Docstoc

Your Momma Taught you.pptx

Document Sample
Your Momma Taught you.pptx Powered By Docstoc
					Your Momma Taught you
    How to be Safe!
 Ever hear “oh my mom works at home”, or 
             “she is just a mom”!
  Well mine had the strength of Ten Bears
And she did it without a JSA or SOP or Permits
   Ever wonder how mom did it?
Well believe it or not 
with good planning 
common sense and the 
smarts of 1000 
computers, she had the 
smarts, strength and 
wisdom  Ten Bears
No this isn't about indigenous lore
• Its about how MOM was able to do all these 
  common every day work practices and not get 
  hurt.   It was about proper 
  planning/competency/practice and following 
  set procedures on how to perform certain 
  tasks
            What are the risk factors of
                  housekeeping
Many of the ways we work — such as lifting, reaching, or repeating the same 
movements — may strain our bodies and lead to injuries. Ergonomics prevents these 
types of injuries by fitting the job to the person using proper equipment and work 
practices. This results in the safest way to work and prevents workplace injuries.
The high number of sprains and strains (musculoskeletal injuries — MSIs) in industry 
but not at home?

Moms  provided equipment and establish competency safe work practices to reduce 
the risks of sprains and strains (MSI). 

Risk Factors
Many jobs have risks that can lead to sprain and strain injuries (MSIs). If we are aware 
of the risk factors, we may be able to change how we do our jobs and prevent injuries.
Our bodies function best in comfortable (neutral) postures. Awkward body postures 
increase the stress on ligaments and joints. This can lead to fatigue and discomfort, 
and increase the risk of injury.
Making beds and cleaning bathrooms is hard on your shoulders, back, and knees.
      A little common sense prevent a 
                  incident
Making beds
• Bend your knees, not your back.
• Kneel or squat and do one side of the bed at a time.
• Reduce awkward shoulder postures when replacing duvet covers.
• For example, use the “inside-out” method to slide the cover around the 
duvet, instead of stuffing the duvet into the cover.
• This method can also be used for changing pillow cases.

Cleaning bathrooms
• Use tools with long handles for hard-to-reach areas.
• Use a step stool to reduce the distance you reach when changing shower 
curtains.
• Stand in the tub to scrub the walls and back of the tub.
• DO NOT BALANCE ON THE EDGE OF THE TUB.  NO DAH!
               Bend Flex and Do it Right
The main risk factors for repetitive motion injuries (RMIs) in housekeeping are: 
heavy physical workload and excessive bodily motions which are a high risk for back injuries 
forceful upper limb motions in awkward positions which are a high risk for neck or shoulder and arm 
injuries 
Space limitations require moms to use many uncomfortable postures. These are: 
• standing or walking 
• stooping 
• squatting 
• kneeling 
• stretching 
• reaching 
• bending 
• twisting 
• crouching 
A mom changes body position every three seconds while cleaning a room. If we assume that the 
average cleaning time for each room in the house is twenty-five minutes, we can estimate that a 
housekeeper assumes 8,000 different body postures day at home. 
Mom showed us
         A small game of math
• In addition, forceful movements while using 
  awkward body positions include lifting 
  mattresses, cleaning tiles, and vacuuming 
  every shift. Housekeeping is a physically 
  demanding and very tiring job. It can be 
  classified as "moderately heavy" to "heavy" 
  work because the energy required is 
  approximately 4 kilocalories per minute (4 
  kcal/min.) 
                               Our Moms
•   Our moms work in a unique place. Your home or your room is usually designed for 
    the comfort of you rather than mom cleaning up. This fact makes it very difficult to 
    improve working conditions for mom by means of better engineering. However, 
    some improvements can be made by selecting more appropriate equipment. 
•   Lighter vacuum cleaners (preferably the self-propelling type), wheels designed for 
    carpeted floors would ease the workload for their operators providing this 
    equipment is always kept in good repair. When new vacuum cleaners are 
    purchased, low noise emissions should be one of the criteria. 
•   Improving the body postures that pose a major risk for musculoskeletal disorders 
    seems an unachievable task. Again, this fact results from the peculiarity of hotels 
    as a workplace. Floors, walls, windows, mirrors, and bathroom fixtures might be 
    adequately cleaned with some form of an extension tool to reduce bending and 
    over-stretching. However, the demand for spotless cleanliness and hygiene, 
    management often requires your mom to spend extra time and effort cleaning by 
    kneeling, leaning, squatting, crouching, slouching and stretching. These postures 
    will in time contribute to new musculoskeletal injuries and aggravate old ones. 
My mom took her break or 45 minute 
        afternoon snooze
Job rotation is one possible 
approach. It requires moms to 
move between different tasks, 
at fixed or irregular periods. 
However, it must be a rotation 
where moms do something 
completely different. Different 
tasks must use different muscle 
groups to allow muscles already 
stressed to recover. 
       My grandma taught my mom
•   A well-designed job, supported by a well-designed workplace and proper tools, 
    allows the mom to avoid unnecessary motion of the neck, shoulders and upper 
    limbs. However, the actual performance of the tasks depends on individuals. 
•   Training should be provided for moms who are involved with housekeeping 
    activities. It is important that your momma be informed about hazards in the home, 
    including the risk of injuries to the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, 
    identification of the hazards for such injury at any given residence is fundamental. 
•   Individual work practices, including lifting habits, are shaped by proper training. 
    For example, it is advisable to plan one's workload and do the heavier tasks at the 
    beginning of the day, rather than at the end, when fatigue is at its maximum. 
    When a person is tired, the risk of injuring a muscle is higher. 
•   Training should also explain the health hazards of improper lifting and give 
    recommendations on what a mom can do to improve lifting positions. Training 
    should also emphasize the importance of rest periods for the mothers' health and 
    explain how active rest can do more for keeping moms healthy than passive rest. 
    The effect of such training can reach far beyond home situations because the mom 
    can apply this knowledge also in their off-home activities. 
         Set the Table Make Supper
High Muscle Tension
• Muscles produce force to move or hold a posture. High forces can result in 
    injury.
• High forces are required to lift, lower, carry, push, or pull heavy objects, 
    especially in awkward postures. High forces are also required to hold a 
    posture, especially for long periods.
Here are two examples:
• Carrying plates often places the wrist and fingers in awkward positions, and 
requires strength to support and balance the load.
• Carrying coffee pots, water jugs, and full glasses places stress on the 
reaching, or repeating the same movements – may strain our bodies and lead 
to injuries.
Ergonomics prevents these types of injuries by fitting the job to the person 
using proper equipment and work practices. This results in the safest way to 
work and prevents workplace injuries.
 
             Ok get the darn car lets go
Let take the kids to hockey  practice get the gear in the vehicle
Reaching, or repeating the same movements –may strain our bodies and lead to injuries.
Ergonomics prevents these types of injuries by fitting the job to the person using proper equipment and 
work practices. This results in the safest way to work and prevents workplace injuries.
Plan your lift
• Think about your lift first, then do it.
• Move your feet to face the load. Don’t twist your body.
• When lifting bags from a car trunk, face the trunk squarely with both feet firmly on the ground.

Example of improved posture
• Get close to the load before lifting. For example, pull bags that are in the back of the trunk close to 
you first.
• Bend your knees, not your back.
Organize luggage storage
• Store large items upright at low levels.
• Store smaller items at waist height.
• Avoid storing anything above shoulder level
   What have you got in this bag young 
                 man
Muscles produce force to move or hold a posture. High forces can result in injury.
High forces are required to lift, lower, carry, push, or pull heavy objects, especially in awkward postures. 
High forces are also required to hold a posture, especially for long periods.
To reduce your risk of injury,
• Use a cart to eliminate the need to carry luggage kit bags a long distances.
• Push rather than pull carts.
• When pushing a cart, place your hands just below shoulder level on the cart handle.
• Ensure carts are maintained properly.
• Tires should be fully inflated and the wheels should not be bent or misaligned. This will decrease the 
amount of force required to push the cart.
• Vary your position or switch to another task to avoid holding postures for long periods.
• Wear substantial shoes with non-slip soles and enough cushioning to relieve the stress on your knees 
and back when you are on your feet for long periods
 
You may not feel pain or discomfort when in risky postures, but the potential for injury is still present.
 
    Pay the bills correct that home work
Be aware of your posture when you work.
Your posture depends on:
• The height of the work surface
• Where materials are stored
• Space available in your work area
• How you organize your work area
• How you position your body
• How you hold objects
Adjust your workstation so that you can answer
YES to the following:
• I can easily reach the items that I use frequently.
• I do not cradle the telephone between my shoulder and ear.
• The monitor is an arm’s length away from me.
• The top of the monitor is at eye level.
• The keyboard is at elbow height.
• When I use the keyboard, my wrists are straight.
• When I use the keyboard, my elbows are by my sides.
• The mouse is on the same level as the keyboard and within easy reach.
• I have the choice of sitting or standing at the workstation.
• I know how to adjust my chair so that I can use good posture.
 
 
       Always tasty meal in dangerous 
                environment
Preventing Slips & Falls
• Safeguard against slippery floors by keeping floors clean and uncluttered 
   and, where necessary, treating floors with slip-resistant coatings or 
   chemical treatments. Choose floor cleaning chemicals with good grease-
   removal and slip-resistance properties. Establish a floor cleaning schedule. 
   When spills occur, clean them up immediately and post "caution" or "wet 
   floor" signs until the floor is dry. 
• Fridge Ice machines can also create fall hazards because of the large 
   volume of water involved. Place rubber or fabric-faced mats in front of the 
   ice machine unless they introduce an additional tripping hazard. Make 
   sure that all ice machines and freezer doors seal properly to prevent water 
   from leaking or freezing on the floor.
• Encourage professional language when everyone who is home are moving 
   through crowded areas. Phrases such as "behind you," "hot," "and 
   "corner" help prevent collisions and falls.
• No one should never carry large loads that obstruct their vision.
                 Moms tool chest
Many accidents may be prevented by using proper equipment 
and attire in the Kitchen. Make sure all kitchen moms have:
• Long sleeves to reduce burns 
• Closed toe, skid-resistant shoes to reduce falls and injuries 
  from hot liquids 
• Heavy pans for increased stability and fewer spills 
Sharp knives 
• Knife Handling - Take time to train new visitors or daughter 
  in laws on proper knife handling. Keep your knives sharp, 
  handles secure and store with the blades covered. Only 
  allow trained persons to operate electric slicers. All slicing 
  machine guards should be kept in place and in good 
  working condition. 
              Moving Heavy Loads

• It is common for moms to need to move loads of up to 
  50 lbs. Everyone not just mom should know how to 
  safely lift heavy loads in order to reduce potential back 
  injuries. Trained moms to lift with their legs, take small 
  steps, and change direction by moving their feet, not 
  twisting, when handling heavy items. Use a cart or 
  dolly to lift extra heavy loads.
• Aisles should be wide enough for living or visiting the 
  home to lift and carry cases without hitting shelves. 
  When possible, store heavy loads at waist height. Load 
  trays with the heaviest items in the center.
   That is not the dinner bell ringing
Burn Prevention

Provide training for everyone in the home on recognizing and controlling burn hazards. Also, take these 
protective measures: 
• Make potholders easily accessible. 
• Provide adequate room for safe handling of pots on the range top. 
• Install safety devices such as temperature and pressure relief valves to help reduce the potential 
     for explosion of pressurized water heating systems. 
• Reduce the temperature on your hot water heaters to reduce the potential for scalding when using 
     hot water in sinks. 
• Train family to stand back when using the automated lid on a braising pan or steam-jacketed kettle. 
• Only allow trained people  to condition deep fryer grease, and only with proper protective 
     equipment. Post written procedures specific to the equipment in use. 
Fire Prevention  Follow these housekeeping rules to help prevent kitchen fires: 
• Never leave dish rags or aprons near a hot surface. 
• Never leave stoves or other equipment unattended when in use. 
• Clean range hoods and stoves on schedule to help reduce build-up. 
• Don't overload electrical outlets. 
• Don't force three-pronged cords into two-prong outlets. 
• Don't use equipment with a frayed cord or bent prongs. 
• Don't use equipment that smokes, sparks or otherwise arouses suspicion. 
 No Hazmat or Whmis in our home
Potentially-hazardous chemical in the home, such as cleaning solvents 
or pesticides, to provide information about these chemicals to family 
through labels on containers, material safety data sheets (a 
manufacturer-provided data sheet), and training programs.
• Cleaning chemicals should be stored in a separate area away from 
   food and heat sources, in their original container and with a tight lid. 
   Employees should be taught to: 
• Never mix chemicals. 
• Use chemicals only in well ventilated areas. 
• Follow label directions when disposing of chemical containers. 
• Wash hands after using or touching any chemical or equipment 
   used with a chemical
        Mom did say life is like a box of 
      chocolates with a whole lot of nuts
PRACTICE THESE TIPS . . .
• Put one foot on a step or rail to reduce stress on your back and legs when standing for long periods. From time to time, 
alternate the foot you have on the rail.
• Take frequent “micro breaks” or share the work with a friend or family member when you are required to hold a 
posture for long periods.
• Wear shoes with enough cushioning to relieve the stress on your knees and back when standing for long periods.
• Use anti-fatigue matting when standing is required for long periods to reduce the stress on your back and legs.
• Choose tools and appliances carefully.
• Select utensils designed to reduce force and awkward postures (e.g., tools that have good grips, knifes that are sharp 
and designed for the task being performed).
Our bodies function best in comfortable (neutral) postures. Awkward body postures increase the stress on ligaments 
and joints. This can lead to fatigue and discomfort, and increase the risk of injury.
Preparing ingredients, cooking, or plating often results in awkward postures for moms.
Awkward postures can happen when you:
• Reach above shoulder level
• Reach below knee level
• Reach across deep counters
• Twist to reach sideways
• Hold objects
You may not feel pain or discomfort when in risky postures, but the potential for injury is still present.
       Stand up straight don’t slouch
Be aware of your posture when you work. Your posture depends on:
• The height of the work surface
• Where materials are stored
• Space available in your work area
• How you organize your work area
• How you position your body
• How you hold objects
• Reduce your reach.
• Use the near part of the work surface, grill, or stove.
• Tilt bins towards you.
• Store frequently used utensils, dishes, and food between shoulder and hip height, and close to where 
they are needed.
• Position frequently used bulk ingredients close to your work area and at a convenient
height (e.g., use a cart).
• Use a work surface that is waist level for forceful tasks (e.g., chopping).
• Use a work surface that is elbow height for finely detailed work (e.g., pastries, candies).
So if my momma could do all this
AND NOT GET HURT---------- Why cant we teach 
our workers with hundred of JSA/SOP/ Permits 
and Manuals to do it right in our workplaces.
Simple you just found the right teacher yet to 
show you the smart way of injury reduction

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:12
posted:3/6/2014
language:English
pages:23