Semantics

Document Sample
Semantics Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                                              1


Last update: 30 September 2008




                            Advanced databases –  
                Defining and combining heterogeneous databases: 



                                    The Semantic Web
                                            Bettina Berendt



                                    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 
                                   Department of Computer Science
                       http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/  
       Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        1
                                                                                                        2

Agenda


                       The Semantic Web: Motivation and overview


                       Very brief recap of XML (& why it’s not semantic)


                       RDF and RDFS


                       OWL

                       Ex.s of standardization: E-commerce, social networks




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        2
                                                                                                         3

Problems with current search engines



  Current search engines = (mostly) keywords:

        n   low precision (… and recall?)

        n   sensitive to vocabulary

        n   insensitive to implicit content




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        3
                                                                                                        4

Search engines on the Semantic Web



   n   concept search instead of keyword search
                                                        è Two classes of approaches è

   n   semantic narrowing/widening of queries



   n   query-answering over >1 document



   n   document transformation operators




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        4
                                                                                                        5

Resolving content problems: Example homonymy

 <html>
 <head>
 <title>A page about jaguars</title>
 <meta name=„description“ content=„animals, cats“>
 </head>


 (Solution approach I)


 OR ...




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        5
                                                                                                        6

Homonymy: Solution approach II




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        6
                                                                                                         7

Homonymy: Solution approach III




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        7
                                                                                                         8

Resolving quality problems

  How to find out whether a page is good, important, etc.?


  <meta name=„isEndorsedBy“ content=„anImportantPerson“>


  OR




  (PageRank)

  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        8
                                                                                                         9

Semantic non-interoperability has real consequences ...




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/        9
                                                                                                        10

The Semantic Web: overview

   n   The semantic web is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which 
       web content can be expressed not only in natural language, but also in a 
       format that can be read and used by software agents, thus permitting them 
       to find, share and integrate information more easily. 
   n   It derives from W3C director Sir Tim Berners-Lee's vision of the Web as a 
       universal medium for data, information, and knowledge exchange. 
   n   At its core, the semantic web comprises a philosophy, a set of design 
       principles, collaborative working groups, and a variety of enabling 
       technologies. 
   n   Some elements of the semantic web are expressed as prospective future 
       possibilities that have yet to be implemented or realized. 
   n   Other elements of the semantic web are expressed in formal specifications. 
   n   Some of these include Resource Description Framework (RDF), a variety of 
       data interchange formats (e.g. RDF/XML, N3, Turtle, N-Triples), and 
       notations such as RDF Schema (RDFS) and the Web Ontology Language 
       (OWL), all of which are intended to provide a formal description of concepts, 
       terms, and relationships within a given knowledge domain. 




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         10
                                                                                                         11

The Semantic Web layer cake (T. Berners-Lee talk at XML 2000)




                                                                             OWL: W3C Rec. 2004

                                                                              RDF: W3C Rec. 2004




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         11
                                                                                                         12

The original vision (or: semantics for interoperability)

  The entertainment system was belting out the Beatles' "We Can Work It 
  Out" when the phone rang. When Pete answered, his phone turned the 
  sound down by sending a message to all the other local devices that 
  had a volume control. His sister, Lucy, was on the line from the doctor's 
  office: "Mom needs to see a specialist and then has to have a series of 
  physical therapy sessions. Biweekly or something. I'm going to have my 
  agent set up the appointments." Pete immediately agreed to share the 
  chauffeuring. 
  At the doctor's office, Lucy instructed her Semantic Web agent through 
  her handheld Web browser. The agent promptly retrieved information 
  about Mom's prescribed treatment from the doctor's agent, looked up 
  several lists of providers, and checked for the ones in-plan for Mom's 
  insurance within a 20-mile radius of her home and with a rating of 
  excellent or very good on trusted rating services. It then began trying to 
  find a match between available appointment times (supplied by the 
  agents of individual providers through their Web sites) and Pete's and 
  Lucy's busy schedules. (The emphasized keywords indicate terms 
  whose semantics, or meaning, were defined for the agent through the 
  Semantic Web.) 
  Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila (2001). The Semantic Web. A new form of 
  Web content that is meaningful to computers will unleash a revolution of new possibilities. 
  Scientific American. http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=the-semantic-web 


  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         12
                                                                                                         13

Update 2006: decentralization, bottom-up engineering

  Q: Project failure is a big subject in the UK and you've been involved in a 
  massive ongoing IT project - what have you learned from it that could benefit 
  our members? 
  A: [...] But I think IT projects are about supporting social systems - 
  about communications between people and machines. They tend to fail 
  due to cultural issues. [...]
  The view we are taking with the Semantic Web is interesting here. In the 
  past scientists have been trained to do things top down. In the business 
  world projects are often the boss's vision made flesh. 
  Even software engineering is about taking an idea and breaking it into 
  smaller pieces to work on - but the software project is itself part of 
  something larger. To make this better we need Web-like approaches - 
  I'm not talking about HTML here but, rather, an interconnected 
  approach. 
  The Semantic Web approach can be visualized as rigid platelets of 
  information loosely sewn together at the edges - rich in local 
  knowledge, but capable of linking to things in the outside world. That 
  approach would benefit the social aspects of projects. 



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         13
                                                                                                        14

Update 2006: The Semantic Web and databases

 Q; [...] the application of [ontologies] would clearly see a true Semantic Web, 
 but how can we apply these principles to the billions of existing Web pages? 

 Don't. Web pages are designed for people. For the Semantic Web we 
 need to look at existing databases and the data in them. 
 To make this information useful semantically requires a sequence of 
 events: 

 1. Do a model of what's in the database - which would give you an 
 ontology you could work out on the back of an envelope. Write it in RDF 
 Schema or OWL (the Web Ontology Language). 
 2. Find out who else has already got equivalent terms in an ontology. 
 For those things use their terms instead. 
 3. Write down how your database connects to those things.
 Using this information you can set up a Web server that runs resource 
 description framework (RDF). A larger database could support queries. 


 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         14
                                                                                                         15

Update 2006: Identifiers, human-machine collaboration

  To make all this really useful it's important that all important 
  things - such as customers and products - have  URIs (Uniform 
  Resource Identifiers) - for example, http:// 
  example.com/products.rdf#hairdryers - so invoices, shipping 
  notes, product specifications and so on can refer to them. 
  These would all be virtual RDF files - the server would generate 
  them on the fly and it would all be available on the Semantic 
  Web. Then an individual could compare products directly by 
  their specifications, weight and delivery charges, price and so 
  on, in a way that HTML won't allow.


  (last 3 slides from:
  Isn't it semantic? Interview with Tim Berners-Lee on BCS. 2006. 
  http://www.bcs.org/server.php?show=ConWebDoc.3337) 



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         15
                                                                                                         16
What does this “buy us”?
A motivating example: Bridging the Terminology Gap using OWL


  A key problem in achieving interoperability is to be able to 
  recognize that two pieces of data are talking about the same 
  thing, even though different terminology is being used.
  The following slides presents an example to show how OWL may 
  be used to bridge the "terminology gap".




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         16
                                                                                                       17
Interested in 
Purchasing a Camera


Scenario:
 n   I am interested in purchasing a camera with a 75-300mm 
     zoom lens size, that has an aperture of 4.5-5.6, and a shutter 
     speed that ranges from 1/500 sec. to 1.0 sec.
 n   I launch my personal "Web Bot" which crawls the Web 
     looking for Web sites that can fulfill my request.
 n   Assume that there exists an OWL Camera Ontology, which 
     the Web Bot can "consult" upon its travels across the Web.




Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         17
                                                                                                                      18

     Is this document relevant?

                                       <PhotographyStore rdf:ID="Hunts"

The Web Bot                                                xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#">
                                         <store-location>Malden, MA</store-location>
                                         <phone>617-555-1234</phone>

finds this                               <catalog rdf:parseType="Collection">
                                           <SLR rdf:ID="Olympus-OM-10"
                                                  xmlns="http://www.camera.org#">
document at a                                 <lens>
                                                 <Lens>

Web site:                                            <focal-length>75-300mm zoom</focal-length>
                                                     <f-stop>4.5-5.6</f-stop>
                                                 </Lens>
                                              </lens>
                                              <body>
                                                 <Body>
                                                    <shutter-speed rdf:parseType="Resource">
                                                       <min>0.002</min>
                                                       <max>1.0</max>
                                                       <units>seconds</units>
                                                    </shutter-speed>
                                                 </Body>
                                              </body>
                                              <cost rdf:parseType="Resource">
                                                 <rdf:value>325</rdf:value>
Is it relevant?                                  <currency>USD</currency>
                                              </cost>
(Note: SLR = Single Lens                   </SLR>
                                         </catalog>
Reflex)                                </PhotographyStore>
     Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/                   18
        A Match?                                                                                                  19




<PhotographyStore rdf:ID="Hunts"
                    xmlns:rdf="&rdf;#">
  <store-location>Malden, MA</store-location>
  <phone>617-555-1234</phone>
  <catalog rdf:parseType="Collection">
    <SLR rdf:ID="Olympus-OM-10"
            xmlns="http://www.camera.org#">
       <lens>
          <Lens>
              <focal-length>75-300mm zoom</focal-length>
              <f-stop>4.5-5.6</f-stop>
          </Lens>
       </lens>                                                      I am interested in purchasing a camera with a
       <body>
                                                                    75-300mm zoom lens size, that has an aperture of
          <Body>
             <shutter-speed rdf:parseType="Resource">      Match?   4.5-5.6, and a shutter speed that ranges from
                 <min>0.002</min>
                 <max>1.0</max>
                                                                    1/500 sec. to 1.0 sec.
                 <units>seconds</units>
             </shutter-speed>
          </Body>
       </body>
       <cost rdf:parseType="Resource">
          <rdf:value>325</rdf:value>
          <currency>USD</currency>
       </cost>
    </SLR>
  </catalog>
</PhotographyStore>

                    To determine if there is a match, these questions must be answered:
                      1. What's the relationship between "SLR" and "Camera"?
                      2. What's the relationship between "focal-length" and "size"?
                      3. What's the relationship between "f-stop" and "aperture"?
         Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/           19
                                                                                                                               20

Relationship between SLR and Camera?




      The Web Bot "consults" the OWL Camera Ontology. This
      OWL statement tells the Web Bot that a SLR is a type of Camera:
                  <owl:Class rdf:ID="SLR">
                      <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:resource="#Camera"/>
                  </owl:Class>




<PhotographyStore                                           "Relationship between
       rdf:ID="Hunts"                                       Camera and SLR?" <owl:Class rdf:ID="SLR">
  <SLR>
     …
                                             Web                                       <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:resource="#Camera"/>
                                                                                   </owl:Class>

  </SLR>
</PhotographyStore>
                                             Bot            "SLR is a type of
                                                            Camera."                     Camera.owl
Hunts.xml
   Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/                              20
                                                                                                       21


Relationship between focal-length and lens size?




 This OWL statement tells the Web Bot that
 focal-length is equivalent to lens size:
          <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="focal-length">
               <owl:equivalentProperty rdf:resource="#size"/>
               <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#Lens"/>
               <rdfs:range rdf:resource="&xsd;#string"/>
          </owl:DatatypeProperty>

     "focal-length is synonymous with (lens) size.
      focal-length is to be used within a Lens.
      focal-length has a value that is a string."
Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         21
                                                                                                       22


Relationship between f-stop and aperture?



 This OWL statement tells the Web Bot that f-stop
 is equivalent to aperture:
          <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="f-stop">
               <owl:equivalentProperty rdf:resource="#aperture"/>
               <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#Lens"/>
               <rdfs:range rdf:resource="&xsd;#string"/>
          </owl:DatatypeProperty>

The Web Bot now recognizes that the XML document it found at the Web site
  - is talking about Cameras, and it
  - does show the lens size, and it
  - does show the aperture for the camera, and
  - the values for lens size, aperture, and shutter speed are met.
Thus, the Web Bot recognizes that the XML document is a match!
Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         22
                                                                                                                                                     23


          Semantic Definitions Separate from Application!




                                                                           "Relationship between     Semantic Definitions
<SLR rdf:ID="Olympus-OM-10"                                                Camera and SLR?"          <owl:Class rdf:ID="SLR">
           xmlns="http://www.camera.org#">                                                               <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:resource="#Camera"/>
    <lens>                                                                                           </owl:Class>
         <Lens>
              <focal-length>75-300mm zoom</focal-length>
              <f-stop>4.5-5.6</f-stop>
                                                                           "SLR is a type of
         </Lens>                                                           Camera."
    </lens>
    <body>
         <Body>
             <shutter-speed rdf:parseType="Resource">
                                                           Web Bot         "Relationship between
                                                                           aperture and f-stop?"     <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="focal-length">
                <min>0.002</min>
                <max>1.0</max>                             (application)                                  <owl:equivalentProperty rdf:resource="#size"/>
                                                                                                          <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#Lens"/>
                                                                                                          <rdfs:range rdf:resource="&xsd;#string"/>
                <units>seconds</units>
             </shutter-speed>                                                                        </owl:DatatypeProperty>
         </Body>                                                           "f-stop is synonymous
    </body>
    <cost rdf:parseType="Resource">                                        with aperture."
         <rdf:value>325</rdf:value>
         <currency>USD</currency>
    </cost>
                                                                           "Relationship between
</SLR>                                                                     size and focal-length?"   <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="f-stop">
                                                                                                          <owl:equivalentProperty rdf:resource="#aperture"/>

           Hunts.xml                                                       "focal-length is
                                                                                                          <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#Lens"/>
                                                                                                          <rdfs:range rdf:resource="&xsd;#string"/>
                                                                                                     </owl:DatatypeProperty>

                                                                           synonymous with
                                                                           size."
                                                                                                            Camera.owl

            Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/                                            23
                                                                                                         24

Summary: Interoperability despite terminology differences!

  The example demonstrated how a Web Bot application was able to 
  dynamically process an XML document from a Web site, despite the fact 
  that the XML document used terminology different than was used to 
  express the request.  This interoperability was achieved by using the 
  OWL Camera Ontology!
  This example also demonstrated the architectural design principle of 
  cleanly separating the application code (e.g., Web Bot) from the 
  semantic definitions (e.g., Camera.owl).




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         24
                                                                                                        25

Agenda


                       The Semantic Web: Motivation and overview


                       Very brief recap of XML (& why it’s not semantic)


                       RDF and RDFS


                       OWL

                       Ex.s of standardization: E-commerce, social networks




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         25
                                                                                                        26


You have data …  How should you structure it?  




            Here's some data about an aircraft:


                         medium-altitude, long-endurance
                         unmanned aerial vehicle

                                                14.7 meters
                         512 kilograms
                                                     70 knots

                                     400 nautical miles
 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         26
                                                                                                        27
The XML approach is to "wrap" each data item in 
start/end tags



<Aircraft>
   <wingspan>14.8 meters</wingspan>
   <weight>512 kilograms</weight>
   <cruise-speed>70 knots</cruise-speed>
   <range>400 nautical miles</range>
   <description>
       medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned
       aerial vehicle
   </description>
</Aircraft>
                                RQ-1.xml
 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         27
                                                                                                        28


XML Terminology




      <wingspan>14.8 meters</wingspan>

           Start tag                                                          End tag


                                          Data


                                            Element


 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         28
                                                                                                       29

Why use XML?




  n   It is a universally accepted standard way of structuring data 
      (syntax).
  n   It is a W3C recommendation (W3C = World Wide Web 
      Consortium)
  n   The marketplace supports it with a lot of free/inexpensive tools.
  n   The alternative to using XML is to define your own proprietary 
      data syntax, and then build your own proprietary tools to support 
      the proprietary syntax (Not a very appealing idea).




Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         29
                                                                                                            30

BUT … XML: limitations for semantic markup



XML makes no commitment on:
 Œ Domain-specific ontological vocabulary
  Ontological modeling primitives
Requires pre-arranged agreement on Œ & 
Only feasible for closed collaboration
 n    agents in a small & stable community
 n    pages on a small & stable intranet
Not suited for sharing Web-resources




     Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         30
                                                                                                        31

Syntax versus Semantics



 Syntax: the structure of your data
  n   e.g., XML mandates that you structure your data by "wrapping" each data 
      item within a start tag and an end tag pair, with the end tag being preceded 
      by / and both tags in <…> brackets.  

  n   That is, XML specifies the syntax of your data.             
 Semantics: the meaning of your data
 Two conditions necessary for interoperability:

         1. Adopt a common syntax:this enables applications to parse the data.
            XML provides a common syntax, and thus is a critical first step.
         2. Adopt a means for understanding the semantics: this enables
            applications to use the data. OWL provides a standard way of
            expressing the semantics.

 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         31
                                                                                                       32
What is this XML snippet talking about, i.e., what are the 
semantics?




                       What is a Predator?
                                   <Predator>
                                      …
                                   </Predator>



Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         32
                                                                                                         33

Predator - which one?

    n   Predator: a medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial 
        vehicle system.
    n   Predator : one that victimizes, plunders, or destroys, especially for 
        one's own gain.
    n   Predator : an organism that lives by preying on other organisms.
    n   Predator: a company which specializes in camouflage attire.
    n   Predator: a video game.
    n   Predator: software for machine networking.
    n   Predator: a chain of paintball stores.




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         33
                                                                                                        34

Resolving Semantics

 The next few slides presents an approach that applications can 
 take for understanding the meaning of data.  This approach is 
 often taken today.
 We will then examine the disadvantages of the approach, and 
 then offer a better approach.




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         34
                                                                                                         35

Meaning (semantics) applied on a per-application basis




                                                                Semantics: A Predator is type of
                                                                Aircraft.
                                                                Actions: These actions must be
                                                                performed on the Predator data:
                                                                  - identify ground control station.
                                                                  - determine onboard sensors.
                                                                  - determine ordnance.

<Predator>
   …                                  application
</Predator>
  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         35
                                                                                                         36

Meaning (semantics) applied on a per-application basis




                                         XML


                       app#1                                   app#2
                 Semantics: Code                         Semantics: Code
                 to interpret the data                   to interpret the data
                 Action: Code to                         Action: Code to
                 process the data                        process the data



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         36
                                                                                                       37
Problem with attaching semantics on a per-
application basis



        application
    Semantics: Code
                                   Problems with burying semantic definitions
    to interpret the data
                                   within each application:
    Action: Code to
                                   - Duplicate effort
    process the data
                                      - Each application must express the semantics
                                   - Variability of interpretation
                                      - Each application can take its own interpretation
                                      - Example: Mars probe disaster - one application
                                         interpreted the data in inches, another application
                                         interpreted the data in centimeters.
                                   - No ad-hoc discovery and exploitation
                                      - Applications have the semantics pre-wired. Thus,
                                        when new data (e.g., new type of aircraft) is encountered
                                        an application may not be able to effectively process it.
                                        This makes for brittle applications.

           What's a better approach?
Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         37
                                                                                                         38

Better approach:

(1) Extricate semantic definitions from applications 
(2) Express semantic definitions in a standard vocabulary



                                          XML


                        app#1                                  app#2
                   Action: Code to                        Action: Code to
                   process the data                       process the data




                                   OWL Document
                                 Semantic Definitions
  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         38
                                                                                                          39
   OWL provides an agreed-upon vocabulary for expressing 
   semantics




A Sampling of the OWL Vocabulary:
   subClassOf: this OWL element is used to assert that one class
        of items is a subset of another class of items.
        Example: Predator is a subClassOf Aircraft.

   FunctionalProperty: this OWL element is used to assert that
        a property has a unique value.
        Example: sensorID is a FunctionalProperty, i.e., sensorID
        has a unique value.

   equivalentClass: this OWL element is used to assert that
        one Class is equivalent to another Class.
        Example: Platform is an equivalentClass to Aircraft.

   Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         39
                                                                                                        40


Why use OWL? Why use RDF?
 Benefits to application developers:
   n   Less code to write (save $$$).
   n   Less chance of misinterpretation (save $$$).
 Benefits to community at large:
   n   Everyone can understand each other's data's semantics, since 
       they are in a common language.
   n   OWL uses the XML syntax to express semantics, i.e., it builds on 
       an existing technology.
         l   Don't have to learn new syntax.
         l   Common XML tools (e.g., parsers) can work on OWL.
   n   OWL is a W3C recommendation.
   n   OWL builds on RDF (also a W3C recommendation)
         l   Expressive enough for many applications
         l   Simpler
         l   è need to understand this first

 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         40
                                                                                                       41

Ontologies and concepts




  n   An ontology is a conceptual model.
  n   An Ontology is the collection of semantic definitions for a 
      domain.
  n   Example: an Aircraft Ontology is the set of semantic 
      definitions for the Aircraft domain, e.g.,
        l   Predator is a subClassOf Aircraft.
        l   sensorID is a FunctionalProperty.
        l   Platform is an equivalentClass to Aircraft.


  n   Predator, Aircraft etc. are concepts.



Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         41
                                                                                                         42
Basic idea of conceptual modelling (not only in SW): 
The semiotic triangle




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         42
                                                                                                          43
  What is an ontology?
  (A commonly accepted informal definition and one formal definition)


 An ontology is „an explicit specification of a shared conceptualisation.“ (Gruber, 1993)




   Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         43
                                                                                                         44

Ontologies, decentralization, and bottom-up 
engineering
  Communities of users (application builders, ...) can
    n   Re-use existing ontologies
          l   Established domain-specific ontologies (e.g., real-estate, 
              medicine, bioinformatics)
          l   All kinds: see the Semantic Web search engine 
              http://swoogle.umbc.edu/ 
          l   „The big one“: Cyc, see www.cyc.com   
    n   Link to existing ontologies (è Ontology matching / 
        alignment)
    n   Extend existing ontologies




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         44
                                                                                                                      45
Ontologies as conceptual models / schemas; or:
Database (knowledge base) = Ontology + Instances

                                                                  <owl:Class rdf:ID="BookCatalogue"/>

                                                                  <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="title">
                                                                       <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#BookCatalogue"/>
                                                                       <rdfs:range rdf:resource="&xsd;#string"/>
                                                                  </owl:DatatypeProperty>

                                                                  <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="author">
                                                                       <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#BookCatalogue"/>
                                                                       <rdfs:range rdf:resource="&xsd;#string"/>
                                                                  </owl:DatatypeProperty>

    title                    author            date               <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="date">
                                                                       <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#BookCatalogue"/>
    My Life and Times        Paul McCartney    June, 1998              <rdfs:range rdf:resource="&xsd;#date"/>
                                                                  </owl:DatatypeProperty>
    Illusions                Richard Bach      1972

    First and Last Freedom   J. Krishnamurti   1974


            BookCatalogue
                                                                     <?xml version=“1.0”?>
                                                                     <BookCatalogue>
                                                                           <title>My Life and Times</title>
                                                                           <author>Paul McCartney</author>
                                                                           <date>June, 1998</date>
                                                                     </BookCatalogue>



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/                      45
                                                                                                        46

OWL vs. Database 

 Advantages of using OWL to define an Ontology:
   n   Extensible: much easier to add new properties.  Contrast with a 
       database - adding a new column may break a lot of applications
   n   Portable: much easier to move an OWL document than to move a 
       database.
 Advantages of using a Database to define an Ontology:
   n   Mature: the database technology has been around a long time and 
       is very mature.  




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         46
                                                                                                        47

Agenda


                       The Semantic Web: Motivation and overview


                       Very brief recap of XML (& why it’s not semantic)


                       RDF and RDFS


                       OWL

                       Ex.s of standardization: E-commerce, social networks




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         47
                                                                                                         48

What is RDF ?

RDF is a data model
       l   the model is domain-neutral, application-neutral 
       l   the model can be viewed as directed, labeled graphs or as an 
           object-oriented model (object/attribute/value)
RDF data model is an abstract, conceptual layer independent of 
XML
       l   consequently, XML is a transfer syntax for RDF, not a component 
           of RDF
       l   RDF data might never occur in XML form




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         48
                                                                                                          49

RDF model

RDF “statements” consist of

  resources (= nodes)                                                = subject
     which have properties
     which have values (= nodes,strings)                             = predicate
                                                                     = object

                                                                      
        resource                           value
                              property

   “http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax/ has the author Ora Lassila”

   http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax/
                                                                             author


                                                                               “Ora Lassila”


   Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         49
                                                                                                        50

RDF Model Example


                                                                             “W3C”

                                                                           dc:Publisher

 http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax/
                                                                           dc:Creator

                                          dc:Date
                                                                             “Ora Lassila”

                               “1999-02-22”




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         50
                                                                                                         51

Complex values

So far, values of properties have been strings
A graph node (corresponding to a resource) also can be the value of a property
     n   arbitrarily complex tree and graph structures are possible
     n   syntactically, values can be embedded (i.e. lexically in-line) or referenced 
         (linked)
Example:


         http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax/
                                                         dc:Creator


                                                               p:Name
                                                                                 “Ora Lassila”
                                            p:EMail

                     “ora.lassila@nokia.com”
  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         51
                                                                                                         52

Complex values (continued)

Corresponding triples

  { “http://www.w3.org/TR/PR-rdf-syntax/”, dc:Creator, x }
  { x, p:Name, “Ora Lassila” }
  { x, p:EMail, “ora.lassila@nokia.com” }




        http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax/
                                                         dc:Creator


                                                               p:Name
                                                                                 “Ora Lassila”
                                            p:EMail

                     “ora.lassila@nokia.com”
  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         52
                                                                                                         53

Containers

Containers are collections
 n   they allow grouping of resources (or literal values)
It is possible to make statements about the container (as a whole) or about 
its members individually
Different types of containers exist
 n   bag - unordered collection
 n   seq - ordered collection (= “sequence”)
 n   alt - represents alternatives
It is also possible to create collections based on URI patterns
 n   for example, all files in a particular web site
Duplicate values are permitted
 n   there is no mechanism to enforce unique value constraints



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         53
                                                                                                        54

Containers (continued)



           http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax

                         dc:Creator

                                                  rdf:Type
                                                                             rdf:Seq



                       rdf:_1                     rdf:_2



                   “Ora Lassila”           “Ralph Swick”




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         54
                                                                                                         55

Higher-order statements

One can make RDF statements about other RDF statements
 n   example: “Ralph believes that the web contains one billion 
     documents”
Higher-order statements
 n   allow us to express beliefs (and other modalities)
 n   are important for trust models, digital signatures,etc.
 n   also: metadata about metadata
 n   are represented by modeling RDF in RDF itself




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         55
                                                                                                        56

Reification

 n   RDF is not really second-order
 n   But it does provide a built-in predicate vocabulary for reification


                                                                dc:Creator
         http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax                                       “Ora Lassila”


                                                        dc:Creator

                                        “Library of Congress”


• The dotted box corresponds to the following 
  statements
     •   { x, rdf:predicate, “dc:creator” }
     •   { x, rdf:subject, “http://www.w3.org/TR/RED-rdf-syntax }
     •   { x, rdf:object, “Ora Lassila” }
     •   { x, rdf:type, “rdf:statement” }

 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         56
                                                                                                         57

Reification


 nAny statement can be an object
      graphs can be nested - reification

                    claims                                     Author-of
  NYT                                      pers05                                       ISBN...



     <rdf:Description rdf:about=“#NYT”>
      <claims>
        <rdf:Description rdf:about=“#pers05”>
          <authorOf>ISBN...</authorOf>
        </rdf:Description>
      </claims>
     </rdf:Description>
  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         57
                                                                                                        58

  RDF Schema  


• Defines small vocabulary for RDF:
    • Class, subClassOf, type
    • Property, subPropertyOf
    • domain, range
• Vocabulary can be used to define other
  vocabularies for your application
  domain                    Person
                                    subClassOf
                                       subClassOf

                                            domain                          range
                              Student                  hasSuperVisor                    Researcher

                            type                                                               type
                               Frank                   hasSuperVisor                        Jeen
 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         58
                                                                                                          59


RDF Schema syntax in XML
<rdf:Description ID="MotorVehicle">
  <rdf:type resource="http://www.w3.org/...#Class"/>
  <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:resource="http://www.w3.org/...#Resource"/>
</rdf:Description>

<rdf:Description ID="Truck">
  <rdf:type resource="http://www.w3.org/...#Class"/>
  <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:resource="#MotorVehicle"/>
</rdf:Description>

<rdf:Description ID="registeredTo">
  <rdf:type resource="http://www.w3.org/...#Property"/>
  <rdfs:domain rdf:resource="#MotorVehicle"/>
  <rdfs:range rdf:resource="#Person"/>
</rdf:Description>

<rdf:Description ID=”ownedBy">
  <rdf:type resource="http://www.w3.org/...#Property"/>
  <rdfs:subPropertyOf rdf:resource="#registeredTo"/>
</rdf:Description>
   Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         59
                                                                                                        60

Agenda


                       The Semantic Web: Motivation and overview


                       Very brief recap of XML (& why it’s not semantic)


                       RDF and RDFS


                       OWL

                       Ex.s of standardization: E-commerce, social networks




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         60
                                                                                                       61




I will use parts of this excellent tutorial:  
Roger L. Costello & David B. Jacobs (2003). OWL Web Ontology
Language.
http://www.racai.ro/EUROLAN-2003/html/presentations/JamesHendler/owl/OWL.ppt  

(please note: the other tutorials referenced on slide 3 of that 
slide set are not available)




Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         61
                                                                                                        62

Agenda


                       The Semantic Web: Motivation and overview


                       Very brief recap of XML (& why it’s not semantic)


                       RDF and RDFS


                       OWL

                       Ex.s of standardization: E-commerce, social networks




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         62
                                                                                                         63

EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)

    n   A set of standards for structuring information that is to be electronically 
        exchanged between businesses, organizations, ...
    n   The structures emulate documents, e.g., purchase orders
    n   Standards independent of communication and software technologies
    n   EDI messages can be transmitted using any methodology agreed to by 
        sender and recipient: Value Added Networks (bisync modem), FTP, email, 
        HTTP, AS2 (MIME-based HTTP EDIINT), ...
    n   Mappings to XML exist; RosettaNet sometimes regarded as EDI standard
    n   Data format used by the vast majority of E-commerce transactions 
        worldwide
    n   Since the 1960s; first UN/EDIFACT standard 1988
    n   Different sets of standards for different subdomains
          l   UN/EDIFACT: the only international standard, predominant outside North America
          l   US standard ANSI ASC X12 (X12)
          l   TRADACOMS: UK retail industry
          l   ODETTE: Europan automotive industry



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         63
                                                                                                         64

EDI: Components needed for an information transfer

    n   The standard used 
    n   Message Implementation Guidelines (human-readable, 
        agreed-upon between the trading partners of a transaction)
    n   EDI Implementation Guidelines
    n   Data transformation from/to the company‘s back-end 
        business systems, e.g. ERP
    n   Transmission protocols
    n   Audit: ensures that any transaction can be tracked to ensure 
        that it is not lost




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         64
                                                                                                         65
EDI example: A purchase order message according to UN/EDIFACT 
version spring 1996


  UNA:+.? '
  UNB+UNOC:3+SenderID+RecipientID+060620:0931+1++1234567'
  UNH+1+ORDERS:D:96A:UN'
  BGM+220+B10001'
  DTM+4:20060620:102'
  NAD+BY+++CustomerID+Street+City++23436+xx'
  LIN+1++Product Screws:SA'
  QTY+1:1000'
  UNS+S'
  CNT+2:1'
  UNT+9+1'
  UNZ+1+1234567'


  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         65
                                                                                                         66

EDI: Lessons learned

    n   Economics
          l   Only worthwhile if lots of similar transactions (economies of scale)
          l   Processes with intangibles (e.g. tenders, auctions with unknown 
              partners) can usually not be represented in EDI alone
          l   significant barrier: the accompanying business process change
    n   Semantics (and economics)
          l   Semantics are dynamic (new EDIFACT versions, often > once a year!)
          l   Often forgotten but essential: background knowledge (e.g., master data 
              à EANCOM)
          l   Information often incomplete and not contained in EDI Implementation 
              Guidelines
                 – e.g.: how much are „10 boxes of candy“ (assume packaged in big 
                   boxes: 5 display boxes; each 24 consumer-packaged boxes)?
                 – ? Shows need for comprehensive ontology language ?
          l   Two-way negotiation of trading partners remain essential 
                 – Market power decides (e.g., whose IDs?; WalMart requires ist 
                   trading partners to use AS2 transmission protocol)


  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         66
                                                                                                         67

FOAF (Friend of a Friend)

    n   a machine-readable ontology describing persons, their activities 
        and their relations to other people and objects. 
    n   Anyone can use FOAF to describe him or herself.
    n   FOAF is an extension to RDF and is defined using OWL. 
    n   Computers may use these FOAF profiles to find, for example, all 
        people living in Europe, or to list all people both you and a friend of 
        you know. 
    n   This is accomplished by defining relationships between people.
    n   Each profile has a unique identifier (such as the person's e-mail
        addresses, a Jabber ID, or a URI of the homepage or weblog of the 
        person), which is used when defining these relationships.
    n   The FOAF project, which defines and extends the vocabulary of a 
        FOAF profile, was started in 2000 by Libby Miller and Dan Brickley.
          l   http://www.foaf-project.org 
    n   „possibly the single most prevalent use of Semantic Web 
        technologies so far“ – blog software exporting FOAF + RSS 
        (Paolillo et al., 2005)


  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         67
                                                                                                        68

FOAF example (1)

 <rdf:RDF
   xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
   xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
   xmlns:rdfs="http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#">
   <foaf:Person rdf:about="#JW">
     <foaf:name>Jimmy Wales</foaf:name>
     <foaf:mbox rdf:resource="mailto:jwales@bomis.com" />
     <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://www.jimmywales.com/" />
     <foaf:nick>Jimbo</foaf:nick>
     <foaf:depiction rdf:resource="http://www.jimmywales.com/aus_img_small.jpg" />
     <foaf:interest>
       <rdf:Description rdf:about="http://www.wikimedia.org" rdfs:label="Wikipedia" />
     </foaf:interest>
     



 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         68
                                                                                                        69

FOAF example (2)



     <foaf:knows>                                          Social-web inferences
       <foaf:Person>
         <foaf:name>Angela Beesley</foaf:name> <!-- Wikimedia Board of Trustees -->
       </foaf:Person>
     </foaf:knows>
   </foaf:Person>
 </rdf:RDF>




 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         69
                                                                                                         70

FOAF extensions (1)

  <rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
           xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
           xmlns:rel="http://www.perceive.net/schemas/relationship/">


   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="spiderman">
     <foaf:name>Spiderman</foaf:name>   
     <rel:enemyOf rdf:resource="#green-goblin"/>
   </foaf:Person>


   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="green-goblin">
     <foaf:name>Green Goblin</foaf:name>
     <rel:enemyOf rdf:resource="#spiderman"/>
   </foaf:Person> 
   
   



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         70
                                                                                                         71

FOAF extensions (2)

   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="peter">
     <foaf:name>Peter Parker</foaf:name>
     <rel:friendOf rdf:resource="#harry"/>
   </foaf:Person>
   
   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="harry">
     <foaf:name>Harry Osborn</foaf:name>
     <rel:friendOf rdf:resource="#peter"/>
     <rel:childOf rdf:resource="#norman"/>
   </foaf:Person>
   
   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="norman">
     <foaf:name>Norman Osborn</foaf:name>
     <rel:parentOf rdf:resource="#harry"/>   
   </foaf:Person> 
  </rdf:RDF>

  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         71
                                                                                                         72

FOAF multimedia (1)

  <rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
           xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
           xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/">


   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="peter">
     <foaf:name>Peter Parker</foaf:name>
     
     <foaf:depicts rdf:resource="http://www.peterparker.com/peter.jpg"/>
     
   </foaf:Person>
   
   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="spiderman">
     <foaf:name>Spiderman</foaf:name>
   </foaf:Person> 




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         72
                                                                                                         73

FOAF multimedia (2)


   <foaf:Person rdf:ID="green-goblin">
     <foaf:name>Green Goblin</foaf:name>
   </foaf:Person>
   
   <!-- codepiction -->
   <foaf:Image 
  rdf:about="http://www.peterparker.com/photos/spiderman/statue.jpg">
     <dc:title>Battle on the Statue Of Liberty</dc:title>
     
     <foaf:depicts rdf:resource="#spiderman"/>
     <foaf:depicts rdf:resource="#green-goblin"/>
     
     <foaf:maker rdf:resource="#peter"/>   
   </foaf:Image>
  </rdf:RDF>


  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         73
                                                                                                         74
What inferences? Ex.: A social-network analysis of LiveJournal FOAF entries
(Paolillo et al., 2005)


                                                        n   Interests over time remain 
                                                            similar
                                                        n   Friends over time remain 
                                                            similar
                                                        n   But: the manner in which 
                                                            people elect friends and 
                                                            interests in their LiveJournal 
                                                            profiles is sharply different. ... 
                                                            [These differences] represent 
                                                            fundamentally different social 
                                                            behaviors.
                                                        n   What does this mean for 
                                                            recommender systems?



  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         74
                                                                                                         75

Cf.: Data about individuals available to Google

  Google operates the largest Internet search engine in the United States. In March 
  2007 alone, approximately 3.5 billion search queries were performed on Google 
  websites.25 Google’s services include:
  a. Google search: any search term a user enters into Google;
  b. Google Desktop: an index of the user’s computer files, e-mails, music, photos, 
  and chat and web browser history;
  c. Google Talk: instant-message chats between users;
  d. Google Maps: address information requested, often including the user’s home 
  address for use in obtaining directions;
  e. Google Mail (Gmail): a user’s e-mail history, with default settings set to retain 
  emails “forever”;
  f. Google Calendar: a user’s schedule as inputted by the user;
  g. Google Orkut: social networking tool storing personal information such as 
  name, location, relationship status, etc.;
  h. Google Reader: which ATOM/RSS feeds a user reads;
  i. Google Video/YouTube: videos watched by user;
  from: EPIC (2007). Complaint and Request for Injunction, Request for Investigation and
  for Other Relief In the Matter of Google, Inc. and DoubleClick, Inc. Before the Federal
  Trade Commission Washington, DC 20580
  http://news.findlaw.com/hdocs/docs/google/googdoubleclick42007cmp.pdf 
  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         75
                                                                                                       76




                                               ?

Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         76
                                                                                                         77

Next lecture


                        The Semantic Web: Motivation and overview


                        Very brief recap of XML (& why it’s not semantic)


                        RDF and RDFS


                        OWL

                        Ex.s of standardization: E-commerce, social networks


                        Schema integration and Federated databases 


  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         77
                                                                                                        78

References

   p. 10: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web 
   p. 16-24: Costello, R.L. (2003). A Five Minute Intro to XML.
      http://www.daml.org/meetings/2003/05/SWMU/briefings/08_Tutorial_D.ppt 
   pp. 26-29, pp. 31-39: Costello, R.L. & Jacobs, D.B. (2003). A Two Minute Intro to
      XML. 
       www.daml.org/meetings/2003/05/SWMU/briefings/07_1045_Essential_Building_Blocks.ppt 
   p. 30, pp. 48-59: Unnamed (no date). RDF and XML tutorial.
      http://lsdis.cs.uga.edu/SemWebCourse/RDF.ppt  
   pp. 40,41: based on Costello, R.L. & Jacobs, D.B. (2003). A Two Minute Intro to
      XML. 
       www.daml.org/meetings/2003/05/SWMU/briefings/07_1045_Essential_Building_Blocks.ppt 
   p. 45, 46: based on Costello, R.L. & Jacobs, D.B. (2003). OWL Web Ontology
      Language.                                                                              
       http://www.racai.ro/EUROLAN-2003/html/presentations/JamesHendler/owl/OWL.ppt 
   p. 65: based on http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/EDIFACT (here is the English info: 
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EDIFACT) 
   pp. 67-69: based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOAF_(software) 
   pp. 70-73: Dodds, L. (2004). An Introduction to FOAF. 
      http://www.xml.com/pub/a/2004/02/04/foaf.html 



 Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         78
                                                                                                         79

Further references, background reading; acknowledgements


    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Data_Interchange 
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Data_Interchange 
    J. C. Paolillo, S. Mercure, and E. Wright. (2005). The social semantics 
       of Livejournal FOAF: Structure and change from 2004 to 2005. In G. 
       Stumme, B. Hoser, C. Schmitz, and H. Alani, editors, Proceedings of
       the 1st Workshop on Semantic Network Analysis at the ISWC 2005
       Conference, pages 69 – 80.                   
       http://www.blogninja.com/paolillo-mercure-wright.final.pdf 
    Specifications:
          RDF: http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-primer 
          OWL: http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-features 
          FOAF: http://xmlns.com/foaf/spec 




  Berendt: Advanced databases, first sem. 2008, http://www.cs.kuleuven.be/~berendt/teaching/2008w/adb/         79

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:3/2/2014
language:Unknown
pages:79