GHS are you trained yet Why Not.pptx by TPenney

VIEWS: 37 PAGES: 82

									                          GHS
            Global Harmonized
                       System
The Globally Harmonised System of Classification and
                                Labelling of Chemicals
Yes it is mandatory training in the United States Now




                                    P bar Y Safety Consultant 
What is the GHS?

•   The GHS of Classifying and Labelling of Chemicals:
     • Comprehensive tool that harmonises chemical classification and 
        hazard communication.

•   Harmonised criteria for classification – physical, health and 
    environmental
     • Applies criteria to classify chemicals based on intrinsic hazards
     • Covers single substances, solutions and mixtures.

•   Communicates hazard information of hazardous chemicals on labelling 
    and safety data sheets.
     • Hazard classes
     • Symbols, signal words and hazard and precautionary phrases
     • Standardised Safety Data Sheet format.
•   Some changes to systems are required and will be obvious to end users.
     • Training for staff to understand GHS



                                                      P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Why was the GHS developed?

•   Many different systems existed worldwide, with differing requirements:
     • Vary in hazards covered and classification criteria used
     • Information required on labels and SDS varied
     • Result = disparity in the information provided.


•   Hazards are an intrinsic property of a chemical. Classification should be 
    consistent!

•   Often leads to conflicting and inconsistent classifications and safety 
    information:
     • Chemicals are often classified differently (even in the same country).
     • Labelling and SDS requirements vary from country to country.

•   Some countries have little or no requirements in force.
     • Often levels of literacy are low
     • Desire to improved the safety outcomes in these countries?


                                                         P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 ◦ We still have to keep chemical inventories

 ◦ We still have to maintain safety data sheets

 ◦ We still have to train new people on the 
   potential hazards of what they will be working 
   with

 ◦ We still have to maintain our records for 30 
   years, per Government Regulations



GHS – What Will Not change…
                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 Labels are required to have:
 ◦ Pictograms
 ◦ Signal Words
 ◦ Hazard Statement
 ◦ Precautionary Statements
 ◦ Product Identifier
 ◦ Supplier Identification
 ◦ Supplemental Information (as required)



Label Requirements
                            P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 ◦ Nine pictograms will be utilized in identifying 
   hazards of ALL chemicals

 ◦ Each chemical will have AT LEAST one pictogram, 
   often multiple pictograms – to visually convey the 
   hazards associated with it

 ◦ We need to be familiar with the meaning(s) of each 
   pictogram 
   Labels and safety data sheets will not always include that 
    information, understanding these is critical
   Radiological & Environmental Management (REM) will provide 
    pictogram reference cards to post in work areas for future 
    reference




GHS PICTOGRAMS
                                          P bar Y Safety Consultant 
GHS - PICTOGRAMS
                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 Signal words describe the severity of a 
  hazard:

 ◦ Danger
    This is reserved for the more severe hazards

 ◦ Warning
    This is used on less severe hazards

 ◦ If there is no significant hazard, a signal word 
   won’t be used



Labels - Signal Words
                                           P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 Phrases that describe the nature of a 
  hazard:

 ◦ Examples:
    Highly flammable liquid and vapor
    May cause liver and kidney damage
    Fatal if swallowed




Labels - Hazard Statements
                                 P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 Recommend measures that should be taken 
  to minimize or prevent adverse effects 
  resulting from exposure to the hazardous 
  chemical:

 ◦ There are four types of precautionary 
   statements:
     1. Prevention (to minimize exposure)
     2. Response (in case of accidental spillage or 
        exposure)
     3. Storage
     4. Disposal




Labels - Precautionary Statements
                                     P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 ◦ The supplier may provide additional 
   instructions, expiration date, fill date or 
   information that it deems helpful.

 ◦ An example is the personal protective 
   equipment (PPE) pictogram indicating 
   what to wear. 




Labels - Supplemental Information
                                P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Labels - Examples of PPE
pictograms
                       P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Label Example
                P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 ◦ Whenever a chemical is taken from its 
   original container, the container it is 
   transferred into must have a secondary 
   label affixed to identify its contents

 ◦ Purdue University utilizes the National 
   Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 704 
   Diamond for secondary labeling




Secondary Labels
                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
            }
                      Numbering
                         ◦ 4 = Most Hazardous
                         ◦ 0 = Least Hazardous
• Health
• Flammability
• Reactivity
    Additional Information

                 Chemical

                 Owner                           Date

Secondary Labels
                                  P bar Y Safety Consultant 
           PHYSICAL HAZARDS


                    •   Pyrophoric Solids
                        Explosives
                    •   Flammable Gases
                        Self-Heating 
                    •   Substances
                        Flammable Aerosols
                    •   Water Reactive
                        Gases Under Pressure
                    •   Oxidizing Liquids
                        Flammable Liquids
                    •   Oxidizing Solids
                        Flammable Solids
                    •   Oxidizing Gases
                        Self-Reactives 
                    •   Organic Peroxides
                        Pyrophoric Liquids
                    •   Corrosive to Metals

Types of Hazards
Types of Hazards

 • Health Hazards
  Acute Toxicity
 • Skin Corrosion/Irritation
 • Serious Eye Damage/Eye Irritation
 • Respiratory or Skin Sensitization
 • Germ Cell Mutagenicity
 • Carcinogenicity
 • Reproductive Toxicology
 • Target Organ Systemic Toxicity - Single 
   Exposure
 • Target Organ Systemic Toxicity - Repeated 
   Exposure
 • Aspiration Toxicity
Types of Hazards

  Environmental Hazards
 Hazardous to the Aquatic 
  Environment

   ◦ Acute Aquatic Toxicity

   ◦ Chronic Aquatic Toxicity
     Bioaccumulation potential
     Rapid degradability
Types of Hazards

   ◦ Hazard classification will be assessed by 
  hazard rating scale
     manufacturers and suppliers with a 
     hazard rating scale

   ◦ Scale of 1-5 (1 being the most 
     hazardous and 5 being the least 
     hazardous)
     NFPA has not adopted the GHS scale
     NFPA scale is opposite 4 - 0
 Identifies the chemical ingredient(s), 
  information on substances, mixtures and 
  trade secret claims:
 ◦ Chemical name
 ◦ Common name and synonyms
 ◦ Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) number 
   impurities and stabilizing additives 
   classifications which contribute to the chemical 
   classification
 ◦ The chemical name and concentration of all 
   ingredients which are classified as health 
   hazards
Composition/Ingredient
Information                        P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 Provides information on how to minimize 
  worker exposure:
 ◦ Control parameters 
    Government Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs)
    Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs)
    Threshold Limit Values (TLVs)

 ◦ Appropriate engineering controls

 ◦ Individual protection measures
    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)



Exposure Control/Personal
Protection
                                       P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 A common and coherent approach to defining 
  and classifying hazards, and communicating 
  information on labels and safety data sheets.
 Provides the underlying infrastructure for 
  establishment of national, comprehensive 
  chemical safety programs.
 No country has the ability to identify and 
  specifically regulate every hazardous 
  chemical product.
 For example, in the United States, there are 
  an estimated 650,000 such products.
 Adoption of requirements for information to 
  accompany the product helps address 
  protection needs.

                                P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 Protections will not be reduced;                     
  comprehensibility will be key.

 All types of chemicals will be covered; will 
  be based on intrinsic properties (hazards) 
  of chemicals.

 All systems will have to be changed.




Principles Of Harmonization
                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification Criteria
  ◦ Health and Environmental Hazards
  ◦ Physical Hazards
  ◦ Mixtures
Hazard Communication
  ◦ Labels
  ◦ Safety Data Sheets




The GHS Elements
                                 P bar Y Safety Consultant 
    Acute Toxicity
  Skin Corrosion/Irritation
  Serious Eye Damage/Eye Irritation
  Respiratory or Skin Sensitization
  Germ Cell Mutagenicity
  Carcinogenicity
  Reproductive Toxicity
  Target Organ Systemic Toxicity – Single and 
   Repeated Dose
  Hazardous to the Aquatic Environment




Health & Environmental Hazards
                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Tiered Approach to Classification
 Generally use test data for the mixture,   
              when available 
                    
  Use bridging principles, if applicable 
                    
 For health and environmental hazards, 
  estimate hazards based on the known 
          ingredient information  
                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Physical Hazards

Explosives
Flammability – gases, aerosols, liquids, solids
Oxidizers – liquid, solid, gases
Self-Reactive 
Pyrophoric – liquids, solids
Self-Heating
Organic Peroxides
Corrosive to Metals
Gases Under Pressure
Water-Activated Flammable Gases

                                  P bar Y Safety Consultant 
 Guiding principles:
 § Information should be conveyed in 
   more than one way.
 § The comprehensibility of the 
   components of the system should take 
   account of existing studies and 
   evidence gained from testing.
 § The phrases used to indicate the 
   degree (severity) of hazard should be 
   consistent across different hazard 
   types.


Comprehensibility
                            P bar Y Safety Consultant 
§ The Working Group identified about 35 
  different types of information that are 
  currently required on labels by different 
  systems.
§ To harmonize, key information elements 
  needed to be identified.
§ Additional harmonization may occur on 
  other elements in time, in particular for 
  precautionary statements.


Labels
                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Key Label Elements
   Product identifier
   Supplier identifier
   Chemical identity
   Hazard pictograms*
   Signal words*
   Hazard statements*
   Precautionary information
*Standardized

                         P bar Y Safety Consultant 
  GHS Pictograms




               !
                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
  Signal Words

           “Danger” or “Warning”
§ Used to emphasize hazard and 
 discriminate between levels of 
 hazard.


                          P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Precautionary Information

§ GHS label should include appropriate 
  precautionary information. 
§ The GHS document includes examples 
  of precautionary statements which can 
  be used.
§ The intent is to harmonize 
  precautionary statements in the future.

                             P bar Y Safety Consultant 
§ The SDS should provide comprehensive 
  information about a chemical substance 
  or mixture.
§ Primary Use:  The Workplace
§ Employers and workers use the SDS as a 
  source of information about hazards and 
  to obtain advice on safety precautions.
Role of the SDS in the GHS
                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
1.      Identification
2.      Hazard(s) identification
3.      Composition/information on 
     ingredients
4.      First-aid measures
5.      Fire-fighting measures
6.      Accidental release measures
7.      Handling and storage
8.      Exposure control/personal protection



SDS Format: 16 headings
                                  P bar Y Safety Consultant 
9.    Physical and chemical properties
10.   Stability and reactivity
11.   Toxicological information
12.   Ecological information
13.   Disposal considerations
14.   Transport information
15.   Regulatory information
16.   Other information



Format: 16 headings (cont.)
                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Why was the GHS developed?
•   Hazard symbols / pictograms


    What do all these symbols mean?




                                                                        ?
     WHMIS                     European                           ADG 
       (Canada)                   Union                             Code

•   The ADG Code has no symbol for chronic/severe health effects.
•   The GHS standardises these symbols on labels/SDS



                                                     P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS converter can be used to 
establish a proposed "new" GHS-
compliant classification based on the 
previous classification in line with the 
guideline relating to the relevant 
substance or preparation. If the 
substance’s UN number is also 
indicated which provides details on 
the transport classification that now 
applies, an even more precise 
classification is possible in the new 
GHS system in many cases.
http://www.gischem.de/ghs/index.ht
m


                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Why was the GHS developed?
•   Labelling inconsistencies




                                P bar Y Safety Consultant 
How was the GHS developed?

•   The GHS is based on considered best practices of chemical hazard 
    communication.

     •   USA and Canada for workplace, consumers and pesticides
     •   EU directives for classification and labelling of substances and 
         preparations
     •   UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods


•   Because the basis already existed, countries’ systems would be 
    maintained or improved by adopting the GHS.




                                                        P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Fundamental approach

•   The GHS would be based on the classification of intrinsic properties of 
    chemicals on a hazard-based approach and would include:

         •   Physical hazards
         •   Health hazards
         •   Environmental hazards


•   One chemical, one classification.

•   If validated data exists for a chemical, then it should be useable for 
    classification.
•   The GHS needed to be comprehensible
     • Need to make it easily understandable for everyone
     • Minimal training required



                                                         P bar Y Safety Consultant 
What are the potential benefits of
 the GHS?
The GHS provides many benefits to governments, industry and chemical users:

     •   Reduces need for duplicative testing and evaluation of chemicals.
          • Principles of animal welfare
     •   Single approach to labels and safety data sheets.
     •   Classification criteria are updated and maintained at an international level.
     •   Increased efficiencies and reduced costs of compliance.
     •   Easier trade of chemicals; no need to reclassify in every jurisdiction.
     •   An increased understanding among the wider community of chemical 
         hazards.

•   Enhanced safety outcomes for protection of human health and environment 
    through harmonised chemical safety and health information.




                                                        P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Who has implemented the GHS?




     •   Japan, China, Singapore, S. Korea (and other ASEAN)
     •   EU adopted as part of REACH (finalised by 2015)
     •   USA adopted in 2012 (finalised at same time as EU)
     •   Canada, Brazil and many others currently preparing.




•   The GHS is updated and revised every two years:
     • Future versions of the GHS will be taken up during 
        reviews of the Safety legislation
     • Available free from UN’s website




                                                     P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS and the Safety Regulations
Scope and Application




•   All hazardous chemicals in the workplace are covered:
     • Substances, products, mixtures, preparations, formulations, etc.
     • GHS hazard classes and categories closely reflect existing coverage 
         in your government safety reguirement.


     •   Transition period applies - 31 December 2016




                                                        P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Scope and Application
How does it work?

 •   A chemical is classified against the criteria of each hazard class and 
     category under:
      • Physical hazards
      • Health hazards
      • Environmental hazards (not mandatory)

 •   If it meets the criteria of the GHS in one or more class, it is a hazardous 
     chemical.
      • Some hazard classes are excluded by the Safety Regulations.
      • Hazardous chemicals include a single substance, mixture or article.

 •   Each hazard class is split into:
      • Divisions (explosives only)
      • Categories
      • Types (applies to organic peroxides and self-reacting substances).


                                                        P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Scope and Application
How does it work?

 •   Hazards information is prescribed to end users: 
      • Symbols (pictograms)
      • Signal words
      • Hazard statements, and
      • Precautionary statements.




 •   These elements are then put onto:
      • Labels
      • Safety data sheets


                                                        P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Hazard Classes and Categories




                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Hazard Classes and Categories




                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Hazard Classes and Categories




•   Not compulsory under Safety Regulations. 
•   Environmental classification may still be required for transportation.




                                                       P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Non-GHS Hazard Statements
•   The are several additional classifications which are not in the GHS.
•   Mandated through Codes of Practice.

    001 – Explosive when dry
    006 – Explosive with or without contact with air
    014 – Reacts violently with water
    018 – In use may form flammable/explosive vapour/air mixture
    029 – Contact with water liberates toxic gas
    031 – Contact with acid liberates toxic gas
    032 – Contact with acid liberates very toxic gas
    044 – Risk of explosion if heated under confinement
    066 – Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness and cracking
    070 – Toxic by eye contact
    071 – Corrosive to the respiratory tract




                                                       P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Hazard communication – Labels
•   A label is the written, printed, or graphical information that is affixed to, 
    printed on or attached to the container of a hazardous chemical.


•   Harmonised elements under the GHS
     • Signal words
       Indicate the relative severity of the intrinsic hazards

     • Pictograms
       Symbols signifying hazards of chemical, e.g.

     • Hazard statements
       Phrase describing the nature of the hazards a chemical possesses

     • Precautionary statements
       A phrase describing measures to be taken to minimise adverse 
       effects of exposure to, or improper handling of, a hazardous 
       chemical (Prevention, Response, Storage, Disposal).


                                                         P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Signal words

•   Signal words are prominently displayed words on labelling to:
     • Alert the label reader to a potential hazard, and
     • Indicate the relative severity of the hazard


•   There are two signal words used on label in the GHS.  These are:
     • DANGER
     • WARNING


• DANGER indicates a higher severity of hazard compared to WARNING

     •   Under the previous systems, signal words included:
          • Danger, Warning, Hazardous, Poison, Dangerous Poison




                                                     P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Pictograms
•   The GHS prescribes 9 pictograms to convey the hazards of chemicals




•   Two new symbols are introduced
•   All relevant pictograms will appear on label (according to the 
    prioritisation rules).
     • In practice more than 4 pictograms is very rare

                                                       P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Pictograms
•   The GHS also allows dangerous goods class labels to be displayed on 
    labelling and safety data sheets.
•   There are no equivalents to the “exclamation mark”  and “health hazard” 
    pictograms.




    1        2        3        4         5        6               8                9
                          Dangerous Goods Class


                                                      P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Possible issue with flammable chemicals?
•   Did anyone spot a possible issue with flammable symbols?




•   6 different “flammable” symbols become one – intrinsic hazard not 
    always obvious at a glance.
     • Read label e.g. In contact with water releases flammable gas
     • NO CHANGE TO PLACARDS - DG symbol still required



                                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Placarding



      FLAMMAZENE

      UN No.


      999
      9
      HAZCHEM


      4YE

                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Hazard statements
•   Describe the nature of the hazards covered by the GHS and the degree 
    of severity.
     • Examples include:
          • Extremely flammable liquid and vapour (Cat. 1)
               • Highly flammable liquid and vapour (Cat. 2)
                  • Flammable liquid and vapour (Cat. 3)
                      • Combustible liquid (Cat. 4)
          • May cause cancer (Cat. 1)
               • Suspected of causing cancer (Cat. 2)
•   Hazard statements are equivalent to Risk Phrases under the Approved 
    Criteria.
          • Extremely flammable (R12)
              • Highly flammable (R11)
                 • Flammable (R10)
          • May cause cancer (R45)
              • Limited evidence of a carcinogenic effect (R40)


                                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Precautionary statements
•   Describe measures recommended to prevent or minimise:
     • The adverse effects of exposure to a hazardous chemical, or
     • Improper handling of a hazardous chemical.

•   Each hazard class / category has several associated precautionary 
    phrases.
     • Prevention, Response, Storage, Disposal.


•   For example, for a flammable liquid, the following statements may apply:

     •   Keep away from sparks and open flames. No smoking. (Prevention)
     •   In case of fire: Use powder for extinction (Response)
     •   Store in a well-ventilated place. Keep cool. (Storage)
     •   Dispose of contents/container in accordance with local regulations. 
         (Disposal)




                                                      P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Other information on labels

•   Product identifier (and ingredient proportions)

•   Supplier / manufacturer details


•   Supplementary information , where applicable, such as:
     • hazard classes and hazard statements not specifically covered by the 
        GHS
     • expiry or retest date.
     • UN number




                                                      P bar Y Safety Consultant 
  Examples of GHS labels


    Product identifier

Ingredient proportions
                         EX                          Signal word


 Hazard pictograms
                           AM                           Hazard statements




                             PL
                               E                      Precautionary statements




                                                      Supplier information




                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Examples of GHS labels
Label suitable for transport




                  EX
DG Class Labels
                      AM
                        PL
                               E

                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Examples of GHS labels
Label for small container



                        EX
                          AM
                                     PL
                                          E                              Refer to SDS




•   When the label does not have enough space, some label elements can 
be omitted.
•   The Safety Data Sheet contains more detailed information



                                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Safety Data Sheets
The GHS also provides a minimum standard for the formatting and content for
communicating a chemical’s hazard through Safety Data Sheets (SDS).


A Safety Data Sheet is a document that provides detailed information about a
hazardous chemical, including:

     •   Its identity and its ingredients
     •   Its physical, health and environmental hazards
     •   Workplace exposure standards
     •   Safe handling and storage procedures
     •   First aid procedures
     •   Transport information
     •   and other useful information.

• Sections of the SDS are aimed at a particular audience.




                                                            P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Safety Data Sheets

•   There are very few changes to SDS by moving to the GHS.



•   For example:
     • Section 2 contains classification information
         • Including pictograms, hazard statements, etc.
     • Section 3 contains information on ingredients in mixtures.



•   Most other sections and information contained in the SDS remain 
    unchanged.




                                                      P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Safety Data Sheets
•   The information in an SDS is provided in 16 sections. 
•   These sections are the same as the current requirements and in the same 
    order.

1. Identification                       9. Physical and chemical properties
2. Hazard(s) identification             10.Stability and reactivity
3. Composition and ingredient           11.Toxicological information
   information                          12.Ecological information
4. First aid measures                   13.Disposal considerations
5. Fire-fighting measures               14.Transport information
6. Accidental release measure           15.Regulatory information
7. Handling and storage                 16.Any other relevant information
8. Exposure controls and PPE




                                                    P bar Y Safety Consultant 
The GHS – Safety Data Sheets
       SECTION 2: HAZARD(S) IDENTIFICATION

       Classification of the substance or mixture




                        EX
       Flammable liquids (Category 2); Acute toxicity – Oral (Category 3)
       Skin irritation (Category 2); Carcinogenicity (Category 1A)
       Aspiration toxicity (Category 1)




                                    AM
       Label elements
       Pictograms:




          Flame        Skull and
                      crossbones
                                      PL
                                     Health
                                     hazard




                                                             E
       Signal word: DANGER

       Hazard statement(s):
       H225 Highly flammable liquid and vapour
       H301 Toxic if swallowed
       H315 Causes skin irritation
       H350 May cause cancer
       H304 May be fatal if swallowed and enter airways

       Precautionary statements:
       P210 Keep away from sparks and open flames. No smoking
       P233 Keep container tightly closed



                                                                            P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Some issues with health hazards translation
•   Not all of the end-points for classification are the same and there is some 
    overlap.
                       Acute toxicity (vapours) -
              20
             20        inhalation
                                          20
                               Cat. 4

                                          10
                                                       Xn, 
                                                       R20

                               Cat. 3
          LC50 / mg/m3




                                          2
                          2
                               Cat. 2                 T, R23




                                          0.5

                                                       T+, 
                               Cat. 1
                                                       R26




                         0.2
                                    GHS             App. Crit.

      Always check for data on SDS on toxicological information (usually 
      section 11).
      Become familiar with the Acute Toxicity table in the GHS (p. 109).
                                                          P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Environmental Hazard Classification
e.g. R50/53  Acute/chronic aquatic toxicity




•   Environmental classification can usually be found in the SDS (sections 14 and 
    15).


                                                      P bar Y Safety Consultant 
GHS Hazard Classes
•   The Safety Regulations refers specifically to the 3 rd revision of the GHS 


•   All hazard classes except the following are included in the Safety 
    Regulations:
     • Acute toxicity – oral/dermal/inhalation: Category 5
     • Skin corrosion/irritation: Category 3
     • Serious eye damage/irritation: Category 2B
     • Aspiration hazard: Category 2
     • Flammable gases: Category 2
     • Acute hazard to the aquatic environment: Categories 1 – 3 (all)
     • Chronic hazard to the aquatic environment: Categories 1 – 4 (all)
     • Hazardous to the ozone layer
•   However, can use these hazard classes and associated label elements if 
    they do not cast doubt upon the correct classification.
•   Building block approach.


                                                         P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification
Where can I get the information to allow re-classification?

•   For the majority of chemicals currently used, a classification under the 
    Legislation will likely already exist.

     • Labelling
     • Safety data sheets – relevant information to consult includes:
        • R-phrases / hazard symbols
        • Transport information (Dangerous Goods Classification / UN 
           numbers)
        • Physical and chemical properties
            • mp / bp / fp / pH / LEL and UELs, etc.
        • Toxicological information 
            • LD50 / LC50 for oral / dermal / inhalation routes of exposure
            • Carcinogenicity / mutagenicity information
            • Sensitisation / skin and eye corrosion / target organs, etc.
        • Ecological information (for environmental hazards)
        • Reactivity / stability data (may assist with non-GHS hazard 
           classes)
                                                        P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification – Single substances – and (some)
                                       mixtures
                  Process for classification using translation of R-phrase to H-statement
   Chemical 
    needing 
 classification




                                 Does the 
  Gather all 
                              chemical have 
 information 
                              a classification 
   available
                                   under 
                                Legislation
                                                     Use translation 
                                                                                              Classify the 
                                                     tables to derive 
                                                                                               chemical
                                                      classifications
  Is testing 
     data 
  available?




                                                     Possibly 
                               Can’t classify.         not 
 Classify the                  Need further         hazardous
  chemical                      information 
                                to proceed.




                                                                 P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification of mixtures
•   For mixtures the translation process will provide adequate classification 
    in the majority of cases – if cut-off limits are not a problem.

     •     The translation of physical hazards should be straightforward.
     •     However, changes to some cut-off concentrations and the way in 
           which chemicals in some categories contribute to the classification 
           may affect some cases.



         You need to be aware of the cut-off limits under the GHS vs. the ACT.

         Beware!
         • If the GHS cut-off limit is lower than its equivalent in the ACT, 
           direct translation could result in non-classification.
         • If the GHS cut-off limit is higher than its equivalent in the ACT, 
           direct translation could result in over-classification.
         • Specified cut-off limits in HSIS do not apply under The Safety 
           Regulations!


                                                         P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification of mixtures
Cut-off limit comparison  reproductive toxicity
•   Cut-off limits and special instructions can be found in each health
    hazard chapter of the GHS.




•   Further, the Safety Regulations implements some specific cut-off 
    concentrations.
•   These changes are detailed Schedule 6 of the Safety Regulations or in 
    Appendix G of the Classification Guidance Document

• Follow the decision logic in each chapter of the GHS.

                                                       P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification of mixtures
Mixtures not classified under AC which would be under
  GHS




    You need to be aware of the cut-off limits under the GHS vs. the AC.

    Manufacturer should be able to supply the information needed to 
    classify properly.




                                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification of mixtures
Acute Toxicity Estimate

To estimate the toxicity of components in a mixture, the GHS provides 
a formula

                            Where:
                            ATEmix = Acute toxicity estimate of mixture
                            ATEi = Acute toxicity estimate of ingredient
                            Ci = concentration of ingredient
                            n = number of ingredients from 1 to i




Only need to consider components which are greater than 1 % w/w, 
unless it is known there is a health effect at a lower level.




                                                       P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification of mixtures (where cut-offs are
  close)
Process for classification            Can’t classify mixture 
                                      – contact supplier to 
       Mixture 
                                          obtain more 
       needing 
                                           information
    classification


                                                                             Use known and/or 
                                                                                derived GHS 
     Gather all      Test data on                                             classification of 
    information         similar                                                  individual 
      available       mixtures?                                                 components
                                         Is hazard data 
                                          available for 
                                           some or all 
                                          components?
     Is testing      Can bridging 
        data         principles be 
     available?                                                                    Classify the 
                       applied?
                                                                                    mixture – 
                                                                                 according to cut
                                                                                    -off limits




    Classify the 
      mixture
                      Classify the 
                        mixture




                                                    P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification examples

9 examples of reclassifying substances or mixtures according to the GHS

For each example, provide label elements: Hazard classes and categories; 
Signal word; Pictograms; Hazard statements.

Use reference materials to assist you assigning the label elements.




Return for discussion and answer session




                                                      P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification – Single substances
Example 1: pH Indicator

A laboratory chemicals supplier is re-classifying its products to the GHS. The regulatory 
compliance officer extracted the following salient data on its classification. What would 
the classification be under the GHS? Provide the associated signal words, pictograms 
and H-statements?

Data from SDS / Labelling                        GHS Classification
Transport information:
Div. 6.1 PG III                                  Acute toxicity: Cat. 3 (oral, dermal,
                                                 inhalation?)
Risk phrases:
R25 – Toxic if swallowed                         Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3
R40 – Limited evidence of a carcinogenic         Carcinogenicity: Cat. 2
effect
Other useful information:
LD50 oral – rat – 200 mg/kg                      Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3
mp = 111°C




                                                               P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification

Example 1: pH Indicator: Answer

GHS Classification                                 +
                                  Signal Word: DANGER WARNING

Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3     H301 Toxic if swallowed
Carcinogenicity: Cat. 2           H351 Suspected of causing
                                  cancer


                                  Pictograms:




                                            P bar Y Safety Consultant    79
Classification

Example 2: Disinfecting agent
A manufacturer of a solid disinfecting chemical agent is re-classifying from ADG/AC to 
comply with the requirements of the GHS under the Safety Regulations. The following 
ADG/AC classification information is available. What would the classification of this 
compound be under the GHS?

Data from SDS / Labelling                       GHS Classification
Transport information:
Div 5.1 PG II                                   Oxidising solids: Cat. 2
Risk phrases:
R8 – contact with combustible material          No translation possible (but covered 
may cause fire                                  by DG classification)
R22 – harmful if swallowed                      Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 4
R50/53 – very toxic to aquatic                  Acute aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
organisms, may cause long-term                  Chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat.1
adverse effects in the aquatic 
environment
Other useful information:
LD50 oral – rat – 1090 mg/kg                    Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 4




                                                              P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classification of mixtures

GHS Classification

To classify this mixture to the GHS, individual GHS classifications and 
toxicology information can be obtained from individual components’ 
SDSs.
Acid component 1:      Eye irritation: Cat. 2A / Skin irritation: Cat. 2
(9.95 %w/w)            Acute/chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 3 


Acid component 2:      Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat.4 (LD50 = 1950 mg/kg)
(9.95 %w/w)            Skin corrosion: Cat. 1B / Serious eye damage: Cat. 1
                       STOT – SE: Cat. 3


Surfactants:           Not classified as a hazardous chemical/env. hazard
(20 %w/w)              (can ignore for classification)


• Need to calculate ATE using formula in GHS text – see 3.1.3.6
• Cut-off for Skin Corr. 1B is ≥5% and ≥3% for Eye Dam. 1

                                                                 P bar Y Safety Consultant 
Classifying mixtures

• Gather as much information as you can – where test data is available, 
  use it.

• Most mixtures should be able to be re-classified using direct 
  translations of R-phrases to H-statement.

• However, where components are close to cut-off concentrations, re-
  classifying sometimes may involve a few extra steps.

• If this is not possible, obtain the individual classifications (GHS or 
  AC/ADG) of each component and derive the overall classification 
  from there.

• Contact the supplier/manufacturer/importer for extra information if 
  necessary.

• The decision logic in each chapter of the GHS text can help greatly.


                                                   P bar Y Safety Consultant 

								
To top