Project Title - Interior Designers Institute of British Columbia by pengxiang

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									If you are an interior designer, then 2012 is the year you will want
to join the Interior Designers Institute of British Columbia!

Already a member?
Congratulations…you are part of the regulatory body that governs interior design practice
provincially.


Not a member?
Here’s what you need to know…
All professions are comprised of three components – education, experience and
examination. And additionally in today’s world, practitioners of any profession also require
‘continuing education’ in order to continue to be registered members of their profession.
The regulatory body in British Columbia for the profession of interior design is the Interior
Designers Institute of BC (IDIBC). They are the only provincial body in BC that forms part of
the national umbrella organization - Interior Designers of Canada (IDC), which is the
federal advocacy body for the interior design profession.
The Interior Designers Institute of BC is working towards further regulation of the
profession which may, in future, result in a practice act. Currently the name ‘registered
interior designer’ is protected, and in future this could expand to the title ‘interior
designer’. If you are currently practicing interior design, there will come a time, likely in
your career that you will be obligated to be a registered member of your professional
regulatory body if you wish to continue to call yourself an interior designer. Whether you
are required to or not, it is the right thing to do.
Professional interior designs ‘solve complex problems that address the creation of
supportive, healthy, safe interior environments for people while maintaining the health of
our planet earth’, and that ‘the health, safety and welfare of the general public’ is
potentially at risk if interior designers are not adequately educated and trained to comply
with fire and building codes. It is in the public’s best interests to ensure interior designers
are registered or regulated, and governments across Canada and the USA are agreeing to
licensing requirements in order to advance the provinces’ and states’ legitimate interest in
promoting the health and safety of occupants of buildings.
Recent changes to the registration standards have come into effect across the nation.
IDIBC has implemented these changes which affect minimum education requirements for
professional membership.




SUITE 400 - 601 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA V5Z 4C2 n TEL 604 298 5211 n FAX 604 421 5211 n EMAIL INFO@IDIBC.ORG n WWW.IDIBC.ORG
What do the changes mean to you?
Education: A diploma is acceptable by IDIBC up to December 31, 2014, after which time a
bachelor degree in interior design will be the minimum education standard for making
application to IDIBC leading to professional registered status. Commencing in 2017, the
minimum standard will be a CIDA–accredited bachelor degree. CIDA (Council for Interior
Design Accreditation) is the body that accredits interior design programs in North America,
ensuring a quality educational program to prepare graduates for professional interior
design practice. (www.accredit-id.org)
Many interior design practitioners graduated from school in a time when a diploma was
deemed sufficient for entry to the profession. Those days have disappeared. According to
the National Council for Interior Design Qualifications (NCIDQ) website: (www.ncidq.org)
“Based on all available research and information obtained through various professional
organizations around North America, the conclusions infer that the knowledge,
understanding and skills gained through CIDA–accredited programs form the optimum
foundation for subsequent practical training, for responsive practice as a registered interior
designer, for advancing the practice of interior design, and for protecting the public health,
safety and welfare”. CIDA – the Council for Interior Design Accreditation, accredits only
those interior design programs that culminate in a Bachelor degree and meet with the
criteria for being granted CIDA–accreditation.
Experience: Once you have joined IDIBC by making application and verifying your formal
education, you are considered a ‘provisional member’. As occurs in the acquisition of
registered status by most professions, you then move forward to acquire the necessary
‘experience’. (For example in Law, you would ‘article’; and in Medicine you would ‘intern’).
As a provisional member you must obtain the necessary amount of supervised work
experience in order to qualify to write the NCIDQ exam. You then become eligible to write
this minimum competency examination in order to become a registered professional.
Examination: Registered professional members of IDIBC have passed all three sections of
the NCIDQ examination. Refer to www.ncidq.org for more information.
Lastly, you commit to ongoing professional and continuing education to ensure your
currency within the profession, and agree to abide by a code of ethics. Welcome to your
chosen profession!
Please visit IDIBC’s website for additional information:
http://www.idibc.org/join/become_a_member/




SUITE 400 - 601 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA V5Z 4C2 n TEL 604 298 5211 n FAX 604 421 5211 n EMAIL INFO@IDIBC.ORG n WWW.IDIBC.ORG
Here are some scenarios …
I graduated a long time ago with a diploma and I’ve been practicing design ever since. Am I
eligible to join IDIBC?
If the education program held a minimum of 60 semester credit hours (or 90 quarter
credit hours) of interior design coursework, then you are eligible (until December 31, 2014)
to become a provisional member of IDIBC. This qualifies you via route 4 of the NCIDQ, to
write the exam, once you have acquired sufficient work experience. Completion of these
steps is required for you to become a registered professional designer (RID). The window
of opportunity to join IDIBC with a diploma will close after December 31, 2014.


I do not want to join an organization
I just want to carry on doing what I am doing.
If interior design practice becomes regulated with a ‘practice act’ … you will be obligated to
be part of the professional body, by law. The basis of legislation is the protection of the
‘health, safety and welfare’ of the general public. It may be that you are not actually
practicing interior design, though, and if this is the case, it may be advisable (morally and
ethically) to change the name of your practice to better reflect what it is you are doing.
Perhaps you are an interior decorator, or a renovation expert, or some related activity to
interior design, but not actually practicing interior design. A re-branding exercise may
prove to be the best solution in such instances. The interior design profession is not
wishing to negatively impact related professions, rather to clarify to the general public the
scope of work and responsibility that is the domain of the profession of interior design.


I gained my education outside of Canada and don’t know if it qualifies for me to become a
member of IDIBC.
There are many interior designer practitioners who received their education outside of
Canada (or the USA). It would be advisable to contact NCIDQ to and investigate the range
of routes of eligibility for taking this exam. NCIDQ reviews overseas educational transcripts
but they must be translated to English and converted to US standards. The converted
transcripts must show course titles, grades earned and credits awarded (in semester or
quarter units). Two companies that offer this service are Educational Credential Evaluators
(https://www.ece.org/) and World Education Services (https://www.wes.org/).
Remember, all professions are comprised of education, experience and examination.


If you have a question, please contact IDIBC to assist you with an answer!



SUITE 400 - 601 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA V5Z 4C2 n TEL 604 298 5211 n FAX 604 421 5211 n EMAIL INFO@IDIBC.ORG n WWW.IDIBC.ORG

								
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