blood glucose meters are
  the usual methods for monitoring day-to-day
  diabetes control;
• Urinalysis for glucose (glucosuric profile);
• Serum electrolytes;
• Protein in urine, microalbuminuria - urinary
  albumin excretion rate (normal level < 20 mg
  min)
• Urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (normal
  level < 2,5mg/mmol for men and <3,5 for
  women)
• Ketone bodies in urine and blood (With
  hyperglycemia and heavy glycosuria,
  ketonuria is a marker of insulin
  deficiency and potential DKA)
• White blood cell count and blood and
  urine cultures to rule out infection;
• Glucosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc)
  N 6-9 % for diabetic patient
• Fructosamine level in blood
• Islet cell antibodies;
• Fasting lipid profile  (cholesterol,
  triglycerides, HDL/LDL calculation)
• Level of C-peptide and insuline in blood
            Instrumental studies:

•   ECG
•   US examination of abdominal cavity
•   Fundoscopy
•   Densitometry
•   Rheovasography of legs
Optimal therapy for diabetes mellitus 
           must include

Ø Insulin 
Ø A regimen for physical fitness 
Ø Psychological support 
Ø Nutritional management
      Daily insulin doses for children:
            Age        Insulin dose (Units/kg)

Infants (< 1 year)           0,1 - 0,125
Toddlers (1-3 years)         0,15 – 0,17
3-9 years                     0,2 – 0,5
9-12 years                    0,5 – 0,8
> 12 years                  1,0 and more
Insulin has 3 basic formulations:
•  short-acting, regular insulin (aktrapid)
• medium- or intermediate-acting (protaphan, 
  isophane, lente)
•  and long-acting (ultralente)
    The main rules of insulinotherapy im
                 children:

• In ketoacidosis should be used only regular 
  insulin 
• Optimal frequency of injections is 4-5 times per 
  day (if 4 times – 9 a.m.(regular), 13 p.m.(regular), 
  18 p.m. (regular), 22 p.m (medium-acting); if 5 
  times – 6 a.m.(regular), 9 a.m.(regular), 14 p.m. 
  (regular), 19 p.m. (regular), 23 p.m (regular); 
• Can be used insulin pompes
The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted 
through a needle into the abdominal fat of a person with 
diabetes.
Designer Ellaluna Taylor has come up with her Flex insulin pump system 
that targets active diabetes sufferers, as this system functions as a “unique 
prosthetic skin” that can be worn under clothing, functioning as a discreet 
glucose management solution. It comes with a PDA-like glucose eReader 
that will talk to the device, where the latter runs on soft battery technology 
while its MEMS Nano Pump is used for increased dosage accuracy and 
reliability. 
        Treatment of diabetic coma
             (DKA III stage)

• An initial intravenous bolus of regular insulin 
  at 0.1 U/kg body weight, followed by a 
  continuous infusion of regular insulin at a dose 
  of 0.1 U/kg/hour is the standard therapy 
  (before 50 U of insulin should be diluted in 50 
  ml of normal saline – than   1 ml will have 1 U 
  of insulin)
• When glucose decreased to 14 mmol/L (250 
  mg/dL) – insulin can be injected 
  subcutaneously (dose 1 U/kg/day).
• If the patient is hemodynamically stable, 
  isotonic saline can be given at a rate of 15-20 
  mL/kg/hour for the first several hours. Once 
  the serum glucose level is below 200-250 
  mg/dL, the fluids should be changed to one-half 
  normal saline with dextrose (D5 1/2NS) given at 
  a rate sufficient to replace the free water loss 
  induced by the osmotic diuresis. 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:7
posted:3/19/2014
language:Unknown
pages:33