Hexagon Core - Research

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					THE CORE OF THE HEXAGON
THE CORE CONSISTS OF 3
SCORED COMPONENTS
 CAS
 TOK

 Extended Essay
THE CORE CONSISTS OF 1
UNSCORED COMPONENT
 The learner profile
 Even though it is not officially scored, the learner
  profile is woven into the entire hexagon
CAS
CREATIVE, ACTION, SERVICE
    A framework for experiential learning, involving students
     in new and active roles
    Develops awareness and a sense of responsibility towards
     the community
    Encourages students to be involved in artistic pursuits,
     sports and community service
    Education outside the classroom
    Development of the learner profile
SELF EVALUATION & LEARNING
OUTCOMES
   When reflecting on learner outcomes, use a
    separate paragraph for each outcome!
   All eight learning outcomes must be
    achieved by the completion of CAS
AIMS OF CAS
   Building self-worth, self      Knowledge, skills, and
    -esteem, self-                  understanding
    confidence, autonomy           Recognizing that
    and self-reliance               education imposes
   Cultivating an                  lifelong ethical
    awareness of                    responsibilities
    humanitarian issues            Developing confidence
    across the world                in their ability to
   Acquiring an                    initiate change, both
    appreciation for the            individually and
    potential of the human          collaboratively
    mind and spirit as well        Developing a
    as of their own and             willingness to inquire
    others’ talents                 and an enjoyment of
                                    discovery
STRENGTHS AND AREAS FOR
GROWTH

 You are able to see yourselves as individuals with
  various skills and abilities
 You understand that you can make choices about how
  you wish to move forward
2. UNDERTAKEN NEW CHALLENGES

   A new challenge may be an unfamiliar activity or an
    extension to an existing one
3. PLANNED AND INITIATED
ACTIVITIES

 Planning and initiation may be in collaboration with
  others
 It can be shown in activities that are a part of larger
  projects
 It can be a part of smaller projects
4. WORKED COLLABORATIVELY WITH
OTHERS

   Can be shown in many different activities
5. SHOWN PERSEVERANCE AND
COMMITMENT

 Regular attendance
 Accepting a share of responsibility for dealing with
  problems that may arise
6. ENGAGED WITH ISSUES OF GLOBAL
IMPORTANCE


   Global issues can be acted upon locally or nationally
    (environment, caring for the elderly)
7. CONSIDERED THE ETHICAL
IMPLICATIONS OF MY ACTIONS

   Ethical issues arise in many CAS activities
8. DEVELOPED NEW SKILLS

 May be something new you learned
 Or increased expertise in an established area
HOURS
   50 hours in Freshman and Sophomore Year
HOURS
   150 hours in Junior and Senior Year

   No hours during the summer between Sophomore and
    Junior Year will count!
CAS HOURS
  All counts start over at the end of the Sophomore year
  Pre-IB CAS hours must be done during Pre-IB years
        All hours must be completed by the last day of classes prior
         to exams Sophomore year
    IB CAS hours must be done during IB years
GUIDELINES
   Must have all CAS earned after spring break your
    senior year
SOME GOOD NEWS…
   You will be all set for Bright Futures!




                                              YAY!
                                              !
CAS PROJECT
   A total of 30 hours that includes two CAS areas
CAS
 Make CAS meaningful!
 It is more than just going through the motions!
GUIDELINES FOR ALL CAS ACTIVITIES
   Supervision by parents, “self – administered”
    programs, or family supervision of activities are not
    acceptable
GUIDELINES FOR ALL CAS ACTIVITIES
 Prior to earning any hours, the activity must be pre-
  approved
 Activity log and site supervisors signature

 Evaluation

 Self evaluation
GUIDELINES FOR ALL CAS ACTIVITIES
   Hours earned will not be counted if the form and all
    activity logs are not submitted within 30 days of
    completion of the project
GUIDELINES FOR ALL CAS ACTIVITIES
   It is highly recommended that students participate in
    CAS hours regularly throughout high school
GUIDELINES FOR ALL CAS ACTIVITIES
   Students are not to include travel time as part of the
    CAS activity
GUIDELINES FOR ALL CAS ACTIVITIES
   The APC of the Magnet school has the final say
    regarding CAS

   You will not earn a high school diploma without CAS!
GUIDING QUESTIONS
 Is the activity a new role for me?
 Is it a real task?

 Does it have real consequences for others and me?

 What do I hope to learn?

 How can this benefit others?

 What can I reflect on during the activity?
CREATIVE
   Those in which a student plans or designs something
    and then carries it out with a tangible final product
CREATIVE HOURS: EXAMPLES
   Interpreted as imaginatively as possible and may
    include:
       Creating a sculpture, painting a picture
       Participating in a musical performance
       Planning practice drills for a sport and then
        overseeing the practice
       Planning a tutoring lesson
       Dance/theatre performance
CREATIVE HOURS
   Band, Chorus, Orchestra, Drama, etc…
    ◦   Nothing you do during school hours counts, but
        performances and competitions done during non-
        school hours count!
   Taking private lessons (instrument, dance,
    painting, etc…) counts because it’s outside of
    school
   Passive activities such as attending
    performances or visiting museums does NOT
    count!
ACTION
      Any activity that promotes physical fitness
ACTION
   Examples
-   Dance class
-   Organized sports
-   Karate classes
-   Organized fitness
-   Or anything that requires physical effort
    ◦ Moving furniture for a teacher
    ◦ Building homes with Habitat for Humanity
    ◦ Participating in a walk-a-thon
    ◦ Marching Band
SERVICE
 Service involves interaction, such as the building of
  links with individuals or groups in the community
 May exist on local, national, or international level

 Not just doing things for others, but doing things with
  others and developing a real commitment with them
SERVICE HOURS
   MUST address a SOCIAL ISSUE:
       Poverty
       Abuse
       Elderly citizens
       Health issues
       The environment
       Youth; Mentoring and Tutoring Students
       Mentally/Physically challenged issues
   But no more than 3!
SERVICE
   Choose one or two areas of interest
SERVICE HOURS
   Not just doing things for others, but with others
    and developing a real commitment to them
   Though raising money is great, the focus should
    not be on raising money but about making a
    difference
   Involves applying academic, social, and personal
    skills to improve the community
   It is recommended that in 11th and 12th grade,
    25 hours are earned on ONE project
SERVICE HOURS
 Direct Service: Reading or tutoring
 Indirect service: Collecting and sorting items
  for the homeless; putting food into boxes
 Advocacy: Civic response to social issues

 Research: Interview people, provide information
  to the community
SERVICE HOURS: EXAMPLES
 Relay for Life
 Habitat for Humanity

 Meals on Wheels

 United Food Bank of Plant City

 United Way

 Metropolitan Ministries

 The Salvation Army/ GoodWill
SERVICE HOURS: EXAMPLES
           Counts:                          Doesn’t count:
   Service club projects             Service club activities
    ◦   Collecting donations for       such as meetings,
        presents for the elderly       socials, or recreational
        at a nursing home with         activities
        NHS
                                      Raising money for a
   Fundraising for specific           field trip
    non-profits or charities
                                      Church youth group
   Church youth group                 activity to raise money
    activity to raise money            for a mission trip
    for the homeless
                                      Activities that serve the
   Taking a class trip with           school (Those are
    Band to go on a beach              Creative or Action!)
    clean-up
CAS IS NOT!
 Promotion of any religion, faith or political persuasion
 Service to the school or anything assigned in school

 Anything in which financial reward was obtained

 Family duties

 Any activity that does not have a leader

 Work experience that only benefits the student

 Passive activities such as filing, lab work, office work,
  visiting a museum, etc…
CAS PROCEDURES
      Find an activity
      Complete Part 1:
       ◦   Get a blank CAS form
       ◦   Fill out the top portion
       ◦   Get your activity PRE-APPROVED  (Have
           your parent/guardian sign FIRST!)
CAS PROCEDURES
   Complete Part 2:
       Complete your activity, and have the supervising
        adult (not a parent or relative!) initial next to your
        hours you logged, verifying you were there.
CAS PROCEDURES
      Complete Part 3:
          Once the activity is completed, have the supervising
           adult fill out the bottom portion of the form,
           evaluating your work.
CAS PROCEDURES
   Complete part 4:
       Complete the BACK of
        the CAS form
   Turn the form in to
    your homeroom
    teacher so they can
    complete Part 5.
DOCUMENTATION
 There is no such thing as over documenting
 Sometimes your CAS form is not enough



   Once you are done with creative and action, stop
    logging hours

   Never stop logging service!
TOK
THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE
    Critical reflection on how we know and what we know
    Develops awareness of cultural perspectives and biases
    Allows for connections to be established between disciplines
    Interdisciplinary
    Explores the nature of knowledge across disciplines
    Encouraging an appreciation of other cultural perspectives
EE
EXTENDED ESSAY
  4000 word essay, on a topic of student interest
  Provides excellent preparation for independent study at
   university level
  Offers the opportunity to investigate a research question of
   individual interest
  Familiarises students with the independent research and
   writing skills expected at university
TIMELINE JUNIOR YEAR
 January of Junior Year = assignment of supervisors
 Jan – Feb = establish guidelines with your supervisor

 March – June = meetings as needed and writing

 End of Junior Year = status reports and summer
  contact schedule
TIMELINE SENIOR YEAR
 Sept – Oct – meetings with supervisor and final
  revisions
 December (before winter break) – final submission
HOW LONG??
 You will be probably putting in about 40 hours of work
  on this essay
 12 – 16 pages long

				
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