Modern Architecture by pengxiang

VIEWS: 2 PAGES: 38

									Modern Architecture
-Origins & Manifestations
  Inventions &
  Discoveries

  Less is More

  Form Follows
  Function

  Minimalism

  Truthfulness of
  Form, Material
  & Expression
- Dr. Sangeeta Bagga, Assistant Professor, Chandigarh College of Architecture, Chandigarh   EDUSAT LECTURE- 1
                                                                                                                1
            Modern Architecture-
                 Origins
 The Industrial Revolution was a period from the 18th to the 
       19th century where major changes in agriculture, 
manufacturing, mining, transportation, and technology had a 
profound effect on the socio economic and cultural conditions 
                         of the times.
                                 
 It began in the United Kingdom, and then subsequently spread 
 throughout Europe, North America, and eventually the world.
  In the two centuries following 1800, the world's average per 
     capita income increased over 10-fold, while the world's 
                population increased over 6-fold.

                                                                      A Watt steam engine, the steam
                                                                      engine fuelled primarily by coal that
"For the first time in history, the living standards of the masses    propelled the Industrial Revolution in
of ordinary people have begun to undergo sustained growth. ...        Great Britain and the world.
 Nothing remotely like this economic behaviour has happened 
                              before.“
It started with the mechanisation of the textile industries, the 
development of iron-making techniques and the increased use 
      of refined coal. Trade expansion was enabled by the 
      introduction of canals, improved roads and railways. 


                                                                                                               2
        Innovations during the Industrial
                  Revolution
The commencement of the Industrial Revolution is closely linked to a small 
   number of innovations, made in the second half of the 18th century:
  Three 'leading sectors', in which there were key innovations, which
  allowed the economic take off by which the Industrial Revolution is                  The only surviving
                              usually defined                                          example of a Spinning
                                                                                       mule built by the inventor
     Textiles – Cotton spinning using Richard Arkwright's water frame, James           Samuel Crompton
      Hargreaves's Spinning Jenny, and Samuel Crompton's Spinning Mule (a 
 combination of the Spinning Jenny and the Water Frame). The end of the patent 
            was rapidly followed by the erection of many cotton mills.
    Steam power – The improved steam engine invented by James Watt and 
  patented in 1775 was initially mainly used to power pumps for pumping water 
      out of mines, but from the 1780s was applied to power other types of 
     machines. This enabled rapid development of efficient semi-automated 
    factories on a previously unimaginable scale in places where waterpower
                                was not available.

     Iron making – In the Iron industry, coke was finally applied to all stages of iron 
  smelting, replacing charcoal. This had been achieved much earlier for lead and copper  Model of the spinning
      as well as for producing pig iron in a blast furnace, but the second stage in the 
    production of bar iron depended on the use of potting and stamping (for which a      jenny in a museum in
     patent expired in 1786) or puddling (patented by Henry Cort in 1783 and 1784).      Wuppertal, Germany. The
                                                                                        spinning jenny was one of
                                                                                        the innovations that
                                                                                        started the revolution
                                                                                                               3
         Innovations during the Industrial
                   Revolution
                          Transfer of knowledge

 Knowledge of innovation was spread by several means. Workers who were 
   trained in the technique might move to another employer or might be 
    poached. A common method was for someone to make a study tour,            A Philosopher Lecturing on the
                    gathering information where he could.                     Orrery (ca. 1766)
                                                                              Informal philosophical
                                                                              societies spread scientific
                                                                              advances
Another means for the spread of innovation was by the network of 
informal philosophical societies, like the Lunar Society of Birmingham, in 
which members met to discuss 'natural philosophy' (i.e. science) and 
often its application to manufacturing.

There were publications describing technology. Encyclopaedias such as 
Harris's Lexicon Technique (1704) and Abraham Rees's Cyclopadia (1802–
1819) contain much of value. 
                                                                               Coalbrookdale by Night, 1801,
Periodical publications about manufacturing and technology began to           Philipp Jakob Loutherbourg
                                                                              the Younger Blast furnaces
appear in the last decade of the 18th century, and many regularly             light the iron making town of
included notice of the latest patents.                                        Coalbrookdale
Rise of Metal-frame Architecture
The fundamental technical prerequisite to large-scale modern architecture 
was the development of metal framing. 

The term industrial age denotes the period of history in which machine-
manufacturing (as opposed to manufacturing by hand) plays a major role. This 
age began ca. 1750 (with the onset of the Industrial Revolution), and            Since iron was becoming
continues to this day.                                                           cheaper and more plentiful, it
                                                                                 also became a major
                                                                                 structural material following
 The industrial age can be divided into two parts: the iron and steam phase      the building of the innovative
(ca. 1750-1900) and the steel and electricity phase (ca. 1900-present).          The Iron Bridge in 1778 by
The “iron and steam phase” is also the age of iron-frame architecture. During    Abraham Darby III.
  
this period, cast iron framing was introduced to masonry buildings.


  
 Masonry walls were gradually relieved of their structural role, eventually 
becoming a cosmetic “skin” over an iron skeleton of columns and arches.

 Iron bridges and iron-and-glass buildings (e.g. greenhouses, train stations, 
markets) were also constructed.

                                                                                 The 1698 Savery Engine – the
                                                                                 world's first commercially useful
                                                                                 steam engine: built by Thomas
                                                                                 Savery. Also called Miner’s friend

                                                                                                            5
  Transport in Britain during Industrial
               Revolution
 The Industrial Revolution improved Britain's transport infrastructure 
 with a turnpike road network, a canal and waterway network, and a 
   railway network. Raw materials and finished products could be 
       moved more quickly and cheaply than before. Improved 
       transportation also allowed new ideas to spread quickly.

                                   Coastal sail
                                                                                  Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, Llangollen,
                                                                                  Wales

    Sailing vessels had long been used for moving goods round the 
 British coast.  The transport of goods coastwise by sea within Britain 
    was common during the Industrial Revolution, as for centuries 
before. This became less important with the growth of the railways at 
                          the end of the period.
  Navigable rivers All the major rivers of the United Kingdom were navigable 
 during the Industrial Revolution. Some were anciently navigable, notably the 
                          Severn, Thames, and Trent. 
                               Canals
 Canals were the first technology to allow bulk materials to be easily 
                                                                                  Puffing Billy, an early railway
 transported across the country.  By the 1820s, a national network                steam locomotive, constructed in
   was in existence. Canal construction served as a model for the                 1813-1814 for colliery work.
   organization and methods later used to construct the railways. 
                          Roads & Railways 
Railways helped Britain's trade enormously, providing a quick and easy way of  
                                                                                                                6
                          to transport mail and news.
       Rise of Metal-frame Architecture
A. Early Modern ca. 1850-          B. Late Modern ca. 1900-60            C. Postmodern ca.
1900                                                                     1960-present

Culmination of iron-frame          Chicago school: skyscrapers,          D.Art Deco ca.
architecture (Crystal              functionalism Louis                   1920-40
Palace, Eiffel Tower)              Sullivan)international style          Antonio Gaudi   
                                   (Gropius, Corbusier, Mies),
                                   Wright (organic architecture)
                                   Total aesthetic freedom 
                                                                         E. Art Nouveau ca.
                                                                         1890-1910



The Thames Tunnel (opened 1843).
Portland Cement was used in the
world's first underwater tunnel     Cotton mills in Ancoats about 1820

                                                                                              7
      Social effects of the
     Industrial Revolution
    In terms of social structure, the Industrial 
  Revolution witnessed the triumph of a middle 
  class of industrialists and businessmen over a 
        landed class of nobility and gentry.
    Ordinary working people found increased 
                                                               England ("Cottonopolis"), pictured in
 opportunities for employment in the new mills                  1840, showing the mass of factory
 and factories, but these were often under strict                                         chimneys
  working conditions with long hours of labour 
dominated by a pace set by machines. However, 
  harsh working conditions were prevalent long 
before the Industrial Revolution took place. Pre-
industrial society was very static and often cruel
 —child labour, dirty living conditions, and long 
working hours were just as prevalent before the 
               Industrial Revolution.
                         York
                                                     John Lombe's water-powered silk mill at
                                                     Derby.
                                                                                                 8
       Social effects of the
      Industrial Revolution
     The transition to industrialisation was not 
without difficulty. Some industrialists themselves 
tried to improve factory and living conditions for 
their workers. One of the earliest such reformers 
   was Robert Owen, known for his pioneering 
efforts in improving conditions for workers at the 
 New Lanark mills, and often regarded as one of 
the key thinkers of the early socialist movement. 




                                                Over London by Rail Gustave
                                                       Doré c.1870.Shows the
     New Lanark-Ideal Worker Village- Robert
                                                       densely populated and
   .                                   Owen
                                               polluted environments created
                                                   in the new industrial cities.   9
      Social effects of the
     Industrial Revolution
    Whole streets,  unpaved  and  without  drains  or 
    main sewers, are worn into deep ruts and holes in 
    which  water  constantly  stagnates,  and  are  so 
    covered  with  refuse  and  excrement  as  to  be 
    impassable  from  depth  of  mud  and  intolerable 
    stench.                                                      Pitiable living conditions

    As a result of the Revolution, huge numbers of the 
    working  class  died  due  to  diseases  spreading 
    through  the  cramped  living  conditions.  Chest 
    diseases  from  the  mines,  cholera  from  polluted 
    water  and  typhoid  were  also  extremely  common, 
    as  was  smallpox.  Accidents  in  factories  with  child 
    and female workers were regular. Strikes and riots 
    by workers were also relatively common.

.                                                                  Workers- Lancanshire
                                                                                      10
Modern Architecture Part -2
Materials of Modern Architecture

 Age of iron and steam                  Age of steel and electricity
 (age of iron-frame                     (age of steel-frame
 architecture)                          architecture)
 ca. 1750-1900                          ca. 1900-present
 iron-frame masonry                     steel framing and reinforced 
 buildings,                             concrete serve as the 
 iron-and-glass buildings,              primary structural materials 
 iron bridges                           of large-scale architecture
 A cast iron frame must use arched construction. The alternative, post-and-beam 
 construction, is not feasible due to the brittleness of cast iron. (The term 
 “brittle” is equivalent to “lacking in tensile strength”)



                                                                                   11
 Post-and-beam Construction vs. Arched Construction




The familiar post-and-beam metal frames of today’s architecture only became 
possible with the mass-production of steel , which has immense tensile strength. 
During the “steel and electricity phase” of the industrial age, which could also be 
called the age of steel-frame architecture, steel and reinforced concrete became 
the predominant structural materials of large-scale architecture. 
Reinforced concrete  which is simply concrete filled with reinforcing steel bars, or 
“rebars”,  is thus combining the tensile strength of steel with the compressive 
strength of concrete.

                                                                                        12
Early Modern Architecture
ca. 1850-1900
Iron-frame architecture, which flourished primarily in England, France, and (eventually) the United 
States, occupies the transitional zone between traditional and modern architecture.
 Iron-frame buildings were erected mainly during the “age of iron and steam” (ca. 1750-1900). As noted 
earlier, this architecture included iron-frame masonry buildings, iron-and-glass buildings, and iron 
bridges.


 
Utilitarian structures (and utilitarian products in general) were important for demonstrating the 
aesthetic potential of plain, mass-produced materials. Whereas iron supports in grand architecture were 
often hidden behind masonry (such that the buildings retained a traditional appearance), they were left 
exposed in structures where appearance was deemed unimportant (e.g. mills, factories) or where 
masonry was unnecessary (e.g. bridges, railway stations).

 Utilitarian buildings also often lacked traditional ornamentation, again due to lack of concern for 
appearance. 

As the nineteenth century drew on, many architects began to embrace these features (plain industrial 
materials and lack of ornamentation) as aesthetically desirable.




                                                                                                           13
Early Modern Architecture
ca. 1850-1900




                            14
 Early Modern Architecture                        The Severn Bridge
 ca. 1850-1900




Abraham Darby commissioned this painting by William Williams in 1780 to promote the Bridge. There are 
482 main castings, but with the deck facings and railings the number rises to 1,736. There were no injuries 
during the construction process, which took three months during the summer of 1779, although work on 
the approach roads continued for another two years. The Bridge was opened to traffic on 1st January 1781. 
Movement in the south abutment was severe and it had to be demolished in 1802 and replaced by two 
timber side arches, which in turn were replaced in cast iron in 1821 and remain to this day. In 1934 the 
Bridge was closed to vehicles and scheduled as an ancient monument, but pedestrian tolls continued until 
1950.
Universally recognised as the symbol of the Industrial Revolution, Severn the Iron Bridge stands at the
heart of the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site.



                                                                                                        15
The Severn Bridge- An aerial View.
It is still used as a foot over bridge




                                         16
                                                                                     Severn Bridge:
                                                                               The stages of construction




All the large castings were made individually as they   all were slightly different. The joints would all 
be familiar to a carpenter - mortise and tenons, dovetails and wedges - but this was the traditional 
way in which iron structures were joined at the time.
                                                                                                             17
Early Modern Architecture
ca. 1850-1900: The Crystal Palace




       Iron-and-glass architecture culminated in the mid-nineteenth century, with London’s Crystal 
      Palace (destroyed), designed by Joseph Paxton (a renowned architect of greenhouses) as the main 
      pavilion of the first World’s Fair. The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and plate-glass building originally 
      erected in Hyde Park, London, England, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. More than 14,000 
      exhibitors from around the world gathered in the Palace's 990,000 square feet (92,000 m2) of exhibition 
      space to display examples of the latest technology developed in the Industrial Revolution. 

                                                                                                                    18
Early Modern Architecture
ca. 1850-1900: The Crystal Palace




  The Great Exhibition building was 1,851 feet (564 m) long, with an interior height of 128 feet (39 m).Because of the 
  recent invention of the cast plate glass method in 1848, which allowed for large sheets of cheap but strong glass, it 
  was at the time the largest amount of glass ever seen in a building and astonished visitors with its clear walls and 
  ceilings that did not require interior lights, thus a "Crystal Palace".
                                                                                                                    19
Early Modern Architecture
ca. 1850-1900

Iron-and-glass architecture culminated 
in the mid-nineteenth century, with 
London’s Crystal Palace (destroyed), 
designed by Joseph Paxton   as the main 
pavilion of the first World’s Fair. 

Then, near the end of the nineteenth 
century, the foremost iron-frame 
structure of all time was constructed: 
the Eiffel Tower, designed by the bridge 
engineer Gustave Eiffel. The fierce 
controversy provoked by the tower’s 
modern aesthetic illustrates the era’s 
lack of mainstream acceptance for plain, 
unornamented construction.

                                            20
  Early Modern Architecture
  ca. 1850-1900




  
The Eiffel Tower, designed by Gustave Eiffel.  The fierce controversy provoked by the tower’s 
modern aesthetic illustrates the era’s lack of mainstream acceptance for plain, unornamented 
construction. The Eiffel Tower is an iron lattice tower located on the Champ de Mars in Paris, 
named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
                                                                                          21
Early Modern Architecture
ca. 1850-1900
The Guaranty Building, which is now called 
the Prudential Building, was designed by 
Louis Sullivan and Dankmar Adler, and built 
in Buffalo, New York. Sullivan's design for the 
building was based on his belief that "form 
follows function"




                                                   22
Early Modern Architecture
ca. 1850-1900




The next step in the development of modern architecture was the shift from iron-frame to steel-frame 
construction. Steel-frame architecture emerged in Chicago, among a circle of architects known as the 
Chicago school, which flourished ca. 1880-1900. At this point in history, architects faced growing 
pressure to extend buildings upward, as cities grew and property values soared. In response, the 
Chicago school built the world’s first skyscrapers. (A good definition of “skyscraper”, for the purposes 
of architectural history, is “a metal-frame building at least one hundred feet tall”.) The Home
Insurance Building (1884; demolished), by William Le Baron Jenney (a member of the Chicago school), 
is usually considered the very first skyscraper.
                                                                                                      23
    Early Modern Architecture
          ca. 1850-1900
    While this building featured a metal frame 
   composed of both iron and steel, pure steel-
   frame construction emerged (in works of the 
          Chicago school) within a decade.
   It should be emphasized that in metal-frame 
 architecture, the entire weight of the building is 
supported by the frame. The building’s walls thus 
 serve as mere “curtains” or “screens”, which are 
      hung upon the frame merely to seal the
  building’s interior from the elements. In other 
words, the metal frame is the building’s skeleton, 
             while the walls are its skin.
       The skyscraper was the great technical
    achievement of the Chicago school. Yet the 
  school is also responsible for a great aesthetic
achievement: the gradual reduction of traditional
        ornamentation in skyscraper design.
     Whereas buildings of ordinary height lend 
 themselves well to traditional styles, skyscrapers 
   were an entirely new building type, for which 
    traditional aesthetics proved unsatisfactory; 
     consequently, skyscrapers accelerated the 
       development of the modern aesthetic.            24
Early Modern Architecture
This transition away from traditional ornamentation 
culminated in the development of functionalism by Louis
Sullivan, the foremost architect of the Chicago school. 
Functionalism is an aesthetic approach in which a building 
is simply designed according to its function, then graced 
with features that are naturally suggested by its internal
structure.6 This approach, which leads to the simple
geometry of the modern aesthetic, is aptly summarized in 
Sullivan’s guiding principle: “form follows function”.


Functionalism provided the modern aesthetic with a 
theoretical foundation; consequently, Sullivan is often 
referred to as the “father of modern architecture”. 
Sullivan’s masterpiece is the Wainwright Building. The 
exterior of this building reflects its three-part internal plan 
(a two-story base, a middle section with seven floors of 
offices, and a service floor at the top), and a brick pier         The intricate frieze along 
indicates each column in the steel frame.                          the top of the building 
                                                                   along with the bull's-eye 
 The horizontal dividers are recessed behind the piers, 
which emphasizes the building’s verticality: an aesthetic          windows
choice that illustrates the creative freedom within the 
bounds of functionalism.5 Most surfaces are plain, 
although the horizontal dividers feature stucco decoration.
                                                                                                 25
Art Nouveau
 In the meantime, a rival aesthetic emerged: Art Nouveau, 
a style that flourished in Europe and America at the turn of    The piers read as pillars
the century (ca. 1890-1910).7 Like functionalism, Art 
Nouveau was purposely developed as an all-new aesthetic, 
free of traditional ornamentation. Yet this was an 
exuberantly decorative style, defined by organic, curving,
asymmetrical lines inspired by natural forms (e.g. stems, 
flowers, vines, insect  wings).  




 The intricate frieze along 
 the top of the building 
 along with the bull's-eye 
 windows
                                                                                            26
Art Nouveau                                              Casa Mila- Barcelona
The most overt architectural expression of Art 
Nouveau is found in the “growing” buildings of                   The piers read as pillars
Antonio Gaudi, whose masterpiece is the Sagrada
Familia, a cathedral in Barcelona. Casa Mila, also in 
Barcelona, is his foremost residential work.




 The intricate frieze along 
 the top of the building 
 along with the bull's-eye 
 windows
The Sagrada Familia, a cathedral in 
Barcelona
                                                                                             27
   Art Deco                                                                                  The Chrisler

                       GE Building
                                                                          The piers read as pillars




                                                  The Empire State Building



 During the period ca. 1920-40 (i.e. the interwar period), another short-lived rival to mainstream modernism 
flourished: Art Deco. Like the modern aesthetic, Art Deco shuns traditional decoration in favor of plain geometric 
forms. The main difference is that, compared with the light minimalism of the modern aesthetic, Art Deco works 
typically look heavy and contrived.
 Distinctive features of Art Deco architecture include setbacks (inward steps), as well as narrow strips of windows 
(with strips of concrete/masonry between them, which gives the building a sense of heavy construction). Although 
Art Deco was primarily a French style, it culminated architecturally in the United States. The foremost examples 
are found in New York: the GE Building(the centerpiece of Rockefeller Centre), the Chrysler Building, and the
Empire State Building.                                                                                            28
Late Modern Architecture  ca. 1900-1960

                                                                        The piers read as pillars




The Bauhaus, German school of design by Walter Gropius



In the early twentieth century, the modern aesthetic (simple, unadorned geometric forms) finally matured, 
becoming the mainstream aesthetic of architecture and design across the world. This was achieved primarily by 
the Bauhaus, a German school of design that operated for most of the interwar period. The school was closed 
when the Nazi government came to power, forcing many of its scholars to emigrate to the United States, where 
they continued to serve as leaders of the architecture/design world (such that the “Bauhaus age” actually 
stretched decades beyond the closure of the school).


                                                                                                             29
                                                                            The piers read as pillars




 The scope of Bauhaus included
  interiors, furniture and accessories



 The International Style
 The scope of Bauhaus efforts included architecture, visual art, interior design, graphic design, and industrial 
design (product design). It should be noted that while Bauhaus designers generally embraced the aesthetic theory 
of functionalism, deliberate use of this theory (or even familiarity with it) is not a prerequisite to designing works 
that feature the modern aesthetic. Thus, for any given modern-style building or object, the designer may or may 
not have had functionalism in mind.
 The modern aesthetic reached maturity when excess material (including traditional ornamentation) had been 
stripped away, leaving only a basic structure of plain geometric forms. As noted above, this maturation was 
achieved in the early twentieth century, with the Bauhaus leading the way (in terms of both innovation and 
propagation). Architecture that features the mature modern aesthetic is known as international style architecture, 
due to the rapid global diffusion of this style once it emerged.
                                                                                                                    30
The International Style
                                                                       The piers read as pillars




                                                       
        The international style’s three most influential pioneers were Gropius, Corbusier, and Mies.
  Walter Gropius, founder and first director of the Bauhaus, designed the buildings of the school’s second
campus. Plain walls (white and grey) and screens of glass, sometimes several stories in height, predominate. 
    Gropius’ balconies showcase an impressive new structural possibility of steel-frame construction: 
   cantilevering (platforms fixed only at one end), which further contributes to a sense of architectural 
                                               weightlessness.



                                                                                                                31
The International Style




The  5 points of Architecture in the Villa Savoye: 
1.Ribbon Window, 2.Roof gardens, 3.Pilotis, 4.free plan,5.free facade



                                             
  The Swiss architect Le Corbusier, though not a member of the Bauhaus, absorbed 
and became a leading figure of the international style. He preferred smooth expanses 
  of white reinforced concrete pierced with horizontal strip windows, as well as a 
   degree of curvilinear geometry . Le Corbusier’s masterpiece is the Villa Savoye.
                                                                                        32
The International Style


                                                                            The piers read as pillars




                                        The Seagram Building               The Lakeshore Drive Apartments- 
                                                                           Chicago

   While Gropius and Le Corbusier made ample use of reinforced concrete, pure glass-and-steel construction in 
   the international style was perfected by Mies van der Rohe (another director of the Bauhaus), who believed 
    so firmly in eliminating all embellishment that his guiding principle was simply “less is more”. Mies brought 
       the international style to the height of its influence, as descendants of his glass-and-steel skyscrapers 
   appeared in every corner of the globe. The Seagram Building in New York, essentially a steel frame sheathed 
      in curtains of glass, is often considered his masterpiece. The Lake Shore drive apartments brought in a 
                                       revolution in high-rise residential lifestyle.

                                                                                                                     33
The International Style


                                                                             The piers read as pillars




              The Robie House


    Contemporary with the “Bauhaus age” was the career of the greatest American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, who 
   focused primarily on residential designs. Wright sought to make his buildings organic; that is, to adjust their layouts 
     and features until they merge with their natural surroundings, rather than simply imposing a rectangular box of a 
  house on any given locale. Wright felt that a house should not be located on a site, but rather be a natural extension 
   of the site.The exterior walls of a Wright house are articulated in a relatively complex, asymmetrical manner (so as 
      to avoid a stiff, “boxy” appearance), and the house is often visually united with the earth via broad, flat surfaces 
  parallel with the ground (e.g. eaves, cantilevered balconies). Interiors are open and flowing (rather than mechanically 
     subdivided into small rooms), and ample windows (including windows that bend around corners) throughout the 
   house merge the interior with the world outside. A mixture of building materials (e.g. brick, wood, stone, concrete) 
                      further contributes to the sense of the house as an organic feature of the landscape.
                                                                                                                     34
The International Style


                                                                 The piers read as pillars
Despite the contrast between functionalism and 
Wright’s “organicism”, both are clearly modern 
  (i.e. not based on anything traditional), and 
     consequently similar in appearance to a 
      significant degree. Wright shared the 
functionalist appreciation for simple geometry 
     and plain, unadorned surfaces, and he 
 embraced mass-produced building materials. 
                                                     The Falling Water –Bear Run Pennsylvania
One could categorize Wright’s architecture as a 
branch of the international style, or as a cousin.
   Wright’s first great works were his Prairie       The Guggenheim Museum
   Houses, built in the Midwest; best-known 
  among them is Robie House in Chicago. His 
  most famous building of all is Fallingwater, 
Pennsylvania, while his foremost urban work is 
     the Guggenheim Museum in New York.




                                                                                                35
  After The International Style

                                                      The piers read as pillars
Toward the end of the Late Modern period, the 
international style experienced two notable 
trends. One was more extensive use of 
curvilinear geometry (as illustrated by Wright’s 
Guggenheim Museum, as well as Corbusier’s 
later work). The other was brutalism: a style that 
features harsh, bulky concrete structures, often 
with unfinished surfaces. These trends are 
considered the transitional phase to postmodern 
architecture, as architects grew impatient with 
the severe simplicity of the international style.




                                                                                  36
Postmodern Architecture


                                                                   The piers read as pillars




    The Sydney Opera house




                        Postmodern Architecture 
                            ca. 1960-present
     As advances in building materials and engineering opened up 
   incredible new possibilities for architectural design, it was only a 
   matter of time until the severe international style was rejected in 
      favor of total aesthetic freedom. (Given its timeless appeal, 
  construction in the international style has continued since ca. 1960, 
     albeit to a more limited extent.) Consequently, it is difficult to 
   generalize postmodern architecture beyond the observation that 
                            “anything goes”.
                                                                                               37
 Postmodern Architecture

                                                                                The piers read as pillars




  Nonetheless, postmodern architecture does exhibit a range of common 
  features, such as complex geometry (including curvilinear geometry), 
  blending of modern and traditional elements, colorfulness, and 
  playfulness. Many postmodern buildings have a sleek, futuristic 
  appearance; these are often described as “high-tech” or “space-age” 
  architecture.

Thankyou


                                                                                               The Gherkin Building
- Dr. Sangeeta Bagga, Assistant Professor, Chandigarh College of Architecture, Chandigarh       EDUSAT LECTURE- 1
                                                                                                                    38

								
To top