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FLFD_5_Year_Strategic_Plan_2013_Update_FINAL 20140124

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					Forest Lakes Fire District (FLFD)

Five Year Strategic Plan (STRAP)

      2013 Annual Update
   Covering Fiscal Years (FY)
    2014/2015 thru 2018/2019

   Published January 24, 2014




                1
                                      Table of Contents

    I.   Preface ............................................................................ 4
   II.   Executive Summary ........................................................ 5
  III.   Introduction .................................................................... 8
   IV.   Leadership Team ........................................................... 13
    V.   Facilities ......................................................................... 15
   VI.   Equipment ...................................................................... 17
  VII.   Services/Service Area .................................................... 25
 VIII.   ISO Rating ..................................................................... 33
   IX.   Partners/Affiliates ......................................................... 35
    X.   Budget Process ............................................................... 36
   XI.   Planning Process ............................................................ 39
  XII.   Guiding Operational Principles ..................................... 44
 XIII.   Mission Statement .......................................................... 45
 XIV.    Vision Statement ............................................................ 46
  XV.    Values ............................................................................. 47
 XVI.    2013 Annual Survey ....................................................... 48
XVII.    SWOT ............................................................................ 61
XVIII.   Goals .............................................................................. 65
 XIX.    Definitions ...................................................................... 79
  XX.    Appendix A, Organization Chart .................................. 82
 XXI.    Appendix B, Fire District Priorities .............................. 84
XXII.    Appendix C, Five Year Budget Projections ................... 85
XXIII.   Appendix D, Paid-On-Call Participation ........................ 99
XXIV.    Appendix E, Green Waste Site ...................................... 118
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  XXV.    Appendix F, Auxiliary ................................................. 120
 XXVI.    Appendix G, Operations Needs Assessment ................. 122
XXVII.    Appendix H, Emergency Preparedness ........................ 124
XXVIII.   Appendix I, Succession Planning ................................. 127




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I.     Preface

The FLFD leadership team wishes to take this opportunity to express their thanks to all who
contributed to the preparation of the 2013 Five Year Strategic Plan Annual Update. The FLFD
five year strategic plan update addresses the fire district’s projected revenues and
expenditures, both operational and capital, for the next five fiscal year periods, beginning July
1, 2014.

The FLFD five year strategic plan update is intended to be used by the leadership team and the
community in general. It is the most complete description available of our district operations
and is published in the spirit of openness and transparency.

This is the third annual update to the original 5 year plan published December 27, 2010.

The annual update process began on August 24, 2013 when the first STRAP update meeting
was held. Subsequent meetings were held on September 21, September 28, October 19, October
26 and November 9. All meetings were of about 2 hours duration and were scheduled to
coincide with regular board meetings except for the all day meeting on October 26.

As a result of the participation and input from Forest Lakes’ residents the leadership team feels
the Five Year Strategic Plan 2013 Update will be a valuable resource for the district. It is a self
contained document and does not rely on reference to the plans previously published. The 2013
update is somewhat incomplete in that it addresses two key scenarios, A & B. The single most
important job facing the Board in 2014 is to arrive at a single go-forward strategy. This will
most likely be achieved in the September 2014 time frame.

Once again, our thanks to all who participated in the creation of this update. Our desire is that
the publication of the plan will encourage more residents to become better informed about
district operations and participate in the annual update process in the future.




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II.    Executive Summary

This document serves as the financial and operational plan required to accomplish the goals and
objectives for the ensuing five year period. The four finance and operating plans presented
during last year’s update have been distilled down to two: Scenario A, Chief Stays, and Scenario
B, Merge with Heber-Overgaard. Based on the recommendation of the Heber-
Overgaard/Forest Lakes Cooperative Service Exploratory Committee, the leadership teams of
both districts have decided to put the merger question to a vote of the electorate. The committee
is proceeding with the planning process to have the merger question decided during the primary
election scheduled for August 26, 2014. If the vote of the merger question results in approval
by both districts, the single go-forward strategy will be to merge with Heber-Overgaard,
beginning in September.

Plans are being prepared for carrying out the merger should that be the outcome. These plans
include a series of public information meetings to provide the citizens of Forest Lakes and
Heber-Overgaard with detailed information so they can make an informed decision. If the vote
is to decline the merger, we will proceed as a separate district. The good news here is that Chief
Rodriquez has advised the board he will no longer be pursuing a promotion opportunity in
Gilbert, and will welcome the opportunity to renew his contract in October 2014, when his
current contract expires.

There are basically two finance and operating plans in Appendix C. The baseline, against which
all scenarios are evaluated, Scenario A, will be used to develop the annual operating plan for
FY2014-2015 as a stand-alone district. Both revenue and expense projections, and projected
Mill rates, have been made for this five year period based on assumptions regarding property
assessed valuation changes, inflation rates, etc. Realistic capital expenditure plans, inflation
adjustments and salary increases have been incorporated. The bottom line assessment is that as
a result of savings and cost avoidance to the district due to austerity plans put in place by your
leadership team over the last several years, including salary freezes and minimal capital
expenditures, we now have the financial head room to pursue much need equipment upgrades,
beginning with the front loader. The five year projection also includes consideration of
restarting our building plans, with the possibility of upgrading our facilities in years 2 through 5.

The five year finance and budget plans for a merged district, Scenario B, are included in
Appendix C. The finance and budget projections show a very favorable business case for a
merger, with Mill rates for Forest Lakes dropping by nearly 50%. There are other
considerations with a merger, so the question will be put to the voters of both districts for
resolution.

Scenarios C & D, New Chief, have been put on hold. There are some preliminary budgetary
numbers for cost comparison against Scenario A should the board decide to pursue the new
chief scenario at some point in the future.




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There continues to be downward pressure on fire district revenues. In addition to AZ Senate
Bill 1421 which limits fire districts to a maximum of 8% year over year revenue increases, the
legislature has passed House Bill HB2572 that limits year over year increases in property
valuation to 5% for the purpose of assessing tax levies, regardless of actual property value
appreciation. For districts like Forest Lakes, which is already operating under the statutory Mill
rate limit of $3.25, this essentially means we are restricted to a 5% year-over-year tax levy
increases. This presents an additional challenge to the leadership team, especially for
addressing our building and equipment needs, given that we had to absorb a 25.4% reduction in
NAV during the last fiscal year. There continue to uncertainties associated with the
implementation of Obamacare and its effects on Medicare, Medicaid and AHCCCS
reimbursements for services provided.

The annual operating budget for fiscal year 2013-2014 (July 2013 through June 2014) has been
approved and is being implemented. The strategic plan update period covers FY 2014-2015,
2015-2016, 2016-2017, 2017-2018 and 2018-2019. The annual operating plan and budget is the
most significant policy document that the leadership team creates each year. The annual
operating plan sets the work plan for the district, the service levels to be provided and the details
of the capital expenditures the district will make. This budget is balanced and typifies the
district’s ongoing commitment to contain expenditures to necessary and reasonable levels.

Future annual operating budgets will derive from the five year strategic plan. This requires that
the strategic plan be a living document and be updated prior to the development of the annual
operating plans.

The five year strategic plan update has been developed with the ultimate goal of accomplishing
the district’s mission: “To provide the highest level of life and property safety through the
extension of Fire Safety Education, Fire Control and Emergency Medical Services for the
community of Forest Lakes, Arizona and our designated service area.”

The FLFD leadership team has determined it will conduct its operations in accordance with
specific guiding operational principles: a) if you are going to hang out your shingle, you better
be prepared do the best job you can; b) we will act with integrity in everything we do; c) we will
do what is morally, legally and ethically responsible; d) we will comply with all legal and
statutory requirements; and e) we will operate in a way that makes the safety of our personnel
and equipment paramount.

As a matter of fiscal responsibility, we will continue to be realistic with department
expenditures and follow our established policy that we will buy good, used and serviceable
equipment versus new. We are a small community, not a large fire district. Buying new is not
consistent with our current and projected financial and economic condition. Furthermore,
building and land improvements will be undertaken with the support of the community and will
have a means for funding the improvements identified before any commitments are made.

The combination model staffing model currently in place is viable for the full five year planning
horizon. The combination staffing model was developed by Chief Rodriquez at the direction of
the board and includes 24 x 7 firefighter coverage to supplement the 24 x 7 paramedic on duty.

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Often the firefighter is a paramedic, giving us double paramedic coverage. On holiday weekends
we provide increased coverage to handle the anticipated increase in call volume. This model has
been in place for about 4 ½ years. The combination model we have in place has been favorably
received by the community based on the results of our annual customer survey updates. The
benefit is that we have two people on duty every day. If a call comes in we respond within 4 to 5
minutes within the subdivision. Our on-duty-staff during the day is located in the fire station;
after hours they are currently housed in quarters across the street, which the department rents
from the Justice family.

There is a misconception that we are moving to a totally professional department. We have a
combination model in place and that is what was intended. It relies on the use of paid-on-call
resident personnel in addition to professional on-duty-staff. The leadership team, having
recognized the need for improved paid-on-call support, chartered a Citizen’s Advisory
Committee to Improve Paid-On-Call Participation, with results contained in Section XXIII,
Appendix D. The recommendations of the committee will be incorporated in department
operations. Changes in POC participation will continue to be monitored.

The results from our recent annual customer survey are overwhelmingly positive. The STRAP
team has interpreted the results as validations of our department’s service delivery model and
staffing models. Our 5 Year Finance and Budget projections maintain that same model. While
the overall survey data and comments are very positive, the leadership team remains concerned
about the unfavorable responses and associated comments. In the spirit of continuous
improvement, the leadership team’s objective is to move as many unfavorable comments to the
favorable categories as possible, while maintaining the high level of favorable response. Since
our STRAP team has set an objective to have an annual update to the customer satisfaction
survey, we will have an opportunity again next year to see how things have changed.

The leadership team feels we have not done enough to make the public aware of the good things
that are happening in the district, and will make improved communications one of our critical
few goals for 2014. To that end, Chief Rodriquez and Board Chairman Hennessey will restart a
series of focus group meetings to discuss the district’s activities in small group settings. We
will also hold our third annual Open House in June 2014 to further expose the public to all
facets of district operations. The June 2013 Open House was well received. And we will
initiate a Fire Department Newsletter to help improve communications and provide timely
information to the public.

The leadership team has committed to forming a collaborative relationship with the Auxiliary.
The Auxiliary performs a valuable function in support of fire district operation. Membership
and community participation have improved dramatically over the last year. There is a new
leadership team in place, and we look forward to forging new and improved working
relationships.

Succession planning has been identified as an area that needs extra attention in the coming
years. Chief Rodriquez will be tasked with addressing the administrative assistant position as
well as the Technical Resources Unit Leader position. Chief Rodriquez has identified an


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Assistant Chief, who can assume his duties if needed. Board members will continue to recruit
new members to be available should the need arise.




                                               8
III.   Introduction

The FLFD leadership team is comprised of the Fire District Governing Board and the Fire
District Chief. The board, which serves at the pleasure of the public, consists of John
Hennessey, Chairman; John Nelson, Clerk; John Fahrendorf, Treasurer; Quentin Tolby,
Member; and Tom Cummiskey, Member. The board is responsible for setting policy and
managing the fiduciary interests of the district. The Fire Chief, who serves at the pleasure of the
board, is Dave Rodriquez, who functions as the chief operations and administration officer of
the district. The Chief is the only employee who reports directly to the board--all other
employees report to the Chief.

This time last year we were dealing with four scenarios for the 2012 STRAP Update: Scenario
A, Chief Stays; Scenario B, Merge with Heber-Overgaard; Scenario C, Hire a New Chief,
Same Staffing Model; and Scenario D, Hire a New Chief, New Staffing Model. For reasons
detailed in the update document, for the 2013 update we are dealing only with Scenarios A
and B. Assuming we go forward with the Scenario A, Chief Stays, option the document will
be updated again next year and will drive the preparation of future annual operating and capital
expenditure plans for a stand-alone district. If we move forward with Scenario B, Merge with
Heber-Overgaard, the strategic planning process will be reviewed by the new board and a new
set of recommendations will be made for the newly formed district.

The Chief Stays Scenario, A, became much more viable with the announcement that Chief
Rodriquez would not be seeking a promotion in his home department and would welcome the
opportunity to continue to serve as Chief following the expiration of his current contract in
October 2014. The Hire A New Chief Scenarios, C & D, were put on hold by the Board in
December.

A list of top issues facing the department was developed by Chief Rodriquez early in the
process to keep the team focused on the critical few areas we need to address. The list is
contained in Section XI, Planning Process.

There were several key overarching issues facing the 2013 STRAP team as it went through this
year’s update process: 1) desire to reduce the number of scenarios being addressed; 2) on-going,
downward fiscal pressures on projected revenues due to prior years’ reduced Forest Lakes’
property valuations combined with legislative constraints for year-over-year NAV increases;
and 3) the need to address our fire, EMS and support equipment.

A key element in generating the 2013 update was the review and evaluation of all the customer
responses from the 2013 customer satisfaction survey. A new electronic format was used for
this year’s survey and resulted in significant time and productivity savings for those involved in
reducing the data. The results of this survey were used to help structure the initial update
meeting agendas.

The leadership team has successfully addressed all challenges over the last six years. The board
and chief have a single agenda, which is detailed in this and prior strategic planning documents,
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and is operating as a team. There are new challenges ahead that will require the complete
cooperation and energy of the leadership team to successfully address: 1) Down select to a single
go-forward strategy for the district; 2) Work with the FLFD Auxiliary to develop supplemental
funding sources; 3) Take specific actions based on the recommendations of the Citizen’s
Advisory Committee To Improve POC Participation; 4) Continue support and awareness of the
waterous hydrants/water delivery system as it relates to fire response; 5) Develop an improved
communications plan; and 6) Develop an updated facility strategy for the district.

The STRAP Team has addressed each of these issues over the last 4 months. In all cases,
discussions were guided by answering the operative question: “What is in the best interest of the
residents of Forest Lakes and the customers we serve?”

The planning process was initiated by an independent review of department operations by
Forest Lakes resident and retired Mojave Valley Fire Chief Mel Sorenson. Mel summarized
his assessment by stating that Forest Lakes is “in the best shape it has ever been in.” He went
on to address several specific points: FLFD is at the statutory maximum of $3.25, with our
primary revenue limitation being the absence of a commercial tax base; the department is well
organized and well managed, even though the Chief is not in the community every day; our
strategy of buying good used equipment instead of new has its limitations, but is a financial
necessity for many rural districts, including our own; the Chief’s salary is the same as we
were paying the previous chief several years ago, but he receives no benefits as the previous
chief had; he is not overpaid in comparison with other districts; our volunteer (Paid-On-Call)
program is not bad, but the main issue is the availability of community personnel who are
willing, able, and trained; and there are issues of more stringent standards and of department
liabilities.

Chief Rodriquez then followed this with a “State of the Department” briefing that laid out the
major issues the department and district faces. This list was used by the STRAP Team to
frame its discussions and set the meeting agendas to further explore and refine the issues
presented. The Goals section of this document (Section XVIII) reflects the action item
assignments that evolved from these discussions. The major issues, detailed in Section
XI, Planning Process, are as follows:

1. Sustainability
      i. Financial-- How do we maintain what we have with the financial forecast?
     ii. Staffing-- Retain On-Duty Staff or Hire Full Time?
    iii. POC Program-- POC – is the program viable for long term sustainability?
    iv. Cost Recovery - are we missing anything to help us obtain additional revenue?
     v. Forest Service Responses?
    vi. Affordable Health Care Act— A work in progress, with unknown consequences and
         impact at this time
2. Service Levels
      i. What does the district need?
     ii. What can the district afford?
3. Facilities

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      i. Plan A: Continue renting Crew Quarters as long as we can.
     ii. Plan B: Add on to the existing facility or Construct a stand-alone facility
4. Equipment
      i. Reevaluate new vs. used philosophy
     ii. Trade in current equipment for newer or trade in to consolidate and have less
         equipment on hand with the goal of maintaining our ISO grade of 5.
    iii. Include equipment other than rolling stock in evaluation (heart monitors, Auto Pulse,
         SCBA, …)
5. Succession planning
      i. Chief
     ii. Operations assistant
    iii. Resource Unit Leaders
    iv. Board members

The team reviewed the following first principles: mission, vision, values, guiding operational
principles, district priorities and services delivered/service area. Minor changes were made to
the mission statement and general priorities to clarify meaning and intent. The leadership team
feels we have captured the right things to guide us. The mission statement says we will provide
the highest level of service, not, for example, barely adequate service. This means that in the
middle of the winter season, we will provide the same level of service to the residents that we
provide over Labor Day weekend. This is the foundation of our service model. Even though
our mission statement no longer references search and rescue, we routinely provide those
services. What we no longer provide are technical rescue services (rope team e.g.). The values
statements clearly describe our fiscal responsibilities. We will do what we can within the
limitations of the budget. It is a balancing act. We must decide how to spend our limited
resources to best serve the community.

One of the key products of the 5 year strategic plan update is the creation of the five year
financial plan and budget forecast for the baseline Scenario A, Chief Stays. The primary drivers
addressed by the team in order to arrive at viable five year plans are revenue and expenditures,
both operational and capital. On the revenue front, HB2572 restricts year-over-year NAV
increases to a maximum of 5%. Since we are at the Mill rate limit of $3.25 in FY2013-2014,
and will be for the duration of the 5 year planning horizon, we will necessarily have significant
revenue constraints. Operating expenditures continue to scrutinized, and capital expenditures
are included to reflect reasonable operational needs, some of which have been postponed for
several years during our austerity program. In order to look at all possibilities the board will
continue to support exploratory discussions with Heber-Overgaard, Scenario B, Merge With
Heber-Overgaard, a question that will be resolved in August 2014. The major focus for
CY2014 will be on these two scenarios.

In order to keep on track the leadership has identified a series of plans for the coming year and
an approach for executing to the plans. For purposes of planning and execution, goals have
been associated with plan elements and are grouped into four categories: the critical few;
business as usual; leadership improvement; and carry over. The critical few goals list are
those the leadership team feels must be accomplished during CY2014. By design, this is a

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short list and will allow the leadership team to focus attention on their successful
completion. This list requires specialized, dedicated plans. The business as usual list is next
in importance, and will be executed as part of our normal business activity. The leadership
improvement goals address specific areas the leadership team has identified where
improvement is needed. The carry over goals are ones that carry over from prior years and
have not been completed, or are of multi-year durations. Goals are assigned unique
identifiers so they can be more easily tracked. The entire leadership team has responsibility
to see these goals are achieved as planned.

The leadership team has established guiding operational principles for FLFD. We have
determined that if we are going to hang out our shingle, we better be prepared to do the best job
we can. We will act with integrity in everything we do. We will comply with all legal and
statutory requirements. We will operate in such a manner that the safety of our personnel and
equipment are paramount. And we will do what is morally, legally and ethically responsible.

The Fire District has undergone a significant amount of change in last five years. Change is
inevitable, uncomfortable, but necessary and required. The Fire Board mandate to Chief
Rodriquez to provide 24/7/365 Paramedic and Firefighter coverage continues in place. This has
resulted in the combination staffing model we now have in place. Further, the Fire Board
mandate to Chief Rodriquez to be legal and safe continues to lead to implementation of new
training standards and on-going skills and abilities assessments.

Other changes continue to improve the functioning of the district. Standing committees,
established to help guide district operations, are led by board members, operate with board
approved charters, and include other department members, community members and subject
matter experts as needed. The current committee structure is as follows: Policies, Procedures &
Bylaws Committee (chaired by Member Cummiskey); Finance and Budget Committee (chaired
by Treasurer Fahrendorf); Building Committee (chair to be assigned); and Strategic Planning
(STRAP) (chaired by Board Chairman Hennessey.) The special committee assignment, Heber-
Overgaard/Forest Lakes Cooperative Service Exploratory Committee to investigate a possible
merger with Heber-Overgaard (Chairman Hennessey and Chief Rodriquez represent the FLFD)
will continue. The special committee assignment, The Citizen’s Advisory Committee to
Improve POC Participation (Citizen Paul Studer, Chair; Sally Kennedy and Ted Cary,
members), has completed its activities. As part of his normal duties Clerk Nelson continues
responsibility for supplemental funding and grant management.

The leadership team recognizes its responsibility to assure continuity of department operations
in the event a change of leadership occurs, and continues to address succession planning.
Succession planning is good business practice, a key to maintaining stability. Succession
planning for all leadership positions (Chief and board) has been discussed as part of the STRAP
Update process.

A critical component for continued success and improvement is to assure continued customer
satisfaction. We must continually identify and address the needs of all our customers. The
leadership team has identified the following customer base: full time residents; summer
residents; weekend residents; absentee owners; RV park residents; registered voters; non-

                                                12
registered voters; business owners, and their customers; and passers through (Highway 260,
campgrounds, …) We are committed to addressing the needs of all our customers.

In addition to personal contact and interaction to gage customer satisfaction, we have committed
to conducting an annual customer satisfaction survey. The recently completed 2013 Annual
FLFD survey is critical to assessing public sentiment. In the spirit of continuous improvement
we are trying to assess what is going well, what is not going well, and identifying areas where
we can improve. The results for the 2013 survey update are contained in this document.

One question the leadership team hears frequently is why can’t we go back to the way things
used to be? There are many reasons why we cannot go back. There is a national trend toward
reduced volunteerism (also noticeable at Forest Lakes.) The Fire District had problems
maintaining adequate coverage from resident paid-on-call staff for several years prior to the
implementation of the combination staffing model. Our demographics are changing: we are all
getting older, less willing and able to help effectively; new residents want services, and are
willing to pay for them; and medical training and certification requirements are constantly being
upgraded, making it difficult to maintain currency in a rural department. Our strong culture of
self-reliance is no longer present, requiring us to look externally for staffing and support. The
leadership team recognizes that strong and vibrant paid-on-call participation is a key element for
our on-going operation but must address the realities with which we are confronted.

The current board realizes there are significant challenges ahead. We continue to face
challenging economic times. There is a strong anti-tax sentiment. The board understands that.
No one wants to pay more taxes. The STRAP annual update had to reconcile what we want or
need to do with what we can afford. In order to keep the leadership team focused on the critical
few issues, we have developed a list of top issues facing the district. This list is contained in
Section XVIII, Goals.

We need your help in order to continue to be successful. Please try to attend monthly board
meetings. Please consider participating in the next STRAP update sessions and the annual
customer satisfaction survey. Your responses provide input into where the district will be
headed. The five year strap budget updates, a key product of the strap sessions, are included in
this document. The five year strap budgets will be the basis for the next fiscal year’s operating
plan and budget. You can help guide its development by participating in the process. You can
also help by becoming a member of the fire department’s paid-on-call staff, by volunteering
your time to support the district, by joining the Fire Department Auxiliary or by becoming a
Board member.




                                                13
IV.    Leadership Team

The FLFD is led by a team comprised of the Governing Board and the Fire Chief. The
Governing Board consists of an elected five member board. The term of office is four years with
alternating term expirations (two positions expired in November 2012, three positions will
expire in November 2014, two positions will expire in November 2016, etc.) The Governing
Board is led by a Chairman, who is selected by a vote of the board members. Other elected
board positions selected by vote of the board are the Clerk and Treasurer. Board positions are
determined each time there is a change in composition of the board. The board serves at the
pleasure of the public.

The primary responsibilities of the Board are to:

   •   Conduct monthly public meetings
   •   Prepare an annual budget
   •   Determine district personnel compensation
   •   Appoint a fire chief
   •   Elect a Chairman, Clerk and Treasurer from among the publicly elected board members
   •   Publish an annual financial report.

Department operations are managed by an appointed Fire Chief under contract to the fire district
for a specific period of time. The Fire Chief is the only member of the district directly
responsible to the board. The chief serves at the pleasure of the board. The Fire Chief is the
chief operations and administrative officer of the district, and handles all human resources
issues. The Chief must operate within the Board approved annual operating plan and budget and
has full responsibility for the daily operation of the department including the hiring of staff.
Subordinate employees are a full time office assistant, part time office staff, a Technical
Services Unit Leader, a Dispatch Services Unit Leader, dispatchers, part-time paramedics and
fire fighters (On-Duty-Staff) and various paid-on-call employees (Paid-on-Call resident
members). The on-duty-staff personnel and paid-on-call employees provide response for fire
suppression calls, Medical Emergency calls and internal support and dispatching.

Currently, the fire district leadership team is comprised of:

   •   John Hennessey, Board Chairman
   •   John Nelson, Board Clerk
   •   John Fahrendorf, Board Treasurer
   •   Quentin Tolby, Board Member
   •   Tom Cummiskey, Board Member
   •   Dave Rodriquez, Fire Chief

The current roster for the department may be obtained by contacting the fire department office
at 928-535-4644. The October 2013 organization chart for the district is contained in Appendix
A.


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Although other state statutes apply, the FLFD operates predominantly under Title 48 Chapter 5
of the Arizona Revised State Statues. The FLFD provides annual budgets to the Coconino
County Board of Supervisors for approval and is also under contract to the Arizona State Health
Department for the Certificate of Necessity (EMS operations.)

Other organizations such as the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) provide standards
of operation.




                                               15
V.        Facilities

Background

The current fire station, built in 1981, comprises 3300 square feet of space and remains the
center of fire district operations. There are two single bays and one double bay capable of
housing two engines and two ambulances. Additional areas include administration offices,
which provide space for an Administration Assistant, a Chief’s office, a small conference area,
employee work stations and a small kitchen.

The property was originally provided to the department in 1981 under a Dedication Deed that
allowed the department to use the land for fire department purposes.

The facility is used for fire and EMS operations, Fire Board meetings, Fire Auxiliary meetings,
training and fire department related social events.

In 2006 Forest Lakes Lots 298 and 299 were purchased for the purpose of building a new fire
station. In 2008, 3/4 of lot 297 was purchased. This purchase made it possible to have a single
parcel extending from the current fire station to the land purchased in 2006.

In 2009 the fire department acquired the fire station and the land upon which it is built from the
county via a quit claim deed. This transaction allowed the department to combine all properties
into a single parcel in 2010. The remainder of the loan to procure Lot 297 was paid off in
November 2012. The deed for the property is now free of all encumbrances.

Space limitations

There are many space requirements that are not being met. These will continue to be evaluated
as part of our STRAP update process. For the record, some of these are as follows:

     1.  Lack of indoor parking for the Attack Truck, Chief’s Vehicle and the Front Loader.
     2.  Inadequate secure space for storing drugs in the fire station.
     3.  Lack of shower and clothing laundry facilities in the station.
     4.  Inadequate secure records storage.
     5.  Lack of an adequate conference room.
     6.  Inadequate chief’s office, lack of privacy.
     7.  Inadequate station kitchen to provide meals to personnel during emergencies.
     8.  Lack of sleeping rooms and day room for on-duty staff. These facilities are currently
         being rented.
     9. Lack of private triage room for walk in patients.
     10. Inadequate office space for administrative staff. The limited space is in a high traffic area
         which causes many interruptions to the staff.
     11. Lack of separate space for copy machine and other office equipment. This also causes many
         interruptions to the office staff.
     12. Inadequate work space for on-duty staff and paid-on-call staff.

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   13. Inadequate storage space for communications equipment.


Facility Planning


As a result of the projected 25.4% decrease in Net Assessed Valuations (NAV) for the 2013-
2014 fiscal year, the board, with its fiscally conservative mindset, put all building plans on hold
in 2012. This year’s STRAP update process has revealed we can reconsider that decision. We
will therefore, have a goal this year to reconstitute the building committee during this fiscal year
with the goal of having a building plan that can be evaluated during the 2014 STRAP update
cycle, which will begin in August 2014.

Computer Infrastructure

As with most modern enterprises, the District relies heavily on information technology for day-
to-day activities. The IT infrastructure, updated to a Small Business Server (SBS) approach
which incorporates the mail server function along with the other domain controller functions,
continues to provide a single, highly reliable server. This approach has been operational for
about two years and has significantly improved the operational effectiveness of the district. It is
projected to save about $40,000 in total cost of ownership over a 10-year period.




                                                 17
VI.    Equipment

Several years ago the leadership team made a strategic decision to buy good used serviceable
equipment in lieu of buying new. The current leadership team has reaffirmed this decision, and
expects to continue this strategy in the future.
Recognizing that one downside to our approach is that equipment maintenance costs and the
frequency of vehicle replacements may be negatively impacted, the fire board tasked Chief
Rodriquez to do a complete operational needs assessment of our equipment. This assessment
included a complete evaluation of our current rolling stock by a licensed mechanic familiar
with fire department equipment. All equipment has been assigned a single, overall numeric
score representative of its condition. The scores are listed for each piece of equipment, and are
based on the following rating guidelines:


      Mechanic’s Numeric Rating                            Equipment Condition
                  0                       Unsafe/unacceptable condition
                  5                       Good condition, with average use, wear and tear
                  10                      Faultless and/or new condition
The good news is that all of our equipment, with the exception of Engine 1212, our back-up,
and the Front Loader, has been determined to be in good or better condition. Replacement of
Engine 1212 will be addressed based on strategic considerations, whereas the Front Loader is
slated for immediate replacement.
This evaluation will lead to a repair or replace strategy for district equipment and will be used
as input to future five year capital expenditure plan updates (see Appendix C). The details of
the operational needs assessment is contained in Appendix G.
All vehicle mileage and hours were recorded on December 2, 2013. Usage is since the last
update (approximately 12 months).
A. Fire Engines

Engine 1211 (Radio Call Sign)




                                                18
Acquired:     New 06-12-05.
Make:         05’ Freight Liner M2 FT.
Mileage:      13,355.
Usage:        1,368
Function. Primary Fire Emergency Response Apparatus.

Features. Enclosed Cab (safer for personnel) - seats 5; 710 Gallon Water Tank; 1250 GPM
                                              -




Pump Capacity; 20 Gallon CAFS (Compressed Air Foam System) Capacity.

Narrative. This apparatus is an All Hazards Response unit with the primary purpose of structural
fire attack and protection. This unit is National Fire Protection Association [NFPA] 1901
Compliant. It has 1.5 inch and 2.5 inch attack lines, 800 feet of supply line, a full complement
of ground ladders, on-board hydraulic generator to power emergency scene lights, Self
Contained Breathing Apparatus [SCBA], a deck monitor rated at 1000gpm and is equipped with
state of the art heavy extrication equipment and airbags for cutting, prying and lifting. This
apparatus is not four wheel drive but has drop down chains for forward travel in snow and ice
conditions.

Overall numerical rating: 8


Engine 1212 (Radio Call Sign)




Acquired:     New 03-25-87.
Make:         86 FEDER FT.
Mileage:      17,471.
Usage:        479



                                                  19
Function. Secondary Response Vehicle.
Features. 2 Seat Enclosed Cab – could seat three if needed. 2 rear Facing Exposed Seats.

Narrative. This apparatus is non-NFPA Compliant due to the rear open seating. It is our back up
pumper and is equipped similar to E1211. It has Class ―A‖ Foam capability, extrication
equipment, ground ladders and attack lines and supply hose. This is a 2 wheel drive unit and
chains are placed on rear tires for snow and ice travel.

Overall numerical rating: 4

B. Ambulances


Rescue 1211 (Radio Call Sign)
Also known as the Blue and White Ambulance




Acquired:      Used 10-01-2010.
Model:         02’ Ford 350 Super Duty Diesel Wheeled Coach - Collins Box.
Mileage:       130,778.
Usage:         4,145.

Function. Primary Patient Transport Vehicle.

Features. Capable of transporting one or more patients to the hospital or helicopter landing
zone.DHS compliant.

Narrative. This unit ―Rear Patient compartment houses one (Stryker) gurney along with
multiple seating and all necessary medical equipment for Advanced & Basic Level care.
Equipment includes a state of the art Zoll Heart Monitor; a Zoll Auto Pulse life board; and
Battery operated Extrication Equipment (Jaws of Life) spreaders and cutters for minor
extrications. This unit is being upgraded with the installation of a STRYKER Power Load system
to assist with loading the patient/gurney. This unit is four wheel drive, giving the Fire

                                                20
Department the ability to assist during the winter months on and off the highway effectively
and safely.

Overall numerical rating: 7


Rescue 1212 (Radio Call Sign)
Also known as the Green and White Ambulance




Acquired:     New 03-12-97.
Model:        97’ Ford E Super. Duty Wheeled Coach III.
Mileage:      71,214.
Usage:        4,139.
Function. Secondary Patient Transport Vehicle.

Features. Capable of transporting one or more patients to the hospital or helicopter landing
zone.DHS compliant.

Narrative. This unit ―Rear Patient compartment houses one (Stryker) gurney along with
multiple seating and all necessary medical equipment for Advanced & Basic Level care.
Equipment includes a state of the art Zoll Heart Monitor; a Zoll Auto Pulse life board; and
Battery operated Extrication Equipment (Jaws of Life) spreaders and cutters for minor
extrications. This unit is two wheel drive and is limited in heavy snow and ice (non-four wheel
drive) – reducing the Fire Department’s ability to respond to emergencies during winter
months in the subdivision.


Overall numerical rating: 7


                                                21
C. Water Tender


Tender 1211 (Radio Call Sign)




Acquired:      New 01-22-91.
Model:         91’ GMC TopKick.
Mileage:       9,599.
Usage:         362.

Function. Portable Hydrant / Water Supply.1,800 Gallon Water Tank.
Features. This apparatus is a 1,800 gallon tanker primarily used for portable hydrant / water
supply.

Narrative. Used to support E1211 & E1212 when hydrant distance is greater than 1000’ and/or
no hydrants are within close proximity such as when in the forest outside the boundaries of
Forest Lakes. The pump capacity is 500 GPM and can be easily moved and filled in lieu of a
moving E1211 / E1212 away from the emergency scene. It carries a fold out tank that has a
capacity of 2,000 gallons. This apparatus is also used during mutual aid with the US Forest
Service, in lieu of sending E1211 or E1212. This is a 2 wheel drive unit requiring chains for
winter time travel.

Overall numerical rating: 7

D. Command Vehicle




                                                22
Battalion 12 (Radio Call Sign)




Acquired:               Used 01-11-2011.
Make:                   1995 GMC KSB 4DSW.
2013 Mileage:           144,162.
Usage:                  4,914.
Function. Chief’s response vehicle; Battalion Command Truck; Extra Safety Barrier during
Highway Incidents; Set Up Landing Zone for Helicopter; utilized by department members for
carpooling for out of district training functions.

Features. Four Wheel Drive; Equipped with a rear Command Center Console to assist with
emergency scene management and personnel accountability. This Command Console is beneficial
for other agencies as they can utilize this Center for incidents specific to their needs. The vehicle is
an additional highway safety barrier and is equipped with two mobile radios for uninterrupted field
communication.

Narrative. Used as additional Highway Safety tool during highway incidents. Also used for
passenger transport in non-emergency incidents [stranded motorist e.g]. Used for additional
assistance to surrounding jurisdictions when needed during mutual aid.

Overall numerical rating: 5

E. Attack Truck



Attack 1211 (Radio Call Sign)




                                                    23
Acquired:             Used 5-21-10.
Make:                 2000 Ford 550.
Mileage:              79,848.
Usage:                3,942.

Function. Primary Response Apparatus for On-Duty Personnel.
Features. Ability to transport EMS / Fire Personnel and Equipment to Medical / Rescue incidents
on and off the highway.

Narrative. This unit was purchased for On-Duty staff (shift personnel). This unit is a quick
response vehicle and is intended to help reduce the wear & tear on E1211. Extended cab
seats 5 giving the Fire Department the ability to transport individuals if needed during
emergencies as well as non-emergency incidents. A Water Tank & Pump along with hose will be
added for future small fire suppression incidents. This unit carries extrication equipment (Jaws of
Life), ALS/BLS life support equipment, along with portable generator and lights. This
apparatus is four wheel drive, giving the Fire Department the ability to assist during the winter
months on and off the highway effectively and safely.

Overall numerical rating: 5

F. Front Loader



Loader 1211 (Radio Call Sign)




                                                24
Acquired:               Used -1995.
Make:                   CASE.
Hours:                  8,142.
Usage:                  152.

Note: usage does not reflect the hours of equipment rental by the district due to unavailability
of the front loader.

Function. Emergency Snow Removal. Station Grounds Management. Green Waste
Site Management.

Features. Bucket attachment for snow removal and grapple attachment for tree moving.

Narrative. A Front Loader has been deemed by the STRAP Team to be an essential piece of
emergency equipment. The Loader is used during the winter months to maintain station grounds
with snow removal - ensuring safe passage of emergency vehicles. The existence of the Front
Loader for snow removal has taken on renewed importance with the Coconino County newly
published and revised guidelines for snow removal. The Loader is used for Rescue Operations
during the winter months within the subdivision and/or surrounding areas when necessary. It also
serves the secondary functions to maintain Forest Lakes Green Waste Site debris and to
maintain the Green Waste Site grounds. The 2013 STRAP update team has determined the
current front loader 1211 has exceeded its useful life and has tasked Chief Rodriquez to
recommend a replacement. Unfortunately, no grant funding has been identified to assist with
its procurement.


Overall numerical rating: 2




                                                  25
VII. Services/Service Area

The combination model staffing model currently in place was developed by Chief Rodriquez at
the direction of the board and includes 24 X 7 firefighter coverage to supplement the 24 X 7
paramedic on duty. Often the firefighter is a paramedic, giving us double paramedic coverage.
On holiday weekends we provide additional coverage to handle the anticipated increase in call
volume. This model has been in place for about 4 ½ years. The benefit is that we have two
people on duty every day. If a call comes in we respond within 4 to 5 minutes within the
subdivision. Our on-duty-staff during the day is located in the fire station; after hours they are
housed in quarters across the street, which the department rents from the Justice family.

Our overall response model is shown in the following table for various support situations: one
call (primary coverage), two simultaneous calls (secondary coverage) or three simultaneous
calls (tertiary coverage) for EMS and fire in the subdivision, on the highway and in the forest
area. The table shows the plan for personnel and equipment coverage for Forest Lakes’
personnel, Heber-Overgaard support and Mutual Aid support.


                      Forest Lakes Fire District Operations Needs Assessment Matrix


                                    EMS (Subdivision)                           Fire (Subdivision)
                       Personnel               Equipment               Personnel             Equipment
Primary Coverage      On-Duty/POC    A1211/R1211                      On-Duty/POC      E1211/E1212/T1211
Secondary Coverage    POC/HOFD       R1212/HOFD                       Mutual Aid       Mutual Aid
Tertiary Coverage     Mutual Aid     Mutual Aid                       Mutual Aid       Mutual Aid


                                     EMS (Highway)                                 Fire (Highway)
                       Personnel               Equipment               Personnel             Equipment
Primary Coverage      On-Duty/POC    A1211/R1211/R1212/E1211          On-Duty/POC      E1211/T1211
Secondary Coverage    POC/HOFD       R1212/HOFD/E1212                 Mutual Aid       Mutual Aid
Tertiary Coverage     Mutual Aid     Mutual Aid                       Mutual Aid       Mutual Aid


                                      EMS (Forest)                                  Fire (Forest)
                       Personnel               Equipment               Personnel             Equipment
Primary Coverage      On-Duty/POC    A1211/R1211                      On-Duty/POC      A1211/E1211/T1211
Secondary Coverage    POC/HOFD       R1212/HOFD                       Mutual Aid       Mutual Aid
Tertiary Coverage     Mutual Aid     Mutual Aid                       Mutual Aid       Mutual Aid
                                                                                                     9/21/2013


There is a misconception that we are moving to a totally professional department. We have a
combination model in place and that is what was intended. It relies on the use of paid-on-call
resident personnel in addition to professional on-duty-staff.

                                                     26
Your leadership team continues to be concerned about the decline in paid-on-call support. To
that end, the fire board chartered a Citizens’ Advisory Committee to Improve Paid-On-Call
Participation to provide recommendations on how to improve the participation rate for paid-on-
call members. The complete report from that committee is contained in Appendix D.
Recommendations from that committee are addressed by means of goals assigned to your
leadership team and others and are contained in section XVIII of this report.


A. Fire Suppression

Fire Suppression efforts provide for the extinguishment and control of fires, emergency rescue,
control of environmental hazards, disaster management and search and rescue, along with
mutual aid with surrounding local Fire Departments (Gila County Fire Agencies, Payson FD,
Pine/Strawberry FD, Hells Gate FD, Houston Mesa FD, Christopher/Kohls FD, Whispering
Pines FD, Gisela Valley FD, Beaver Valley FD, Globe FD, Tri-City FD, Canyon FD, Pleasant
Valley FD, Tonto Basin FD and Blue Ridge FD and Heber-Overgaard Fire District).

Our current firefighter staffing model consists of off-duty firefighters from the towns of Gilbert,
Apache Junction, Mesa, Queen Creek, Hells Gate along with the Heber-Overgaard Fire District.
All firefighters at a minimum are certified FF, are an all hazards mitigator, first responder,
extrication certified – to include Basic Life Support (BLS) and EMT capability at a
State/National Certification level.

ISO (Insurance Services Office) requirements for all firefighters includes a minimum of 60
hours of continued ongoing in-service fire training, per quarter, per employee. Other continued
education/certification requirements include Vehicle Extrication and Stabilization, Hazardous
Materials (40 hours) and Technician Level Certification, Engineer-Pump Operator/Emergency
Vehicle Operator that meets NFPA 1901 Standards.

EMT Continued Education Requirements: The National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration’s National Standard Curriculum for Basic EMTs is approximately 120 hours of
classroom instruction and 15-30 hours of supervised clinical training in Basic CPR, First Aid,
Patient Assessment and Stabilization, Respiratory and Trauma Management and Cardiac
Management. Required continuing education calls for 72 hours of training -- 24 hours DOT NS
EMT Basic Refresher and 48 hours of additional continued EMS related education every two
years.

All costs for certifications, medical exams and continuing education requirements are provided
by the firefighters’ home departments. The Forest Lakes Fire District does incur any additional
costs in this regard.

B. Emergency Medical Services

Emergency Medical Services provide life saving (ALS and BLS) emergency medical care to our
residents and visitors alike within the Forest Lakes Fire District. They include mutual aid with
our surrounding local Fire Departments (Gila County Fire Agencies, Payson FD,

                                                 27
Pine/Strawberry FD, Hells Gate FD, Houston Mesa FD, Christopher/Kohls FD, Whispering
Pines FD, Gisela Valley FD, Beaver Valley FD, Globe FD, Tri-City FD, Canyon FD, Pleasant
Valley FD, Tonto Basin FD and Blue Ridge FD and Heber-Overgaard Fire District).

Our current ALS staffing model consists of off-duty Paramedics from the towns of Gilbert,
Apache Junction, Queen Creek, Hells-Gate and Heber-Overgaard fire districts who are
State/Nationally certified Paramedics.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administrations National Standard Curriculum for
Paramedics (NSC-P) requires 1000 to 1200 hours of instruction, which may be completed in
about a year’s time. This training includes 500-600 hours of Practical Laboratory and Classroom
hours, 250-300 Clinical Hours, and 250-300 Field Internship hours.

Paramedic Required Continued Education hours range from 18 hours annually to 192 hours
every two years.

All costs for certifications, medical exams and continuing education requirements are provided
by the paramedics’ home departments. The Forest Lakes Fire District does not incur any
additional costs in this regard.


C. Administration

The Administration office is responsible for all fire district personnel and human resources,
secretarial and clerical, record keeping of district records, patient medical records, processing
financial statements, and management of the daily business aspects of the department to include
accounts payable and receivables. The admin staff manages all incoming public traffic within
the department (via phone and/or walk in), answers all questions for the public regarding the
Green Fuel initiative (Grant) and manages the Green Waste Site receivables and traffic. The
office is staffed year-round, 7 days a week from 8am– 4pm.

D. Support
Dispatch Services (DS) Unit Leader: The responsibility of the Dispatch Services Unit leader is
to oversee dispatch and dispatch call tracking, and the scheduling of dispatchers for 24/7
coverage. The DS Unit leader provides department liaison for any issue related to communications
with the Flagstaff 911 Call Center and coordinates any vendor relationships pertaining to dispatch
and communications for the department with the Technical Services Unit Leader. The DS Unit
leader works in close coordination with the Fire Chief on budget forecasting and expenditure
management.

Technical Services (TS) Unit Leader: The responsibilities of the Technical Services Unit leader
are to oversee cell phone and radio inventory along with their repair and maintenance. The TS
Unit leader is responsible for emergency response mapping and their annual updates in
conjunction with Coconino County GIS, the National Forest Service and Forest Lakes Water
District. The TS Unit leader is responsible for all fit testing, air sampling, SCBA fill station
and management of all SCBAs. The TS Unit leader is responsible for programming,

                                                28
maintenance and management of all entry door locks and codes. The TS Unit leader works in
close coordination with the Fire Chief on budget forecasting and expenditure management.

E. Green Waste Site (GWS)

The responsibilities of the GWS attendant are to ensure the dumping of the correct green waste,
collect fees and insure the site is being maintained per Grant guidelines. See Appendix E for a
more complete description of the GWS operations.

F. Grant Procurement/Administration

The responsibilities of the Grant Services manager are to manage grants per state of Arizona
guidelines, accept and oversee the application process from residents, management of each
application until fulfilled or completed, marking of trees to be removed etc. The Grant Services
manager conducts twice a year mailings to all residents within the Forest Lakes area regarding
the Grant program.

G. Burn Permits

The Fire District is responsible for processing, managing acceptance of and maintenance of all
Burn Permits within the District based on the Arizona Administrative Code, Title 18, Chapter 2
regarding any open burning permit issued in accordance with the State of Arizona Department
of Environmental Quality open burning laws. Burn permit details can be obtained by contacting
the office.

H. Blood Pressure Checks

Blood Pressure checks are provided free of charge to Forest Lakes’ residents or anyone else who
would like to have a blood pressure check at the station. We also provide house calls for Forest
Lakes’ residents who are unable to come to the station.

I. Wellness Checks

Wellness checks are done anytime someone calls into the station and asks for us to check on
their loved one. This is done free of charge.

J. Fire Patrol

Fire Patrols are done every holiday weekend to insure our community is safe from unnecessary
fire from unattended or abandoned campfires within our community and surrounding area.

K. Dispatching

Our dispatchers are responsible for 24/7 monitoring with the Flagstaff 911 messaging system
and all radio contact with personnel and other emergency divisions. Dispatchers are responsible
for management of each and every emergency call from start to finish, including timestamps,
logs, resource management, personnel and equipment needs.

                                               29
L. Mutual Aid Support

The purpose of an intergovernmental agreement, IGA, also known as mutual aid, is to provide a
mechanism for the dispatch of personnel and equipment from the area serviced by one agency to
the area serviced by any other agency. This assures additional fire, EMS or other emergency
services are available to other agencies in the event of emergencies.

The FLFD has engaged in mutual aid agreements with the Northern Gila County Chiefs
Association, the Heber/Overgaard Fire District and the Arizona Mutual Aid Plan. These
agreements are intended to provide aid to members in emergency situations. The agreements do
not provide equipment or operator compensation but do allow reimbursement for consumable
supplies and non-emergency incident activities such as training.

As a small fire district, it is advantageous for the FLFD to continue participating in the Mutual
Aid plans as they exist as the district is, more often than not, the beneficiary of additional
resources.

Aid rendered to the Forest Service is generally billable.

It is the objective of the district to continue to participate in mutual aid programs when they
benefit the district.

M. Service Area

The STRAP Team discussed reducing the service area as a means of reducing costs. In the past
we made a conscious decision to exclude Knoll Lake from our response area--it is closer to Pine
and Strawberry. No other reductions are foreseen at this time, and we will stay with our service
area as currently defined. Our basic approach is, and always has been, if we get a call from
anyone, and we are in a position to respond, we will respond unless we are going to violate the
safety or well being of our residents.

The service area for the FLFD for structural fires is comprised basically of the community of
Forest Lakes, with some extensions. The following graph depicts this area.




                                                 30
The FLFD ambulance service area is defined basically by the Certificate of Necessity (CON)
issued to the department.


                                              31
Per agreement with the Forest Service, the FLFD service area is extended to
include the area shown in the following chart. This area comprises roughly 325
sq. mi.
  VIII.        ISO Rating

Insurance Services Office’s (ISO) Public Protection Classification (PPC) Rating System
program provides important, up-to-date information about municipal fire-protection
services throughout the country. Insurance companies use PPC information to help
establish fair premiums for fire insurance — generally offering lower premiums in
communities with better protection. The program also provides help for fire departments
and other public officials as they plan for, budget, and justify improvements. But the
most significant benefit of the PPC program is its effect on losses. Statistical data on
insurance losses bears out the relationship between excellent fire protection — as
measured by the PPC program — and low fire losses. And in a prior survey of fire
chiefs, 97% of the respondents said that the PPC program is important in helping the
community save lives and property.ly

ISO is an independent organization with an expert staff that collects information about
municipal fire-protection efforts in communities throughout the United States. In each of
those communities, ISO analyzes the relevant data and assigns a Public Protection
Classification — a number from 1 to 10. Class 1 represents exemplary fire protection,
and Class 10 indicates that the area’s fire-suppression program does not meet ISO’s
minimum criteria.

A community’s PPC depends on:
   • fire alarm and communications systems, including telephone systems, telephone
     lines, staffing, and dispatching systems
   • the fire department, including equipment, staffing, training, and geographic
     distribution of fire companies
   • the water supply system, including condition and maintenance of hydrants, and a
     careful evaluation of the amount of available water compared with the amount
     needed to suppress fires

ISO’s PPC program evaluates communities according to a uniform set of criteria,
incorporating nationally recognized standards developed by the National Fire Protection
Association and the American Water Works Association. The PPC program provides a
useful benchmark that helps fire departments and other public officials measure the
effectiveness of their efforts — and plan for improvements.ter fire protection — as

On average, communities with superior fire protection services — and therefore good
Public Protection Classifications — have lower fire losses than communities whose fire-
protection services are not as comprehensive. ISO reviewed the cost of fire claims per
thousand dollars worth of insured property by PPC for communities around the country.
On average, per $1,000 of insured property, communities in the worst classification had
homeowners fire losses more than twice as high as communities in the best classification.

The dollar value of a better PPC varies by state. But on average across the country, the
cost of fire losses for homeowners’ policies in communities graded Class 9 is 65 percent
higher than in communities graded Class 5. If a fire district improves its PPC,
homeowners and businesses in the community often save money on their insurance
premiums.
In 2000, the Rural Fire Protection Work Group quantified the economic benefits of
improved fire protection for Arkansas. The work group projected the reduction in
property insurance premiums when each of 839 rural fire departments had improved its
PPC to Class 7. According to that analysis, the statewide savings would total more than
$100 million per year. More than 425,000 homeowners would share the benefits, with an
average annual savings of $235 per household.

Forest Lakes ISO Status


Currently Forest Lakes has a dual classification of 5/9. The 5 classification applies to the
bulk of the properties in the subdivision and is considered very good, putting Forest
Lakes in the top 1/3 of properties nationwide in the ISO system. The 9 classification, is
the minimum standard for fire protection set by ISO, applies to some properties within
the subdivision which are more than 1000 feet from a fire hydrant. In an Inter-
Governmental Agreement between the Forest Lakes Domestic Water Improvement
District and the Forest Lakes Fire District, both entities agreed to pursue a minimum
hydrant spacing of 750 feet.

Our ISO rating was last updated in 1997. Improving our ISO score is a consideration of
our on-going strategic planning process. A top level ISO strategy will be defined and
included in our future update plans as needed. Improving our ISO score, which will lower
our insurance premiums, can be a significant point in our planning and in our discussions
with the taxpayers.
IX.    Partners/Affiliates
There are many organizations that assist the FLFD in accomplishing its mission.
These include the following:

   •   Forest Lakes Fire Auxiliary – Coordinates various fund raising activities
       that provide funds for fire department special projects, emergency food
       rations, various department equipment, etc.
   •   Forest Lakes Domestic Water Improvement District (FLDWID) – Provides
       water for fire suppression with access to 77 fire hydrants.
   •   Forest Lakes Owners Association (FLOA) – partners with the FLFD and
       the Fire Auxiliary in fund raising events. Established the Green Waste site.
   •   Coconino County Sheriff’s Office – Provides law enforcement and search
       and rescue services.
   •   Arizona Fire District Association (AFDA) – Assists fire districts with the
       complex task of managing a fire district. This association provides a year
       round source of information and conducts training and educational
       conferences twice each year where members of FLFD have an opportunity
       to share information about the operation of a fire district.
   •   Mutual Aid Agreements - Heber/Overgaard Fire District provides back-up
       BLS/ALS services when needed to Forest Lakes.
   •   U.S. Forest Service – manages the forest and camp grounds surrounding
       Forest Lakes
X.Budget Process

A draft annual operating and capital expenditure budget for the following fiscal
year is prepared by the Fire Chief and his staff in concert with the Board standing
finance committee using the approved 5 Year Strategic Plan as guidance. The draft
budget is presented to the Board at a regular meeting early in each calendar year.
After appropriate discussion and approval, the budget is posted and listed in
newspapers of general circulation. Public input is considered throughout the process.
The budget is finalized and forwarded to the Coconino County Board of Supervisors by
the beginning of the next fiscal year, which commences on July 1st and ends on June
30th of the following year.

From a revenue perspective, the FLFD currently uses two major fund groups: the
Operations Fund and the Capital Projects Fund. The Operations Fund includes
required annual revenues, transfers and expenditures. The Capital Projects Fund is
used for funding present and future capital improvements. The Operations Fund, or
working fund, outlines in detail anticipated revenues and expenditures for each
fiscal year. This fund’s activities represent the true financial plan for the district.
The Capital Projects Fund is established through Board action and is designed to
fund future capital purchases. Revenue sources for this fund include transfers from
the General Fund and interest earnings. Any remaining or unspent operations
funding is available to the Capital Fund at the end of the fiscal year. Various capital
program items are detailed in the five year strategic plan. Transfers of funds from
the Capital Fund will be made as needed during the creation of each year’s annual
operating budget.

Operating Fund revenues are anticipated using available information and historical
projections. The five year strategic plan revenue assessment includes funding from
property taxes, fire district assistance tax (FDAT), ambulance billing, fire recovery
billing, program revenues (permit fees, plan review fees, green waste site fees,
etc.), miscellaneous revenues (interest revenues, donations, Wildland revenues and
sale of surplus equipment), transfers from capital projects and lease/purchase
proceeds.

Property taxes are levied by Coconino County. Property taxes are due to the County
from property owners on October 1st and March 1st. The district receives its tax
revenues from the County on a similar schedule. Property owner taxes are
computed based on the Limited Property Value determined by the County
Assessor’s office. The 2013-2014 tax rate (Mill rate) for Forest Lakes residents is
$3.25 per $100 of assessed valuation. Senate Bill 1421 limits year over year
increases in actual tax levies (not Mill rates) to a maximum of 8%. House Bill 2572
places a further constraint on tax income by limiting year over year property
valuation changes to 5%, for the purpose of assessing tax levies, beginning in 2014.
Per ARS 48-807F the Mill rate cannot exceed $3.25 per $100 of assessed valuation.

 Because property tax revenues are received in two lump sums, with the first being
in October, the district maintains a minimum cash balance to fund operations from
July through October of each fiscal year. Based on a review of the last four full
years of FLFD operations, it was agreed that a minimum cash balance of $175,000
was needed. Implicit in this assessment is the assumption that no capital
expenditures will be made during this period and that our existing Line of Credit
(LOC) would supply any needed cushion (on the order of a maximum of $25,000.)
Our borrowing rate for LOC transactions is 60% of the federal funds rate, which
makes it currently around 2% annualized, a cost which the team was comfortable
with. The minimum cash balance will change from year to year based on projected
revenues and expenditures. Using the LOC for exceptional circumstances is simply
a matter of exercising our fiduciary responsibilities. It allows us to plan for the
future using a most likely forecast versus a worst case forecast. The team reiterated
its support of a policy of not using the LOC option as a routine budgetary tool. The
entire discussion related to minimum cash balance is related to cash flow, not the
inherent fiscal health of the district in a balance sheet context.

FDAT is a secondary property tax established by the Arizona Legislature to provide
a fund to assist rural fire districts with costs for emergency and fire assistance when
responding outside their tax area and assisting citizens in need of aid who do not
live and pay taxes within that rural fire district. The fund is divided, each year,
among the rural fire districts within the state. All property tax payers pay into this
fund. For the FLFD, FDAT usually amounts to 20% of our tax levies. Forest
Lakes’ residents also pay into the FDAT pool to cover their support by other fire
districts when they travel around the state.

Projected revenues from ambulance service are expected to cover as much of the
cost possible that is incurred in providing this invaluable service to our customers.
It is important to remember that the FLFD does not charge its property owners any
out-of-pocket cost for ambulance transport nor does it profit from this service as
stipulated by the FLFD’s Certificate of Necessity (CON).

The district continues to aggressively investigate alternative revenue sources. Fire
Recovery USA has been engaged by the district to help collect from accident
victims’ auto insurance policies as a result of services delivered by the district.
AeroMed has been providing a similar service to the district for EMS related
services provided by the district.

The STRAP Team addressed a citizen’s recommendation that we pursue increased
funding from the Forest Service and surrounding campgrounds, but made a
conscious decision not to pursue it at this time. It is considered to be a noble
concept, but to have a low probability of a successful outcome, and could
potentially have negative consequences. In addition, we already receive FDAT, we
bill insurance companies of individuals we provide service to, and we receive
payment for equipment we provide to the Forest Service (water tender e.g.).
Dealing with federal agencies can be an exercise in frustration, and could be a
political mine field, with negative public relations implications.

The district continues to pursue other sources of income, notably grant monies and
donations. Clerk Nelson has been providing our grant writing services to help
secure grants to enhance district services provided to the community. However,
grants are not a guaranteed source of revenue. The 2013-2014 annual operating
budget was prepared assuming no grant income. The five year strategic plan does
not include grant funding for equipment upgrades. If grant funding does
materialize, adjustments will be made for each fiscal year on a go-forward basis.
There are some monies budgeted for matching fund grant requirements that may be
needed if the district is successful in achieving grant funding. The amount of match
is a function of the grant under consideration.
XI.Planning Process

The strategic planning (STRAP) process was originally started in October 2007,
with STRAP sessions following regular monthly board meetings and lasting 2 to 4
hours each. Attendees included all relevant representatives from all department
functions and interested parties from the FLFD. This effort led to the publication
of the initial FLFD 5 Year Strategic Plan and its accompanying 5 Year Budget on
December 27, 2010. The strategic planning process is on-going, as reflected by the
publication of this document. Key elements of the plan published in December
2010 include an annual update and the completion of an annual customer
satisfaction survey.

The initial 2013 STRAP update meetings that led to the publication of the 2013
update focused on the development of the top issues facing the department as
determined by Chief Rodriquez. In summary, the top 5 issues are discussed below.


       1. Sustainability
            i. Financial-- How do we maintain what we have with the financial
               forecast?
                   Legislature is not fire district friendly. This makes it difficult for
                   small departments like Forest Lakes.
                   Our NAV went down over 25% for the current fiscal year, resulting
                   in a $97,000 reduction in tax revenues. Since FDAT is 20% of tax
                   revenues, there is a corresponding reduction in that category. Our
                   projection for next year is another 6 to 8% decline, further reducing
                   our operating budget.
                   HB2572 will reduce year over year Net Assessed Valuation (NAV)
                   increases to a maximum of 5%, beginning in September 2013.
                   SB1421, already in effect, caps year over year tax revenue increases
                   to 8% maximum, with 2009 as a baseline.
                   There are some harsh realities in years 3 through 5 of our 2012
                   projected STRAP planning horizon—what changes/reductions are
                   going to be needed to allow us to remain viable?
                   The realities of the 5 year budget projection from last year’s STRAP
                   Plan need to be reviewed at the September board meeting.
                   Do we need to look at going to a true “volunteer” staff—unpaid.
                   Will the Chief’s salary need to be reduced?
                   Tom Cummiskey stated he believes the budget assumptions for the
                   out years in the 2012 STRAP Update are overly conservative.
                   We are tapping into our cash reserves to fund operations in the out
                   years.
           ii. Staffing-- Retain On-Duty Staff or Hire Full Time?
                   Is full time employment an option financially?
                   We currently pay ODS an hourly wage (no food allowance, no fuel
                   allowance, no benefits.) If they become injured while on duty at
                   FLFD they are covered under workmen’s compensation, which we
                   provide coverage for. Many ODS car pool to minimize the cost of
                   travel to and from Forest Lakes.
         ODS have not had an increase in their hourly rate for 5 years.
iii. POC Program-- POC – is the program viable for long term
     sustainability?
         We are about to lose one of our POC staff members. John McKeever
         has announced his intent to retire. He has been a valuable resource to
         the community and the fire district.
         The situation with diminishing levels of volunteerism is not unique to
         FLFD. HOFD is having trouble attracting and retaining volunteers.
         FLOA is having trouble finding volunteers.
         Chief Rodriquez takes every available encounter with residents as an
         opportunity to ask about their interest in joining the fire department.
         The response is almost always not interested, especially with the
         younger residents. They want to spend time with their family, enjoy
         the weekends, and go home.
         POCs include First Responders, EMTs and Firefighters (we have no
         Paramedics).
         First Responders require the lowest level of certification and training
         (40 hours of training). This certification allows them to drive an
         ambulance with patients in the back to the hospital or to a landing
         zone. We currently have 2 first responders.
         EMTs require 9 credit hours of training at a community college.
         They provide basic life support: stabilize patients, maintain airways,
         perform CPR, treat fractures and apply splints. They assist
         Paramedics on scene. We currently have 4 or 5 EMTs who are
         active. However, we have at most only one available at any given
         time. Often times, we have none. EMTs can replace a First
         Responder if none is available.
         Paramedics require 2,000 hours of training. They provide advanced
         life support: administer drugs, conduct advanced airway procedures,
         provide cardiac care, execute invasive maneuvers, … They are the
         doctor’s extension in the field.
         Firefighter II certifications are separate and distinct from the
         emergency medical side. They are required to complete training and
         pass tests, including physical capability tests, in order to be certified.
         We experienced some dropouts in the POC program when Chief
         Rodriquez assumed leadership of the fire department. Part of this
         was due to policy decisions implemented by the board at that time
         (e.g., we required all ambulance drivers to have First Responder
         certification, a legal requirement.)
iv. Cost Recovery - are we missing anything to help us obtain additional
     revenue?
         We need to capitalize on Auxiliary support. The Blue Ridge
         Auxiliary funded the cost of a new fire station as well as some
         equipment. We need a good business model to address this. It is all
         about improving relationships with the Auxiliary. We need to
         prioritize the areas where the Auxiliary can provide support to the
         fire district.
         We need to establish priorities and stick to them. Don’t try to do an
         end around based on funding availability.
            Perhaps we need to reconsider a bond issue.
            The Green Waste Site is operating in the red since it reopened. The
            cost overruns are due to front loader rental fees since our front loader
            can no longer move the large piles we have to the height required.
            Our agreement with the forest service requires us to have on-site
            monitoring. Should FLOA bear some of the cost of operation? Our
            costs used to be subsidized by the Hazardous Fuels Grant. A
            question that needs to be answered: ae we legally restricted from
            spending fire district taxpayer monies to subsidize the Green Waste
            Site? Can we argue that the Green Waste Site is a Fire Wise activity,
            and thus falls under the purview of the fire district?
            Should our mission statement be revised to include operation of the
            Green Waste Site?
            It was pointed out that Forest Lakes cannot enforce a Fire Code
            because we are not incorporated.
            Our breakdown in call volume/cost remains at 1/3 highway, 1/3
            forest service and 1/3 subdivision.
            We need to be more aggressive in advertising to the community all
            the benefits residents get as a result of the services provided by the
            fire district.
            Fire Recovery USA continues to bill insurance companies for all
            responses, including ATV incidents.
     v. Forest Service Responses?
            Our water tender has been a good source of revenue in the past. It
            has been deployed for 10 to 14 days at a time under contract with the
            Forest Service.
            We are at a breakeven situation when we deploy personnel to assist
            with wild land fires.
    vi. Affordable Health Care Act—
            A work in progress, with unknown consequences and impact at this
            time.
            We must meet the medical requirements, including equipment, as
            stipulated by Payson Regional Medical Center (PRMC).
            We are extensions of PRMC—we live by their rules.
            We will be required to move to paperless medical records at some
            point in the near future (Electronic Patient Change reporting System-
            EPCRS). This will be an added financial burden.
            We must address infrastructure needs and requirements.
2. Service Levels
     i. What does the district need?
            Service levels are established by board policy, with input from the
            community via the annual customer survey.
            It was suggested we need to evaluate the trade-off of 24X7X365 ALS
            + 1 support versus having a fire district that also serves as a center for
            community activities.
            We need to look at infrastructure needs versus service demand.
            Chief Rodriquez and Roxie were assigned to benchmark 5 districts of
            similar size (Pleasant Valley, Christopher-Kohls, Young, …)
    ii. What can the district afford?
             All decisions/recommendations will be filtered through the Finance
             Committee for affordability.
3. Facilities
      i. Plan A: Continue renting Crew Quarters as long as we can.
     ii. Plan B:
              1. Add on to the existing facility
                       Existing facility cannot house equipment made to current
                       commercial standards.
              2. Construct Stand Alone Facility
                       Explore selling a portion of adjacent land to provide needed
                       revenue for facility upgrades.
                       Explore leasing the old Beckett property to provide a regular
                       income stream.
                       Explore floating a bond issue.
                       It was stated we need a standalone facility, even if it takes a
                       10 to 20 year plan to make it happen. Other communities our
                       size have community centric facilities that also house the fire
                       department. Such a facility could house the fire department,
                       the water department, the auxiliary, FLOA, the church, the
                       library, and the post office.
                       It was pointed out that 7 or 8 years ago there was a strong
                       push by the board to construct just such a facility, but at
                       $1.6M it was cost prohibitive.
4. Equipment
      i. Reevaluate new vs used philosophy
     ii. Trade in current equipment for newer or trade in to consolidate and have
         less equipment on hand with the goal of maintaining our ISO grade of 5.
              One option being considered by Chief Rodriquez is to trade in Engine
              1212 and the Attack Truck on a new mini-pumper that would fit in
              the existing bay as well as the rented crew quarters.
              We need to be careful about requesting an ISO re-grade. If we only
              go from ISO 5 to ISO 4, there is no insurance cost benefit. If we go
              to a 3 or 2 rating, there would be a benefit. However, there is a risk
              the re-grade would be to a less favorable level since we have not had
              an ISO review for 10 years. An ISO review is very labor intensive,
              and typically is done every 10 years.
              It was pointed out that property taxes are deductible on your income
              tax returns, insurance premiums are not. Keeping low insurance
              premiums is good for the residents.
              We need to be more proactive in letting the community know we
              have low insurance rates at Forest Lakes. This is due in large part the
              capabilities of our fire department and water department.
    iii. Include equipment other than rolling stock in evaluation (heart monitors,
         Auto Pulse, SCBA, …)
              Chief Rodriquez has taken the action to provide a comprehensive
              review of our existing equipment, other than rolling stock, including
              its age.
              Chief Rodriquez will employ the services of a fire mechanic from
              Payson to assist with the evaluation of our rolling stock.
            Chief Rodriquez is preparing a 10 year capital plan as input to our 5
            year strategic budget projection.
5. Succession planning
     i. Chief
            Chief Rodriquez is under new leadership at Gilbert. With new
            leadership comes change, and with change opportunities for
            advancement. If Chief Rodriquez were to accept a position at Gilbert
            with increasing responsibility it is unlikely he could maintain his
            current position as Fire Chief at Forest Lakes.
            Chief Rodriquez has been our leader for about 6 years. At some
            point in time, for whatever reason, that will likely change, causing us
            to pursue new leadership. Two of the four scenarios identified during
            last year’s STRAP discussions relate to this situation.
    ii. Operations assistant
            We need to be aware that Roxie provides a valuable resource to the
            Chief and the district. It is only prudent that we consider the
            eventuality that, for whatever reason, she might someday need to be
            replaced.

This list was used by the STRAP Team to frame its discussions and set the
meeting agendas to further explore and refine the issues presented. The
Goals section of this document (Section XVIII) reflects the action item
assignments that evolved from these discussions.
XII.Guiding Operational Principles

In order for any organization to be successful it must have a clear set of guiding
operational principles that help it define its mission and purpose, its vision and
values. The FLFD leadership team has determined it will conduct its operations in
accordance with the following operational principles:
    • If you are going to hang out your shingle, you better be prepared do the best job
       you can.
    • We will act with integrity in everything we do.
    • We will do what is morally, legally and ethically responsible.
    • We will comply with all legal and statutory requirements.
    • We will operate in a way that makes the safety of our personnel and equipment
       paramount.
XIII.Mission Statement

The five year strategic plan has been developed with the ultimate goal of
accomplishing the district’s mission:

    “To provide the highest level of life and property safety through the extension of
     Fire Safety Education, Fire Control and Emergency Medical Services for the
        community of Forest Lakes, Arizona and our designated service area.”
XIV.Vision Statement

The Fire District faces unique challenges in keeping pace with the changing world in
which we live and work. We will continue to build on the traditions and people who
brought us to this point. However, we must adapt, be flexible, and be progressive in
order to continue to be successful. The following paraphrased statements provide us
with a vision that will enable us to continue to be an exceptional organization.

We will strive to always put the safety of our personnel and equipment uppermost in our
priorities.

We will strive to be perceived as good stewards of community property: we will be fiscally
responsible, providing good value for the money spent; we will have a plan in place to
govern growth; we will establish priorities in line with department needs; and we will
always live within our means, always able to pay our bills.

We will strive to build community support and trust through frequent, open and honest
communication, being transparent in everything we do.

We will strive to nurture and develop relationships with outside agencies so that we
develop cooperative support and expand our ability to respond to emergencies.


We will strive to foster a spirit of continuous improvement, achieving excellence in
everything we do.

We will strive to be customer friendly: we are service providers, we treat our customers
with respect, we have a service mentality—“What can I do to help you?”, and we let
customers know that serving them is the most important job we have.

We will strive to be a fire department that is a community focal point for everyday
community activities, not just fire department operations and emergency response.
XV.Values

The cornerstone of who we are and how we operate is defined by the values we, as a
group, treasure and hold dear. The following values are personalized to the FLFD.

Trust. We rely on the integrity, strength and ability of every member of the Board and
fire department. We are confident each one will do the right thing in dispatching his or
her duties. We are entrusted with the responsibility and authority to run the fire district,
and all our actions will reflect positively on the department and community.

Respect. We value and hold in high esteem the sense of the worth or excellence of all
members of the Board, the department, as well as all people we deal with. All
members of the Board and department are expected to demonstrate the personal
qualities or abilities that reflect this attitude of holding others in high esteem.

Attitude/Conduct. Each member of the Board and department will strive to
demonstrate, by their personal behavior, manner, disposition, feeling, bearing or
deportment, a positive mental attitude with regard to people and equipment and will
conduct themselves accordingly.

Honesty. All members of the Board and department will strive to be upright and fair,
truthful, sincere, frank and free from deceit or fraudulent behavior.

Loyalty. All members of the Board and department will strive to act in ways that reflect
faithfulness to the fire department and its commitments and obligations.

Commitment. Every member of the Board and department will strive to be engaged and
involved in the discharge of fire district duties and responsibilities.

Teamwork. Each member of the Board and department will strive to be cooperative and
participate in coordinated efforts on the part of the fire district, acting together as a
team in the interests of a common cause.

Openness to Change. All members of the Board and department will strive to
demonstrate a willingness to transform, convert or otherwise make the future course
of the department different from what it is or from what it would be if left alone.

Accountability. Each member of the Board and department shall be answerable to the
members of the fire district, and shall be subject to the obligation to report, explain, or
justify their actions.
XVI.2013 Annual Survey

Thank you to those who took the time to participate in our annual FLFD customer
survey. And special thanks to Clerk Nelson, who coordinated this year’s survey.

In order to gage customer satisfaction we are committed to conducting an annual
customer satisfaction survey. The leadership team has identified the following customer
base: full time residents; summer residents; weekend residents; absentee owners; RV
park residents; registered voters; non-registered voters; business owners, and their
customers; and passers through (Highway 260, campgrounds, …) We are committed to
addressing the needs of all our customers.

In the spirit of continuous improvement we conducted this year’s survey using an
electronic format (Survey Monkey). We allowed for the use of paper surveys for those
so inclined, and modified the questions based on feedback from prior surveys. The
survey questions were unanimously approved by the fire board prior to dissemination to
the customer base. Some additional comments:
    • The survey was available to all customers and interested parties
    • Notices were published in Email “Happenings” and on the FLFD website
    • Charts and analysis results are direct from Survey Monkey
    • Survey period was from July 27 to August 22, 2013
    • There were 132 electronic responses
    • There was one hard copy response, which is not included in this summary, but was
        generally “Very satisfied”

The customer survey feedback is an important part of our annual 5 year STRAP update.
The feedback helped the STRAP Team assess what is going well, what is not going well,
and to identify areas where we can improve. The results from last year’s customer
survey can be found in the 2012 5 Year STRAP Update document available on the fire
district’s web site.

As can be seen from the graphical analysis which follows, the overall sentiment can, in
general, be classified as “very satisfied.” Eighty-four per cent of the survey participants
indicated that they are either very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the fire department
overall. The results are very much in line with previous years’ surveys. The STRAP
team interpreted Figure 5 as validation of our department’s service delivery model and
staffing models. As a result our 5 Year Finance and Budget projections will maintain
that same model as long as it is economically sustainable.

While the overall survey data and comments are very positive, the leadership team
remains concerned about the unfavorable responses and associated comments. A number
of less than positive comments are to be expected based on the turnover of ownership at
Forest Lakes. It takes some amount of time for new owners to find out what is
happening. Being realistic, however, we also understand that there are a certain number
of people who will be critical of department operations regardless of what actions the
board, the chief or the department take. That begs the question as to how much time and
effort should be addressed to these responses.

All comments, both favorable and unfavorable, have been reviewed. Unfavorable
comments determined to be actionable have been grouped into themes for the purpose of
generating a response to address the concerns presented. In the spirit of continuous
improvement, the leadership team’s objective is to move as many unfavorable comments
to the favorable categories as possible, while maintaining the high level of favorable
response. Since our STRAP team has set an objective to have an annual update to the
customer satisfaction survey, we will have an opportunity this time next year to see how
things have changed.

The leadership team feels we may not be doing enough to make the public aware of the
good things that are happening in the district. To that end, we conducted our second
Open House in June 2013 to further expose the public to all facets of district operations.
We will be sponsoring more community-based recognition events for our Paid-On-Call
and Dispatch members. Chief Rodriquez and Board Chairman Hennessey will renew
their efforts to conduct focus group meetings to discuss the district’s activities in small
group settings. These meetings will continue in 2014. And we will initiate a Fire District
newsletter.


The written comments are included for the record (see comments section). Some minor
edits have been made to allow the comments to be more easily grouped together, leading
to a more condensed and readable presentation format. No substantive changes were
made to the content or meaning being conveyed. The original comments are available to
all who are interested by requesting a copy from the office staff. It should be noted that
the number of respondents who entered unfavorable comments is not proportional to the
total number of negative entries. Clerk Nelson, who reviewed the data, said it was his
observation that each respondent who entered negative comments tended to provide
similar, negative comments in all four areas of the survey where comments were allowed.
Hence the total number of respondents who were negative amounts to about 6 or 7, about
the same as the last several years.

Graphical Summary
Comments Section. As stated above, the comments have been grouped into categories to
facilitate analysis and follow-up. Note: individual comments are denoted by ending with
“…”, and within a given comment, some items may be separated by “—“ for readability.
Green Waste Site
What green waste site...Green waste site is charging a flat $10.00 for dumping regardless of size--this is not
fair and reasonable for the small guy that cannot afford a LARGE container to carry off his green
waste…we need a Green waste site…Green Waste Site is closed and there seems to me there is no progress
to open it…we need a green waste site that is open.
Need More Communication
We really haven't needed a response for a problem--they did survey our fire ring and carefully explained
burn restrictions--as for the Board, we have no idea who is who…wonder if volunteers in the community,
such as the C.E.R.T. Teams and other volunteers are being fully utilized by the current leadership…lack of
information from staff--public communication gap…there needs to be more "transparency" regarding the
details of such things as crew facilities rental, paid volunteers, etc...when are office hours to personally
speak with someone…an area that would be helpful would be a new family packet that explains "rules"
"how to's" and "where to go" answers--for instance, what is the rule for clearing pine needles--how far out
from a house should plants be trimmed back to--where do we take rotten wood, pine cones, needles, etc.--is
there a non emergency phone number--how do I know if there is a situation in the area such as wildlife, fire,
etc--we are so "green" we don't even know what we don't know so I don't know what I should be asking…I
don't really know much about the Fire Board's members or activities…pleased with regular communications
so we are always aware of what is going on with fire restrictions and the green waste site...educate and
inform public more effectively…need further info on merger…response times, where are firefighters
stationed, etc…how many folks live in Forest Lakes year round.
Negative - High Costs, Too Big
Hire a professional and assume no review is required--a little checking would say you are wrong…$80,000
for a part time chief is too much…concerned over the increase in property tax the last 2 years--the county
states that the increases are due to the fire department--how much more are our taxes going to go up just so
we can have a part time fire chief and part time fire fighters--the rest of the time, they have assignments in
other areas...how high would our taxes be if we had a "full time" chief and fire fighters…our taxes are
increased yearly while our department responds to calls in the resort areas--it is our understanding that FL
Fire Dept. is not paid by the forest service or AZ State for these calls...while we would not want to see
anyone go without care, there should be a way to defray these costs from the state or forest service--it
should not be entirely up to our residents to pay for this service--we hope our chief is as concerned over
these costs as we are...we do not believe the answer should be that FL Fire is taking the calls in the
campgrounds and resort areas, while FL residents have to wait for Heber-Overgaard to take care of our
health crises--with the population of FL aging, we will have needs that will not wait the 15-20 minute
response time from Heber-Overgaard…the board is a rubber stamp for the chief...Forest Lakes is not a big
city, yet our fire board and chief continue to try to operate our fire dept as such...we are already at the
highest allowed mil-rate with regard to our property taxes for the district and we still want more money to
buy things that not even some valley cities have…$800.00 a day to pay our chief and just two of his boys
from the valley is way too much to pay for part-time workers…we need to return to our roots as a volunteer
fire dept and get rid of this big city mentality…Fire Chief and Borad Members have raised my taxes by 30%
and still cannot live within budget--it's time for new blood all the way around...what does he do…to watch
the trucks drive back and forth from the fire house to their quarters double digit times in an afternoon tells
me that they need to use a monthly fuel allotment or for some other unknown reason...my taxes are less than
half in the valley and I'm sure they answer a lot more calls that Forest Lakes...if we continue to raise taxes to
satisfy the fire dept, only the rich will survive...FLFD is over sized for our community...the City of Gilbert
growth philosophies are non-applicable to Forest Lakes...the Heber-Overgaard FD is over sized for their
community as well...let's learn from this mistake and not shoulder Forest Lakes with a similar financial
burden...I believe strongly that money spent on maintaining aging and questionably needed FD equipment,
and budgets asked for, could be/have been used for more community benefit i.e. dust abatement...worst we
have ever had…as for the Chief and his Gilbert Buddies--at least Jesse James used a Gun when he Robbed
people…to me it seems that anything and everything the fire department wants they get--who is paying for
this…I understand also that every minor incident is reported so that the numbers better justify the
expenses…we do not need this overpaid, under- performing fire department...I don’t believe we need a
Mesa fire department at Forest Lakes and raise the tax rate to be a burden on tax payers…if you get
everything you want it should be very satisfying--but it was before all the Valley people were put on the
payroll just think how wonderful things will be when they get their new building--people this is Forest
Lakes, not Phoenix…vehicles driving around Forest Lakes adding wear and tear to them, justifying the
reason to purchase newer or used vehicles…this is not an urban locality but a rural Community…we also
have vehicles which are costing more to maintain than they are worth--we probably need a new ambulance
not new $50,000 gurneys--we are a rural fire dept not a city fire dept with deep pockets…if a detail review
were done on actual cost including labor over and above the 24/7 we should be able to maintain our own fire
department with reduced income…spending too high a percentage on staff at expense of building and
equipment…the operating costs could be reduced if you didn't have extra On Duty Staff except on holiday
weekends--we know that there are more than 2 more often than is justified--we see them and yet we are told
there aren't more than 2…the chief and board are going for a full time, full service EMT/ Fire department
supported by a small community…many EMT calls outside FL are for non-critical reasons--are these call
screened for priority…why not have most 911 callers travel to the EMT at a central location--many calls
are well outside our district-- sometimes miles back in the forest…replace the chief upon expiration of his
current contract--he is over paid in salary and benefits to run a small town fire department...go back to basic
services WITHIN our district--the proposed purchase of the Stryker power load cot is NOT NECESSARY
& NOT NEEDED--why have these when every valley FD doesn't have them or need them--WHY spend
taxpayers money on this item--the board and chief want and act like big time departments without regard to
the actual wants and needs of this community…get back to the basic needs of FL and have some regard to
the cost in terms of taxes being paid on property…why are we running a million dollar budget-- for
what…do not over- spend your budget--do not spend like a big city district…do not spend money you don't
have…CLEAN HOUSE--get rid of this IDIOT BOARD--the Gilbert Bunch--and START OVER…again,
usage of Fire Dept. vehicles driving around the Community (non-emergency)--wearing them out to justify
purchasing new ones--this is not an urban, but a rural Community…I have nothing positive to say.
Negative - Reponses Outside CON
As a Forest Lakes resident I feel that there are not enough personnel--most of the calls seem to be in the
national forest campgrounds leaving Forest Lakes residents uncovered—do we get paid for forest service
calls…FLFD should not being doing Forest Service jobs like clearing logs on forest roads or searches for
lost people unless the fire dept is being reimbursed… we used to have a search & rescue group...we have a
lot of people with quads that could search and call for appropriate aid when the lost have been located.
Opposed to Merger
It is my opinion that service levels drop when you merge with other FD's or contract that service out to
private providers--a great example of that is Rural Metro in the Valley—it is also my opinion the Chief is
doing an excellent job and has developed a stellar admin and field staff…I am opposed to merging with
Heber-Overgaard--fully support Chief and am reassured with the competence of staff…equip the attack
truck with a foam unit to handle small fires without taking out the engine--merging with H/O Fire district
makes no sense to me--we need to have our own protection for our community and not rely on H/O to
"come to our rescue"…any merger would reduce local control, first responder availability and put us under a
higher population for out-voting us which might cause us a higher tax burden…I object strongly to merging
with Heber Overgaard--our tax money shouldn't be managed by another county with a higher tax base and
would be in control as they have the larger area…you need to up your game fire board to improve our
district as getting money from the National Forest Service.
Other
It seems like some of the board members do not support the chief and are on a crusade to replace him…not
in touch with the reality of the Department, the history and what could be gained from keeping the
professional chief…does not follow through on commitments…Chief has ignored Paid-On-Call…I have
heard that there is a small group of residents trying to get the fire chief fired--please tell them to go away--
we have a FIRE DEPARTMENT now--there is leadership in place and not some person driving around in
that old red pick up trying to look like a fireman…do not have many opportunities to interact with them--
most times, they are quick to handle my concerns--sometimes, there is no one around…the department
should have more input and influence in order to motivate people to clear their lots--some have said "this is
the way mother nature meant it to be", with "trees the size of thin sticks and too close together…office
personnel need to dress more professionally--not pants that are not professional…question # 9 does not
work--my preferences are 1. #1 4. #2. 3. #3 2. #4…the Survey Monkey priority buttons are broken--
financial responsibility after public safety and well being is priory number one…have not had any dealings
with the fire department…you do not provide 24X7 professional paramedics coverage to Forest Lakes--we
need a board that understands 24X7 among other things…#3 please do due-diligence to ensure that the high
quality of our Fire Board and Service Level continues…I'm not interested in 4 or 5 above--my perspective is
that the District needs to do whatever they can afford to improved the quality of their first responders and
equipment including the outdated fire station…do we have data on how many residents are full time--the
age brackets of homeowners--and number of properties in need of attention (clearing, upkeep, etc)--the age
bracket info might help FL fire determine the need for medical staff and how far away they should
be…there is a concern that significant money is being spent on personnel from Phoenix--we don't know
how their availability affects response time--there may be opportunities in the community to get an adequate
level of support from residents especially with a growing younger base to call upon…sorry--I just don't
know enough about how effective our personnel are or how to measure their effectiveness--I'm glad for
them…#2--would really like to see more volunteerism--driving vehicles, assisting as trained--also, does
FLFD get reimbursed from the Forest Service when called out into the forest--we need to have trained back-
up when that happens--and lastly, why do ALL the paid staff respond to an out of FL call--can't one (or
more) remain in the subdivision in case of another "local" call…find some way to control the dust and the
noise from cars and ATVs…all options in question 9 must be examined on the basis of affordability and
sustainability of the department operations--we are faced with unprecedented financial constraints and an
uncertain economy--the path we choose for the future will have to balance multiple, competing and
conflicting priorities--the strategic planning process which we have followed diligently for the past 5 to 6
years will be our tool of choice for arriving at our desired solution.
Positive – Chief
Great Fire Chief Dave Rodriguez…retain our current chief--Chief Rodriguez has done a fantastic job
turning FLFD into the top notch fire department and community icon that it is today--he has assembled a top
notch staff of fire fighters, paramedics, EMTs and administration support--they are professional and truly
care about the community on and off duty--great leaders attract great personnel and FLFD has it all--the
chief and his staff deserve our support and praise as they continue to provide this community and all the
people who visit on a daily basis the finest protection and service that can be offered anywhere in the
country…Chief Rodriguez is doing an outstanding job making Forest Lakes Fire a reputable FD--he is to be
commended on a JOB WELL DONE…you will not be getting a better captain than the one we have at this
time…Forest Lakes has never been covered in such a level as Chief R. has done--the community will be
broken and unprotected if his leadership is taken away--the Forest Lakes Community would be crippled
beyond repair…
Positive - Glad We Are Here
I wanted explain the “no opinion"--we just moved to FL 3 weeks ago and we had only one interaction with
the fire department, which was informative, welcoming and helpful--I can't remember names but they were
great…I have not used the fire department so have no knowledge of their abilities, etc.--from what is in the
newsletters, etc they are GOOD--THANKS for being there…the District has some professionalism about
them--not a bunch of old men standing around the fire station drinking coffee and smoking…I have been
pleased with the courteous service, prompt and professional care…I want to thank you for getting to my
home so quickly and for taking such good care of my husband Brad--his AirVac transport to the valley was
very quick getting to the services he required…these guys are the best I have ever dealt with--they are
compassionate and I trust them with my life…we have received excellent service from the medical
emergency service…I called the Fire Department and spoke to a fire fighter asking specific questions about
the red flag-no burn rules--we are new homeowners here in Forest Lakes and wanted to make sure we
complied--he was very sweet and helpful…the FLFD exceeds all expectations--without them our
community would be in a world of hurt…although have not used, have heard positive comments from
others…keep up the good job…the heart and muscle of the FLFD is strong and witnessed with every call--
job well done…dept. seems to be responsive, helpful…the chief and the whole department seem to be doing
their jobs well--I have no reason to be unsatisfied…current fire district is run professionally and gives me a
great deal of confidence in its abilities should I or my family ever need assistance…I have not heard any
negative reports about our Fire Department or the employees /volunteers in the years I have resided at
Forest Lakes…always professional…I called regarding smoke detectors and they came to help with it within
a short time…do not know of any problems but do not have sufficient knowledge to be very
satisfied…outstanding service and support…we have not had any events to test the fire department through
an accident or at our cabin--we received our fire permit with no problem--we enjoy the pancake breakfast--
and we appreciate knowing the fire department stands ready to help us as needed…someone answers calls
every time I call now--brought in fire permit and was signed off and given back immediately…the fire
department is operating at the highest level of service since I have been a resident (16 years)--everyone
involved, from the admin staff, to the POC, to the ODS, to the fire board and the chief work as a team to
provide the highest level of EMS and fire protection to the community and all its customers--our ALS
support is outstanding--I for one am glad they are here in case me, my family, my grandchildren, my guests
should need their services--the unsolicited testimonial of the helicopter EMS crew at the recent Open House
was very much appreciated--they stated that they really appreciate working with the Forest Lakes crew--
everything is handled very professionally--Chief Rodriquez has provided outstanding service to the
community--he has received outstanding performance reviews from multiple boards and multiple board
members--the fire board operates in an open and honest manner and strives to do what is in the best interests
of the community--they have conducted annual customer surveys for the last several years to make sure all
the citizens of Forest Lakes have the opportunity to express their opinions…my close association with the
Fire District has provided me with a deep appreciation for all who contribute and provide such a high level
of service…please keep up the high level that is provided and looking forward toward the future…keep up
the good work--I sleep better at night knowing if something does happen, qualified people will show up to
help--I had to call 911 many years ago for my wife and at least 10 people showed up at my door--nine of
them just stood around while Sally carried everything in the house--thank goodness it was not serious…big
reason we live here--on-site Fire Department with team of professionals--don't impact service by reducing
ops costs--other than that, I have no input for Item 4 as "other"-- first 3 items in order, and I'd place Item 5
down around 99 if I could..keep up the good support—cheers…ensure that the community is as supportive
as you are to them--I know I support you guys 500%...I appreciate what you do--by the way, for me
question 9 above does not work--it assigns the numbers 1-5 automatically…I believe a local Fire
Department and Emergency services are VERY important to the Forest Lakes community…again THANKS
for being there--never know when a need for services will be needed…keep the chief, let’s not go
backwards, let’s not reduce our level of service at any cost…fortunately, we have not had need of the
services of the Fire Department or paramedics, but it is reassuring to know that they are there if needed.
Recommendation
We respond in the attack truck w/ personnel that have absolutely no means of providing any fire suppression
capabilities--the attack truck is capable of being a type six vehicle if we would install a functional CAFS
unit ( which we own) on the truck--we need to maximize our attack truck for utilization of responding to fire
response operational needs for the community…through proper five year financial analysis determine a base
line budget figure including management reserve monetary levels and as our property tax value starts to
increase reduce our mil levy rate accordingly to the minimum level necessary that covers yearly operating
cost plus a reasonable monetary financial reserve for ongoing capital and equipment needs--as a registered
voter and tax payer I shall not support any formal merger agreements with Heber -Overgaard fire district--
last but not least any reduction in services should be in reducing our response area coverage--and dedicate
any services required to our Community District boundaries (as determine by Coconino charter) and our
Dept. of Health Services mandated CON which is currently in place and if necessary can be re-negotiated
with them…use of local help on busy weekends could help…conduct fundraising and/or grants to
supplement rising costs so services are not impacted…increase of fire protection and emergency service
staff with additional paid firefighters, paramedics and EMTs--coordinate with local Forest Lakes clinic for
higher level medical service support on weekends…we are seasonal residents and are only at Forest Lakes
on weekends May through Sept.--we have never had occasion to use fire dept services other than getting a
burn permit--we support by attending various fundraising events ( breakfast, socials, etc)--I was not aware
that some services (fax, blood pressure check, etc.) were available for residents and think this should be
publicized more--I would love to see the department offer a program for teens that might be interested in
Firefighting to "work" ( volunteer) at the station for a day or two sometime in the summer to see what
firefighters do and get some advice, info from the firefighters--I know my son would love that…Priority 4--
improve public support through continuing education and communication.

Customer Survey Questionnaire
The customer survey is shown here for the record.

1. Thank you for participating in the Forest Lakes Fire District annual customer satisfaction survey.
Overall, how satisfied are you with the fire department?
 Very Satisfied
 Somewhat Satisfied
 Neutral
 Somewhat Dissatisfied
 Very Dissatisfied
 No Opinion

2. How satisfied are you with the Administration Office Support?
 Very Satisfied
 Somewhat Satisfied
 Neutral
 Somewhat Dissatisfied
 Very Dissatisfied
 Not Used / No Opinion

3. How satisfied are you with the Fire District Board of Directors?
 Very Satisfied
 Somewhat Satisfied
 Neutral
 Somewhat Dissatisfied
 Very Dissatisfied
 No Opinion

4. How satisfied are you with our Fire Chief?
 Very Satisfied
 Somewhat Satisfied
 Neutral
 Somewhat Dissatisfied
 Very Dissatisfied
 No Opinion
5. How would you rate the Fire Department's service levels (response time, professionalism, quality of
service)?
 Very Satisfied
 Somewhat Satisfied
 Neutral
 Somewhat Dissatisfied
 Very Dissatisfied
 Not Used / No Opinion

6. Please provide further explanation for any responses of "Somewhat Dissatisfied" or "Very Dissatisfied".

7. Please provide further explanation for any responses of "Somewhat Satisfied" or "Very Satisfied".

8. Which of the following services have you used and/or know are available for our community's
convenience? (Please check all that apply.)
 FAX/Copy/Notary
 EMS, Blood Pressure Check
 Wellness Check
 Directions/Information
 Burn Permit
 Green Waste Site
9. The Fire Board will soon begin updating the Five Year Strategic Plan. Considerations will
include service levels, costs, and organizational topics (including possible merger). Please rank
order the following priorities according to their importance to you. (Highest priority is number 1.)
 Continue to ensure 24x7 professional paramedic and fire fighter coverage (On Duty Staff), with
support from local Paid On Call staff

 Reduce operating costs, even if service level is impacted

 Pursue a cooperative service agreement (including possible merger) with Heber-Overgaard Fire
District to reduce costs while preserving service levels

 Upgrade facilities and equipment as finances allow

 Other (please explain any specific priority in comments section below)

10. Please provide any other comments or suggestions you may have, including further comment
on the question above.
-------------------------------------------------------
XVII.SWOT

Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT)
Analysis
SWOT analysis is a strategic planning tool used to evaluate the Strengths,
Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats involved in a project or in a
business venture. It involves specifying the objective of the business venture or
project and identifying the internal and external factors that are favorable and
unfavorable to achieve that objective.
    • Strengths: internal characteristics of the business or team that give it a strategic
        advantage over others in the industry.
    • Weaknesses: internal characteristics that place the project or business venture at a
        strategic disadvantage relative to others.
    • Opportunities: external chances to improve customer service, increase
        productivity or make greater sales or profits in the environment.
    • Threats: external elements in the environment that could cause trouble for the
        business.

The STRAP update will address the following issues for this section: Viable
& sustainable workforce (combination staffing model); Succession planning
(Chief/Board); Enterprise funding; Tax revenue; and Facilities.

      ISSUE     Viable & sustainable workforce (combination staffing model)

                Strengths
                                  Flexible (how we deploy our staff)
                                  Cost effective (flat fees, no benefits, no training & cert costs, no
                                  annual medical costs ($1200 to $1500 per person)
                                  Highly skilled workforce (hand-picked crew; pool of talent is deep)
                                  Paid-On-Call member training enhanced with cross training with
                                  ODS
                                  Stronger feeling of confidence that the current staff can handle any
                                  and all emergencies
                                  We are well equipped for BLS and ALS
                Weaknesses
                                  Dependent on Dave's continued presence (Dave's personna, contacts,
                                  …)
                                  Requires travel from valley and surrounding areas for on-duty-staff (4
                                  hour round trip, large gas bills-not reimbursed, wear and tear on
                                  vehicles-not reimbursed)
                                  Maintaining certification of Paid-On-Call staff (due to low call
                                  volume)
                                  Increasing certification/regulatory requirements
                                  Inability to expand Paid-On-Call staff (we may be at 100% of what
                                  we are going to able to get)
                Opportunities
                                  Implement recommendations from the Citizens’Advisory Committee
                                  To Improve Paid-On-Call Participation
                        Market the fire department--pound the pavement, community
                        outreach, open house
                        Explore mutual aid agreements (modify, tailor, strengthen, …)
                        Mergers and consolidations
                        Beef up fire response plan, response protocol, how do we handle
                        multiple incidents?
        Threats
                        On-Duty-Staff tied to Dave
                        Increasing regulatory concerns
                        $3.25 cap on mill rate
                        HB2572

ISSUE   Succession planning (Chief/Board)
        Strengths
                       Chief position a desirable job
                       Combination staffing model is functioning well
                       District infrastructure is dramatically improved
                       Admin function is much improved
                       Department is performing at a high level
                       Sense of community is stronger
                       Community support very strong as evidenced by our recently
                       completed survey
                       Board and Chief work well together, Policy Document for Board and
                       Chief up to date and in place, helps clarify expectations of the board
                       and chief
                       5 Year STRAP plan shows we have a roadmap for the future
                       We have an Assistant Chief who has expressed willingness to continue
                       with the current Chief Model.
        Weaknesses
                       Cost of living at Forest Lakes is a concern; however the situation is
                       improving with lower real estate valuations coupled with low
                       borrowing costs. Real estate analysis by Dennis Justice shows there
                       are some opportunities to attract a resident chief who does not already
                       own property in Forest Lakes.
                       Volunteer spirit has decreased, puts pressure on being able to maintain
                       the combination staffing model.
                       Constant regulatory pressures, negative mind set of the legislature
        Opportunities
                       Community outreach efforts to increase public awareness of
                       department activities
                       Market the district and its potential for new chief
                       New building, equipment
                       STRAP--market the 5 year vision of the district
        Threats
                       Chief Rodriquez may be offered a new career opportunity in Gilbert
                       that would require termination of his current arrangement
ISSUE   Enterprise funding
        Strengths
                       Significant revenue comes from external sources (AeroMed, Fire
                       Recovery USA, others)
                       Forest Lakes Auxiliary continues to provide financial support
        Weaknesses

        Opportunities
                        Pursue supplemental funding (Grants, …)
                        Increased donations from Auxiliary
        Threats


ISSUE   Tax revenue
        Strengths
                        Significant percentage of revenues comes from FDAT
                        Bulk of revenue comes from property taxes
        Weaknesses
                        No growth opportunities (we are embedded in a national forest)
                        No commercial tax base
        Opportunities
                        Improved property valuations
        Threats
                        On-going restrictions from the legislature
                        HB2572 limits revenue growth

ISSUE   Facilities
        Strengths
                        We have the room to grow
                        We are debt free
                        We are able to rent crew quarters at an affordable price
                        Mini-pumper could eliminate need for one vehicle under roof
                        Current financial picture means we have options for new facility
                        construction.
        Weaknesses
                        Fire station will not house new equipment
                        Not all equipment will fit in the existing building
        Opportunities
                        Add on to existing fire station
                        Add a standalone building
                        Sell all or part of the old Beckett property
                        May be able to house some equipment within the subdivision
                        Low interest rates make borrowing much more affordable than at any
                        time in the past
                        Look at a bond issue as a potential source of funding a new building
        Threats
Justice family moves, or no longer wants to rent crew quarters
Equipment will deteriorate faster with outside exposure
Options for replacement equipment will be limited due to size
restrictions (ambulance boxes are taller, 4WD increases platform
height for both engines and ambulances, …)
XVIII.Goals

For purposes of planning and execution, goals are grouped into four categories: the
critical few; business as usual; leadership improvement; and carry over. The critical
few list contains goals the leadership team feels must be accomplished during
CY2014. By design, this is a short list and will allow the leadership team to focus
attention on their successful completion. This list requires specialized, dedicated
plans. The business as usual list is next in importance, and will be executed as part of
our normal business activity. The leadership improvement goals address specific
areas the leadership team has identified where improvement is needed. The carry
over goals are ones that carry over from prior years and have not been completed or
are of multi-year durations. Goals are assigned unique identifiers so they can be more
easily tracked.

All goals are detailed assuming we go forward with the Baseline Scenario A, Chief
Stays.

The Critical Few (CF) for 2014

This section identifies the critical few goals and associated strategies and objectives the
leadership team has identified that will be pursued in the coming year. Goals have been
specifically identified to align with the top issues list as determined by the STRAP team
during its update meetings and from feedback from the recently completed 2013 annual
customer survey. We are isolating these goals so we can better focus on their execution
strategies and allow successful completion in the intended time frame. Each goal has an
assigned owner and completion objective which will be tracked throughout the year.
Each assigned owner has agreed with the stated goal and its associated objective and
completion date.

The critical few goals, those that require specific, designated actions and owners, in
descending order of importance, are listed here:
   • Down select to a single go-forward strategy for the district. (Owners: Leadership
        Team)
   • Work with the FLFD Auxiliary to develop supplemental funding sources (Owners:
        Leadership Team)
   • Take specific actions based on the recommendations of the Citizen’s Advisory
        Committee To Improve POC Participation (Owners: Chief Rodriquez/John
        Hennessey)
   • Continue support and awareness of the waterous hydrants/water delivery system as
        it relates to fire response. (Owners: Chief Rodriquez/John Hennessey)
   • Develop an improved communications plan (Owner: John Hennessey)
   • Develop an updated facility strategy for the district. (Owner: John Hennessey)
Specific plan elements to address these critical few goals are listed. Goals are given a
sequence number for tracking purposes.

       Goal CF2014-1. Downselect to a single go-forward strategy for the district. As a
       result of uncertainties surrounding the district and its operations at this time last
       year the leadership team developed a four pronged approach for 2013 to resolve
some of these uncertainties. Four scenarios were identified: Scenario A, Chief
Stays, which was our baseline against which other scenarios would be measured;
Scenario B, Merger With Heber-Overgaard; Scenario C, Hire A New Chief, Keep
the Same Staffing Model; and Scenario D, Hire A New Chief, New Staffing
Model.

Strategy: Scenario A, Chief Stays, Our Baseline, has renewed importance as a
result of Chief Rodriquez’s recent announcement he is no longer pursuing
promotion opportunities at his home department and is willing to accept a new
contract without reservation with FLFD in October 2014 when his current
contract expires. With Chief Rodriquez having received an acceptable
performance review in December 2013, it is assumed the board would be willing
to offer Chief Rodriquez a new contract in October 2014. Of the three
competing scenarios, only Scenario B, merge with Heber-Overgaard, remains in
play at this time. At the December 2013 FLFD board meeting Scenarios C and D
were put on hold. As a result of work conducted by the Heber-Overgaard/Forest
Lakes Cooperative Service Exploratory Committee, Scenario B presents a cost
effective option for residents of Forest Lakes to Scenario A. From a business
perspective, a merger makes sense. But there are reasons why some residents
may prefer to remain a stand-alone department. The Committee has
recommended the decision be put to a vote of both districts in August 2014.

Objectives:
a) Heber-Overgaard/Forest Lakes Cooperative Service Exploratory Committee to
   continue its activities to bring the merger question to a vote of the public in
   August 2014. The committee will continue to report its activities monthly and
   seek board approval as required. Action: Chief Rodriquez/John Hennessey.
   Completion: August 31, 2014.
b) If the merger question is approved by the voters of both districts, the Heber-
   Overgaard/Forest Lakes Cooperative Service Exploratory Committee is to
   complete its implementation plan to merge. Action: Chief Rodriquez/John
   Hennessey. Completion: September 30, 2014.
c) If the merger question is not approved by the voters of both districts, the FLFD
   board will initiate the creation of a new contract for Chief Rodriquez to
   become effective November 1, 2014. Action: Leadership Team. Completion:
   November 1, 2014.
Goal CF2014-2. Work with the FLFD Auxiliary to develop supplemental funding
sources. The newly invigorated FLFD Auxiliary, with over 100 members and a
full board, has renewed its commitment to its basic mission of helping the fire
district achieve its goals. With the help of an anonymous donor, and matching
contributions by the Auxiliary, a STRYKER Power Load System has been
procured that will improve the safety of our ODS and POC members, and will
act as a force multiplier. The new board has already discussed plans for
contacting neighboring auxiliaries to see how they have been successful in
assisting their fire departments financially.

Strategy: Establish a close working relationship with the new Auxiliary leaders.
Communicate department needs to the Auxiliary. Publicize and encourage tax-
deductible donations (such as the anonymous donation for the STRYKER
Power Load System).

Objective:
a) Attend monthly Auxiliary meetings. Demonstrate support of the Auxiliary by
   attending monthly meetings and presenting monthly updates on department
   status and department needs. Action: Chief Rodriquez/John Hennessey/Fire
   Board. Completion: monthly, on-going.
b) Prepare, deliver and maintain a list of fire department priorities for Auxiliary
   leader consideration. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Completion: initial list
   delivered; maintenance on-going.
c) Review priority list from the 2013 STRAP Plan Update process with Auxiliary
   Leaders. Action: Chief Rodriquez/John Hennessey. Completion: March 31,
   2014.
d) Communicate Auxiliary related support in the FLFD Newsletter. Action:
   Chief Rodriquez. Completion: on-going.
e) Use the FLFD newsletter (to be created) as a vehicle for Auxiliary enhanced
   communications. Action: Chief Rodriquez/John Hennessey/Chris Bennett.
   Completion: monthly, on-going.
f) Assist the Auxiliary with establishing a relationship with the Blue Ridge
   Auxiliary, which has been very successful with fund raising efforts. Action:
   Chief Rodriquez/John Hennessey. Completion: June 30, 2014.
Goal CF2014-3. Take specific actions based on the recommendations of the
Citizen’s Advisory Committee To Improve POC Participation. The Citizen’s
Advisory Committee to Improve POC Participation has made several
recommendations to the Leadership Team of actions that can be taken to help
improve participation by residents. The complete report is contained Appendix D of
this document. There some loose ends with respect to committee recommendations
that will be addressed by the committee in 2014.

Strategy: POC Committee to address loose ends for some of its recommendations.
Leadership team to implement key recommendations, with revisions, from the POC
Committee.

Objectives :
a) Clarify the roles and responsibilities of the committee proposed POC
   Coordinator. Action: Paul Studer. Completion date: March 31, 2014.
b) Investigate financial impact of the POC compensation recommendations.
   Make recommendations to the leadership team for incorporation in the
   FY2014-2015 budget. Action: Treasurer Fahrendorf/Finance Committee/Chief
   Rodriquez. Completion: April 30, 2014.
c) Assign POC Coordinator. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Completion: April 30,
   2014. Note: this action item may be modified based on the results of item a)
   above.
d) Implement POC compensations recommendations per item b) above. Action:
   Chief Rodriquez. Completion: July 1, 2014.

Goal CF2014-4. Continue support and awareness of the waterous hydrants/water
delivery system as it relates to fire response. Water delivery capability is one of
the key ISO measurements for determining our ISO rating. Our situation at Forest
Lakes produces additional challenges for the fire department. Most fire districts
do not have to be involved with the water system infrastructure, they just assume
the water will be there when needed. The Forest Lakes fire department and the
Forest Lakes water department have a symbiotic relationship that places us
squarely in the water infrastructure issue. The water district’s mission statement
calls for them to deliver drinking water to the community, but they have sized the
basic water delivery system for the much higher flows needed to fight structural
fires. We have a long standing hand-shake agreement with the water department
that we will supply two new waterous hydrants per year to replace existing
hydrants, be they low-flow or otherwise, with the water department paying for
installation. As a result of recent improvements we have only three low flow
hydrants (<500gpm with 1,000 feet of hose attached), and they are only marginally
low. Over 75% of our hydrants flow at 700 gpm with 1,000 ft of hose attached.
The water district is pursuing improving its hydrant spacing goals to 600 to 700
feet. Since the water district and fire district are both special taxing districts, all
improvements benefit the residents and business owners of Forest Lakes and are
eventually paid for by them, so it is important that we continue to work together in
the best interests of the community.

 Strategy: Formalize the hand-shake agreement between the water district and
the fire district regarding maintenance and upgrading of the water system
infrastructure. Establish a closer relationship between the two districts by
attending water board meetings. Become familiar with the 5 year water system
improvement plan. Fire department is to develop a plan/process to maintain
awareness of the water system operational capabilities and develop work-
arounds.

Objective:
   a) Execute and sign an IGA formalizing the working agreement between
       the water district and the fire department. Action: John Hennessey.
       Completion: completed November 2013.
   b) Attend water district board meetings. Action: Chief Rodriquez/John
       Hennessey. Completion: On-going.
   c) Become familiar with the water district 5 year improvement plans.
       Action: Chief Rodriquez/John Hennessey. Completion: initial June 30,
       2014; on-going.
   d) Fire department to develop a plan/process to remain abreast of water
       system delivery issues and develop work around plans. Action: Chief
       Rodriquez. Completion: On-going.
   e) Fire district to provide annual capital budget allocation to cover the
       procurement of two water hydrants per year. Action: Treasurer
       Fahrendorf/Finance Committee. Completion: initial June 30, 2014.
       On-going.


Goal CF2014-5. Develop an improved communications plan. Note: this goal has
been moved to the Leadership Improvement section (LI2014-2).
       Goal CF2014-6. Develop an updated facility strategy for the district. Significant
       progress has been made over the last several years by the Building Committee under
       the leadership of then board member Geoff Stanisic. A conditional use permit was
       approved by the county and we were prepared to move ahead with building plans
       until we were advised by the County Assessor in early 2012 that property values
       would go down by over 25%. Building plans were put on hold at that time and
       austerity plans, already in place, were reinforced. The most recent 5 year budget and
       financial forecast contained in Appendix C, shows we are now in a position to
       address this critical priority.

       Strategy: Pursue a “soft start” approach by gathering the bits and pieces from the
       past building committee activities into one place, by determining the value of the old
       Beckett property, by waiting for the merger question to get resolved, etc. Investigate
       other options as they present themselves.

       Objective:
          a) Identify a leader for the reconstituted building committee. Action:
              John Hennessey. Completion: March 31, 2014.
          b) Gather building committee history. Action: Committee leader.
              Completion: September 30, 2014.

Business As Usual (BAU) for 2014

Goals that will be addressed as a result of normal business actions, or business as usual,
are listed. These goals are aligned with the top issues list as determined by the STRAP
team during its update meetings. Regular report outs to the leadership team will be
established to provide visibility into the completion status of these goals.
    • Fire response plan-disaster preparedness/fire-wise education and ready-set-go
    • Supplemental funding/mutual aid agreements
    • Adherence to regulatory standards
    • Communications (radio equipment/infrastructure)
    • Community support.
Plans to address these business as usual goals are listed here. Goals are given a sequence
number for tracking purposes.

       Goal BAU2014-1. Fire response plan; disaster preparedness; fire-wise
       education; ready-set-go.

       Strategy: Use available literature and programs to develop a program suitable
       for FLFD. This plan to include our approach to emergency response planning
       and crisis management.

       Objectives:
       a) Identify programs. Action: Chief Rodriquez will identify available programs
          and tailor them to FLFD. (Completion: June 30, 2014, on-going)

       Goal BAU2014-2. Supplemental funding/mutual aid agreements
Strategy: With restrictions on property tax and the decrease in property values
it is important that the district pursue additional funding wherever possible to
ensure the District has the equipment and staffing to operate effectively. The
current sources of supplemental income are from grants, small donations and
fund raising activities such as pancake breakfasts and ice cream socials. Grants
that were a source of funding in the past have become more difficult to obtain
due to the economic downturn.

The FLFD has engaged in mutual aid agreements with The Northern Gila
County Chiefs Association, The Heber/Overgaard Fire District and The
Arizona Mutual Aid Plan. These agreements are intended to provide aid to
members in emergency situations. The agreements do not provide equipment
or operator compensation but do allow reimbursement for consumable supplies
and non-emergency incident activities such as training. As a small fire district it
is advantageous for the FLFD to continue participating in the Mutual Aid plans
as they exist as the District is more often than not the beneficiary of additional
resources. Aid rendered to the Forest Service is generally billable.

Mandy Metzger, Coconino County Board of Supervisors for District 4, has
discussed opportunities for county assistance during previous board meetings.
She stated that the fire district was an autonomous political entity and that there
was limited, if any, opportunity for county financial assistance. She did
identify one category of potential funding, community improvement, that might
be pursued.

Objectives:

   a) Additional funding. FLFD Board to continue to seek additional funding
      through grants and other means as they become available. Action: Clerk
      John Nelson. Completion CY2014, on-going.

   b) Mutual aid agreements. The District will continue to participate in
      mutual aid programs when they benefit the District. Action: Chief
      Rodriquez. Completion: CY2014, on-going.

   c) County assistance. Provide Mandy Metzger, Coconino County
      Supervisor, with our list of district priorities. Mandy will notify us if
      opportunities exist for supplemental funding assistance. Action: Board
      Chairman. Completion: List to Mandy March 31, 2014, on-going.

Goal BAU2014-3. Adherence to regulatory standards. Ensure that all legal
requirements are met.

Strategy: Review the laws and regulations that govern the department and if
necessary, update internal business practices to ensure compliance.

Objectives:
a) Non-compliance. Chief Rodriquez will identify laws and regulations with
   which we are not in compliance. (Completion: June 30, 2014, on-going)
b) Establish internal business practices. Chief Rodriquez to establish internal
   business practices that will bring the department into compliance.
   (Completion: CY 2014, on-going)
c) Certification compliance. We have engaged in some activities where people
   are not certified, but should be. For example, Forest Lakes in the past has not
   enforced the requirement for ambulance drivers to be certified as first
   responders in order to transport patients. Consequently, we have not been in
   compliance with regulations. Action: Chief Rodriquez to put plans in place to
   assure we maintain compliance. Completion: On-going.

Goal BAU2014-4. Communications (radio equipment/infrastructure.)

Strategy: Replace all 40 department hand-held radios over a five year
period, beginning in FY2011-2012. The current cost of each individual
radio including spare batteries and chargers is $950 (2010 dollars). In order
to accomplish this we need to budget for replacing eight radios per year at an
annual cost of $7,600. The current group of radios can be maintained over the
five year period for approximately $1,000 per year.

Objective:
a) Replacement radio equipment. Allocate $7,600 capital funding for 5 years,
   beginning with FY 2011- 2012. Note: no radios will actually be purchased
   during this 5 year time frame. The purchase price of each of the eight radios
   will be rolled into the following budget, so at the end of the five year period
   the money will be available to purchase all 40 radios at the same time. This
   gives us the maximum technical advantage. The Budget and Finance
   Committee will allocate $7,600 capital funding each year for a 5 year period
   beginning in FY2011-2012. Action: Budget and Finance Committee Chairman
   to assure capital funds are allocated and available when needed. Completion:
   FY 2015-2016.
b) Maintenance of existing radio equipment. Costs to maintain existing
   equipment will be reviewed each year and adjusted as necessary. Action:
   Budget and Finance Committee to allocate $1,000 operations funding each
   year for 5 years, beginning in FY 2011-2012. Completion: FY 2015-2016.

Goal BAU2014-5. Community support. Improve the department
image/relationship with the community.

Strategy: Provide methods for FLFD residents, taxpayers and customers to
better understand the department and to become more involved in the
department activities.

Objectives:

a) Conduct an annual customer satisfaction survey. An annual customer
   satisfaction survey update is a prudent way for the leadership team to keep
   abreast of customer concerns as well as areas where they are satisfied. The
   survey updates need to be completed in time to feed into the annual update to
   the 5 Year Strategic Plan. Action: John Hennessey/John Nelson/Chief
   Rodriquez. Completion: Survey updates to be initiated at mid-year and
     completed by the end of September. Survey results to be included in the 5
     Year Strategic Plan updates (published by the end of each calendar year.)
b)   Conduct focus group meetings. Continue to hold focus group meetings.
     Action: Chairman and Chief Rodriquez to conduct initial meetings, other board
     members to participate as needed. Completion: Restart meetings in May 2014,
     continue through October, with regular reports to the Board and community.
c)   Host an annual open house. Host an annual open house, to be held in the
     month of June. Open house to showcase the department operations, the
     leadership team and promote department involvement by the community,
     especially in the paid-on-call arena. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Completion:
     June 2014, on-going.
d)   Improved community relations. Develop and foster cooperative relations with
     all Forest Lakes entities: DWID, FLOA, Sheriff, DPS, Forest Service,
     Auxiliary, Quilt Group, Library, Community Church, Post Office, etc. Action:
     Chief Rodriquez. Completion: Ongoing, with regular reports to the leadership
     team.
e)   Center of community activities. Work with the Auxiliary, FLOA and the other
     community organizations to continue to foster a sense of community within
     Forest Lakes. Include outreach activities for new residents and our
     neighboring trailer park residents. Support pancake breakfasts and ice cream
     socials. Hold community pot luck lunches and dinners. Action: Connie
     Widener. Completion: On-going.
f)   Marketing plan. Develop a marketing plan for the fire district. Build on
     lessons learned from the focus group meetings and open houses. Develop a
     marketing plan that addresses customer issues. Action: Board Chairman, and
     the Leadership Team. Completion: Initial plan by April 30, 2014; ongoing.
g)   Diverse customer base needs. Develop a plan to address differing needs of our
     customer base. Action: Leadership Team, Chief Rodriquez to take the lead.
     Completion: Complete the plan by mid-year; on-going.
BAU2014-6. Update salary rates and job descriptions for all department
members.

Strategy: Good management practice requires we maintain up-to-date job
descriptions and salary rates. Salary rates are applied by job position, not by
individual. This assures all employees are being treated fairly.

Objective:
a) Salary rates/job descriptions. The department is to update salary rates and job
   descriptions for all department members. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Salary
   rates and job descriptions to be completed by the end of June 2014.
b) Coordinate changes to annual operating budgets to reflect compensation
   changes. Action: Chief Rodriquez/Treasurer John Fahrendorf.


BAU2014-7. Develop a plan to rebid services periodically.

Strategy: FLFD has contracts for various services, including Smart Systems,
Auditor, etc. These should be reviewed for possible rebid. It is always easier to
stay with the same company but the only way to really know if FLFD is getting
       good value is to rebid. It is recommended that we change contractors every three
       years or so

       Objective:

       a) Rebid services. The department is to develop a plan to rebid services
          periodically Action: Chief Rodriquez. Plan to be completed by end of CY
          2014.


       BAU2014-8. Develop and maintain a Disaster Recovery Plan.

       Strategy: Good business practice requires that business leaders plan for the
       unexpected and have plans in place in case these events occur.

       Objective:

       a) Identify a potential list of disasters that could negatively impact the ability of
          the fire district to function. Action: Chief Rodriquez/Administrative
          Assistant/Resource Unit Leaders. Completion: April 30, 2014.
       b) Develop plans to mitigate or eliminate potential consequences of disaster
          elements identified in a). Action: Chief Rodriquez/Administrative
          Assistant/Resource Unit Leaders. Completion: September 30, 2014.


Leadership Improvement (LI) Goals 2014

Goals have been included that align with improvement areas as identified by the
leadership team during Chief Rodriquez’s annual performance review. These goals
have a significant potential impact on the department’s performance for the baseline,
scenario A, chief stays option.
Plans to address these leadership improvement goals are listed here. Goals are given a
sequence number for tracking purposes:
   • Develop and execute a succession planning strategy as it relates to our
        administrative staff, technical resources unit leader and assistant chief.
   • Improve communications by means of consistently providing verbal reports at
        monthly FLOA meetings, providing input to the quarterly FLOA newsletter and
        initiating a fire department monthly newsletter.

       LI2014-1. Develop and execute a succession planning strategy as it relates to our
       administrative staff, technical operations leader and assistant chief.

       Strategy: Good management practice requires we plan for succession at critical
       organizational positions. Criticality of positions depends both on the job
       function as well as the perceived near-term risk of employee departures. For
       2014, there are three positions identified for which succession plans need to be
       identified and executed: administrative staff assistant, technical resources unit
       leader and assistant chief. Chief Rodriquez has been notified that Roxie Allen,
       administrative assistant, will be listing her home for sale in the near future.
      Keith Scholl, technical resources unit leader, has been dealing with significant
      health issues. And Lee Barnes, assistant chief, may be in line for a promotion
      in his home department. Other positions may become critical, but these three
      are imminent.

      Objective:
      a) Ensure the department has updated job descriptions and salary ranges for all
         three positions. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Complete by the middle of
         February 2014.
      b) Ensure each job position has an up to date desk manual describing the day-to-
         day operations and responsibilities for each position. Action: Chief
         Rodriquez. Complete by the middle of March.
      c) Create job postings as appropriate for the three positions. Action: Chief
         Rodriquez. Complete by the middle of March.
      d) Identify candidates for the three positions. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Initial
         list complete by the end of March 2014; on-going.
      e) Be prepared to execute replacement strategies as needed. Action: Chief
         Rodriquez.


      LI2014-2. Improve communications by means of consistently providing verbal
      reports at monthly FLOA meetings, providing input to the quarterly FLOA
      newsletter and initiating a fire department monthly newsletter.

      Strategy: The recent customer survey highlighted communications as an area to be
      addressed by the leadership team. The monthly inputs at FLOA meetings and
      the quarterly input for the FLOA newsletter are excellent opportunities to
      communicate fire district issues to those who don’t regularly attend fire board
      meetings or visit our web site. Chief Rodriquez will be tasked with instituting a
      regular fire department newsletter using the questions and concerns identified in
      the comment section of the survey as a catalyst for issues to be addressed. Fire
      board members will be tasked with discussing fire department issues at the Open
      House, Pancake Breakfasts, Ice Cream Socials, etc.

      Objective:
      a) Continue to provide regular fire department feedback at monthly FLOA board
         meetings. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Complete by year end.
      b) Continue to provide regular written input for the FLOA quarterly newsletter.
         Action: Chief Rodriquez. Complete by year end.
      c) Develop a plan to initiate a department newsletter. Initial newsletter topics
         will be developed from the comments section of the most recent annual
         customer survey. Determine the frequency and distribution (e-Mail blasts,
         posting on the web site, paper, …) of the news information. Action: Chief
         Rodriquez. Plan by the end of February. Execute to plan—on-going.
      d) Leadership team to take every opportunity to discuss fire department issues
         with members of the public at the Open House, Pancake Breakfasts, Ice Cream
         Socials, … Action: Leadership Team (Chief Rodriquez plus Board members).
         Completion: on-going.

Carry Over (CO)Goals
Goals in this category include those that carry over from prior year’s lists. Plans to
address these carry over goals are listed here. Goals are given a sequence number for
tracking purposes. Goal descriptions are as they initially appeared (except as noted to
bring them up to date).

       Goal CF2013-3. Equipment/apparatus plan. (Reworded) A baseline
       operational needs assessment was completed in December 2013 to determine
       the minimum level of equipment/apparatus needed to support department
       operations. A maintenance plan and replacement plan for equipment and
       apparatus derived from that needs assessment will complete the goal
       identified in CY2013. The replacement plan and maintenance requirements
       will reflect the effects of the leadership team policy to procure good, used,
       serviceable equipment in lieu of buying new. Operational needs include
       fire suppression, emergency medical, highway accident coverage, snow
       removal and Green Waste Site support.

       Strategy: The district is operating under extreme budgetary pressures. The
       FY2014-2015 budget has the tax levy mill rate at the legislative maximum of
       $3.25. Recent legislation will limit year over year increases in tax revenue to
       5% regardless of changes to Net Assessed Valuation. The recently completed
       baseline reassessment of equipment needs will be used to determine
       repair/replace/maintain strategies. Per usual practice, we will consider replacing
       obsolete equipment based on maintenance records and standards of
       performance. We will continue to procure replacement vehicular
       equipment based on clearly identified needs.

       Objectives :
       e) Develop a replacement plan and maintenance requirements for our rolling
          stock. Action: Chief Rodriquez. Completion: March 31, 2014; ongoing
          updates.
       f) Replace obsolete equipment. Action: Chief Rodriquez to monitor equipment
          and identify a replacement schedule in support of the strategic planning
          process. Completion: Ongoing.
       LI2013-1. Update salary rates and job descriptions for all department members.
       Per A.R.S. §§ 48-803, 48-804 and 48-805, the Fire Board shall determine the
       compensation payable to district personnel. The Fire Board controls compensation
       to district personnel through its approval of FLFD Policy 0021, Pay Scale, which
       is maintained by the Policies, Procedures and By-Laws (PPB) Committee. This
       policy specifies pay ranges and is in compliance with this requirement and
       contains the pay for all district personnel except the fire chief, who is under
       contract to the fire district for his services. The chief, in his capacity as Chief
       Operations Officer, including responsibility for Human Resources (HR), is tasked
       with assuring all compensation payable to district personnel is in compliance with
       this policy and is consistent with the annual operating budget. All department
       personnel report directly or indirectly through the Chief’s office. All personnel
       assigned to positions described herein are considered employees of the district and
       are subject to payroll tax withholding.
Strategy: Good management practice requires we maintain up-to-date job
descriptions and salary rates. Salary rates are applied by job position, not by
individual. This assures all employees are being treated fairly.

Objective:
c) Salary rates/job descriptions. The department is to update salary rates and job
   descriptions for all department members. Action: Chief Rodriquez/PPB
   Chairman Tom Cummiskey. Completion: updated salary rates and job
   descriptions to be completed by the end of March 2014; on-going.

CO2013-1 Administration (as modified December 2013). Maintain
administrative policies and procedures.

Strategy: Continue to update our policies and procedures.

Objectives:
a) Identify and draft FLFD Board Policies, Procedures and Bylaws. Department
   policies to be all inclusive for on-duty-staff, paid-on-call year round residents
   and paid-on-call summer / weekend residents. Action: PPB Chairman Tom
   Cummiskey. Completion: Manual updates published on a regular schedule
   (one or two per month) throughout CY 2014.

CO2013-2 Administration. Identify methods to improve productivity of office
staff.

Strategy: Continue to review the office procedures and practices to make them
more efficient.

Objectives:
a) Outsource patient billing. Continue with outsourcing patient billing. Action:
   Office staff to monitor billing revenue and provide monthly reports to the
   leadership team. Completion: On-going.
b) Outsource fire recovery billing. Continue with outsourcing fire recovery
   billing. Action: Office staff to monitor billing revenue and provide monthly
   reports to the leadership team. Completion: On-going.
c) Review decision to outsource payroll. Payroll processing has been outsourced.
   The program has met the criteria established to be successful, but in the spirit
   of continuous improvement, the decision needs to be revisited to see if
   outsourcing is still appropriate. Action: Chief Rodriquez and Office Staff.
   Completion: By end of CY 2014.

CO2013-3 Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Procure and maintain
Emergency Medical equipment that ensures a safe and effective environment for
both the staff and patients. Identify and procure equipment and implement methods
that will improve safety of EMS workers and patients and make us more cost
effective.

Strategy: Replace obsolete equipment based on maintenance records and
standards of performance and continually review the medical emergency
methods by reaching out to vendors, other fire districts, AFDA, etc for
appropriate, cost-effective new technology and resources.

Objective:
a) Identify needs. District personnel to identify needs and present
   recommendations to the leadership team for possible action. Action: Chief
   Rodriquez. Completion: Ongoing.

CO2013-4 Fire operations. See Goal CF2013-3 above).

CO2012-6 Supplemental funding/grant funding. (See BAU 2014-2
above). Ensure adequate funding is available to meet the service
requirements of the Department.

Strategy: Pursue alternate funding and bridge financing options. Establish a line
of credit with Wells Fargo Bank to bridge the funding between the beginning of
the fiscal year and the October time frame when tax revenues are received. Pursue
grant funding opportunities.

 Objectives:
a) Line of Credit. Establish a line of credit with Wells Fargo Bank to bridge the
   funding between the beginning of the fiscal year and the October time frame
   when tax revenues are received. Action: Finance and Budget Committee
   Chairman. Already in place. No further action required at this time.
b) Grant funding. FLFD to submit grant applications as needed and to maintain
   awareness of grant funding opportunities. Action: Member Nelson.
   Completion: On-going.
c) Donations. FLFD to pursue donations as a means of department support.
   Action: Chief Rodriquez at al. Completion: On-going.
d) Fund raisers. Leadership team to pursue fund raisers as a means of department
   support. Action: Leadership team. Completion: On-going.
e) Facility donations. Request donations of specific equipment via newsletters
   and bulletin boards (furniture, appliances, e.g.) Action: Connie Widener.
   Completion: On-going.
f) Investigate alternative/designated community based funding options (FLOA,
   Community Church, Auxiliary, etc.). Action: Leadership team. Completion:
   On-going.
g) Initiate programs to increase fire department exposure, perhaps as a potential
   fund raiser, such as a “Firefighters for a Day” program, with raffle to select the
   participant as a fund raiser. Action: Connie Widener. Completion: On-going.
h) Develop coordinated, aggressive fund raising activities. Action: Leadership
   team and Fire Department Auxiliary. Completion: on-going.
i) Initiate a used equipment donation program. There is a possibility of acquiring
   used equipment from grants. Action: Chief Rodriquez/Unit Leaders/Office
   Staff. Completion: On-going.

C02012-7 SCBA Upgrades. This is a critical issue for personnel safety.

Strategy. The current plan is to replace 14 SCBA harnesses including air
cylinders over a five year period beginning in FY2011-2012. This also includes
7 spare air cylinders. The current cost (2010 $) of one MSA harness/cylinder is
$6,200.

Objective:
a) Allocate capital to replace three SCBA harnesses per year at a cost of $18,600
   beginning in FY 2011-2012. Action: Budget and Finance Committee
   Chairman to assure funds are allocated and available when needed.
   Completion: FY 2015-2016.
b) Allocate capital funding to replace three air cylinders at a unit cost of $1,000
   (total cost of $3,000.) Action: Budget and Finance Committee Chairman to
   assure funds are allocated and available when needed. Completion: FY 2015-
   2016.

  Note: no purchases will be made during the time capital is being
  accumulated. Capital funds allocated during this time will be rolled into the
  following budget so at the end of the five year period the money will be
  available to purchase all harnesses and air cylinders at the same time.

  Note: if the harness money is not available, we must plan to purchase 14 MSA
  cylinders within the next seven years. This is because all of our current
  cylinders will be obsolete at that time. This means they can no longer be
  used and must be destroyed in 2018. A cylinder’s life is 15 years. Costs
  should be reviewed each year and adjusted as necessary.
XIX.Definitions

AFDA. Arizona Fire District Association. Assists fire districts with the complex task of
managing a fire district. This association provides a year round source of information and
conducts training and educational conferences twice each year where members of FLFD
have an opportunity to share information about the operation of a fire district.

AHCCCS. Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System. Arizona's Medicaid agency
that offers health care programs to serve Arizona residents. Individuals must meet
certain income and other requirements to obtain services.

ALS. Advanced Life Support. A set of life-saving protocols and skills that extend Basic
Life Support to further support the circulation and provide an open airway and adequate
ventilation (breathing).

BLS. Basic Life Support. the level of medical care which is used for victims of life-
threatening illnesses or injuries until they can be given full medical care at a hospital. It
can be provided by trained medical personnel, including emergency medical technicians,
paramedics, and by laypersons who have received BLS training. BLS is generally used
in the pre-hospital setting, and can be provided without medical equipment.

CON – Certificate of Necessity. A.R.S 36-2232 authorizes the Arizona Department of
Health Services to certify ambulance service for specific areas. This certification is
referred to as the Certificate of Necessity (CON). It stipulates the area that FLFD is
responsible to provide Emergency Medical Service and allows for the appropriate
billing for these services.

DS. Dispatch Services. Along with Technical Services, Dispatch Services (DS) are the
two major organizational legs of the fire district. DS handles all dispatch and dispatch
call tracking, and provides 24 x 7 x 365 coverage. The DS Unit leader provides
department liaison for any issue related to communications with the Flagstaff 911 Call Center.

EMT-B. Emergency Medical Technician -Basic. EMT-Bs focus on rapid in-field
treatment and transport to higher medical providers. EMT-Bs work in conjunction with
other medical providers such as paramedics, nurses, and physicians, as well as with
other EMT-Bs. When operating in the prehospital environment, their actions are
governed by protocols and procedures set by their system's physician medical director.

FDAT Fire District Assistance Tax. FDAT is allocated to each fire district within a
       –



county based on a formula determined by state statute. The funding is derived from a tax
that is levied on all properties within Coconino County. FLFD allocation from this the
FDAT fund is usually equal to 20% of the FLFD levies.

FLDWID. Forest Lakes Domestic Water Improvement District. Provides water for fire
suppression with access to 77 fire hydrants.

FLOA. Forest Lakes Owners’ Association. Partners with the FLFD and the Fire Auxiliary in
fund raising events. Established the Green Waste site.
FY. Fiscal Year. The FLFD fiscal year runs from July 1 through June 30.

GIS. Geographic Information System. Computer based system for graphical
representation of the areas geography.

GWS. Green Waste Site. A community service provided by FLOA and the fire district.
Enables convenient and cost effective disposal of green waste. Encourages residents to keep
their lots clear of combustible materials.

IGA. Intergovernmental Agreement. Also known a mutual aid, it provides a mechanism
for the dispatch of personnel and equipment from the area serviced by one governmental
agency to the area serviced by any other governmental agency. This assures additional
fire, EMS or other emergency services are available to other agencies in the event of
emergencies.

ISO. Insurance Services Office. An independent organization with an expert staff that
collects information about municipal fire-protection efforts in communities throughout the
United States.

IT. Information Technology. Refers to the use of computers and telecommunications
equipment to store, retrieve, transmit and manipulate data. The term is commonly used as
a synonym for computers and computer networks.

NAV. Net Assessed Valuation. The assessed values of property is based on the primary
and the secondary values multiplied by an assessment ratio which currently is 10%.

NFPA. National Fire Protection Association. The world's leading advocate of fire
prevention and an authoritative source on public safety.

ODS. On-Duty-Staff. A Forest Lakes fire district designation that denotes off-duty
professional paramedics and firefighters from neighboring towns and districts who work 24 or
48 hour shifts at Forest Lakes to provide the 24 x 7 x 365 service level dictated by the fire
board. They are paid at an hourly rate for the full shift.

OSHA. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The main federal agency
charged with the enforcement of safety and health legislation.

POC. Paid-On-Call. A Forest Lakes fire district designation that denotes Forest Lakes
residents who provide on-call support for the ODS to help provide the 24 x 7 x 365 service
level dictated by the fire board. They are paid at an hourly rate for the duration of their call
support.

PPC. Public Protection Classification. Assigned by ISO. A numeric rating system, which
ranges from 1 to 10. Class 1 represents exemplary fire protection, and Class 10 indicates
that the area’s fire-suppression program does not meet ISO’s minimum criteria.

PRMC. Payson Regional Medical Center. Payson Regional Medical Center is a 44-bed,
acute care hospital providing services that include inpatient and outpatient care;
diagnostic imaging; and emergency, medical and surgical care.
SBS. Small Business Server. Windows Small Business Server (SBS) is an integrated
server suite from Microsoft designed for running network infrastructure (both intranet
management and Internet access) of small and medium enterprises. Application server
technologies are tightly integrated to enable small businesses with targeted solutions such
as the Remote Web Workplace, and offer management benefits such as integrated setup,
enhanced monitoring, a unified management console, and remote access.

SCBA. Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus. Sometimes referred to as a compressed air
breathing apparatus, air pack, or simply breathing apparatus. A device worn by rescue
workers, firefighters, and others to provide breathable air in an immediate danger to life
and health atmosphere. The term "self-contained" means that the breathing set is not
dependent on a remote supply. Typically has three main components: a high-pressure
tank, a pressure regulator, and an inhalation connection (mouthpiece, mouth mask or face
mask), connected together and mounted to a carrying frame.

SOG. Standard Operating Guidelines. Deal with daily operating issues requiring domain
specific knowledge and training. SOGs are the responsibility of the Chief in his role as
chief operations officer for the district. SOGs differ from policies, which are the
responsibility of the fire board, in that they don’t: apply equally to all facets of the
business; don’t address pay scale by category; don’t address issues which potentially
reflect on the image of the department; don’t address issues which potentially impact the
fiduciary interests of the district; don’t address issues dealing with a legal or statutory
requirement; don’t address issues which deal with condition of employment; don’t
address issues which deal with good business practice; and don’t address issues which
require flexibility in execution.

STRAP. Strategic Plan. A comprehensive road map used to guide the development of
an organization and to its progress. Typically a multi-year duration document, it
requires a collaborative approach involving the stake holders in the organization, and
includes a mission statement, a vision statement, a description of the organization and a
listing of goals and objectives. Typically includes a finance and budget projection
module to guide the organization as it prepares annual operating plans and budgets.

SWOT. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. Part of the strategic planning
process, it is a tool used to evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats
involved in a project or in a business venture. It involves specifying the objective of the
business venture or project and identifying the internal and external factors that are
favorable and unfavorable to achieve that objective.

TS. Technical Services. Along with Dispatch Services, Technical Services (TS) are the
two major organizational legs of the fire district. TS handles all cell phone and radio
inventory along with their repair and maintenance. The TS Unit leader is responsible for
emergency response mapping and their annual updates in conjunction with Coconino
County Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the National Forest Service and Forest
Lakes Domestic Water Improvement District (FLDWID). The TS Unit leader is responsible
for all fit testing, air sampling, SCBA fill station and management of all SCBAs. The TS
Unit leader is responsible for programming, maintenance and management of all entry
door locks and codes.
XX. Appendix A. Organization Chart

   FOREST LAKES FIRE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION CHART
                    (September 9, 2013)

    CHIEF
         Rodriquez, Dave

    ASSISTANT CHIEF
         Barnes, Lee (ODS PM)

    ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
         Allen, Roxie (also BEMT)


    UNIT LEADERS
         TECHNICAL SERVICES
         Scholl, Keith
         DISPATCH SERVICES
         Widener, Connie
    PAID-ON-CALL RESIDENT STAFF
         Allen, Briana (Dispatcher)
         Allen, Roxie (BEMT)
         Bragg, Susie (Dispatcher)
         Buckley, Nanette (Dispatcher)
         Cary, Ted (BEMT)
         Cooper, Grant (Fire Support)
         Cooper, Trina (BEMT)
         Goodwin, Char (Dispatcher)
         Johnson, Becky (GWS)
         Mannett, Robert (BEMT, FFI & II)
         Mannett, Veronica (BEMT)
         McKeever, Dana (Dispatcher, GWS)
         McKeever, John (BEMT, FF I)
         Morris, Bill (FFI & II)
         Pontious, April (BEMT, Green Fuels Mgr)
         Pontious, Brad (Dispatcher)
         Skeldon, Debbie (Dispatcher, GWS)
         St.Germain, Mary (Dispatcher)
         Walter, Shere (Certified First Responder, Support)
FOREST LAKES FIRE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION CHART – Continued
                      (September 9, 2013)

    ON DUTY STAFF


      Armitage, Jeremy
      Ashton, Justin (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Barton, Aaron (ALS, FF I & II)
      Bell, Troy (ALS, FF I & II, Wld)
      Bramble, Wyatt (ALS, FF I & II)
      Brown, Gary (ALS, FF I & II)
      Burkhart, Mike (ALS, FF I & II)
      Cantarella, Tony (ALS, FF I & II)
      Christensen, John (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Destrini, Nick (ALS, FF I & II)
      DeWit, Stan (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Ellis, Richard (ALS, FF I & II, Wld)
      Ensman, Brian (ALS, FF I & II)
      Flores, Mike (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Gates, Jay (ALS, FF I & II)
      Gerard, Cory (ALS, FF I & II)
      Heron, Rick (ALS, FF I & II, Wld)
      Highstreet, Matt (ALS, FF I & II)
      Hildebrandt, Gary (ALS, FF I & II)
      Hvidsten, Troy (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Hyer, Bryan (ALS, FF I & II, Wld)
      King, Kevin (ALS, FF I & II)
      Lecher, Cris (ALS, FF I & II)
      Long, John (ALS, FF I & II)
      Magoffie, Ernie (ALS, FF I & II)
      McHugh, Ryan (ALS, FF I & II)
      Parsons, James (ALS, FF I & II, Wld)
      Peterson, Kevin (ALS, FF I & II)
      Puailoa, Gisa (ALS, FF I & II)
      Purinton, Jeff (BEMT, FF I & II, Wld)
      Rambo, Jesse (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Reynolds, Josh (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Rodriquez, David "Mister" (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Ruiz, Ben (BEMT, FFI & II)
      Skaggs, Danny (BEMT, FF I & II)
      Spada, Jamie (ALS, FF I & II)
      Stephens, Dane (ALS, FF I & II)
      Tirado, David (ALS, FF I & II)
      Vowell, Scott (ALS, FF I & II, Wld, Haz)




                                         84
XXI. Appendix B. Fire District Priorities

One of the challenges in creating a strategic plan is to prioritize the various ideas and plan elements
that arise out of the many hours of discussion about department operations.

Priority ratings are established for each plan element, ranging in magnitude from highest priority
to lowest priority, 1 to 5:

    •   Priority 1 - plan element needed in order to be compliant with legal requirements.
    •   Priority 2 -- plan element needed to insure safety of our personnel and equipment.
    •   Priority 3 - plan element needed in order to carry out our mission, improve the image of
        the FD and / or improve community relations.
    •   Priority 4 - plan element needed to improve efficiency and/ or productivity.
    •   Priority 5 -- assigned to everything else.

Plan elements with a priority rating of 1 or 2 are further characterized as ―must do, since they
involve compliance with legal requirements or personnel and equipment safety.




                                                   85
XXII.Appendix C. Five Year Budget Projection

The Baseline Scenario A, Chief Stays, 5 Year Financial Plan/Budget Projection is updated and
published in full as part of the 5 Year STRAP Update document. Only summary data is provided
for Scenario B, Merger With Heber-Overgaard that shows the bottom-line impact on property tax
rates. The complete budget projection is available for those who wish to better understand the
details. Similarly, only summary data is shown for Scenarios C and D, which assume we hire a
new chief. This data is considered preliminary since the Chief Search Committee has been
placed on hold until the merger question is resolved.
The comments that follow are aimed toward the baseline scenario.
Inflation and revenue uncertainties are strong drivers for the bottom line fiscal health of the
district over the various STRAP 5 year planning horizons. A separate inflation forecast has been
approved by the STRAP update team and is included in the spreadsheet. Net Assessed Valuation
(NAV) for the 5 year planning horizon determines the Mill Rate for property tax. A separate
NAV forecast has been approved by the STRAP update team and is included in the spreadsheet.
Year over year (YOY) tax revenues are limited to a maximum of 8% per Arizona Senate Bill
1421. Mill rate is limited by statute to $3.25. House Bill 2572, which goes into effect in
February 2014, limits NAV changes to 5% YOY for the purpose of assessing tax levies. There
continue to be downward pressures on Medicare/Medicaid and Arizona Health Care Cost
Containment System (AHCCCS) reimbursements for EMS services rendered. There continue to
be uncertainties with the implementation of Obamacare that could potentially provide a negative
impact to district revenues.
The STRAP Update team adopted the recommendation we keep FDAT at 20% of tax revenue for
the 5 year budget projection. We all recognize this as a potential threat to our fiscal plan.
Our current plan is to maintain our existing level of staffing and service delivery for all 5 years
of the planning horizon: 24x7x365 Paramedic (PM) and Firefighter (FF) coverage. The
Combination Model we have in place provides the designated coverage. The Combination
Model is comprised of Paid-On-Call (POC) and On-Duty-Staff (ODS.) The POC staff is a
function of the number of resident personnel who possess the required qualifications and
training. POC personnel are qualified as EMTs, Firefighters and Support personnel. The
Citizen’s Advisory Committee to Improve POC Participation concluded it is not realistic to
expect that Forest Lakes will have a resident Paramedic. That capability must be provided by the
ODS.
The ODS is comprised of personnel from East Valley and neighboring Fire Departments who
work 24 hour shifts at Forest Lakes to provide continuous Paramedic (PM) and Firefighter (FF)
coverage. The district currently pays PM $15/hr and FF $10/hr for 24 hour shifts. These rates
are mid-range for the area. The district provides housing, but no meals. The ODS receive no
benefits from FLFD. The ODS are trained and certified by their home departments. Their home
departments pay for their annual physicals. The annual cost avoidance for Forest Lakes is
estimated to be $1,200 to $1,500 per person. They are highly qualified, handpicked, professional
fire fighters with sterling records. Often we have 2 PMs on hand to provide the staffing required,
but only one is paid at the PM rate. If they become a problem, they are not are asked back.
Their training and regular call volume at their home departments far exceeds what they
                                                86
experience at Forest Lakes, keeping their skills honed to a very high level. As an example,
Insurance Service Organization [ISO] requires each Firefighter to have 60 hours of pure fire
training per employee to get 100% credit for insurance rate calculations. Gilbert, Apache
Junction and Queen Creek follow this standard, which in turn benefits us in Forest Lakes.
Hazardous Materials training and certification, Extrication and Patient Stabilization and National
Incident Management System (NIMS) training/certifications are some other examples that the
ODS bring with them. The ODS willingly provides training to our POC personnel, thereby
increasing the base skill levels of our personnel.

Specific adjustments included in the baseline 5 Year Financial Model are as follows:
   • The budget includes a $2,100 annual contribution from FLOA for the operation of the
       Green Waste Site.
   • There is a $12,500 contribution assumed from the Auxiliary to help offset the cost of the
       Front Loader.
   • A Mini-Pumper is included in the capital plan, to be acquired through debt service. This
       allows the district the maximum flexibility to control cash flow. Interest rates are at
       extreme lows, so the cost of money is low. We can pay off the debt at any time.
   • The 5 year budget and finance forecast allows for inflation for most expense items,
       including personnel compensation.
   • The Workmen’s Compensation line item includes the reclassification of Chief Rodriquez
       as a firefighter, not administration.
   • The Lube, Repair and Maintenance line item has been increased to be more realistic and
       consistent with recent run rates.
   • Building plans, put on hold in 2012, will be revisited in CY2014. Building expenditures
       are included in year 5 of the plan.
   • The Mill rate is held constant at $3.25.
   • Realistic capital expenditure profiles have been included.
   • It is assumed the Front Loader will be replaced with FY2013-2014 funds.
   • Chief Rodriquez and his staff continue to review the budget for opportunities for cost
       reduction.
   • Net Assessed Valuation (NAV) projections have been updated.
   • Lodging costs for the ODS continue at $10,800 annually
   • Grant $ is not used to justify expenditures. Grant monies, if any, are considered “extras.”
       The only exception is protective clothing, which has a very high probability of success.
   • Nominal salary increases have been included for the Chief, ODS, POC and Admin Staff.
   • We are open to selling part of the old Beckett property at some point in the future. For
       the record, the "old Beckett property" refers to former lot numbers 298 and 299, with 299
       forming the southern boundary. These two lots (one acre each), combined with old lot
       297 (partial lot, about 3/4 acre), immediately adjacent to the fire station, for which we
       recently paid off the mortgage, plus the fire station property itself (about 1/4 acre), have
       been combined into a single parcel, with the fire district as owner. The combined
       property comprises 3 acres (nominally). The Building Committee determined we could
       build a new facility on 2 acres. Therefore, the old Lot 299 is to be kept free of
       construction so we can dispose of it if needed.

                                                87
   •   We will track our balance sheet in addition to our profit and loss (P&L) statements. We
       have been focusing on the P&L side of the problem, and we will include balance sheet
       issues as well. The balance sheet will be maintained by the Finance and Budget
       Committee on a go-forward basis.
   •   The compensation recommendations of the POC Citizen Advisory Committee will be
       reviewed and incorporated.

Other budget assumptions are embedded in the spreadsheets and are not listed separately.

Five Year Budget Projections

The details of the 5 year budget projection follow for Scenario A, Chief Stays, which is the
baseline. Budget line items are the same as those used for our monthly reporting and come
directly from QuickBooks. The district has only one set of books for financial record keeping
and reporting. An approved chart of accounts with detailed account descriptions is used by the
office staff to assure we are accounting for cost and revenue elements on a consistent basis.

Summary details are included for Scenario B, Merge With Heber-Overgaard. There is a
complete 5 year budget projection available for the merger, but only the summary is included
that shows the bottom line impact of the merger on property tax rates. The merger budget is a
combined Heber-Overgaard and Forest Lakes budget as if they were operating under the new
district.

Similarly, summary details only are included for Scenarios C and D, both of which assume we
will be hiring a new chief. The baseline for Scenarios C and D is Scenario A, and only bottom
lime changes are reflected in the table.




                                              88
Scenario A, Chief Stays

The Scenario A 5 year budget forecast and projection was constructed as part of the normal
business planning for the fire district. It is the responsibility of the Finance and Budget
Committee under the leadership of the Treasurer Fahrendorf.

                            Scenario A - Chief Stays - 5 Year Financial Model



                              Base Line FY 2012/13 Financial Model and Five Year Forecast


                        2013/14       2014/15         2015/16       2016/17       2017/18       2018/19
                      Approved NTE
                        Budget
 Assessed Value          16,184,967    16,184,967     16,994,215    17,843,926    18,736,122    19,672,929
 Mil Rate                   3.2500        3.2500           3.2500       3.2500        3.2500       3.2500
 Property tax
                           (76,744)             20         26,301       27,616        28,996       30,446
 change (yr/yr)
 Total Revenue            1,033,203      811,934          846,609      884,513       924,216     1,122,534
 Total Operating
                           780,239       756,673          788,449      811,793       835,431      860,334
 Expenses
 Revenue minus
                           252,964        55,261           58,159       72,720        88,785      262,200
 Expenses
 Total Budget (Incl
                          1,033,203      806,673          788,449      811,793       895,231     1,122,534
 Capital Exp)
 Net Fiscal Year
                                  -         5,261          58,159       72,720        28,985
 cash flow                                                                                                0
 Year End Cash
                           310,814       384,701          442,860      515,580       544,565      544,565
 Balance
 Forecast
 Parameters
 Assessed Value
 Change
                           -25.16%         0.00%           5.00%        5.00%         5.00%         5.00%
 (Year/year
 estimate %)
 FDAT Rate                     20%           20%             20%          20%           20%           20%
  Inflation Amount
 (Year/year                       -         1.0%            2.0%         3.0%          3.0%          3.0%
 estimate %)
 DEBT SERVICES                    -              -         17,000       17,000        17,000       17,000
 Land Payment                     -              -              -             -             -             -
 Equipment
 Payment                          -              -              -             -             -             -
 Final payment on
 Lot 297                          -              -              -             -             -             -




                                                     89
Future Debt /
LOC (Assumed to
                                     -                   17,000    17,000    17,000    17,000
be a Mini-
Pumper)
CAPITAL
                               252,964    50,000         85,000         -    59,800   262,200
EXPENDITURES
           Radios               13,984
     Radios (Next
     Generation)                                                                        7,600
   Mini-Pumper
     Engine - #4                                         85,000
 SCBA Harnesses
                                     -                                                 19,600
 14 air cylinders -
                 #2                  -                                        9,800
  Second Stryker
                                56,298    30,000              -                   -         -
    PwrLoad - #3
         Facilities
  Improvements                 100,000
         Turnouts               50,682
 Loader - Priority
               #1                    -
2 Heart Monitors                                                             50,000
 EPCR (Electronic
    Patient Care                          20,000
      Reporting)
   Other Capital                32,000                                                235,000
Revenue Section

TAXES                          631,189   631,214        662,774   695,913   730,709   767,244
Real Property Tax              525,991   526,011        552,312   579,928   608,924   639,370
            FDAT:              105,198   105,202        110,462   115,986   121,785   127,874
   Personal Prop
            Tax:
      Enterprise
         Income                284,041   180,720        183,834   188,599   193,507   198,563
 EMS Receivables                92,500    93,425         95,294    98,152   101,097   104,130
 Fire Receivables                9,896     9,995         10,195    10,501    10,816    11,140
GWS Receivables                 15,000    15,150         15,453    15,917    16,394    16,886
     Investment
         Interest                5,000     5,050          5,151     5,306     5,465     5,629
   Miscellaneous                32,500    32,100         32,742    33,724    34,736    35,778
             Grant
 Reimbursement                 129,145    25,000         25,000    25,000    25,000    25,000
    FLFD pension
         transfers
    Loan / Line of
             Credit
    District Funds
                      117973
 (capital reserve)                                                                    156,727


                                                   90
Operating
Expense Section

PERSONNEL
                    440,005   436,830        445,567   458,934   472,702   486,883
SALARIES
Chief District
Salary               79,500    80,295         81,901    84,358    86,889    89,495
Administrative
                     35,000    35,350         36,057    37,139    38,253    39,400
Assistant Payroll
Part Time Office
                      5,000     5,050          5,151     5,306     5,465     5,629
Help Payroll
Green Waste Site
Attendant &
                     14,720    14,867         15,165    15,619    16,088    16,571
Fuels Mgmt
Payroll
On Duty Staff FF
                     93,960    94,900         96,798    99,702   102,693   105,773
I&II Payroll
POC Fire
                     10,240    10,342         10,549    10,866    11,192    11,527
Response Payroll
On Duty Staff
Paramedic           140,940   142,349        145,196   149,552   154,039   158,660
Payroll
POC EMS
                     25,260    25,513         26,023    26,804    27,608    28,436
Response Payroll
Dispatcher           20,385    20,589         21,001    21,631    22,280    22,948
Training In House     7,500     7,575          7,727     7,958     8,197     8,443
Grant Fuels
                      7,500
Mgmt Payroll
Employee
Benefits             69,442    69,272         70,658    72,778    74,961    77,210
FICA/Medicare
Tax (7.65% of        33,942    33,417         34,086    35,108    36,162    37,247
Payroll)
Unemployment
                      1,000     1,010          1,030     1,061     1,093     1,126
Compensation
Workmans Comp
(experience mod      19,000    19,190         19,574    20,161    20,766    21,389
of $1.04)
FLFD pension
transfers                 -         -              -         -         -         -
Health Care
Benefits for FT      15,500    15,655         15,968    16,447    16,941    17,449
Personnel
Accrued Benefit           -         -              -         -         -         -
Insurance            26,500    26,765         27,300    28,119    28,963    29,832
Accident &
Sickness              4,506     4,551          4,642     4,781     4,925     5,073
Automobile           10,330    10,433         10,642    10,961    11,290    11,629
Commercial
Package               6,081     6,142          6,265     6,453     6,646     6,846
Umbrella              5,583     5,639          5,752     5,924     6,102     6,285

                                        91
Fire Department
                    109,866   74,955        76,097   78,580   80,731   83,503
Administration
Uniforms - All
                      5,000    5,050         5,151    5,306    5,465    5,629
Departments
Benefits &
Awards                 500      505           515      531      546      563
Office Staff
Training               500      505           515      531      546      563
Office Staff Per
Diem                   500      505           515      531      546      563
Outside
Duplication and       2,800    2,828         2,885    2,971    3,060    3,152
Publishing
Dues and Fees         3,600    3,636         3,709    3,820    3,935    4,053
Grant Writing
Mgmt Service
Fee's                     -        -             -        -        -        -
 Professional
Services             41,466   41,881        42,718   44,000   45,320   46,679
Notary                    -     150                       -        -     150
Elections                 -     200                    200               200
Public Finance        1,000    1,010         1,030    1,061    1,093    1,126
Postage &
Shipping              1,000    1,010         1,030    1,061    1,093    1,126
Board Expenses /
                      3,500    3,535         3,606    3,714    3,825
Dues / Training                                                         3,940
Board Per Diem        1,500    1,515         1,545    1,592    1,639    1,689
Fire & EMS Public
                      2,000    2,020         2,060    2,122    2,186    2,251
Education
Office Supplies /
Copier / Office       9,300    9,393         9,581    9,868   10,164   10,469
Equipment R&M
Furniture &
                       700      707           721      743      765      788
Improvements
Grant
Reimbursement
                     36,000
(Fuels mgmt $ to
homeowners)
Misc. Receivables
/ Contributions        500      505           515      531      546      563
Expended
FUEL, OIL, LUBE,
R&M                  39,626   50,500        51,510   53,055   54,647   56,286
Fuel-Oil             25,000   10,100        10,302   10,611   10,929   11,257
Lube Repair &
                     14,626   40,400        41,208   42,444   43,718   45,029
Maintenance
FIRE & EMS
                     60,600   63,809        65,085   67,038   69,049   71,120
OPERATIONS
POC Tuition /
Training              9,000    9,090         9,272    9,550    9,836   10,132
POC Training Per      3,500    3,535         3,606    3,714    3,825

                                       92
Diem                                                                   3,940
Protective
Clothing             5,000    5,050         5,151    5,306    5,465    5,629
SCBA R & M           5,000    5,050         5,151    5,306    5,465    5,629
POC Medical -
Physicals &          2,000    2,020         2,060    2,122    2,186    2,251
Immunizations
Hydrant R & M
                      500      505           515      531      546      563
EMS/Fire Small
Tools-New/
Replacement          7,500    7,575         7,727    7,958    8,197    8,443
Equipment &
Expenditures
Expired Drugs        2,000    2,020         2,060    2,122    2,186    2,251
Disposables          6,500    6,565         6,696    6,897    7,104    7,317
Expendables -
Oxygen                700      707           721      743      765      788
Certification /
Licenses / ADHS       600      606           618      637      656      675
Registration
Lodging - On Duty
                    10,800   10,908        11,126   11,460   11,804   12,158
Personnel
GWS / Grant
                         -    2,603         2,655    2,735    2,817    2,901
Mgmt Expense
Dispatch
Equipment &          5,000    5,050         5,151    5,306    5,465    5,629
Equipment R&M:
Personnel Radios
                     2,000    2,020         2,060    2,122    2,186    2,251
& Radio R & M
Mileage
Reimbursement         500      505           515      531      546      563
BUILDING &
                    11,100   11,211        11,435   11,778   12,132   12,496
GROUNDS R & M
Building R & M       7,400    7,474         7,623    7,852    8,088    8,330
Grounds R & M        2,600    2,626         2,679    2,759    2,842    2,927
Janitorial
Supplies             1,000    1,010         1,030    1,061    1,093    1,126
Back Flow Test        100      101           103      106      109      113
UTILITIES           23,100   23,331        23,798   24,512   25,247   26,004
Electric             5,000    5,050         5,151    5,306    5,465    5,629
Telephone /
                     9,000    9,090         9,272    9,550    9,836   10,132
Communications
Propane              6,000    6,060         6,181    6,367    6,558    6,754
Water                1,200    1,212         1,236    1,273    1,312    1,351
Garbage Service       600      606           618      637      656      675
Septic                500      505           515      531      546      563
TV / Media            800      808           824      849      874      901


                                      93
94
Scenario B, Merge With Heber-Overgaard

The Scenario B, Merge With Heber-Overgaard, 5 year budget and forecast was created under the
auspices of the Heber-Overgaard/Forest Lakes Cooperative Service Exploratory Committee,
which was duly chartered by both boards. The numbers shown are a best estimate from and do
not assume that future boards will approve a salary increase every year or that we are going to
increase costs every year. The approach taken by the committee was to be conservative with its
numbers and not under estimate expenses or over estimate revenues.


The rationale, assumptions and approach are listed here for the record:
   •   The starting point was to create a sample budget for the current fiscal year, for which we
       had solid numbers for both districts and could create a realistic budget for a potential
       merged district.
   •   A spreadsheet was created taking the HOFD budget and adding in all of the operating
       costs and revenues from FLFD.
   •   Duplicate costs were eliminated. The FLFD Fire Chief position is eliminated $75,000,
       FLFD grant writing fees $3,816, FLFD Board expenses are reduced, there is one board
       $3000, Aero Med ambulance billing eliminated HOFD does in house billing $7,500,
       Audit fees duplicated both districts $7,500, CPA and Legal fees duplicated $10,000.
       FLFD Dispatch fees would be reduced, they currently have Coconino County relay the
       call to on- call Dispatchers who work for FLFD and there would be a reduction by going
       to a fee for the number of calls with Heber-Overgaard's dispatch provider.
   •   The spreadsheet calculated a tax rate of $1.625 for a merged district. This is 2.5 cents
       higher than the current HOFD tax rate and about half the FLFD rate.
   •   The budget included a $100,000 transfer to capital reserve which was in the current
       FLFD budget.
   •   The combined capital reserve accounts for both districts currently is approx. $700,000.
   •   Non secondary property tax revenue from FLFD would not change with the reduced tax
       rate.
   •   FLFD ambulance revenue $92,000, FLFD FDAT $121,388, FLFD Green Waste site
       income $3000 would still be intact.
   •   The budget projection includes a 7% decrease in HOFD NAV (Net assessed valuation)
       for next fiscal year and a 0% change in FLFD NAV for next fiscal year (based on
       information from Coconino and Navajo County Assessors offices). The next fiscal year
       shows a 5% increase in FLFD NAV and 0% change for HOFD NAV, the 3 out years
       showed a 5% NAV increase for both areas. This is based on actual increases in real estate
       values and the 5% cap on annual increases by legislation.
   •   The expenses reflect a 3.5% increase in annual salaries.
   •   The non salary expenses assume that we can keep them flat the first fiscal year and show
       a 5% increase every year after that.
   •   The projected budget also shows a line item for unforeseen merger costs in 14-15 of
       $87,000 and 15-16 of $43,000, this was based on information from ESCI based on
       experience from other mergers.

                                               95
     •    The projection shows the tax rate holding steady around $1.75 per year.

   Scenario B – Merge With Heber-Overgaard - 5 Year Financial Model




                                       Mogollon Fire District 5 Year Projection—Summary
                                             All budget figures are in then-year $
                                                                  FY            FY        FY            FY            FY
                                                               2013-14       2014-15    2015-16      2016-17       2017-18
Personnel Services Total                                     2,115,750      2,179,223 2,244,600     2,311,938    2,381,296
Total Supplies-Adm                                           59,300       59,300       62,265       65,378       68,647
Total Supplies-Operations                                    213,450      213,450      224,123      235,329      247,095
Total Service and Charges/Admin                              262,300      262,300      275,415      289,186      303,645
Total Service/Charges Operations                             58,200       58,200       61,110       64,166       67,374
Total Capital Outlay                                         145,000      0            0            0            0
                                             Budget Total    2,854,500    2,772,473    2,867,513    2,965,997    3,068,057
                                       Less Cash Carryover   (422,973)    (425,000)    (425,000)    (430,000)    (440,000)
                           Less Wildland Response Revenue    (50,000)     (50,000)     (50,000)     (50,000)     (50,000)
                                       Less Misc Revenues    (62,500)     (62,500)     (62,500)     (62,500)     (62,500)
                       Less Transfer From Capital Reserves   (45,500)     0            0            0            0
                                 Less Ambulance Revenues     (492,000)    (500,000)    (500,000)    (510,000)    (510,000)
                 Plus Adj for Unforeseen Merger Expenses     0            87,000       43,500       0            0
                                       Adjusted Sub-Total    1,781,527    1,821,973    1,830,013    1,913,497    2,005,557
                                                    FDAT     206,740      192,268      192,268      201,881      211,975
                                             Levy Amount     1,574,787    1,629,705    1,637,745    1,711,616    1,793,582
                                       Assessed Valuation    96,896,912   92,341,429   93,205,366   97,865,634   102,758,916
                                                TAX RATE     $1.625       $1.765       $1.757       $1.749       $1.745




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97
Scenarios C & D, Hire a New Chief

The Scenarios C & D, Hire a New Chief, financial impact assessments are incomplete at this
time. The original approach was to have the Chief Search Committee generate the 5 year
projection using the Baseline, Scenario A, Chief Stays model. This was not achieved in time for
the 5 year STRAP Update. In addition, the Chief Search Committee activities have been put on
hold pending resolution of the merger question.
In lieu of the 5 Year Budget projection, the STRAP team generated an estimate of the financial
impact for Scenarios C & D. The STRAP Team used a salary survey of comparable positions in
other fire districts generated by the committee as a guideline for the salary which would be
required should we advertise for a new chief. Based on the range of salaries identified, it was
felt a salary, with benefits of $111,532 would need to be planned for. This assumes a standard
40% adder for benefits. This is compared to a total salary for Chief Rodriquez of $79,500, who
receives no benefits from FLFD. Other considerations included added costs for FICA/Medicare,
annual training/certifications and loss of productivity for a changeover of leadership (it is
assumed we would need to hire additional personnel to accommodate the changeover to new
leadership). There is a favorable offsetting cost of $11,520 for hiring a PM Chief (assumes
he/she would handle some PM duties). Details are shown below.


     Scenario C&D– Hire a New Chief - 5 Year Financial Model Impact

                                                                                       Scenario C
Assumes we hire a chief at average of min and max     Year 1          Year 2        Year 3    Year 4      Year 5    Cumulative


                   Total Compensation                111,532         111,532    111,532      111,532     111,532
                   Salary Shortfall                  (32,032)        (32,032)   (32,032)     (32,032)    (32,032)   (160,161)
                   Delta FICA/Medicare               (2,450)         (2,450)    (2,450)      (2,450)     (2,450)    (12,252)
                   Annual Training/Cert              (4,000)         (4,000)    (4,000)      (4,000)     (4,000)    (20,000)
                   Offsetting PM Costs               11,520          11,520     11,520       11,520      11,520     57,600
                   Productivity Costs                (20,000)        (10,000)   -             -           -         (30,000)
                          Percent productivity hit        -5%           -2.5%           0%          0%         0%
                   Net Shortfall                      (46,963)       (36,963)   (26,963)     (26,963)    (26,963)   (164,814)




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                                                                                    Scenario D
Assumes we hire a chief at average of min and max     Year 1          Year 2     Year 3     Year 4     Year 5    Cumulative


                   Total Compensation                111,532         111,532    111,532    111,532    111,532
                   Salary Shortfall                  (32,032)        (32,032)   (32,032)   (32,032)   (32,032)   (160,161)
                   Delta FICA/Medicare               (2,450)         (2,450)    (2,450)    (2,450)    (2,450)    (12,252)
                   Annual Training/Cert              (4,000)         (4,000)    (4,000)    (4,000)    (4,000)    (20,000)
                   Offsetting PM Costs               11,520          11,520     11,520     11,520     11,520     57,600
                   Productivity Costs                (40,000)        (20,000)   (10,000)    -          -         (70,000)
                          Percent productivity hit        -5%           -2.5%         0%         0%         0%
                   Net Shortfall                      (66,963)       (46,963)   (36,963)   (26,963)   (26,963)   (204,814)




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XXIII.Appendix D. Citizen’s Advisory Committee to Improve Paid-
On-Call Participation

The citizen’s advisory committee was formally chartered by the FLFD board to address the
concerns of the fire board and the community regarding the perceived decrease in paid on call
participation by residents of Forest Lakes. The committee charter is presented at the end of this
section for the record.

The committee was comprised of three residents of Forest Lakes: Paul Studer, who has no direct
affiliation with the fire department; Sally Kennedy, former dispatcher and retired FLFD
paramedic, among other previous roles in the fire department; and Ted Cary, current FLFD
EMT. The committee was given complete autonomy to conduct its investigation and document
its findings, which are contained in this section.

In conducting the work of the committee its participants gained a deeper appreciation of the
contributions by POC members to the community and their interaction with the On Duty Staff
(ODS). For Sally and Ted, current and past POC members, the interviews and discussions
served to reinforce what they already knew personally, as well as providing them with a broad-
based assessment from other members. For Paul, being new to department operations, there was
a new understanding of how things work and the commitment made day in and day out by the
POC community. Paul’s new understanding of the role of the POCs is important, not just for the
purpose of documenting the committee’s findings, but because he probably represents the bulk of
the community in their understanding of the fire department and its operation. In his words:
As a resident for almost 30 years it is sad that I must admit that I did not understand the
commitment by the community fire volunteers/POC members and their personal commitment to
achieve and maintain the certification requirements for fire, EMT and Paramedic to support the
community. As I drove by the fire station to enjoy a weekend in Forest Lakes I never stopped to
think about the residents who signed up for fire/medical support, giving of their time to support
each of us. After learning what these certified representatives receive for signing up for a 12
hour shift commitment, it validated they are extremely dedicated, caring neighbors, who
definitely are not doing it for the money. This left me to question if this program was
communicated and I just never paid attention, or was it not communicated. In any event I owe
those who have supported us over the years a great deal.

According to the committee report, it was felt by the committee that it happened to conduct its
work at a time when there was more perceived unrest in the community than normal regarding
operation of the fire department. For the sake of completeness and accuracy, the committee noted
any concerns and made them part of the findings, sensing what they believed to be valid points
of view on both sides of the issue. Some unrest is to be expected, and has been documented in
the customer satisfaction survey section. Note: it was later determined, based on the survey
results, that the perceived unrest was not broad-based.

The committee’s conclusions are as follows:


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•   This committee has not identified any new/unknown source of people ready to participate in
    the POC program.
•   It was clear to the committee POC members clearly were not signing up for the money. They
    care about each of us and committed their time and technical skills on our behalf.
•   It is understood that each of us is getting older and at times can't do what we used to be able
    to do. Without recognition of this issue it possible a person could be adding to the emergency
    situation.
•   It is assumed for older POC personnel their specific assignment would be restricted to
    vehicle/fire truck driver or operators.
•   Other local fire departments offer medical support staffing and differ on their approach to
    transporting patients, suggesting that the FLFD is doing more with less support.
•   It appears clear with the understood population that POC cannot provide full time back up
    support.
•   Community unrest can have a negative impact on people involvement.
•   Some POCs have indicated they would not continue in their role without the ODS so they
    can benefit from their increased call volume experience.
•   It appears unreasonable to expect to have a POC certified Paramedic.
•   It appears the HOFD backup program is critical when FLFD ODS is required to transport
    without available POC support.
•   If a study of POC sign-ups indicates the availability of increased POC support on holidays
    and red flag days, the board could restrict the additional support on holiday weekend /red flag
    days for ODS to allow for more POC participation.
•   Currently, certified POC staff are not given desired time in the back of the ambulance to
    increase their experience level.

The committee’s recommendations are as follows:
This committee has not identified any new/unknown source of people ready to participate in the
POC program. Young people can receive training/certification and can offer future support.
New/existing members were impacted by personal problems.

Detailed recommendations:
   1) Communicate to the community the support that has been available to each of us over the
       years with volunteer/POC support. In the past, certified Paramedics and EMTs have
       committed to remain in the community for a 24 hour period, ready to support all residents
       of the Forest lakes community, anyone traveling highway 260, or enjoying surrounding
       woods and lakes in the event of fire or medical needs, any hour of the day or night. The
       community needs to express our thanks to everyone who has been there for all of us and
       those who continue to be there for all of us. This would be an ideal time to recruit
       additional support.
   2) If the POC program is part of the fire district team, then a dedicated POC lead should be
       identified reporting to the chief like the dispatchers.
   3) When we say paid on call (POC) we are talking about neighbors who completed the
       training necessary to be certified to supply required medical treatment in a time of need

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      and or protect our property in the event of a fire. Each time they sign up to support they
      are committing to remain with in the area ready to support each of us. We currently
      compensate these dedicated individuals $8 for a 12 hour shift sign-up and $16 for a 24
      hour shift sign-up. This certainly validates these dedicated individuals are not signing up
      for the money. However, it is recommend we acknowledge this professional support with
      shift sign-up increase options to $10 for 8 hours, $20 for 16 hours and $30 for 24 hours.
      Reference: Christopher Creek pays $15 per call to reimburse for time and vehicle plus
      $3per hour for station or battalion duties -- No active members. Heber Overgaard pays
      $30 for a 12 hour shift.

  4) When considering the value to the program and our ability to make the above
     adjustments, it is suggested a review of the existing budget for the two ODS personnel,
     including additional support/over time for holidays and red flag days, is in order. The
     CAC Committee feels sure with the current limited participation the additional funds can
     be identified. Side note: For a clear understanding of actual participation/support, it is
     important to request all POC member sign in after each call. Documented POC sign up
     can reduce the additional ODS added for holiday weekend/red flag days substantial
     saving

  5) Calls are not to be seen as a training session. FLFD covers both fire and medical
     emergencies. It is assumed training covers fire, medical and other emergencies
     requirements – the FLFD web page demonstrates required teamwork training.
     Understanding there are limits on training during the winter, what are we doing in these
     areas? HOFD indicates they have at least one training session for each area each month.
     Training must be a requirement and should be tracked/acknowledged.

  6) Concerned people have indicated they do not sign up but will support if available. The
     added support definitely can be of a value - must find a way to welcome the support
     while getting participation/training. Considering limited support and outside demands,
     consider possible training options. The best training session is the extra time spent after
     each emergency response to debrief as a team. ODS recommendation to participate in
     ODS shift checks to be considered a training session. POC have indicated they did not
     get certified and sign up to be a driver and need to get time in the back of the ambulance
     with support by ODS, indicating time is critical improved medical knowledge. Training /
     certification is obviously the critical first step in emergency response. Each person must
     jump in to assist, leaving feelings at the door.

The POC committee’s conclusions and recommendations were reviewed in detail at one of the
STRAP sessions. It was agreed the recommendations would be addressed as part of the goals
and objectives for next year (see Goals and Objectives section).

As part of the follow-on discussion, Chief Rodriquez provided a comprehensive review of our
current POC staff and their availability:
    • Bill Morris, FFII, limited availability due to his obligations to the Forest Service

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    •   Lou St.Germain, First Responder, provides year round service
    •   Veronica Mannett, EMT, has limited availability and no winter support
    •   April Pontious, EMT, is currently unavailable
    •   Bob Mannett, EMT, has limited availability, and no winter support
    •   John McKeever, EMT and FF I, provides year round support, but has announced his
        intention to retire
    •   Grant Cooper, FR, limited availability
    •   Shere Walter, FR, limited availability
    •   Trina Cooper, EMT, limited availability
    •   Ted Cary, EMT, provides summer support, not available in the winter
    •   Roxie Allen, EMT, limited availability, back-up of last resort for driving.

    As confirmed by Sally Kennedy, the POC roster has been shrinking for the last 8 to 9
    years, and predates Chief Rodriquez’s involvement with the department. Despite the fact
    that the board’s position has been and continues to be that a strong POC program is vital to
    the continued financial viability of the district, one has to question how reasonable it is to
    expect a dramatically improved POC program. On the other hand, given the numbers we
    have today, an increase by even two would be significant.

Complete POC Report, Including Questions and Responses
Interviews were conducted with both POC and ODS to gather input for their findings. The
questions asked were different for each group. The entire committee was present for each
interview. The questions asked are listed below.

POC Questions
  1. Why are you currently signing up or not signing on the schedule to support?
  2. Do you have any problems with the contracted on duty staff?
  3. Do you have any problems with the board or chief as it pertains to the POC program?
  4. Do you have any conflict with others stopping you from supporting the program?
  5. Do you have any recommended changes in the POC training requirements to increase
     your or others support?
  6. Do you have any recommended changes in the POC operating procedures to increase
     your or others support?
  7. Do you have any recommended changes in the POC compensation to increase your or
     others support?
  8. General Comments?

ODS Questions
  1. Do you have any issues with the POC program?
  2. Do you have any recommendations to improve the current POC Program?
  3. Do you plan on continuing to support the Forest Lakes Fire District after Dave leaves?


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The committee had the opportunity to talk to 14 past and present POC members. Because of the
rotating nature of the ODS assignments, a random sample of ODS members was interviewed.

Citizens’ Advisory Committee Findings

General Comments:
The board needs to decide if POC program that has served the community for so many years is
important enough to make changes. The existing two person ODS crew response could improve
with this POC participation. This would also improve our commitment to safety. Medical
emergency on highway support is limited with the two person crew, backup support is 20
minutes away if transport is required. In the event of a structure fire, back up is 20 miles without
the POC program.

It is clear to the committee that the community is divided over the FLFD. This may or may not
have played a role in the reduction in POC support we have witnessed. As with similar
situations, there appear to be valid points on both sides. Communication may have played a part
of the issues - the message not properly communicated, message properly communicated, the
receiver not willing to accept, or a poor decision trying to be communicated. The division has
created some walls among members of the community and the fire district leadership team. If
the walls remain it will have a negative impact on the community. Yet being a caring
community, in the event of an emergency the people will come together to help one another as in
the past.

Part A. FLFD fire board policies and or department operational procedures

The following board policies and department operational guidelines were used by the committee
to help frame the discussions and interviews. They are the policies/procedures currently in place,
and may be changed based on the nature of the findings:

   •   FLFD will comply with the established CON
   •   FLFD will provide 24X7X365 ALS service
   •   FLFD will require a minimum of two people responding to every call
   •   Safety of people responding to a call must be paramount
   •   All people responding to a call must be certified and qualified
   •   Calls are not to be considered training exercises

Part B. Approach
Step 1. Identify current POC and ODS roster.

                           2009                2010                 2011                2012
       POC                  18                  15                   14                  12
       ODS                  30                  34                   33                  32


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Notes:
   •     POC numbers may include 4 or 5 members not active -- unsure on new member status.
   •     We had the opportunity to talk to 14 past and present POC members.
   •     The current list reflects 12 active POC members with some currently not available.
   •     There have been 24 ODS serving FL for a number of years.

Step 2. Establish the pool of possible candidates in Forest Lakes (both full time and seasonal
residents)
    • With very limited knowledge of the new residents within Forest Lakes, it was felt the
       previous members may be our best source for additional POC members.
    • It was understood some of the previous members were no longer available for health or
       personal reasons. The only way to understand if there was any possibility of getting any
       to return was to meet and understand their issues and concerns.
    • The team identified a few basic questions to ask the ODS and POC members.

Step 3. Identify how the use of POC benefits FLFD from a business perspective
   • With adequate / consistent POC signing up FLFD could maintain support for the
       community when the ODS team is dispatched -No cost benefit.
   • With adequate / consistent POC signing up FLFD could maintain the identified staffing
       model even on holiday weekend without requesting additional ODS for the weekend -
       The additional ODS members are costly / more if compensated on a overtime bases.
   • With adequate / consistent POC signing up FLFD could increase support with two
       Paramedics at minimal increased cost.
   • Without adequate POC signing up the chief feels required to add the additional back up
       support just in case of an emergency - uncomfortable with support 20 miles away.
   • Without POC program our only support is 20 minutes away in Heber Overgaard when
       our ODS crew is dispatched - without additional staffing
   • In the event of a transport requirement we could be without support for 2 plus hours

Step 4. Research how other similar size districts use Volunteers / POCs
        Outstanding items to be reviewed

Step 5. Establish the trend in the use of Volunteers / POCs in others districts
   • Heber Overgaard -is a 24/7 Full Time Fire Department
           o There are 3 shifts that work 48 hours with 4 full time personnel and 1 reserve
           o Reserves work 24 hours shifts
           o EMTs are paid $12.50 per hour
           o Paramedics are paid $14.60 per hour
           o Volunteers sign up for being on call for 12 hour shift
           o EMTs are paid $30for a 12 hour shift
           o Paramedics are paid $35.00 for a 12 hour shift
           o Red shirts are volunteers that must hold FF1 & 2 and or Wildland Red Card
               certification. They are paid $10 from the time of call up to 1 hour. After the 1st
               hour 1/2 they are paid $7.50 per hour.

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            o There are 31 fire fighters on our roster that have a EMT or Paramedic
               certification, that includes our fulltime, reserves and volunteers. There are 6
               volunteers that hold an EMT or paramedic certification that are not fire fighters.
            o There is at least 1 EMS training done monthly and at least 1 fire training done
               monthly - Volunteers are paid $10 for EMS training
    •   Christopher Creek -- is a 24/7 Full Time Fire Department ( Medic & EMT on shift 24/7
        help with recent ISO -6/9 )
            o There are 6 full time employee including chief and administration assistant
            o Back up support from surrounding area departments –EMTs at $10.20 per hour on
               shift / Medics at $15 per hour on shift
            o POC $15.00 per call ( to reimburse for time and vehicle for call) -- plus $3.00 per
               hour for station or battalion duties
            o Note: There currently no POC members on staff -- report due physical limitations
            o No red shirt program

Step 6. Research the compensation for Volunteers / POCs in other district and establish whether
or not this is a limiting factor for FLFD.

It was clear to the committee the POC members clearly were not signing up for the money. They
care about each of us and committed their time and technical skills on our behalf.

Interviews with a number of POC identified the recommendations noted below.

Step 7. Identify qualifications required for each position a POC fills (qualifications should
include knowledge, skills and physical ability)

•   On Duty Staff (24 hr shift) Paramedic -Certified Emergency Paramedic- Job Description
    available with Requirements identified. Note: physical ability not identified.
•   On Duty Staff (24hr shift) Fire Fighter - Job Description available with Requirements
    identified -- Note: physical ability not identified
•   Paid On Call (POC) Emergency Medical Technician - Job Description available with
    Requirements identified -- Note: physical ability not identified
•   Paid On Call (POC) Emergency First Responder - Job Description not defined,
    Requirements identified -- Note: physical ability not identified
•   Paid On Call (POC) Firefighter I & II - Job Description not defined, Requirements identified
    - Note: physical ability not identified
•   Notes:
         It is understood that each of us is getting older and at times can't do what we used to
            be able to do. Without recognition of this issue it possible a person could be adding to
            the emergency situation.
         At the same time to meet our safety commitments more than two people may be
            required to properly treat people at a emergency scene or at a structure fire. There
            must be additional certified firefighters as backup prior to entering a building. You
            cannot meet the fire fighting back up requirements without a back up a crew to


                                                106
           operate fire truck / pumper. Two people are certainly not the desired crew to meet
           safety objectives.

Step 8. POC positions to be considered include EMS, Fire and general

•   EMS -- Paramedic and EMT certification requirements and area of expertise are defined by
    rules and regulation - some medical situations may require the strength of a younger person
•   Fire -- Requirements are also defined. In the event of emergency, physical requirements are
    more suited for a younger person.
•   General -- It is assumed for older POC personnel their specific assignment would be
    restricted to vehicle/fire truck driver or operators.

Side Note: Other local fire departments offer medical support staffing and differ on their
approach to transporting patients, suggesting that the FLFD is doing more with less support.

•   Christopher Creek has 2 full time member staffing, yet transport comes from Payson.
•   Forest Lakes has 2 full time ODS staffing, yet provides transport to Payson or Show Low.
    Each transport requires 2 plus hours. Back up, if required, is provided by FLFD POC or by
    HOFD.
•   Heber Overgaard has 4 full time staffing, and provides transport to Payson or Show Low.
    Each transport requires 2 plus hours. Back up, if required, is provided by FLFD.

Step 9. Establish the commitment in terms of time and availability required to successfully
employ POCs.

Note: The comments below do not address the intent of the above statement. The intent was to
address the commitment POC members have to make to be in the community and to be available
for extended periods of time so that schedules can be made in advance. This also means they
must be a state of readiness at all times: in uniform, radios nearby, refraining from drinking
alcohol, etc.

•   EMS First Responder training - Class held at FLFD in January 2013 over a two weekend
    time frame, for a total of 38 contact hours and 4 hours self preparation/study.
•   EMT Certification costs about $1,500 (paid for by the FLFD). Time commitment? There is
    a 2 year retesting requirement. Requires a 2 year commitment to the FLFD.
        - Feedback indicates a problem retaining people after signing up for the program or
            after getting certified. This requires repayment procedures, which do not exist.

Step 10. Assuming POCs cannot provide full time coverage to meet FLFD requirements,
providing an analysis of possible methods to use POCs with ODS or similar staffing model.

•   It appears clear with the understood population that POC cannot provide full time back up
    support.
•   Community unrest can have a negative impact on people involvement.


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•   Some POCs have indicated they would not continue in their role without the ODS so they
    can benefit from their increased call volume experience.
•   It appears unreasonable to expect to have a POC certified Paramedic.
•   It appears the HOFD backup program is critical when FLFD ODS is required to transport
    without available POC support.

Step 11. Determine what savings can be expected with increased use of POCs at FLFD

•   FLFD model ODS Paramedic 7/24/365 (ALS plus 1) with additional ODS support on
    holidays and red flag days, including some overtime compensation.
        o If a study of POC sign-ups indicates the availability of increased POC support on
           holidays and red flag days, the board could restrict the additional support on holiday
           weekend /red flag days for ODS to allow for more POC participation.
        o A review of last year’s ODS expenditures could determine the amount spent for
           support above the base line (ALS plus 1), including overtime. This could be
           compared with the equivalent POC expenditure for the same coverage.
        o Specific data could eliminate generalities - define actual cost/possible saving.
        o While not discussed with everyone, it was suggested that when additional ODS was
           employed, active POC members said they felt they did not need to sign up. There
           was some sentiment that ODS were being incentivized to work on holidays/red flag
           days, and that the same incentives were not being made available to POC staff.
        o Holiday weekend / red flag days present possible additional support requirements for
           our back up HOFD, so if scheduled POC support is not available then added ODS
           maybe required.
        o It should be noted ODS member have families and make plans like everyone else so it
           up front coordination is required. This is one of the reasons FLFD has had to offer
           incentives to ODS for holiday/red flag days.
        o POC members have indicated they do not sign up but will support if available. This
           is not a dependable process for certified support.

Step 12. Assess whether or not the use of less qualified people will affect the availability of
ODS.

•   Currently, certified POC staff are not given desired time in the back of the ambulance to
    increase their experience level. It is acknowledged that sometimes POC must be more
    willing to jump in and help to be accepted.
•   Less qualified people could assist in specific defined roles, with proper training, if a non-
    standard large community approach would be considered.

Step 13. Document the cost to recruit and train additional POCs

•   Firefighter estimate $1,500
•   EMT estimate $1,500
•   Paramedic. It is unrealistic to consider this cost as we are unlikely to have any candidates for
    paramedic certification. While the FLFD area has a limited pool of young people, we need to
                                                 108
    advertise the opportunities in the above fields, along with the training requirements and time
    commitments involved after certification.

Step 14. The committee has the latitude to add additional information or task to be addressed.

•   No action taken

Part C. Questions addressed to ODS.
Step 1. Do you have any issues with the POC program?

•   No issues-- vital to the operation
•   Field experience is not as good. Limited knowledge because of call volume- not as good--
    but usually good
•   Some need a little more direction than others
•   Wish there were more but understand why not
•   No -- you almost feel like a babysitter - they need to ask us to help them --- Program is good
    could be great

Step 2. Do you have any recommendation to improve the current POC program?

•   More interaction with ODS
        o Come to the station and participate in shift checks.
•   For the most part they work well
        o Field experience not as good because of low call volume
•   POC s need to attend training
        o They should be allowed to go on calls if they attend training
•   Personal feelings should be left at the door
•   Participate in training and keeping CE's up
        o POC's need to be more aggressive
        o Most of rotating ODS know who can do what
•   Could be great
        o POC's need to be more committed
        o Need more time in back to maintain skills
        o Need to attend training

Step 3. Do you plan on continuing to support FLFD after Dave leaves?

•   Summary response to above question
       o Maybe
       o I do not think so
       o Probably not
       o Doubtful
       o Depends on leader/model

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       o   Possibly
       o   Doubtful
       o   Hard pressed without Dave
       o   Unlikely

Comment: A good number of the current ODS staff have been here for a few years. The above
response was expected. Yet the assumption is it all depends on the new chief and his operational
plans. It seems additional regular fire fighter / paramedics could be available with some
coordination.

Part D. Questions- POC member past / current
Step 1. Why are you currently signing up or not signing on the schedule to support?

•   Eight responses
       o Not currently in the dept now
       o Some stated they felt pushed out
•   Five responses
       o No, because I can't leave the area for 12 hrs
       o Not lately
       o Used to
       o Not currently
       o No
       o Will respond
•   Two responses
       o No, because of job
       o Depends on if thing are going on
•   One response
       o I sign up when here

Step 2. Do you have any problems with contracted on duty staff?

•   Two responses
       o Expense for the chief is eating up community
       o Would not call them for help
•   Seven responses
       o No problem,
•   Two responses
       o None
•   One response
       o Never
•   Three responses
       o They seem to think they way above us
       o Started good then got pushed aside

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       o Felt like a visitor, not a peer
•   One response
       o One or two not so good, but does not keep me from signing up

Step 3. Do you have any problems with the board or chief as it pertains to the POC program?

•   Thirteen responses
    o No / None
    o More pay for sign up
    o Not familiar with the board
    o No POC leader
    o Chief made it clear we are not professional enough, but he still wants us to sign up
    o Chief had me respond and leave others who had signed up
    o Not enough POCs
•   One response
    o Felt intimated by chief - did not like way he treats people
•   Board never talks to anyone to validate anything
•   Did not get paid for some duties, yet the ODS can sit and get paid

Step 4. Do you have any conflict with others stopping you from supporting the program?

•   One response
       o Put up with more stuff than I should have
•   Twelve responses
       o No, missed camaraderie with everyone
       o I was asked to stop
       o None
       o Small
•   One response
       o POCs s should get more pay for their sign up time

Step 5. Do you have any recommended changes in the POC training requirements to increase
your or others support?

•   One response
       o Need POC leader to meet regularly with all POCs
•   Three responses
       o More fire training
       o See web page
•   One response
       o They bring more people up than necessary
       o Community involvements
•   One response
       o More debriefing on/after calls

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       o More get together with members
•   Two responses
       o No
•   One response
       o No
       o Requirement should be adhered to follow through-most important thing
       o No calls
•   Five responses
       o Required - you should have to attend
•   One response
       o Can't force people to attend training
•   One reponse
       o Should be required to attend training
       o Keep rules
       o Don't make the rules
       o We were required to attend training
•   One response
       o ODS & POC should study maps to learn the mile posts
       o Cross/training
•   One response
       o Attend an occasional morning check with ODS

Step 6. Do you have any recommended changes in the POC operating procedures to increase
your or others support?
• One response
       o Possible three eight hour shifts instead of two twelve hour shifts
       o Need to attend more training
• Two responses
       o Improved communication
       o What is needed and requirement for joining
• One response
       o Chief needs to change his attitude
                Some times positive
                Some times negative
• One reponse
       o EMTs need to be aggressive with on scene treatment
       o More appreciation from ODS and Chief of good job
       o More time in back
• One response
       o No more fire training, truck operation/pumping
• Five responses
       o No
       o None
       o I don't know

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•   One response
       o Like to see more people signing up
       o Perhaps a more flexible schedule
•   One response
       o Professionals don't seem to need volunteers or want to work them
       o Would not return with the present chief
•   One response
       o Find a replacement if have to leave and you are signed up
       o Replacement staff vehicles
•   One response
       o Need to attend training sessions and keep current
•   One response
       o 8 hr shifts would be better for some people (working people)

Step 7. Do you have any recommended changes in the compensation to increase your or others
support?

•   Eight responses
    o Should be increased pay for signing up
    o An increase may help, it may influence to more to commit
    o Raise standby pay to at least match dispatcher
    o EMT should get more, small increase would help
    o More pay for sign up, more would help
•   One response
    o It is fair
    o Compensate for certification
•   One response
       o Change to 3 shifts
       o Perhaps raise to stand by
•   Five responses
       o No, don't do it for money
       o Would not be important for me
       o Don't think it is a big deal
       o No
       o No

Part E. General comments (tend to be individual in nature, not grouped)

•   Need a designated POC leader to address issues in a timely manner
•   With some changes I would be interested in getting involved
•   More contact with people in the community & especially with the new people- more
    involvement in community
•   Mental thing, blood-borne pathogens should be in ambulance for ODS not attack truck
•   Need more debriefing after calls

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•   Need a washing machine
•   Older people can assist on fire fighting equipment operation, but may not handle full gear
    requirements going into fire- can drive tender etc,
•   Let EMTs be EMTs don't make them a drivers
•   Missing incentive for people to sign up
•   Better recognition of people’s time & work they do
•   Unit leader could help
•   POCs should have a leader
•   Improved communication
•   No response (two respondents)
•   Jump in ---Ask to help-- What can I do to help
•   I would help get something started if available during summer
•   On Duty Staff should study area maps
•   Tie a tin can on the chief and run him down the road
•   Yes I would come back-- more recognition to POC --They need to feel wanted and important
•   POC should rotate who drives or works in the back
•   Politics has stopped me from coming back
•   If no POCs have signed why dispatch the attack truck to medical emergency? (Two
    responses)
•   Advertise in newsletter to acknowledge accomplishment / recruit new members

Part F. Conclusions:

•   This committee has not identified any new/unknown source of people ready to participate in
    the POC program.
•   It was clear to the committee POC members clearly were not signing up for the money. They
    care about each of us and committed their time and technical skills on our behalf.
•   It is understood that each of us is getting older and at times can't do what we used to be able
    to do. Without recognition of this issue it possible a person could be adding to the emergency
    situation.
•   It is assumed for older POC personnel their specific assignment would be restricted to
    vehicle/fire truck driver or operators.
•   Other local fire departments offer medical support staffing and differ on their approach to
    transporting patients, suggesting that the FLFD is doing more with less support.
•   It appears clear with the understood population that POC cannot provide full time back up
    support.
•   Community unrest can have a negative impact on people involvement.
•   Some POCs have indicated they would not continue in their role without the ODS so they
    can benefit from their increased call volume experience.
•   It appears unreasonable to expect to have a POC certified Paramedic.
•   It appears the HOFD backup program is critical when FLFD ODS is required to transport
    without available POC support.


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•   If a study of POC sign-ups indicates the availability of increased POC support on holidays
    and red flag days, the board could restrict the additional support on holiday weekend /red flag
    days for ODS to allow for more POC participation.
•   Currently, certified POC staff are not given desired time in the back of the ambulance to
    increase their experience level.

Part G. Recommendations:

This committee has not identified any new/unknown source of people ready to participate in the
POC program. Young people can receive training/certification and can offer future support.
New/existing members were impacted by personal problems.

Detailed recommendations:
   7) Communicate to the community the support that has been available to each of us over the
       years with volunteer/POC support. In the past, certified Paramedics and EMTs have
       committed to remain in the community for a 24 hour period, ready to support all residents
       of the Forest lakes community, anyone traveling highway 260, or enjoying surrounding
       woods and lakes in the event of fire or medical needs, any hour of the day or night. The
       community needs to express our thanks to everyone who has been there for all of us and
       those who continue to be there for all of us. This would be an ideal time to recruit
       additional support.
   8) If the POC program is part of the fire district team, then a dedicated POC lead should be
       identified reporting to the chief like the dispatchers.
   9) When we say paid on call (POC) we are talking about neighbors who completed the
       training necessary to be certified to supply required medical treatment in a time of need
       and or protect our property in the event of a fire. Each time they sign up to support they
       are committing to remain within the area ready to support each of us. We currently
       compensate these dedicated individuals $8 for a 12 hour shift sign-up and $16 for a 24
       hour shift sign-up. This certainly validates these dedicated individuals are not signing up
       for the money. However, it is recommend we acknowledge this professional support with
       shift sign-up increase options to $10 for 8 hours, $20 for 16 hours and $30 for 24 hours.
       Reference: Christopher Creek pays $15 per call to reimburse for time and vehicle plus
       $3per hour for station or battalion duties -- No active members. Heber Overgaard pays
       $30 for a 12 hour shift.

    10) When considering the value to the program and our ability to make the above
        adjustments, it is suggested a review of the existing budget for the two ODS personnel,
        including additional support/over time for holidays and red flag days, is in order. The
        CAC Committee feels sure with the current limited participation the additional funds can
        be identified. Side note: For a clear understanding of actual participation/support, it is
        important to request all POC member sign in after each call. Documented POC sign up
        can reduce the additional ODS added for holiday weekend/red flag days substantial
        saving


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   11) Calls are not to be seen as a training session. FLFD covers both fire and medical
       emergencies. It is assumed training covers fire, medical and other emergencies
       requirements – the FLFD web page demonstrates required teamwork training.
       Understanding there are limits on training during the winter, what are we doing in these
       areas? HOFD indicates they have at least one training session for each area each month.
       Training must be a requirement and should be tracked/acknowledged.

   12) Concerned people have indicated they do not sign up but will support if available. The
       added support definitely can be of a value - must find a way to welcome the support
       while getting participation/training. Considering limited support and outside demands,
       consider possible training options. The best training session is the extra time spent after
       each emergency response to debrief as a team. ODS recommendation to participate in
       ODS shift checks to be considered a training session. POC have indicated they did not
       get certified and sign up to be a driver and need to get time in the back of the ambulance
       with support by ODS, indicating time is critical improved medical knowledge. Training /
       certification is obviously the critical first step in emergency response. Each person must
       jump in to assist, leaving feelings at the door.


The charter for the Citizen’s Advisory Committee to Improve Paid-On-Call Participation is listed
here for the record.

Citizen’s Advisory Committee Charter
Purpose
       The purpose of the POC Evaluation Citizen Advisory Committee is to evaluate the POC
       situation for the FLFD, and to provide the FLFD Leadership Team with recommendations
       for improving POC response. Evaluation and recommendations are to be based on business
       reasons.
Membership
       The Citizen Advisory Committee shall be comprised of members of the Forest Lakes
       community who are not, and will not be for the duration of the committee activities, part
       of the Forest Lakes Leadership Team. Members are initially appointed by the FLFD
       Board Chairman and ratified by the Board. The committee can add new members as
       needed in order for it to carry out its function. The committee chair shall notify the board
       when its membership or leadership is changed. Prospective members, subject to board
       approval, are Paul Studer, Sally Kennedy and Ted Cary.
       The committee chair person will be selected by the members. Paul Studer will be acting
       chair for the initial organizational meeting.
Meetings
       Meetings will be held as required to accomplish the committee objectives.
       Agendas and minutes
               Agendas and minutes will be posted and published in accordance with A.R.S. 38-
               431.01and A.R.S. 38-431.02

Responsibilities

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      Investigate the full spectrum of POC participation by resident personnel within the
      FLFD.
      Address all issues identified and make recommendations to the board on how to improve
      POC participation.
      Provide reports at regularly scheduled fire board meetings.
      Provide a final written report documenting the committee’s activities and
      recommendations. Target date for the final report is June 30, 2013 so that its results and
      recommendations may be used in preparation of the 2013 Strategic Plan update.
Approach
          • Identify current POC roster
          • Establish the pool of possible candidates in Forest Lakes (both full time and
              seasonal residents)
          • Identify how the use of POCs benefits FLFD from a business perspective
          • Research how other similar size districts use Volunteers/POCs
          • Establish the trend in the use of Volunteers/POC s in other districts
          • Research the compensation for Volunteers/POCs in other districts and establish
              whether or not this is a limiting factor for FLFD.
          • Identify qualifications required for each position a POC fills. (Qualifications
              should include knowledge, skills and physical ability.)
          • POC positions to be considered include EMS, Fire and General Support.
          • Establish the commitment in terms of time and availability required to
              successfully employ POCs
          • Assuming POCs cannot provide full time coverage to meet FLFD requirements,
              provide an analysis of possible methods to use POCs with ODS or similar staffing
              model.
          • Determine what savings can be expected with increased use of POCs at FLFD
          • Assess whether or not the use of less qualified people will affect the availability
              of ODS
          • Document the cost to recruit and train additional POCs
          • The committee has the latitude to add additional information or tasks to be
              addressed.

Voting
         Members of the public may participate in committee meetings from time to time at the
         discretion of the committee chairperson. However, recommendations forwarded to the
         FLFD board will consist of a positive vote of designated committee members only. In
         the case of a tie vote, the recommendation will be forwarded to the FLFD Leadership
         Team for final decision.

Authority
       The committee’s authority is limited to committee activities only. All policy decisions
       are the responsibility of the FLFD Board. All operational decisions are the responsibility
       of the Fire Chief.


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118
XXIV.Appendix E. Green Waste Site

The GWS fosters a “Fire-Wise” spirit within the community by providing a convenient disposal area
for residents and commercial operators. It provides a cost effective, affordable means of disposing
of green waste locally and alleviates the need to travel to Heber or Payson to discard green fuels.

The GWS is very important to the residents of Forest Lakes as evidenced by the comments in the
recently completed annual customer survey and the residents’ negative reaction to the temporary
shutdown of the GWS in 2013.

The GWS is a public service provided jointly by the Forest Service, FLOA and the FLFD. FLOA is
the permit holder and handles the contractual interface with the Forest Service. FLFD provides
operations management, including site maintenance and preparation of the site for chipping
operations, the latter of which requires a front loader, which FLFD provides. FLOA and the FLFD
are committed to assuring the GWS remains open to Forest Lakes’ residents. The fire department is
responsible for fire suppression.

Site improvements, including changes in operation, have been made to the site in 2013:

•   The Forest Service provided a gate at no cost to us, allowing the GWS to be secured and locked.
•   New signage for Forest Service 99 & 99A Roads was provided by FLOA
•   An office and portable toilets have been located on site
•   Messages will be posted throughout community promoting the GWS
•   GWS gate keys are provided only to those contractors that are resident in the community
•   A schedule master has been assigned - Debbie Skeldon

Both FLOA and the FLFD agree the site must be self-sustaining financially. In past years the
Hazardous Fuels grant had been subsidizing 90% of GWS operational costs. This funding was
withdrawn in 2012, causing the GWS to operate at a deficit. The Fire Board has decided tax
revenues are not to be used to fund the operation of the GWS, reversing a position taken by the
board in 2008.

The STRAP Team has conducted an extensive review of historical load fees, both residential and
commercial, including the hours of operation, staffing, site security and loader operation costs
(including loader maintenance) and has recommended a new fee structure for 2014. A single rate
structure will be put in place at $11.00 per load. This rate structure assumes that FLOA will
contribute $2,100 to the annual cost of operations. Costs of operation are monitored and reported
monthly by the fire department, and may result in an adjustment to the fee structure. We are
pursuing other options for financial support and cost reductions, such as grant assistance, Coconino
County subsidies, reduced hours of operation, etc.

An updated GWS agreement is being pursued by FLOA, Chief Rodriquez and the Forest Service.
This agreement should be in place in the spring of 2014.

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There has been some discussion about the possibility of forming an oversight committee for the
GWS to provide input and guidance to the operation of the site. The committee would be comprised
of representatives from the fire department, FLOA and the community (both citizens and
contractors).




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XXV. Appendix F. Auxiliary

The Auxiliary is a valuable resource to the fire department and community. It is registered with
the Arizona Corporation Commission as a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation (Filing number
01347342), providing residents and others the ability to make tax refundable donations in
support of the fire department. The Auxiliary is comprised of a Board of Directors who works
directly with the FLFD Board of Directors in decision making concerning the needs of the fire
department. All requests for funds for equipment, training, activity and community support are
approved in writing by the Fire Chief and a majority of the Fire Board and then presented to the
Auxiliary for their consideration.
The mission statement of the Auxiliary, per Section 2 of the Bylaws, is to raise funds to support
the Forest Lakes Fire Department, the Emergency Medical Services, and Search and Rescue
Operations and to act as liaison between the fire department and the Forest Lakes community.
Their purpose, per Section IV of the 1995 Restated Articles of Incorporation of the Auxiliary is
stated as: “Said corporation is organized exclusively for charitable purposes within the meaning
of Section 501(C) (3) of the Internal Revenue Service Code of 1954, including for such purposes
the making of distributions to the Forest Lakes Volunteer Fire Department. Such funds shall be
used exclusively for the purchase of materials and equipment to be used by the Fire Department
in carrying out designated duties and responsibilities.”
The Auxiliary has traditionally raised money by sponsoring ice cream socials, apparel sales and
by working with FLOA to sponsor holiday events. All money earned by the Auxiliary is to be
used at the discretion of the Auxiliary for the benefit of the Fire Department.

The Auxiliary will be pursuing alternative funding sources in the future. One recent example is
that of a directed donation from an anonymous source to fund half the cost of a STRYKER
Power Load System with the provision the Auxiliary match the contribution. With Auxiliary
Board approval, the system has been procured and is awaiting installation in one of our
emergency response vehicles.

Members of the Auxiliary perform many functions in support of the Fire Department. Members
of the Auxiliary are community members who do not wish to, or are not able to, be firefighters or
emergency medical personnel, but wish to assist the Fire Department and the community in other
ways. In the past, the Auxiliary has supported Fire Department personnel and other emergency
workers at prolonged emergency scenes by providing food, drinks and as well as maintaining a
pantry that is well stocked with cold drinks and high energy, non-perishable foods.

The Auxiliary endeavors to foster a positive image of FLFD, helping to build a strong foundation
for the future of Forest Lakes and its residents.

The Auxiliary has forged a collaborative relationship with the fire department. In order to
provide guidance to the Auxiliary in its efforts, Chief Rodriquez has communicated the
following levels of support available for the Auxiliary to consider:



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Level 1. Non-Recurring Assistance with Capital Expenditures. These would all be documented
by way of formal resolutions approved by the Forest Lakes Fire Board and delivered to the
Auxiliary Board by Chief Rodriquez in accordance with Auxiliary Bylaws. Resolution No.
2013-0002, A Formal Resolution Of The Governing Board Of The Forest Lakes Fire District
Authorizing A Request For Funds From The Fire Auxiliary For Procurement Of Two Stryker
Gurney Loader Systems, is an example of such a request, and was approved by the Fire Board on
April 20, 2013.

The fire district maintains a current priority list. Auxiliary financial assistance for items on this
list can be full or partial, depending on the resources of the Auxiliary, and is appreciated in any
amount. The Fire District, with its ability to generate revenues from property taxes, fire district
assistance taxes, ambulance billing, and fire billing, as well as from miscellaneous sources, is
expected to shoulder the bulk of these expenses.

The Auxiliary, in turn, as a 501.c.3 organization, has access to financial resources that the fire
district does not (cash deductible contributions e.g.), as well as the ability to generate income
from fund raisers (Ice Cream Socials and Apparel Sales e.g.). Contributions from the Auxiliary
will allow us to leverage our limited resources to the maximum benefit of our customers as we
carry out our mission statement.

Level 2. Recurring Assistance with Department Operational Expenses. There are numerous
operational expenses associated with operating the fire department, some anticipated, some
not. It is recommended the Auxiliary consider an annual commitment (say $2,000) that the fire
district can include as a budget line item in support of department operations.

Level 3. Miscellaneous/Other. There are many areas of the fire department operations that tend
to get overlooked because they don’t rise to the priority level needed so they can be addressed.
A recent example is the need to upgrade our sound system and microphones so the audience can
better hear the items being discussed at board meetings. The overhead projector has become a
key tool in our efforts to maintain transparency, and has recently been upgraded. As anyone who
has attended our board meetings and strategic planning sessions would attest, upgrading our
chairs would be a very welcome addition. Lastly, our office chairs are in need of replacement.

Level 4. Hydration and Nourishment Supplies. In the past, the Auxiliary was in charge of
maintaining a supply of bottled water and high-energy snacks and food stuffs to support our
paid-on-call (POC) and ODS members when they respond to calls. The POC and ODS members
can be called into service at any time, and for extended periods. It is critical that they have
access to needed hydration and food supplies as needed. Connie Widener has taken over this
role for hydration supplies by establishing relationships with some of the large grocery chains in
Payson to donate bottled water. It is suggested the Auxiliary explore resuming this role, and
adding nourishment supplies as well.




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XXVI. Appendix G. Operations Needs Assessment

The STRAP team addressed the repair or replace strategy for all the FLFD rolling stock.
Replace is only an option if sufficient capital exists to support the procurement. Whether
sufficient capital exists can only be answered by referring to our 5 year budget projection.

 Perhaps the most important question that needs to be answered is “do we still need the
equipment?” The assessment of need was addressed by Chief Rodriquez, and the
recommendation is that we need the functionality provided by the equipment we now have.
Once the need was determined, we proceeded to evaluate the cost impact of the decision to repair
or replace. In order to assist with data gathering for the repair/replace evaluation we had all the
rolling stock evaluated by a qualified mechanic familiar with fire service equipment. The
vehicle assessment template included the following categories:

    Mechanicals (weight 25%)
        1. Chassis & drive train
                1. Engine & transmission - Above average condition, normal wear and tear
                2. Suspension - Above average condition, normal wear and tear
                3. Steering gear & brake system - Good condition, normal wear and tear
                4. Tires/wheels - Poor condition - all rear tires need replaced
        2. Pump and related equipment
                1. Pump - Excellent condition, rebuilt less than five years previous
                2. Transfer case - Above average condition, normal wear and tear
                3. Valves & piping - Good condition, normal wear and tear
                4. Booster tank - Good condition, normal wear and tear
                5. Annual pump tests - Passed all pumping tests
        3. Aerial device
                1. Aerial meets specifications of NFPA 1901 Chapter 18 - Needs modernized -
                obsolete control system
                2. Annual tests - Passed all ladder tests
2. Electrical System (weight 5%)
        1. Alternator - Above average condition, normal wear and tear
        2. Wiring & batteries - Above average condition, normal wear and tear
        3. Warning lighting & siren system - Needs brought up to current NFPA 1901 standards
        4. Electronic controls - Above average condition, normal wear and tear
3. Cab & Body (weight 10%)
        1. Hose Body - Good condition, normal wear and tear
        2. Compartment & hose storage volume/layout - Above average condition, normal wear
        and tear
        3. Ground ladders - Poor condition, ladders not banked for efficient deployment and use
        4. Fit & finish - Good condition, normal wear and tear
4. Obsolescence (weight 10%)
        1. Compare with new apparatus with latest “improvements” - Aerial needs upgraded to
        new technology (electronic controls)

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       2. Parts availability into future - No problems noted with recent maintenance and repairs
       in obtaining parts and materials
5. Ergonomics (15%)
       1. Apparatus efficiency - Rated well
       2. Apparatus safe to operate - Yes, except for enclosed seating positions
       3. Enclosed seating positions - Needs rear seating area of crew compartment enclosed
       4. Training - Average time and skills needed
    6. Economics (weight 35%)
       1. Economic Factor Score

The results of the evaluation conducted in November 2013 are shown in Attachment 1.


Aparatus Scoring -
 Dec 02 2013.pdf




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XXVII. Appendix H. Emergency Preparedness


 Note: The following information is not intended to be a complete emergency preparedness guide.
 Residents are encouraged to use this material as a guide to do their own research. The fire
 department can assist with any specific questions.

 All residents should have a plan in case of an emergency. Before an emergency happens, be sure
 to sit down with your family and decide how you will get in contact with each other, where you
 will go and what you will do in an emergency. Keep a copy of this plan in your emergency
 supply kit or another safe place.

 Residents should do three key things: 1) get an emergency supply kit, 2) make a family
 emergency plan, and 3) be informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur
 and their appropriate responses. Residents should have some basic supplies on hand in order to
 survive for at least three days if an emergency occurs. It is important that residents review this
 list and consider that we live in the middle of a national forest that creates unique needs for their
 family in order to create an emergency supply kit that will meet these needs. Individuals should
 also consider having at least two emergency supply kits, one full kit at home and smaller
 portable kits in their vehicle or other places they spend time.

 The following notes are from a community meeting held at the Forest Lakes fire station in
 response to the Poco fire, and are presented as additional information:
     • We live in the middle of a forest. We need to be prepared take action as needed.
     • Coconino County All Hazards Evacuation Plan is in place. The Sheriff’s office has
        responsibility for implementing the plan.
     • We remain vulnerable to dry lightning caused fires. These can occur anywhere, at any
        time.
     • The Forest Service is responsible for classifying the fire threat (Type I, II or III)
     • The Sheriff’s office implements the plans as appropriate to the fire threat classification
     • If an evacuation is ordered, you will be notified by public safety officials through a
        variety of means such as personal contact, email, telephone, information check poits,
        radio, television, etc. Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) members and
        others go door to door to alert residents on the fire dangers
     • Routes for evacuation have been pre-determined (Route 260 east, Route 260 west and
        Forest Service Road 95 north)
     • Special needs issues are of particular interest (health, disability, large animals, large
        motor homes or trailers, etc.)
     • If you plan to move large vehicles such as RVs, 5th Wheel Trailers, Travel Trailers or
        Horse Trailers be sure the vehicle is in good operating condition, is positioned for an easy
        exit and has a full tank of gas. Allow extra time for vehicle hook-up and to be able to
        drive at a normal pace.
     • If you have small pets, be sure you have their moving supplies ready and available.

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   •   If you have large animals, such as horses or cattle, have a means of transportation
       accessible and establish a pre-arranged location where they can be boarded.
   •   People can refuse to leave
   •   Looting and vandalism are a concern
   •   Trigger points have been pre-determined that will put the evacuation plan in process
   •   Notice time for evacuation can be days or hours depending on the nature of the
       emergency
   •   Residents should be especially sensitive to medical needs and medications and
       irreplaceable family treasures when evacuating. Residents may or may not be able to
       return to their homes.
   •   Public safety and safety of firefighting personnel and equipment are paramount.
   •   FLOA’s Emergency Contact Data Base is a valuable resource for contact information.
   •   Coconino County and Navajo County Sheriff’s departments have in IGA in place to
       provide support to Forest Lakes.
   •   The Forest Lakes CERT activity needs to be better coordinated with the Fire District.
   •   Block Watch can be an effective mechanism for alerting residents to fire dangers.
   •   CERT is also tied to FEMA
   •   The forest area around Forest Lakes has been treated and provides excellent protection
       against wildland fires.

Residents are encouraged to register their names and telephone numbers in the Ready Coconino
Notification System to receive emergency telephone and computer messages and updates. You
can register at www.readycoconino.az.gov

Contact Information
       o Emergency: 911
       o Coconino County Emergency Hotline (Operational During Emergencies):
           1.888.679.8393
       o Coconino County Emergency Information: www.readycoconino.az.gov
       o Arizona Emergency Information Network: www.azein.gov
       o Emergency Preparedness Planning: www.ready.gov
       o American Red Cross: www.arizonaredcross.org

Supplemental Information Sources
      Arizona Office of Emergency Management. The Arizona Division of Emergency
      Management (ADEM) coordinates the state's response to reduce the impact of disasters
      on people and property. The Division's operations support the four phases of emergency
      management: mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.
          •   Arizona Division of Emergency Management
              5636 E McDowell Road
              Phoenix, Arizona 85008-3495
              1-800-411-ADEM (2336)

                                               126
         (602) 244-0504
         www.dem.azdema.gov
    •    Coconino County Emergency Management
         5600 E. Commerce
         Flagstaff, AZ 86004
         (928) 526-2735
         www.coconino.az.gov

Citizen Corps. Get Involved in Preparing your Community. Citizen Corps, Homeland Security's grassroots
effort, localizes preparedness messages and provides opportunities for citizens to get emergency response
training; participate in community exercises; and volunteer to support local first responders. To learn more
and to get involved, contact your nearest Citizen Corps Council by visiting www.citizencorps.gov.
     o Arizona Citizen Corps Program
          1700 W. Washington St., Suite 210
          Phoenix, AZ 85007
          (602) 542-7077
          http://www.azdohs.gov/ASCCC/




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XXVIII. Appendix I. Succession Planning

  In the broadest perspective, succession planning as practiced in a normal business environment is
  a process for identifying and developing internal people with the potential to fill key business
  leadership positions in the company. When applied in this manner, succession planning increases
  the availability of experienced and capable employees that are prepared to assume these roles as
  they become available. This approach cannot be used at the Forest Lakes Fire District since we
  are only “one deep” at our various positions. Instead, we resort to position-driven replacement
  planning, whereby the requirement to replace individuals can occur for various reasons and at
  various times. Sometimes the timing of these events can be anticipated (expiration of a contract
  e.g.), but most often the events are driven by circumstances beyond our control. Thus, a
  position-driven replacement strategy is reactive in nature.
  Position-driven replacement planning begins with a complete analysis of the organization
  structure. Reporting relationships and job descriptions help to clarify the roles played by the
  various individuals.
  The succession planning portion of the SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and
  Threats) Analysis module from last year’s update was reviewed and modified. Succession
  planning includes both near term, tactical, or bridging elements as well as longer term, or
  strategic, elements.

  The near term, or tactical, bridging elements would come into play if, for some reason, Chief
  Rodriquez were unable to continue as leader. The board could be presented with this challenge
  at any time, for a number of reasons. The board feels it has adequately addressed the situation:
  a) we have assigned an interim successor (Lee Barnes, Assistant Chief) who could assume Chief
  Rodriquez’s leadership role, with the possibility the arrangement could be for an extended period
  of time; or b) we could negotiate an IGA with Heber-Overgaard for interim support. Designation
  of the Assistant Chief to be Chief Rodriquez’s successor would have the added benefit of
  promoting from within, and would minimize the disruption associated with the change in
  leadership. The department would operate more efficiently with an internal transfer. It is felt
  that promoting from within would also maximize the number of ODS who would remain with
  the department. Assistant Chief Barnes is very familiar with the operation of the fire department,
  having been an ODS PM who has supported the Forest Lakes Fire District Combination Staffing
  Model for about five years.

  There would be a new dynamic associated with an Assistant Chief assuming leadership of the
  department, and would require adjustments on behalf of the entire leadership team. There is also
  the possibility that Chief Rodriquez could assume an Assistant Chief role to ease the transition.

  Succession planning at Forest Lakes is very challenging in general. We are not two or three
  deep. Our combination staffing model, and the unique contractual relationship we have with
  Chief Rodriquez, don’t exist anywhere else in the state of Arizona. The Chief/Board relationship
  and the combination staffing model are well accepted by the community, as evidenced by the
  annual survey results.


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The longer term, or strategic, elements are being addressed by Scenarios C and D of our scenario
based strategic plan (hire a new chief).

It was recommended the succession plan also contain the elements of a Disaster Recovery Plan,
which is standard practice for most corporations.

Succession planning and disaster recovery goals have been assigned to the leadership team and
are detailed in Section XVIII, Goals.




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