SCO Handbook - DLIELC.edu

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					                                         October 1, 2013
Defense Language Institute
English Language Center
Joint Base San Antonio Lackland, Texas




English Language Training Support for
Security Cooperation Organizations




                                         FY14
                                             DLIELC Directory
 If You Have Questions About:                         Contact:                         Phone / FAX / E-mail

•	 Programming	Students                                                            POCs	on	SAN	Web_Training_Country	
                                                                                    Program	Manager_DLIELC:	Resident
•	 Course	Description	and	Availability        •	 Resident	Support	
                                                                                         DSN	FAX:	(312)	473-3700
•	 Student	Academic	Progress                     (DLIELC/RSF)
                                                                                        COMM	FAX:	(210)	671-3700
•	 Student	Disciplinary	Status                                                     E-mail:		DLIELC.RSF-CPM@us.af.mil

                                                                                          DSN:		(312)	473-4060		
                                                                                        DSN	FAX:		(312)	473-2890	
                                              •	 Protocol		
•	 Arranging	for	DLIELC	Visits                                                           COMM:		(210)	671-4060	
                                                 (DLIELC/CCP)
                                                                                          FAX:		(210)	671-2890	
                                                                                         E-mail:		CCP@us.af.mil

                                                                                    DSN:		(312)	473-2929	/	2928	/	2927			
                                              •	 Operations	Support	
•	 Getting	to	DLIELC	from	the	San Antonio	                                             DSN	FAX:		(312)	473-7437	
                                                 [On-Call	24	hours]		
   Airport                                                                         COMM:		(210)	671-2929	/	2928	/	2927	
                                                 (DLIELC/OSF)
                                                                                          FAX:		(210)	671-7437

                                                                                          DSN:		(312)	473-4889			
•	 Language	Testing:	ALCPT,	ECL	and	OPI	
                                                                                        DSN	FAX:		(312)	473-0211	
                                              •	 Test	and	Measurement	
•	 Test	Security	                                                                        COMM:		(210)	671-4889	
                                                 Branch	
•	 Approval	of	ALCPT	sales	                                                                FAX:		(210)	671-0211	
                                                 (DLIELC/LEAT)
                                                                                      E-mail:		DLI.Testing@us.af.mil
•	 Arranging	Telephonic	OPIs
                                                                                          E-mail:		OPI@us.af.mil

•	 Nonresident	English	Language	Training	
   Programs	(ELTPs)                                                                       DSN:		(312)	473-3783			
                                                                                        DSN	FAX:		(312)	473-5362	
•	 DLIELC	Advisors/Instructors	for	           •	 Nonresident	Programs	
                                                                                         COMM:		(210)	671-3783	
   Overseas	Assignments                          Division	(DLIELC/LEN)
                                                                                          FAX:		(210)	671-5362	
•	 ELTP	Development	Consulting			                                                        E-mail:		LEN@us.af.mil
   (ALC	materials	/	site	surveys)

                                                                                         DSN:		(312)	473-4711			
                                                                                       DSN	FAX:		(312)	473-3063	
•	 Ordering	Materials                         •	 Logistics	Branch	
                                                                                        COMM:		(210)	671-4711	
•	 Obtaining	Catalogs                            (DLIELC/LESL)
                                                                                          FAX:		(210)	671-3063	
                                                                                     E-mail:		dlielc.leslwork@us.af.mil

                                         Mailing	address	for	all	DLIELC	offices:
                                         DLIELC/[OFFICE	SYMBOL]	
                                         2235	ANDREWS	AVENUE	
                                         JBSA	LACKLAND	TX	78236-5259


                                                   DLIELC	web	page:
                                                 http://www.dlielc.edu/
Defense Language Institute English
        Language Center

      English Language Training Support
                     for
      Security Cooperation Organizations

                                FOREWORD
 Since 1954, the Defense Language Institute English Language Center (DLIELC) has
 performed its mission to support the policies and objectives of the US Government and the
 US Department of Defense (DoD). DLIELC started as the US Air Force Language School;
 our primary mission was to teach English to allied pilot candidates. In 1966, our mission
 expanded to include other career fields, and our school moved under the DoD, with the US
 Army as the executive agent. DLIELC assumed its present form in 1976 when the USAF
 became the executive agent.

 The resident campus, located at Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA) Lackland, Texas, includes
 headquarters and academics facilities, a learning resource center, dining hall, officer and
 enlisted quarters, student administration building and a conference center. Small
 classrooms, equipped with the latest in training technology, are specifically designed to
 support student-centered instruction. In addition, the DLIELC curriculum meets the diverse
 needs of the adult military population with tailored courses that address the specific
 language requirements of the students’ career fields.

 This guide, published annually, is a reference for planning, scheduling and conducting
 English language training in support of the Security Cooperation Training Program. This
 publication supersedes the English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation
 Organizations, FY13.
                          -NOTES-




ii   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                           TABLE OF CONTENTS
 PART I – OVERVIEW                                                                                                                          PAGE
          DoD Policy on Security Cooperation-Sponsored English Language Training (ELT) ................ 3
          English Comprehension Level (ECL) Test .................................................................................. 4
          DLIELC Student Profile Guidelines ............................................................................................ 7
          ECL Questionnaire and Test Materials Requirements ................................................................. 13
          ECL Test Control Officer (TCO) Appointment Memorandum for Record ................................. 14
          Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) Overview ................................................................................ 15
          OPI Request Form ....................................................................................................................... 17
          OPI Rating Factor Grid ............................................................................................................... 18
          Determining Countries Exempt from English Language Testing and Testing Exemptions ........ 19
          Programming Guidance ............................................................................................................... 20

 PART II – RESIDENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRAINING PROGRAM
          American Language Course (ALC) ............................................................................................. 23
          General English Training (GET) ................................................................................................. 23
          ECL/ALCPT Placement Guidelines ............................................................................................ 24
          ALC Computer Based Training (CBT) ....................................................................................... 25
          Specialized English Training (SET) ............................................................................................ 27
          Advanced English Training (AET) including Instructor Development ....................................... 28
          Resident English Language Training Courses ............................................................................. 29

 PART III – IN-COUNTRY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRAINING PROGRAMS
          General Information .................................................................................................................... 43
          Planning Factors .......................................................................................................................... 45
          ELT Assistance ........................................................................................................................... 47
          Nonresident English Language Training Courses ....................................................................... 51
          Language Laboratory Systems .................................................................................................... 56
          How to Obtain English Laboratory Systems ............................................................................... 58

 PART IV – STUDENT INFORMATION
          SCO’s In-Country Student Pre-Departure Briefing ..................................................................... 63
          Follow-On Training (FOT) Courses Requiring Physical Training .............................................. 68


DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                                                                       iii
                          -NOTES-




iv   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                                 PART I




                                         OVERVIEW




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14   1
                         -NOTES-




2   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                        DoD POLICY ON
              SECURITY COOPERATION-SPONSORED
               ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRAINING (ELT)
 - DLIELC has responsibility for, and exercises operational and technical control over, the Defense English
   Language Program (DELP) that encompasses all DoD English Language Programs or courses conducted for
   US personnel or for international students under the International Military Education and Training (IMET)
   Program and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) in CONUS and OCONUS.
 - As a matter of policy, all Security Cooperation-sponsored CONUS ELT is conducted by DLIELC unless
   unusual or extraordinary conditions exist that would warrant exceptional ELT arrangements under FMS
   funding. No exceptions are permitted for IMET-funded ELT. To request an exception to FMS-funded ELT, a
   written justification for an exception to this policy must be submitted by the military departments (MILDEPs)
   to Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA/PGM) prior to submission of Letters of Offer and
   Acceptance (LOAs) or LOA amendments to DSCA for countersignature. Waivers must be approved by
   DSCA.
 - Requests for exception to DSCA CONUS ELT policy must include the following information:
   -- Written DLIELC review and recommendations on the proposed ELT exception
   -- Explanation of the unusual or extraordinary conditions that would warrant training outside of DLIELC
   -- Complete information on the ELT to be conducted to include location, description of training facilities,
      number of students, training objectives, duration of the overall ELT program, estimated cost, etc.
   -- A statement that DLIELC will coordinate and approve the ELT curriculum, teaching materials and
      instructor qualification standards
   -- A statement that DLIELC will monitor the ELT to ensure that DLIELC technical standards are being met
      and will certify the English Language Training Program (ELTP) every six months
   -- A statement that the LOAs will contain an appropriate line item for DLIELC to monitor and provide
      quality control of the proposed ELTP
 - If a DSCA waiver is granted, the waiver applies strictly to the scope of the proposed ELT program justified in
   the exception request. No change to the LOAs will be made to increase the student load or extend the duration
   of the ELT program without submitting a revised request to DSCA/PGM as indicated above.
 - References
   -- DoD Directive 5160.41E, Defense Language Program (DLP), 21 Oct 05, change 1, 27 May 10
   -- Air Force Joint Instruction 16-103, Managing the Defense English Language Program, 31Aug 94
   -- Air Force Instruction 16-105, Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training (JSCET), 3 Jan 11
   -- DoD 5105.38-M, Security Assistance Management Manual (SAMM), Chapter 10, 6 Jun 12




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                             3
             ENGLISH COMPREHENSION LEVEL (ECL) TEST: OVERVIEW
    - Primary DoD measurement tool for assessing the general English language proficiency of nonnative English
      speakers scheduled for training in US
     -- Four-option, multiple-choice test of listening and reading comprehension
     -- Emphasis on general English language proficiency (not academic or technical)
     -- Scored on a scale of 100
        --- Required ECL score for course entry set by school conducting course
        --- Most course requirements fall between 65 and 85
    - Paper-and-pencil version used outside of DLIELC
     -- 66 listening items on audio compact disc (CD)
     -- 34 reading items
     -- Test administration takes approximately 75 minutes
     -- Scored manually, using an answer key
     -- Number of correct items is student’s score
    - Online version used outside of DLIELC
     -- Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) provides online ECL administration through the Defense Language
        Proficiency Test (DLPT) system
     -- “English Comprehension Level (ECL) User Guide,” prepared by DMDC, provides assistance to TCOs/ATCOs
     -- 66 listening items
     -- 34 reading items
     -- Items are randomized
     -- Test times out automatically after 60 minutes
     -- Immediate access to scores via DMDC website
     -- Number of correct items is student’s score
     -- No answer sheets to return to DLIELC
     -- Technical requirements:
        --- One computer per candidate
        --- One pair of headphones per candidate
        --- More specific technological requirements can be found in the “Web-based Defense Language Testing
            Guide,” available from DMDC
    - Policy and procedures governed by DLIELC Instruction 1025.15, ECL Test Guidelines (through authority of
      DoD Instruction 5160.71)

    - JSCET prescribes policies and procedures for all security cooperation-sponsored education and training of
      international military students

    - Solely issued to and administered by Test Control Officers (TCOs) or Alternate Test Control Officers (ATCOs),
      designated on a Memorandum for Record (MFR) of TCO Appointment. TCOs must be US citizens who work
      for the US government in the grade of E-5, GS-05, or above (or equivalent)


4                                  DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
 - DLIELC mails new paper-and-pencil ECL test forms annually to properly appointed TCOs after they submit
   the annual ECL Questionnaire and DLIELC verifies test site compliance
   -- Overseas TCOs test International Military Students (IMS) to determine CONUS training requirement
      fulfillment or ELT needs
   -- CONUS TCOs test all direct-entry students to verify course-entry qualification
 - DLIELC tests all entry students to verify in-country ECL scores in accordance with JSCET, paragraph 5-12
 - Computer-adaptive (CAT) ECL version used at the DLIELC campus
   -- User-friendly format (Students need to use only A, B, C, D, and Enter keys)
   -- Students receive hands-on orientation through a video and a tutorial prior to taking the test
   -- Each student gets a unique version of the test
     --- Computer program determines appropriate item difficulty level based on student responses
     --- Advanced students do not waste time answering easy items
     --- Beginning students do not struggle with items beyond their level
     --- Better discrimination among students at higher levels
     --- Test administration takes approximately 28 minutes
     --- Approximately 18 reading items
     --- Approximately 19 listening items
     --- Reading section precedes listening section


                         ECL TESTING: IN-COUNTRY PROCEDURES
 - IMS identified as candidate for CONUS training
 - Country will administer American Language Course Placement Test (ALCPT) as screening test prior to ECL
   if candidates’ level of English is unknown or when a country has 3 candidates for one course
 - TCO administers ECL as final language qualification assessment to a maximum of 3 candidates per training
    slot
   -- If selected candidate makes the required score, and it is no more than 105 days old from the CONUS course
      report date
     --- The Invitational Travel Order (ITO) is processed and ECL score, test form, and date are provided on ITO
   -- If candidate makes the required score, but it is more than 105 days old from the CONUS course report date,
      calculated as the Wednesday prior to starting the first day of class for the DLIELC MASL, candidate
     --- Should be entered in language training in order to maintain language proficiency, and
     --- Must retake the ECL within 105 days of the CONUS course report date
   -- If candidate does not make required score
     --- Candidate is entered in full-time language training and can be retested after 30 days, or
     --- Another candidate is selected, or
     --- Course is rescheduled or canceled




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                           5
    - TCO forwards all paper-and-pencil ECL test answer sheets on a monthly basis to:
            DLIELC/LEAT
            2235 ANDREWS AVENUE
            JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO LACKLAND TX 78236-5259

                     ECL TESTING: US SERVICE SCHOOL PROCEDURES
    - Students are administered the ECL test upon entry at first US training location only. Students arriving to
      US training location directly from DLIELC are not tested again
    - If student achieves required ECL score, student is entered into training
    - If student does not achieve required ECL score
     -- Student is retested in 1-2 working days
     -- DLIELC and MILDEP are advised if retest is not successful
     -- MILDEP has responsibility to
        --- Waive prerequisite score, or
        --- Cancel training and assess penalty charges
     -- A second retest (third ECL) can be given if a waiver to do so is obtained from the MILDEP and from
        DLIELC/LEAT
    - TCO forwards all ECL test answer sheets on a monthly basis to:
            DLIELC/LEAT
            2235 ANDREWS AVENUE
            JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO LACKLAND TX 78236-5259

                               ECL TESTING: DLIELC PROCEDURES
    - Students receive a CAT ECL orientation on their first day of classroom instruction, which includes watching
      an instructional video and taking a short CAT ECL tutorial in the laboratory

    - Students take a CAT ECL during their first week in training
    - Students programmed under Military Articles and Services List (MASL) Item Identification Number (IIN)
      D177008, Specialized English Training (SET)
     -- Students must achieve the required ECL score to go to SET; if required score is not achieved
        --- Student enters General English (MASL IIN D177009 or D177027, as the case may be) and MILDEP is
            contacted
        --- MILDEP either reprograms student at DLIELC or recalls student homeland
    - Students programmed under MASL IIN D177009 or D177027
     -- Are placed in language training according to their in-country ECL score, and progress is monitored
        --- If the entry ECL is 11 points or more higher or lower than the in-country ECL score, a discrepancy
            message is transmitted by DLIELC Country Program Manager (CPM) to MILDEP, Combatant
            Command, and country
        --- If indications are that student will not achieve a qualifying ECL score, conditions (attitude, motivation,
            application, etc.) are investigated and a recommendation is sent to MILDEP/country for action


6                                DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                          DLIELC STUDENT PROFILE GUIDELINES
                           Selecting English Comprehension Level (ECL) Requirements
                                                   May 2012

 General Information

 The English Comprehension Level (ECL) measures English language proficiency through reading and listening
 items. Speaking and writing skills are not tested. A student’s background knowledge, experience, and aptitude
 in a specialty field ARE NOT tested on the ECL. Therefore, whereas the ECL is an indicator of a student’s
 general English language knowledge, the overall language competence a student demonstrates when completing
 specific tasks in a follow-on training (FOT) setting is influenced by the student’s language knowledge, topical
 knowledge and personal characteristics (e.g., aptitude, motivation).

 In the DLIELC Student Profile charts below, English language training level ability statements and limitations
 are based on DLIELC historical data and curriculum objectives.
      - These statements suggest levels of proficiency in other skills.
         -- The ECL tests reading, listening comprehension, vocabulary knowledge, and grammar knowledge.
             ECL test scores might suggest a general proficiency in speaking and writing, but these skills are not
             tested on the ECL.
      - These statements suggest general areas of capability.
         -- The range of ability within each DLIELC training level can vary.

 Ability can fluctuate based on the following:
    - A student’s ability can be stronger or weaker in some skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) than
        others.
     - A student functions at a higher/lower level in his or her own language.
              -- A student has a higher/lower educational level in his or her native country.
              -- A student’s personality and cultural background may influence performance.
     - Students who have attended General English Training (GET) and/or Specialized English Training (SET)
        typically demonstrate greater abilities at FOT than direct entry students since DLIELC graduates have
        experienced several weeks of acclimation and exposure to authentic language while also taking classes in
        an intensive English language program.
     - Students who have military specialty content knowledge and/or experience in their native language tend
        to have better success with both DLIELC SET and FOT courses.

 Recommended procedures for schoolhouses to determine ECL requirements for a FOT course

 1) Check the guidance in the JSCET regulation, 3 Jan 11 (Army Regulation 12-15, SECNAVINST 4950.4B,
    AFI 16-105) Chapter 5, Section IV, 5-14 and Section V, 5-18.
 2) Use the DLIELC Student Profile Guidelines chart to determine the general level of English proficiency
    desired.
 3) Reference ECL requirements of comparable training courses in the Military Articles and Services List
    (MASL).
 4) Contact AETC/A3T if you have questions about the ECL requirements and recommended prerequisites
    which might be applicable for a particular training course.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                             7
                            DLIELC STUDENT PROFILE CHARTS
    ECL                                                                            Oral Proficiency
    Requirement and      DLIELC Training Level & Limitations                       Interview (OPI)
    FOT Examples                                                                   and Other Possible
                                                                                   Prerequisites

    60-65 ECL            The DLIELC-trained language learner in this
                         range has the ability to:
    Less than 1% of
    FOT courses select   · Communicate at a basic level sufficient for
    this level of          performing non-skilled tasks.
    proficiency
                         · Read and understand simple instructions and
                           elementary military texts with basic military
    Target level for
                           themes (ranks, branches, common military
    “hands on” type
                           courtesies).
    jobs
                         · Handle basic social interactions such as seeking
    Sheet metal            and giving information, requesting and granting
    worker                 permission, and expressing preferences, all at a
                           very basic level without elaboration.
    Light-wheeled
    vehicle mechanic     · Provide simple descriptions of concrete
                           procedures using minimally connected sentences.
    Unit supply
                         · Understand the main idea of oral announcements
    Construction           up to 45 seconds in length or approximately 150
    equipment              words in length.
    operator
                         · Listen to a short message (in a face-to-face
                           interaction or on the phone), take simple notes,
                           and relay the message to a third person.

                         · Listen to a text and complete a simplified outline,
                           graphic organizer, or flow chart.

                         · Write simple as well as compound sentences and
                           combine two simple sentences to create a complex
                           sentence, but frequent errors in basic structure
                           occur.




8                           DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
  ECL                                                                                  Oral Proficiency
  Requirement and          DLIELC Training Level & Limitations                         Interview (OPI)
  FOT Examples                                                                         and Other Possible
                                                                                       Prerequisites

  70-75 ECL                The DLIELC-trained language learner in this
                           range has the ability to:
  Target level for
  technical jobs           · Understand and use materials required for most
                             technical vocations (technical orders, simple
  Basic                      manuals) and other material based on general
  Maintenance                military themes.
  (70)
                           · Conduct routine social and business interactions,
                             such as giving recommendations and suggestions,
  Supply training
                             requesting and offering assistance, asking for and
  (70)
                             making comparisons, expressing cause and effect,
                             inquiring about and responding to reasons and
  On-the-job
                             purposes, and giving sequenced instructions.
  training (70)
                           · Communicate face-to-face or via telephone/radio
  Medical service            to perform official duties.
  technician (70)
                           · Read a text up to 300 words in length, identify the
  Basic electronics          main idea and supporting details, and supply notes
  (70)                       in an outline or graphic organizer.

  Basic Officer            · Write a summary of an oral text 1-3 minutes in
  Leadership                 length; errors in sentence structure occur.
  courses (75)
                           · Participate in a discussion on a familiar topic.
  Captain’s Career
  courses (75)

  Military Police
  Basic Officer
  Leadership (75)

  Army
  Maintenance
  Management
  (75)




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                        9
     ECL                                                                            Oral Proficiency
     Requirement and      DLIELC Training Level & Limitations                       Interview (OPI)
     FOT Examples                                                                   and Other Possible
                                                                                    Prerequisites

     80 ECL               The DLIELC-trained language learner in this               An Oral
                          range has the ability to:                                 Proficiency
     Appropriate level                                                              Interview (OPI) is
     for higher level     · Function in an English-only academic or highly          a prerequisite for
     professional           technical environment.                                  aviation courses,
     military                                                                       where listening
     education (PME) or   · Exhibit listening comprehension and greater             comprehension and
     hazardous courses.     facility with speech as demonstrated in situational     speaking and
                            dialogs, various types of oral texts, and role-         pronunciation
     Management             playing activities.                                     skills are critical
     courses                                                                        for success.
                          · Write a summary of an oral paragraph up to 3
                            minutes in length and accurately write a                For students
     Some
                            paraphrase of an oral paragraph 1 minute in             attending PME
     undergraduate
                            length.                                                 courses, a DLIELC
     pilot training
     (UPT)                                                                          PME Prep course,
                          · Read authentic military and semi-technical texts
                                                                                    offered in the
                            350 words in length in a variety of formats, such as
     EOD                                                                            Advanced English
                            essays, reports, and briefings.
                                                                                    Section, is highly
     Diving courses       · Accurately transcribe from dictation.                   recommended.

                          · Write an original cohesive paragraph up to 150          FOT courses with a
                            words in length in military format as well as in the    highly technical or
                            following styles: descriptive, narrative, and           professional
                            expository. More controlled use of the language,        component should
                            but errors are still common.                            consider previous
                                                                                    experience in the
                                                                                    content or technical
                                                                                    area as a
                                                                                    prerequisite.

                                                                                    Some FOT sites use
                                                                                    the Nelson- Denny
                                                                                    reading test for
                                                                                    additional
                                                                                    assessment of
                                                                                    reading ability.




10                           DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
  ECL                                                                                  Oral Proficiency
  Requirement and          DLIELC Training Level & Limitations                         Interview (OPI)
  FOT Examples                                                                         and Other Possible
                                                                                       Prerequisites

  85 ECL                   The DLIELC-trained language learner in this                 An Oral
                           range has the ability to:                                   Proficiency
  Advanced flying                                                                      Interview (OPI)
  courses and              · Handle oral presentations, lectures, class debates,       test is also a
  some UPT                   military briefings and impromptu speeches; when           prerequisite for
                             giving presentations, student can adhere to an            exchange officer
  Safety engineer            assigned time limit.                                      programs,
  courses                                                                              advanced and/or
                           · Speak extensively about work and professional             instructor aviation
  Intelligence               experience.                                               courses, and public
  officer course                                                                       affairs courses.
                           · Conduct library research and produce an essay
                             of 450-500 words consisting of a minimum of five          The Test of English
  Public affairs
                             logically connected, cohesive paragraphs each             as a Foreign
  qualification
                             90-150 words in length; the essay has a                   Language
  course (PAQC)
                             recognizable introduction, development, and               (TOEFL) is
                             conclusion.                                               required for some
                                                                                       post-graduate
                           · Incorporate abstract concepts into writing and
                                                                                       courses. DLIELC
                             speaking
                                                                                       offers an Advanced
                           · Successfully interact with native speakers not used       Language
                             to dealing with non-native speakers of English.           Proficiency Skills
                                                                                       (ALPS III) TOEFL
                                                                                       course to help
                                                                                       prepare students
                                                                                       for these courses.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                         11
     ECL                                                                               Oral Proficiency
     Requirement and         DLIELC Training Level & Limitations                       Interview (OPI)
     FOT Examples                                                                      and Other Possible
                                                                                       Prerequisites

     90 ECL                  · Students with an ECL requirement of 90 should be        The TOEFL is
                               scheduled for The Advanced Language Proficiency         required for some
     This advanced             Skills courses, taught in the Advanced English          post-graduate
     professional level        Section at DLIELC, before proceeding to FOT. The        courses. DLIELC
     of proficiency is         DLIELC-trained language learner in these courses        offers an ALPS III
     rarely selected           has the ability to interpret, analyze, and critique     TOEFL course to
     for FOT courses.          academic materials from various sources.                help prepare
     Less than 0.5% of                                                                 students for these
     courses require this                                                              courses.
     level of proficiency.

     Judge   Advocate
     Officer  graduate
     program

     International
     Counterterrorism
     Fellows program




12                              DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                  FY      SERIES ECL QUESTIONNAIRE

 Please provide the information requested below. Please use the MEMORANDUM FOR RECORD to indicate
 any TCO or ATCO additions/changes. If TCO is scheduled to rotate, please inform DLIELC/LEAT. If there is
 no requirement for ECL testing, annotate below and return this form with a Certificate of Destruction (AF Form
 1565) for all ECL materials.

 SITE NUMBER:
 TEST CONTROL OFFICER:
 ALTERNATE TEST CONTROL OFFICERS:


                  MAILING ADDRESS
 Activity:
 Street:
 City/State/Zip

 PHYSICAL ADDRESS (if different from mailing address):
 Activity:
 Street:
 City/State/Zip
 Comm Phone:
 DSN Phone:
 Comm FAX:
 DSN FAX:
 E-mail:
 Message Address:


                           FY      ECL TEST MATERIALS REQUIREMENTS
 NUMBER OF ECL FORMS REQUIRED:
 NUMBER OF TEST BOOKLETS PER FORM:
 ONE CD WILL BE SENT PER FORM.
 NUMBER OF ECL ANSWER SHEETS (FORM 6748A) REQUIRED FOR FY _:
 IS THE ECL ADMINISTERED IN A LANGUAGE LAB? YES                           NO
 IF SO, HOW MANY POSITIONS ARE IN THE LAB?
 REMARKS:
 PERSON COMPLETING THIS FORM:
 DATE:




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                        13
                                  ECL Test Control Officer (TCO) Appointment
                                      MEMORANDUM FOR RECORD
     SUBJECT: Appointment of English Comprehension Level (ECL) Test Control Officer (TCO) and
              Alternate Test Control Officer (ATCO)

     REF: DLIELC Instruction 1025.15 (latest issue)

     1. The following personnel are appointed subject duties for Site #__________ IAW reference, effective
     ________________________________, or until officially relieved or released from appointment. Signatures
     below signify that the appointee has read and understood DLIELC Instruction 1025.15 and agrees to follow its
     provisions.


      TCO (print or type name)                              RANK                           SERVICE


      E-MAIL ADDRESS                                        SIGNATURE


      ATCO (print or type name)                             RANK                           SERVICE


      E-MAIL ADDRESS                                        SIGNATURE


      ATCO (print or type name)                             RANK                           SERVICE


      E-MAIL ADDRESS                                        SIGNATURE


      ATCO (print or type name)                             RANK                           SERVICE


      E-MAIL ADDRESS                                        SIGNATURE

     2. Appointments above supersede those of the previous TCO/ATCOs (provide names):



     3. Mail to:     DLIELC/LEAT                OR             FAX to:                     DSN: (312) 473-0211
                     2235 ANDREWS AVE                                                      COMM: (210) 671-0211
                     JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO LACKLAND TX 78236-5259
                     DLI.Testing@us.af.mil


     Signature of Appointing Official (Installation Commander or SCO)                              Date


     Name / Rank / Title of Appointing Official (typed or printed)                            E-mail Address

14                                  DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                  ORAL PROFICIENCY INTERVIEW (OPI): OVERVIEW
 - Some international students entering CONUS training must take the OPI.
 - Policies and procedures governed by DLIELC Instruction 1025.9, Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) Program
   Guidelines
   -- US services/schools establish the OPI requirement for their courses, coordinate with DLIELC/LEAT.
   -- Students must be ECL-qualified before taking the OPI.
 - The OPI tests interactive listening comprehension and speaking ability by means of an interview.
   -- DLIELC only certifies select GS-1701 personnel assigned to the resident campus as OPI raters
 - Two OPI raters conduct interviews on the resident campus or as part of a Mobile Training Team (MTT).
   Raters conduct:
   -- Resident interviews face-to-face or telephonically (primarily aviators/divers)
   -- Non-resident interviews telephonically
   -- MTT interviews according to method requested
   -- Students will be asked to talk about various topics, ask and answer questions, verbally handle situations,
      etc.
 - Ratings, based on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) skill level descriptions, range from 0 to 5 (0,
   0+, 1, 1+, etc.) with 0 indicating no functional proficiency and 5 the proficiency of a well-educated, native
   speaker.
 - A qualifying OPI score is valid for six months.
 - OPI interviews are verified only by DLIELC OPI-certified personnel on the resident campus.
 - OCONUS candidates who have taken a telephonic OPI must wait 90 days before being re-interviewed, unless
   a waiver is granted by DLIELC/LEAT. Waivers will normally not be granted before a 30-day wait-period has
   elapsed.
 - Students who require a qualifying OPI score must be tested in country or receive a waiver from DSCA prior
   to their arrival at DLIELC or their first training site. Those countries that are in-country OPI exempt will be
   tested upon arrival at DLIELC or their first training site.
 - Students who are programmed for OPI-required aviation training and who do not meet their OPI requirement
   must be programmed for MASL IIN D177026, Oral Proficiency Skills for Aviation (OPSAV) training, and
   meet their OPI requirement before entering their nine-week SET.


OPI TESTING: IN-COUNTRY PROCEDURES
 - TCO/SCO
   -- Ensures candidate is ECL-qualified before submitting a complete OPI request form to DLIELC.
   -- Arranges OPI schedule with DLIELC by submitting the “OPI Request Form” - found at
      http://www.dlielc.edu/Testing/opi_ReqFm.html - at least one week in advance.
     --- Allows 60 minutes per candidate
     --- Requests no more than two OPIs on one date
   -- Follows all test protocol outlined in the OPI appointment confirmation email message sent by DLIELC’s
      OPI coordinator.

DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                               15
      -- Establishes a private room as test site:
        --- Free of noise/distractions
        --- With chair, table/desk, telephone
            ---- Telephone must be a land-line; no cell phones, magic jacks/IPAD, or telephones via internet or
                 computer.
        --- With paper/pencil for candidate to use during Information Gathering Task (IGT) portion of interview
            only when requested by the raters/interviewers
      -- Identifies candidate (photo ID) on the day of the test
      -- Calls DLIELC at the telephone number designated in the appointment confirmation email message using
         only a land-line phone (not a speaker phone or cell phone)
      -- Remains in the testing room (off to the side) during test to preclude test compromise; does not allow
         anyone else to enter the room while test is being conducted
      -- Does not allow candidate to read or write anything except during the IGT
      -- Does not discuss OPI questions or responses with candidate during or after test, or permit such discussions
         of OPI questions between candidates.
     - DLIELC staff:
      -- Verifies clarity of connection and candidate information prior to start of interview
      -- Asks for a re-call if there is a bad connection (no more than two call-backs on a given date)
      -- Contacts LEAT staff if call is not received within 5 minutes
      -- LEAT cancels OPI session if call to DLIELC is more than 20 minutes late
      -- Terminates OPI if testing protocol is violated
      -- Releases rating to TCO/SCO by email within 2 business days (to allow time for rating verification process
         if necessary)
     - TCO/SCO:
      -- Informs appropriate in-country personnel of candidate’s OPI rating after notification by DLIELC
      -- Maintains OPI log book, noting candidate’s name, rank, date of OPI, and the rating
      -- Adds the OPI rating and date of interview on ITO and Security Assistance Network (SAN) Web
     ONLINE “OPI REQUEST FORM”: http://www.dlielc.edu/Testing/opi_ReqFm.html

     E-MAIL: OPI@us.af.mil

     TELEPHONE:          COMM:       (210) 671-5428
                         DSN:        (312) 473-5428
                         or
                         COMM:       (210) 671-4889
                         DSN:        (312) 473-4889

     FAX:                COMM:       (210) 671-0211
                         DSN:        (312) 473-0211




16                                DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14   17
                                                      OPI RATING FACTOR GRID
                Interactive                 Structural Control              Lexical              Delivery           Sociolinguistic          Global Tasks and
              Comprehension                   Texts Produced                Control                                  Competence                 Functions
     0+ The individual understands a       No control. Can only use     Memorized words       Even in              Severely limited.      Can make statements and
        number of short, memorized         memorized structures.        and phrases           memorized            Any knowledge of       ask questions using
        utterances in areas of             Individual words and         related to            speech, stress,      cultural               memorized material.
        immediate needs; frequent,         phrases.                     immediate             intonation, and      appropriateness has
        long pauses and repeated                                        survival needs.       tone usually         a nonlinguistic
        requests for repetition.                                                              quite faulty.        source.
     1   A native speaker must often       Structural accuracy is       Very limited.         Often speaks         Uses greetings and     Can create sentences;
         use slowed speech,                random or severely           Covers courtesy       with great           courtesy               begin, maintain, and close
         repetition, paraphrase, or a      limited. Almost every        expressions,          difficulty.          expressions. Can       short conversations by
         combination of these to be        utterance has errors in      introductions,        Pronunciation,       interact with native   asking and answering
         understood by this                basic structures. Time       identification,       stress, intonation   speakers used to       simple questions; satisfy
         individual.                       concepts are vague. Can      personal and          generally poor.      dealing with non-      simple daily needs.
         Misunderstandings are             formulate some               accommodation                              natives.
         frequent, but the individual is   questions.                   needs, daily
         able to ask for help and to       Discrete sentences.          routine.
         verify comprehension of
         native speech in face-to-face
         interaction.
     2   The individual can get the        Discourse is minimally       Sufficient to         Speaks with          Satisfies routine      Can describe people,
         gist of most everyday             cohesive. Grammatical        discuss high          confidence but       social demands and     places, and things; narrate
         conversations, but has some       structures are usually not   frequency             not facility. Can    limited work           current, past, and future
         difficulty understanding          very elaborate and not       concrete topics       usually be           requirements. Can      activities in full
         native speakers in situations     thoroughly controlled;       such as work,         understood by        interact with native   paragraphs; state facts;
         that require a specialized or     errors are frequent.         family, personal      those not used to    speakers not used to   give instructions or
         sophisticated knowledge.          Simple structure and         background and        dealing with         dealing with           directions; ask and answer
         (May require a native             basic grammatical            interests, travel,    non-natives.         non-natives; native    questions in the work
         speaker to adjust to his/her      relations are typically      current events.                            speakers may have      place; deal with non-
         limitations in some way).         controlled.                  Imprecise for less                         to adjust to           routine daily situations.
                                           Full paragraphs.             common topics.                             limitations.
     3   In face-to-face conversation      Effectively combines         Broad enough for      Speaks readily       Uses cultural          Can converse extensively
         with natives speaking the         structure and vocabulary     effective formal      and fills pauses     references. When       in formal and informal
         standard dialect at a normal      to convey meaning.           and informal          suitably.            errors are made,       situations; discuss abstract
         rate of speech,                   Discourse is cohesive.       conversations on      Pronunciation        can easily repair      topics; support opinions;
         comprehension is quite            Use of structural devices    practical, social,    may be               the conversation.      hypothesize; deal with
         complete. Although cultural       is flexible and elaborate.   and professional      obviously                                   unfamiliar topics and
         references, proverbs, and the     Errors occur in low          topics. Can           foreign. Flaws                              situations; clarify points.
         implications of nuances and       frequency and highly         convey abstract       in stress,
         idiom may not be fully            complex structures; but      concepts.             intonation, pitch
         understood, the individual        structural inaccuracy                              rarely disturb
         can easily repair the             rarely causes                                      the native
         conversation.                     misunderstanding.                                  speaker.
                                           Extended discourse.
     4   Can understand native             Organizes discourse well,    Precise for           Speaks               Uses and               Can tailor language to fit
         speakers of the standard and      using appropriate            representational      effortlessly and     understands details    the audience; counsel;
         other major dialects in           rhetorical devices and       purposes within       smoothly, but        and ramifications      persuade; represent an
         essentially any face-to-face      high-level discourse         personal and          would seldom         of target cultural     official point of view;
         interaction. Can understand       structures.                  professional          be perceived as      references. Can set    negotiate; advocate a
         the details and ramifications     Speeches, lectures,          experience. Can       a native speaker.    and shift the tone     position at length; interpret
         of concepts that are              debates, conference          elaborate                                  of exchanges with      informally.
         culturally or conceptually        discussions.                 concepts freely;                           a variety of native
         different from his/her own.                                    choose                                     speakers.
         Understands shifts of both                                     appropriate words
         subject matter and tone.                                       to convey
                                                                        nuances of
                                                                        meaning.
     5   (No gaps in comprehension,        Functionally equivalent      Breadth of            Functionally         Speech reflects the    Functionally equivalent to
         including all details and         to a highly articulate,      vocabulary and        equivalent to a      cultural standards     a highly articulate, well-
         nuances.)                         well-educated native         idiom equivalent      highly articulate,   of country where       educated native speaker.
                                           speaker.                     to that of a highly   well-educated        language is
                                           All texts controlled by a    articulate, well-     native speaker       natively spoken.
                                           highly articulate, well-     educated native       of a standard
                                           educated native speaker.     speaker.              dialect.
         DLIELC FORM 1025.9(A), 20030301 (Reverse)




18                                           DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                        DETERMINING COUNTRIES EXEMPT FROM
                            ENGLISH LANGUAGE TESTING
 - DSCA, DLIELC, MILDEPs and Combatant Commands evaluate countries annually based on
   -- Use of English as a first language
   -- Literacy rate
   -- Socioeconomic standards
   -- CONUS training success/fail rate by service
 - DLIELC will track
   -- ECL/OPI scores by country/service
   -- ECL TCO appointments
   -- ECL/OPI test administrations by test site (TCN) and country, respectively
 - DLIELC will coordinate requests for new waivers, continued waivers, and removal of waivers
 - DSCA has final approval authority and will initiate message listing exempted countries annually


                       ENGLISH LANGUAGE TESTING EXEMPTIONS
 The DSCA FY 12 ECL AND OPI COUNTRY EXEMPTION LISTS, USP 011136-10, issued
 Dec 27, 2011, is still in effect until further notice. When the new exemption message is available,
 DSCA will send notification to DLIELC, Combatant Commands (COCOMs), and the MILDEPs.
 The current Exemption List memo is available on the SAN WEB Home Page or at
 https://www.dlielc.edu/Testing/ecl_test.html .




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                 19
                                        PROGRAMMING GUIDANCE
     TO
     GRADUATE
     WITH                60 ECL       65 ECL       70 ECL       75 ECL        80 ECL       85 ECL       90 ECL


      IF ECL IS:        THEN PROGRAM TRAINING FOR THE FOLLOWING NUMBER OF WEEKS:

      29 or less         29           31           33           36            43           55           69
      30 to 34           14           16           18           21            28           40           54
      35 to 39           12           14           16           19            26           38           52
      40 to 44            9           11           13           16            23           35           49
      45 to 49            6            8           10           13            20           32           46
      50 to 54            4            6            8           11            18           30           44
      55 to 59            2            3            5             8           15           27           41
      60 to 64                         2            4             7           14           26           40
      65 to 69                                      2             5           12           24           38
      70 to 74                                                    4           11           23           37
      75 to 79                                                                 6           18           32
      80 to 84                                                                             11           25
      85 to 89                                                                                          12


     NOTES:

     1. One week of training = 30 hours of instruction.

     2. This guidance does NOT include nine weeks for the SET phase of the ALC. Therefore, to estimate the
        amount of time needed to achieve a certain ECL exam score AND complete SET, add nine to the number of
        weeks shown on the chart. For example, someone with an ECL score of 60-64 could be expected to reach a
        70 ECL and complete SET after approximately 13 weeks of intensive training.

     3. The ECL test is not designed to discriminate within a score range of 0 to 29. Based on DLIELC experience,
        the average student will progress from zero proficiency level to a score of 30 in about 15 weeks. The ECL
        test is of no value in tracking growth during this period.

     4. Progress in an in-country training program should be measured with the ALCPT, not the ECL. Kept secure
        and properly administered, the ALCPT renders results comparable to those of the ECL.

     5. Students lacking the required OPI rating, as determined by FOT MASL, will be programmed for MASL IIN
        D177026, which includes nine weeks of SET. Aviation Leadership Program Scholarship students lacking the
        required OPI rating will be programmed for MASL IIN D177028, which includes nine weeks of SET.

     6. This chart represents only general estimations of programming time for language training. See DLIELC
        Student Profile guidelines on p. 8 for a list of other factors that affect individual language acquisition.


20                                DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                                PART II




                               RESIDENT
                           ENGLISH LANGUAGE
                           TRAINING PROGRAM




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14   21
                           -NOTES-




22   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                    RESIDENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE
                        TRAINING PROGRAM
This section provides information on DLIELC’s resident ELT program. Specifically, this part covers the
American Language Course (ALC), Advanced English Training (including Instructor Development courses),
and FY14 and FY15 ELT course programming information.


                               AMERICAN LANGUAGE COURSE
The ALC, published by DLIELC, is designed to teach English as a foreign language (EFL). The objective of the
course is to provide students with a sufficient level of fluency and communicative proficiency in English to
enable them to successfully pursue technical or professional training in schools conducted by the DoD. The
ALC materials are geared for students from a wide variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. The materials
are available for nonresident purchase and are currently used in more than 70 countries worldwide. Information
on how to obtain the materials can be found in the DLIELC Catalog of Materials, Courses, and Support, or on
DLIELC’s web site, http://www.dlielc.edu/.
The ALC is divided into two phases: General English Training (GET), Specialized English Training (SET) or
Professional Military Education Preparation (PME Prep), which is offered in the Advanced English Section.
Students may enter GET only, SET only or PME Prep only, or a combination of GET and SET or GET and
PME Prep. Those who enter SET or PME Prep must first meet all language proficiency requirements, including
required ECL score and OPI ratings, either in their countries before coming to DLIELC or through their GET
courses. Following graduation, students proceed to their FOT.


                                GENERAL ENGLISH TRAINING
The purpose of GET is to raise a student's English language proficiency to the level required to enter SET, PME
Prep, or other FOT programs, such as DLIELC courses offered in the Advanced English Section for instructors
and other language specialists.
The GET of the ALC consists of materials designed to conform to classroom group learning and individualized
interactive multimedia laboratory instruction. Small classes at DLIELC ensure that students have ample
opportunity to participate in classroom activities. Students are grouped homogeneously according to their ECL
scores. Achievement tests (book quizzes and performance evaluations) and the ECL are administered on a
regular basis to evaluate the students’ mastery of the objectives and their progress in the language. Students are
expected to demonstrate progress at a rate determined by their required ECL scores and the time allotted to their
training. They are also expected to complete all classroom assignments and two or more hours of homework
each evening. Students experiencing academic problems are provided counseling and supplementary language
training as warranted. When students do not meet their ECL requirements, DLIELC recommends to the
sponsoring service that their training time be extended or the students be returned to their countries. When
students progress at a rate above expectations, DLIELC advises the sponsoring services so that their FOT
schedule can be adjusted to accommodate an anticipated early graduation from DLIELC.
The General English materials consist of 34 books divided into 6 levels. Levels I through V consist of six books
each; Level VI has four books. The Placement Guidelines Chart on the following page contains end-of-book
ALCPT/ECL scores.

DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                          23
     GUIDELINES FOR PLACEMENT IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRAINING AND
                 ADVANCEMENT IN THE ALC BOOKS, 1-34

                                           ALCPT and ECL RANGE
                                                   FOR:




              PLACEMENT ADVANCEMENT                                      PLACEMENT ADVANCEMENT
      BOOK                                                   BOOK
                SCORE      SCORE                                           SCORE      SCORE

        1            0*                   0*                    18           59 - 63                61

        2            0*                   0*                    19           61 - 65                63

        3            0*                   0*                    20           63 - 67                65

        4         0* - 29                 0*                    21           65 - 69                67

        5         0* - 29                 0*                    22           67 - 71                69

        6         0* - 29                 25                    23           69 - 73                71

        7         25 - 33                 29                    24           71 - 74                73

        8         29 - 37                 33                    25           73 - 75                74

        9         33 - 41                 37                    26           74 - 76                75

       10         37 - 45                 41                    27           75 - 77                76

       11         41 - 49                 45                    28           76 - 78                77

       12         45 - 51                 49                    29           77 - 79                78

       13         49 - 53                 51                    30           78 - 81                80

       14         51 - 55                 53                    31           79 - 82               80+

       15         53 - 57                 55                    32           80 - 83               80+

       16         55 - 59                 57                    33           81 - 84               80+

       17         57 - 61                 59                    34           82 - 85               80+


 * ALCPT and ECL scores of 29 or below cannot be considered valid indicators of a student’s proficiency.
   Students at this level should be placed in appropriate books based on instructor evaluation.




24                          DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
Books 1-30 focus on four areas: functions, grammar, skills, and vocabulary. Functions are the ways we use a
language to communicate. There are exercises in the lessons that show the student how and when to use certain
words, phrases, and sentences in particular situations. The grammar structures in the lesson are the forms the
student needs in order to communicate correctly. Skills exercises are designed to improve the student’s
listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Finally, the vocabulary section provides the words and
expressions the student will need to accomplish the functions and the grammar exercises. Each instructional
package for Books 1-30 consists of the following materials:

                Student Text
                Instructor Text
                Language Laboratory Activities Text
                Audio CDs / DVD kit
                Book quizzes

Books 31-34 focus on the development of language skills. Each of these books is centered around a specific
theme which acts as the framework for the teaching of vocabulary and grammar and provides the content for
higher language skills development in the areas of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
The materials include readings, audio recordings, and videos which have been selected from commercially
published sources as well as from professional military education course materials. Each instructional package
for Books 31-34 is composed of the following materials:

                Student Text
                Instructor Text
                Audio Recordings on CD
                Videos on DVD
                Book of Idioms


                        ALC COMPUTER BASED TRAINING (CBT)

In the field of ELT, multimedia computer platforms and computer-assisted language learning methodologies
have rapidly evolved to the point of universality in their application to language training. Computer Based
Training (formerly referred to as Interactive Multimedia Instruction [IMI]), as the name suggests, employs
multimedia—full-motion video, graphics, text, animation, and sound—to support classroom and textbook
language learning objectives.

DLIELC has developed and integrated CBT as part of the total instructional package for its training materials
and has virtually replaced audiotapes in the traditional language laboratory setting. Because students totally
control the pace and direction of the CBT lessons, they can concentrate on exercises that will improve their own
weakest areas and thus become more independent learners of English.

CBT has been developed to support Levels I through V of the American Language Course. Students studying
DLIELC’s CBT attend CBT labs two-to-four periods per book. CBT has also been developed supporting
several SET codes.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                          25
 As more and more nonresident locations install computer labs for language training, it becomes more important
 for the SCOs to provide information on compatible computer lab or CBT systems.


                              CBT Systems Requirements
                   Minimum Operating System and Software Requirements

     Minimum: Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 3

     1.5 Ghz processor or faster processor (2 Ghz recommended)

     4 GB RAM

     500 GB ATA 7200 RPM hard drive (1 TB recommended)

     Graphics card supporting DirectX 9 with 256 MB of RAM (DirectX 10 with 1 GB of RAM recommended)

     CD-ROM / DVD-ROM drive – for installation only

     Audio input / output

     Headphones or speakers; microphones

     Keyboard and mouse

     15-inch or larger monitor with resolution capability of 1024 x 768 (17-inch monitor recommended)




26                          DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                              SPECIALIZED ENGLISH TRAINING
SET is designed for students who already have a strong proficiency in general English. The materials emphasize
the language skills necessary for, and the technical terminology of, a particular military occupational specialty
such as flying, ordnance, or electronics.

The SET phase of the ALC consists of modular materials designed to meet the English language skills needs of
students scheduled to attend training in a variety of specialties. All SET students study Module 101, Orientation
to Specialized English, during their first week. The next seven weeks of training depend on the scheduled FOT.
In addition, there are materials addressing reading comprehension, specific speaking, and formal writing skills
for those scheduled for mid- and senior management training, and integrated live radio communication tape
practice for aviators. All students conclude SET with Module 109, Transition to Follow-On Training.


                                          SET PROGRESSION


      WEEK 1              2          3         4         5         6         7         8              9

  Orientation to                                                                               Transition to
   Specialized                       7-WEEK SPECIALIZED CORE                                    Follow-On
     English                                                                                     Training


    Module 101                           SKILLS CONTINUATION                                    Module 109


                                NOTE: 7-week core depends on scheduled FOT.

Various combinations of the SET materials are used to meet a wide variety of FOT requirements. In each
specialty, there are one to seven specific modules supplemented by modules from other specialties. For
example, after Module 101, a student scheduled for Air Traffic Control would study English Language Skills
for Communication, English Language Skills for Aviation, and English Language Skills for Navigation.
Scheduling decisions depend upon such factors as experience, military service, FOT site, and educational
background. SET materials—designed for use in an intensive language training program—are taught in classes
of six to eight students.

Students in language-critical and flight-related training (e.g., undergraduate pilot, advanced flying, instructor
pilot, experimental test pilot, public affairs officer, etc.) have oral proficiency requirements (determined by the
FOT) ranging from 2/1+ to 2+/2+. These students are given an OPI before entering SET. The purpose of this
assessment is to rate the students’ overall listening comprehension and speaking proficiencies and identify areas
in need of improvement in order to meet rigorous FOT requirements. The OPI requirements must be met before
entering SET.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                            27
                          ADVANCED ENGLISH TRAINING (AET)
                        INCLUDING INSTRUCTOR DEVELOPMENT
 In addition to General English and Specialized English training, DLIELC offers Advanced English Training
 (AET). AET is made up of a number of courses that target Advanced Language Development, Instructor
 Development, and Professional Development.

 Advanced Language Development courses (PME Prep, ALPS I, II, and III) employ an integrated curriculum
 that increases students’ communicative competence in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
 Additionally, students will develop their critical thinking skills and increase their knowledge of American
 culture. Advanced Language Development courses are ideal for instructors, NATO and international posting
 candidates, translators, interpreters, and candidates for professional military post-graduate studies.

 Instructor Development courses like the Basic American Language Instructor Course (BALIC), the Advanced
 English Language Instructor Course (AELIC), and the Methods and Culture Seminar (MACS) are designed to
 provide training and practice in English-as-a-Foreign or Second Language (EFL/ESL) methodology for novice
 as well as experienced instructors. These courses provide advanced instruction in grammar and phonology and
 are designed to improve an individual’s proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
 Familiarization with American culture, along with learning how to incorporate cultural knowledge into the
 teaching process, is also emphasized.

 Professional Development courses such as the Materials Development Seminar (MDS) allow English language
 specialists to become familiar with different phases of the curriculum development process used at DLIELC.
 The principles and practices involved in establishing/managing language training programs in their countries are
 covered in Managing English Language Training (MELT).




28                          DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
            English Language Training Resident Courses
DLIELC offers a variety of English language courses for beginner, intermediate and advanced learners of
English as a Second or Foreign language at JBSA Lackland, TX. In-house developed materials and some
commercial texts are used for these courses.

Courses in General and Specialized English
Ÿ American Language Course (ALC) General English Training (GET) and Specialized English Training
  (SET) – MASL IIN D177009
  This course is variable in length (minimum 10 weeks to be eligible for a diploma and there must be a
  minimum of 7 weeks in SET), includes GET and SET, and may be scheduled to start any week. Students
  must meet the ECL and, if applicable, the OPI requirement(s) for the follow-on training (FOT) course before
  they are moved into the SET portion of this course—even if in specific cases the ECL and/or OPI
  requirement(s) have been waived by FOT.
Ÿ ALC GET only – MASL IIN D177027
  This course is variable in length (minimum 10 weeks to be eligible for a diploma) and may be
  scheduled to start any week.
Ÿ ALC SET only – MASL IIN D177008
  This nine-week course focuses on functional aspects of language, learning strategies, and terminology
  associated with technical training and professional military education skills. It may be scheduled to start any
  week. Students must meet the ECL and, if applicable, the OPI requirement(s) for their FOT course before
  they are moved into the SET portion of the course. To be eligible for a diploma the student must successfully
  complete at least 7 weeks of SET. If FOT decides in specific cases to waive their ECL and/or OPI
  requirement(s), SCO/MilDep must submit a separate waiver request to DLIELC for approval to allow
  student to enter SET, with the understanding that the student will not receive a diploma.
Ÿ ALC for Aviation Leadership Program (ALP) Scholarship – MASL IIN D177024
   This MASL is established for AF ALP Scholarship students and is used for funding purposes only.
   Training is basically the same as MASL IIN D177008 or D177009. All students will complete aviation
   SET. Students who do not have their required ECL must attend GET. Students who do not have their
   required OPI must attend the OPSAV course. See below.

Ÿ Oral Proficiency Skills for Aviation (OPSAV) Course – MASL IIN D177026
  (MASL IIN D177028 for ALP Scholarship candidates)
  This course is designed to help students achieve the necessary oral proficiency level for success in both their
  SET and FOT. The course offers extensive practice in pronunciation, global speaking proficiency, and
  listening comprehension within a variety of contexts and a wide range of formats. Particular emphasis is
  given to the comprehension of electronic voice communication over two-way radios and telephones. This
  training prepares students for the unique challenges of radio communication which is required of them in
  SET and at FOT. While the course focuses primarily on routine, day-to-day proficiency needs, a variety of
  aviation-related themes are woven into each lesson. Recorded samples obtained from Americans are used as
  the basis for classroom language instruction. Additionally, the OPSAV course provides relevant cultural
  orientation by examining typical communication styles and training methods used in the US. This MASL
  includes 16 weeks of OPSAV and nine weeks of SET for a maximum of 25 weeks. The student must
DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                          29
      complete at least 7 weeks of SET in order to be eligible for a diploma. However, course length is variable
      because students can be moved out of OPSAV and into SET as soon as they achieve their required OPI
      ratings. Students must meet the ECL requirement for FOT prior to entrance into the OPSAV course and they
      must meet the OPI requirement before they are moved into SET—even if in specific cases the ECL and/or
      OPI requirement(s) have been waived by FOT. If FOT waives one or both requirements, DLIELC still needs
      to approve a waiver before the student is moved into SET. If candidates ECL qualify in country, it is
      strongly recommended that they be administered a telephonic OPI in their homeland prior to
      scheduling them for this course. If they achieve the OPI score required by their FOT, they need not be
      programmed for the OPSAV course.



 Advanced English Section
 The Advanced English Section’s mission is twofold: 1) improve the language proficiency skills of
 international military and civilian personnel through courses for advanced language development, and
 2) develop English language specialists to work in their countries’ English language training programs
 as instructors, managers, and curriculum/test developers.

 Courses for Advanced Language Development
     Professional Military Education Preparation (PME Prep) – MASL IIN D177014
     Course Length: 9 weeks
     Entry Requirement: 80 ECL
     PME Prep emphasizes the development of English language skills for International Military Students who
     will attend PME courses with their American counterparts. Students practice all four language skills
     (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and learn to deal linguistically with challenging military topics
     through formal and informal discussions, presentations and military-style briefings, and completion of a
     research paper. Each student will assume the role of group discussion leader, learning how to plan, lead,
     monitor, and mediate wide-ranging discussions among classmates from different countries and cultures.
     Students will experience intensive group dynamics, enhancement of their English language skills, and US
     military acculturation in preparation for PME follow-on training.

     This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                          PME Prep
                   FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                 Start Date    Grad Date                Start Date    Grad Date
                 28 OCT 13        27 DEC 13             27 OCT 14        26 DEC 14
                  4 NOV 13         3 JAN 14              3 NOV 14         2 JAN 15
                 11 NOV 13        10 JAN 14             10 NOV 14         9 JAN 15
                 20 JAN 14        21 MAR 14             19 JAN 15        20 MAR 15
                 24 MAR 14        23 MAY 14             23 MAR 15        22 MAY 15
                  7 APR 14         6 JUN 14              6 APR 15         5 JUN 15
                 21 APR 14        20 JUN 14             20 APR 15        19 JUN 15
                 23 JUN 14        22 AUG 14             22 JUN 15        21 AUG 15

30                             DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
Advanced Language Proficiency Skills (ALPS)
The following Advanced Language Proficiency Skills courses are intended for English language instructors,
NATO candidates, translators, interpreters, candidates for professional military post-graduate studies, as well as
other military members and civilian personnel. These courses are designed using an integrated curriculum to
increase communicative competence in all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), as
well as increase familiarity with US culture.

  ALPS I – MASL IIN D177018
  Course Length: 12 weeks
  Entry Requirements: 1) 80 ECL
                      2) OPI rating of 2/1+
  ALPS I emphasizes development of English language skills through class interaction, with a focus on
  contemporary issues. Although this course is structurally similar to ALPS II, the material is geared toward
  those students who exhibit intermediate-level English language proficiency skills in reading, writing,
  speaking, and listening. Through theme-based readings, audio/video materials, classroom discussions, and
  writing assignments, students have many opportunities to practice and improve all four language skills.
  Notes:   1) Students entering the course with a 2/1+ OPI will be administered a maximum of two OPIs
              while in residence in order to meet the diploma requirement rating of 2/2.
           2) Schedule a telephonic OPI with DLIELC well in advance of the course dates. OPI scores are
              valid for six months.
           3) Consider scheduling students for MACS and ALPS I combinations, if desired.

  This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                           ALPS I
                  FY14 Class Schedule                     FY15 Class Schedule
                Start Date     Grad Date                Start Date    Grad Date
                 7 OCT 13         27 DEC 13              6 OCT 14       26 DEC 14
                23 DEC 13         14 MAR 14             22 DEC 14       13 MAR 15
                31 MAR 14         20 JUN 14             30 MAR 15       19 JUN 15
                23 JUN 14         12 SEP 14             22 JUN 15       11 SEP 15




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                            31
     ALPS II—MASL IIN D177031
     Course Length: 12 weeks
     Entry Requirements: 1) 85 ECL
                         2) OPI rating of 2/2
     ALPS II emphasizes development of English language skills through class interaction, with a
     focus on contemporary issues. Although this course is structurally similar to ALPS I, the material
     is geared toward those students who exhibit higher-level English language proficiency skills in
     reading, writing, speaking, and listening. By participating in group discussions, giving oral
     presentations, reading and writing essays, and viewing videos related to relevant topics, students
     can improve all four language skills and can learn to deal linguistically with challenging,
     unfamiliar topics. Each student will assume the role of discussion facilitator, learning how to
     plan, lead, monitor, and mediate wide-ranging discussions among classmates from different
     countries and cultures.
     Notes:   1) Schedule a telephonic OPI with DLIELC well in advance of the course dates. OPI scores are
                 valid for six months.
              2) Consider scheduling students for ALPS II and AELIC/MELT/MACS combinations, if
                 desired.

     This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                            ALPS II
                    FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                  Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
                   7 OCT 13         27 DEC 13             6 OCT 14        26 DEC 14
                  23 DEC 13         14 MAR 14            22 DEC 14        13 MAR 15
                  31 MAR 14         20 JUN 14            30 MAR 15        19 JUN 15
                  23 JUN 14          12 SEP 14           22 JUN 15         11 SEP 15




32                            DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
  ALPS III TOEFL—MASL IIN D177022
  Course Length: 16 weeks
  Entry Requirements: 1) 85 ECL
                      2) OPI rating of 2/2
  ALPS III emphasizes development of critical thinking skills and techniques for improving linguistic
  competence. It is an ideal course for military and civilian professionals who will pursue post-graduate
  degrees at Department of Defense schools and colleges and for EFL instructors who will teach a Test of
  English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) familiarization course in their countries. General test-taking
  strategies and those specifically needed for the TOEFL Internet-based Test (TOEFL iBT) are the focus of
  the first four weeks. During the subsequent twelve weeks, participants will hone their academic language
  skills by analyzing and critiquing materials from various sources and by completing several writing
  assignments leading up to the completion of a university-style research paper.
  Notes:   1) Schedule a telephonic OPI with DLIELC well in advance of the course dates. OPI scores are
              valid for six months.
           2) Only students scheduled for follow-on training (FOT) that requires a TOEFL score will take
              the TOEFL iBT.
           3) For students with an FOT TOEFL requirement, an in-country TOEFL iBT score of 70 or
              higher is strongly recommended.

  This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                          ALPS III
                  FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
                25 NOV 13         14 MAR 14             24 NOV 14       13 MAR 15
                3 MAR 14          20 JUN 14             2 MAR 15        19 JUN 15
                26 MAY 14          12 SEP 14            25 MAY 15        11 SEP 15
                 8 SEP 14         26 DEC 14              7 SEP 15       25 DEC 15




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                         33
 Courses for English Language Specialists
     DLIELC offers a variety of courses designed to enhance the skills of international English language
     specialists—personnel dedicated to English language teaching, program management, and course/test
     development. In addition to the courses described below, it is highly recommended that English language
     specialists continue to work on their English language proficiency by enrolling, every two or three years, in an
     ALPS course appropriate for their proficiency level. Language maintenance and enhancement are essential for
     all English language specialists and the programs they serve.

 Instructor Development Courses
     Basic American Language Instructor Course (BALIC)—MASL IIN D177007
     Course Length: 27 weeks
     Entry Requirement: 80 ECL
     BALIC is designed to provide military and civilian personnel who are non-native speakers of English
     with a strong foundation in the field of English Language teaching in order that they may teach English in
     their countries. The course is divided into three 9-week blocks consisting of two 3-hour units of
     instruction each day. Each block provides many opportunities for participants to improve their English
     proficiency in each of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), as well as increase their
     knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, teaching fundamentals, linguistic functions, American culture, and
     the ALC materials. In addition to observing ESL instructors teaching classes in the General English
     Section, trainees are afforded numerous practice-teaching opportunities using the ALC materials.

     This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                               BALIC
                     FY14 Class Schedule                     FY15 Class Schedule
                   Start Date     Grad Date                Start Date    Grad Date
                    4 NOV 13           9 MAY 14              3 NOV 14        8 MAY 15
                    6 JAN 14           11 JUL 14             5 JAN 15        10 JUL 15
                   10 MAR 14           12 SEP 14            9 MAR 15         11 SEP 15
                   12 MAY 14          14 NOV 14             11 MAY 15       13 NOV 15
                    14 JUL 14         16 JAN 15              13 JUL 15      15 JAN 16
                   15 SEP 14          20 MAR 15             14 SEP 15       18 MAR 16




34                              DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
  Advanced English Language Instructor Course (AELIC)—MASL IIN D177006
  Course Length: 16 weeks
  Entry Requirements: 1) 85 ECL
                      2) OPI rating of 2/2
  AELIC is designed for BALIC graduates or those with a teaching degree (or its equivalent) and at least
  two years’ experience teaching English as a Foreign or Second Language in their countries. The purpose
  of the course is threefold: 1) to increase the student’s own written English language proficiency, 2) to
  acquaint the student with current language teaching theory and methodology for application in both
  intensive and non-intensive language-learning environments, and 3) to give the student practice-teaching
  opportunities in order to experiment with, and perfect, contemporary language-teaching techniques.
  Objectives include learning to deliver student-centered and communicative lessons by observing ESL
  instructors teaching classes in the General English Section, learning to utilize ALC Books 25 to 30,
  gaining knowledge about student evaluation and assessment (including an overview of the OPI), and
  learning to use CDs/DVDs and Computer Based Training (CBT) lessons in support of the ALC texts.
  Notes:   1) Schedule a telephonic OPI with DLIELC well in advance of the course dates. OPI scores are
              valid for six months.
           2) Students must have completed BALIC or have a teaching degree (or its equivalent).
           3) Students must be ESL/EFL instructors with a minimum of two years’ experience.
           4) Consider scheduling students for AELIC and MELT/MACS/ALPS II combinations,
              if desired.

  This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                           AELIC
                  FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
                 6 JAN 14         25 APR 14              5 JAN 15       24 APR 15
                12 MAY 14         29 AUG 14             11 MAY 15       28 AUG 15
                15 SEP 14          2 JAN 15             14 SEP 15        1 JAN 16




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                         35
     Methodology and Culture Seminar (MACS)—MASL IIN D177019
     Course Length: 9 weeks
     Entry Requirements: 1) 80 ECL
                         2) OPI rating of 2/2
     MACS is designed for experienced ESL/EFL instructors and focuses on expanding participants’
     knowledge of culture in general and US culture in particular so that when they return to their countries to
     teach English, they can do so with greater cultural awareness. Activities on a range of topics such as
     family life, education, government, and the military present US customs and values within a framework
     that allows participants to compare and contrast US culture with their own. In addition, participants will
     explore ways to handle the cultural aspects of language acquisition and better prepare their students for
     training opportunities in the US and/or interactions with American military and civilian personnel
     stationed abroad. Teaching strategies for incorporating aspects of US culture into ALC lessons will be
     examined and practiced through peer-teaching opportunities. Regularly scheduled tours and classroom
     observations of ESL instructors in the General English Section will supplement and further solidify
     information covered during the seminar.
     Notes:   1) Schedule a telephonic OPI with DLIELC well in advance of the course dates. OPI scores are
                 valid for six months.
              2) Students must be ESL/EFL instructors with a minimum of two years’ experience.
              3) Consider scheduling students for MACS and AELIC/ALPS I/ALPS II combinations,
                 if desired.
     This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                              MACS
                     FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                   Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
                   27 JAN 14         28 MAR 14             26 JAN 15       27 MAR 15
                   28 APR 14         27 JUN 14             27 APR 15       26 JUN 15
                    1 SEP 14         31 OCT 14             31 AUG 15       30 OCT 15




36                             DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
Professional Development Courses
  Managing English Language Training (MELT) – MASL IIN D177013
  Course Length: 9 weeks
  Entry Requirement: 80 ECL
  MELT is designed for international personnel who are or will be in English Language Training Program
  (ELTP) managerial positions in their countries. Participants are provided with the practical knowledge
  needed for administering, managing, and supervising an ELTP. Participants also become more familiar
  with concrete aspects of ELTP management as they focus on DLIELC’s organizational planning,
  structure and goals, practical day-to-day operations, and implementation of the ALC materials.
  Participants will encounter and explore real-world aspects of ELTP management and apply theories to
  understand the workings of educational environments. Group and individual projects allow participants to
  examine particular facets of management for their specific programs or areas of interest.
  Note:    Consider scheduling students for MELT and AELIC/ALPS II combinations, if desired.

  This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                            MELT
                  FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
                21 OCT 13         20 DEC 13             20 OCT 14       19 DEC 14
                 6 JAN 14         7 MAR 14               5 JAN 15       6 MAR 15
                 1 SEP 14         31 OCT 14             31 AUG 15       30 OCT 15


  Materials Development Seminar (MDS)—MASL IIN D177030
  Course Length: 8 weeks
  Entry Requirement: 85 ECL
  MDS is designed for international English language specialists who are or will be creating materials for
  English language training. Seminar participants become familiar with different phases of the curriculum
  development process used at DLIELC, with particular emphasis on course design, the writing of language
  objectives, and the development of targeted activities for the language classroom. Each participant is
  expected to arrive with a specific curriculum project in mind that can be developed by the end of the
  course. Participants develop all materials electronically; therefore, word processing and basic computer
  skills are required.
  Notes:   1) Students must have completed BALIC/AELIC or have a teaching degree (or its equivalent).
           2) Students must be ESL/EFL instructors with a minimum of two years’ experience.
  This course requires a minimum enrollment of 6 students.

                                              MDS
                  FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
                16 JUN 14          8 AUG 14             15 JUN 15        7 AUG 15


DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                         37
     Observer Professional Training – Familiarization with DLIELC – MASL IIN D177002
     Course Length: 1 week
     Entry Requirement: 80 ECL
     This training is designed to provide orientation in the development, coordination, and management of
     English language training for international English Language Training Program (ELTP) managers,
     supervisors, and key language training staff. The training is a combination of briefings, seminars, and
     observations that address various aspects of management, administration, and academics. The training is
     tailored to the needs of the participants by targeting specific areas of ELTP operations (i.e., testing,
     curriculum development, classroom instruction, multimedia instruction, ESL/EFL teaching techniques,
     overseas and country program management, and warehouse operations).
     Notes:   1) The ECL entry requirement above is more of a strong recommendation than a strict
                 requirement. However, due to the topics covered throughout the training, participants need
                 to be able to operate with a high degree of English language proficiency.
              2) Students who have attended or will attend MELT (MASL IIN D177013) should not be
                 programmed for this training because much of the material presented in MELT is also
                 presented in the Observer Professional Training.
              3) The length of this training is normally one week; however, it can be scheduled for two
                 weeks to meet the needs of the participants.

                        Observer Professional Training
                    FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                  Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
                 As requested                           As requested




38                            DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
  Observer Professional Training – English Language Proficiency Testing –
  MASL IIN D177003
  Course Length: 2 weeks
  Entry Requirements: 1) 85 ECL
                      2) OPI rating of 2/2
  This training is designed to familiarize participants with the underlying principles and the practical
  techniques involved in creating, administering, and evaluating criterion-referenced English language
  proficiency tests based on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) levels (closely correlated with
  North Atlantic Treaty Organization Standardization Agreement [STANAG 6001] Language Proficiency
  Levels). The testing of any or all language skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing—may be
  included in the objectives depending on the specific requirements of those attending. An exploration of
  one of DLIELC’s primary testing instruments—the Oral Proficiency Interview or the English
  Comprehension Level test—is available as an objective if requested before the participants arrive. This
  training will be conducted by experienced personnel assigned to the Testing Branch and the Advanced
  English Section.
  Notes:   1) Schedule a telephonic OPI with DLIELC well in advance of the training dates. OPI scores
              are valid for six months.
           2) Consider scheduling students for this training in conjunction with one of DLIELC’s higher-
              level courses such as ALPS II or AELIC, if desired.
  This course requires a minimum enrollment of 4 students.

               Observer Professional Training – ELPT
                  FY14 Class Schedule                    FY15 Class Schedule
                Start Date     Grad Date               Start Date    Grad Date
               As requested                           As requested




                        For information on availability of resident courses,
                                             contact:
                                        Resident Support

                                  E-mail: DLIELC.RSF-CPM@us.af.mil




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                        39
                           -NOTES-




40   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                               PART III




                              IN-COUNTRY
                          ENGLISH LANGUAGE
                          TRAINING PROGRAMS




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14   41
                            -NOTES-




42   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                    GENERAL INFORMATION
1. Mission
    From the point of view of US national interests, the mission of an in-country English Language Training
    Program (ELTP) is to produce a sufficient number of English language-qualified personnel to support US
    Security Cooperation objectives. Effective in-country ELTPs are a vital link in the Security Cooperation
    chain. The English language-qualified personnel produced by in-country ELTPs are essential to the success
    of US arms sales and transfers because their graduates are the individuals who are trained, frequently in
    CONUS, to maintain and operate the weapon systems received from the US. The in-country ELTPs also
    feed students into US military schools of Professional Military Education (PME). Therefore, the goal of an
    in-country ELTP is to train the student to the level of English language proficiency required for technical
    training or PME as measured by the ECL test.
2. ELTP Checklist for Security Cooperation Organizations (SCOs)
    Below are questions which should be asked by SCOs when planning or supporting an in-country ELTP.
    These questions are also the questions DLIELC will ask should the SCO request DLIELC assistance in
    establishing or maintaining an in-country ELTP.
    a. Purpose of ELTP
        (1) What is the purpose of the ELTP?
             (a) Do graduates attend CONUS training?
             (b) Does the ELTP support the operation and maintenance of US-origin equipment?
             (c) Are students trained to meet requirements other than those of the US Security Cooperation
                 Program? If so, what are those requirements?
        (2) In what ways does the ELTP further the objectives of the US Security Cooperation Program?
    b. Curriculum
        (1) If the American Language Course (ALC) is the primary ELTP curriculum, is there an adequate
            supply of materials on hand to meet the objectives?
        (2) If the ALC is not used, what is?
        (3) Are American Language Course Placement Tests (ALCPT) on hand to evaluate training progress
            and readiness to take the ECL?
    c. Training Management
        (1) How many students will be trained each year?
        (2) Are students sent to CONUS training funded under IMET or FMS?
        (3) Do IMET-sponsored students need an ECL waiver?
        (4) What level of proficiency will students have upon entry into the ELTP?
        (5) What ECL scores will graduates require?
        (6) What is the general educational level of the students?




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                         43
         (7) Is the training
             (a) Intensive (20 or more class-hours per week)?
             (b) Nonintensive (fewer than 20 class hours per week)?
         (8) How many ELTP training sites are there?
         (9) Would the ELTP benefit from a survey conducted by a DLIELC team?
     d. Instructors
         (1) Are there a sufficient number of qualified indigenous English language instructors available to
             serve as instructors in the ELTP?
         (2) Have ELTP instructors received training on the ALC materials?
         (3) Should local instructors be sent to DLIELC for training?
         (4) Should a DLIELC team be requested to provide training to the local instructors on the ALC
             materials?
     e. Facilities
         (1) Are classroom, administrative and storage facilities adequate?
         (2) Are laboratory facilities adequate?
             (a) Are there a sufficient number of laboratory positions available for the ELTP?
             (b) What kind and level of laboratory is required?
             (c) How many hours per week are the laboratories used?
             (d) Is there an in-country capability to install and maintain audio laboratories, video equipment,
                 and/or multimedia laboratories?
             (e) Is a Technical Assistance Team (TAT) required to install or repair the laboratory equipment?




44                             DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                        PLANNING FACTORS
1. Manning
    a. DLIELC Resident Training for Managers, Supervisors and Instructors: The success of an in-country
       ELTP depends upon the knowledge and competence of supervisory and instructor personnel. DLIELC
       conducts English language instructor courses and a management course to train in-country ELTP
       personnel. DLIELC also provides a form of on-the-job training called Observer Professional training.
       See Part II, Resident English Language Training Program, for training options.
    b. Student-Instructor Ratio: In order to maintain an average class size of one instructor for every ten
       students, there should be sufficient instructors to allow for annual and sick leave (preferably a ratio
       of 1-8).
    c. First-line Supervisors: First-line supervisors should be assigned no more than 10 instructors to
       supervise.
    d. Clerical Personnel: The number of clerical personnel required varies widely depending on the types of
       duties assigned to them and the number of students enrolled in the ELTP.
2. Curriculum
    ALC materials, produced by DLIELC and described in the DLIELC Catalog - Materials, Courses, and
    Support, are recommended as the curriculum for in-country ELTPs which provide training to adult military
    personnel or Ministry of Defense civilians. The ALC has proven highly successful in the training of such
    students.
3. Training Management
    a. Homogenous Grouping of Students: Students should be grouped into classes as homogeneously as
       possible based on their level of proficiency and rate of academic progress. The ALCPT described in the
       DLIELC Catalog should be used to determine student English language proficiency, and the ALC book
       quizzes also described in the DLIELC Catalog should be used to determine student academic progress
       in the course.
    b. Size of the ELTP: The greater the number of students in the ELTP, the greater the degree of
       homogeneity possible in the grouping of students. In a small ELTP, students must frequently be placed
       into classes composed of students with widely disparate levels of proficiency. Ideally, an ELTP would
       have a minimum of 150 students. This number of students generally renders it possible to create a
       sufficient number of classes to accommodate students on different levels.
    c. Academic Standards: In general, students should be required to achieve an ALC book quiz score of 70
       in order to qualify for advancement to the next book.
    d. Remedial Help: Remedial help should be available for students who fail to meet academic standards.
4. Facilities
    a. General: A language training facility is similar to other schools, but it does have some special
       requirements. To increase the effectiveness of the ELTP, the facility should include adequate space for
       administrative and faculty offices, classrooms, training aids, secure storage for tests, library, one or
       more language laboratories, a laboratory maintenance shop, and storage areas for instructional materials
       and equipment. Large ELTPs may require projection rooms, conference rooms, study halls, learning
       centers, and an auditorium.

DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                             45
     b. Location: Academic buildings should be located in noise-free areas. The classrooms and laboratories
        should be either in the same building or in immediately adjacent buildings. It is recommended that
        facilities be as self-contained as possible.
        (1) Classrooms
            (a) Classroom Acoustics: In many countries, buildings are constructed of stone with the result that
                classroom acoustics are poor. Poor acoustics in a language-learning classroom has a disastrous
                impact on the quality of instruction. Acoustic tiles and carpeting can improve the acoustic
                qualities of classrooms. Of equal importance, classrooms should be constructed in such a way
                that noise from adjacent classrooms is not heard.
            (b) Classroom Size: The ideal classroom for language learning is relatively small, accommodating
                no more than 12 students. However, because of local economic and cultural considerations, in-
                country classrooms frequently must be designed for 20 or more students.
            (c) Heating and Air Conditioning: It is imperative that buildings be adequately heated so students
                can focus their attention on language learning rather than on keeping warm. Whenever possible,
                especially in tropical or sub-tropical climates, air conditioning should be installed in classrooms
                and language laboratories. Air conditioning not only prevents instructor and student fatigue
                from excessive heat, but it also blocks outside noises, which interfere with learning, and
                extends the life of language laboratory equipment.
            (d) Furnishings and Equipment: Classrooms should be equipped with a chalkboard, whiteboard, or
                SMART Board; table armchairs for the students; a desk, chair and lectern for the instructor; and
                a storage closet or cabinet. Adequate lighting is a must. A projection screen, overhead projector,
                maps and, if possible, a TV and VCR or DVD player should be available for use in the
                classroom. Each classroom should contain sufficient electrical outlets to operate electrical
                equipment.
        (2) Administrative Space
            Sufficient administrative space is required to accommodate the program director, supervisors,
            instructors, clerical personnel, visitors, meetings, computer equipment, a copying machine, supplies
            and equipment. In general, the larger the student load, the more office space is needed because of
            increased faculty and staff requirements.




46                         DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                           ELT ASSISTANCE
1. Overview
    DLIELC provides a broad range of professional and technical assistance for in-country ELTPs. These
    services include English language surveys, pre-deployment surveys and operational mobile training teams
    (MTTs), as well as language training detachments (LTDs). Below is a description of these forms of
    assistance.
    a. English Language Survey MTT (MASL IIN D307009)
        (1) Purpose: The purpose of an English language survey MTT is to evaluate the in-country ELTP and
            make recommendations for its improvement or expansion. Before the DLIELC MTT survey
            members depart the overseas location, they provide an out-briefing to the SCO and designated host-
            country officials on their observations, findings and recommendations. The final MTT Survey
            report is forwarded to the SCO within 30 days of the team’s return to DLIELC.
        (2) Composition of the MTT: The English language survey MTT is conducted by one or two GS-12
            Overseas Program Managers from the Nonresident Programs Division.
        (3) Duration of Survey: The duration of a survey MTT depends upon the scope and complexity of the
            in-country ELTP, but generally ranges from three days to three weeks.
        (4) Controls Over Work: The Commandant, DLIELC, through the Nonresident Programs Division
            (DLIELC/LEN), maintains professional and operational control over the work of the MTT
            members. The SCO designates an official who serves as the POC for the MTT members.
    b. Pre-deployment Survey MTT (MASL IIN D307009)
        (1) Purpose: The purpose of a pre-deployment survey MTT is to ensure that the deployment of
            DLIELC personnel to an overseas location is accomplished with maximum efficiency. The MTT
            members will ensure that:
            (a) The mission of the DLIELC MTT or LTD personnel who are to be deployed is clearly defined.
            (b) The resources to accomplish the mission will be available.
            (c) The DLIELC personnel who are to be deployed will receive, to the extent possible, support
                equivalent to that afforded to other official Americans in the following areas: lodging,
                transportation, office and classroom facilities, administrative support, communication support,
                medical care, postal privileges, etc.
        (2) Composition of the MTT: The pre-deployment survey is conducted by one or two GS-12 Overseas
            Program Managers from the Nonresident Programs Division.
        (3) Duration of Survey: The duration of a pre-deployment survey is generally three days to two weeks,
            depending upon the scope of the in-country ELTP.
        (4) Controls Over Work: The Commandant, DLIELC, through the Nonresident Programs Division
            (DLIELC/LEN), maintains professional and operational control over the work of MTT members.
            The SCO designates an official who serves as the POC for the MTT members.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                         47
     c. Operational MTT (MASL IIN D307011)
        The purpose of an Operational MTT is to assist in the operation or establishment of an in-country
        ELTP. There are three types of Operational MTTs, instructional, advisory and managerial, which are
        described below.
         (1) Instructional MTT
           (a) Purpose: The purpose of an instructional MTT is twofold: First, to provide instructors to in-
               country ELTPs that do not have a sufficient number of qualified instructors to produce
               language-qualified graduates. Second, to provide training to in-country English language
               instructors on the use of the ALC materials or to test administrators on the principles and
               practices of testing. The four workshops, which are described in the DLIELC catalog, are
               Familiarization with the American Language Course, Familiarization with the Nonintensive
               American Language Course, Teaching English for Specific Purposes, and English Language
               Proficiency Testing. These two-week nonresident workshops require up to 60 days from the
               date of an MTT call-up to deployment. The maximum class size should be 10. Prerequisites
               for the workshops are the completion of the BALIC or its equivalent and experience in
               teaching EFL.
           (b) Composition of the MTT: The instructional MTT is composed of one or more DLIELC
               EFL/ESL instructors and/or team chief. When DLIELC deploys an instructional MTT
               consisting of a single instructor, the grade of the instructor is GS-11 or GS-12. When the
               instructional MTT consists of more than one instructor, the grade of the instructor who serves
               as team chief is GS-11 or GS-12, depending on the scope and complexity of the ELTP. When
               the grade of the team chief is GS-12 or GS-13, the primary duties of the team chief normally do
               not include classroom instruction.
        (2) Advisory MTT
           (a) Purpose: The purpose of an advisory MTT is to provide advice to in-country ELTP managers
               on the operation of an ELTP. SCOs can request advisory MTTs to provide advice in the areas
               of ELTP administration and management, curriculum and test development, or instruction.
           (b) Composition of the MTT: The advisory MTT is composed of one or more DLIELC EFL/ESL
               specialists who have expertise in the particular skills required. The grades of advisory MTT
               members range from GS-11 to GS-13, depending on the following factors: the scope of the
               ELTP, the significance of the ELTP to US national interests, the level of the host-country and
               US officials to whom the member is giving advice and the complexity of the advisory services
               required.
        (3) Managerial MTT
           (a) Purpose: The purpose of a managerial MTT is to assist in the management of an in-country
               ELTP until local managers can be trained to assume ELTP management responsibilities.
           (b) Composition of the MTT: The managerial MTT is composed of one or more DLIELC
               EFL/ESL specialists who have expertise in the particular skills required. The grades of
               managerial MTT members range from GS-12 to GS-13, depending on the following factors: the
               scope of the ELTP, the significance of the ELTP to US national interests, the level of the host-
               country and US officials with whom the member is giving advice and the complexity of the
               managerial services required.

48                        DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
        Controls Over Work: For an Operational MTT, a designated SCO official exercises operational and
        administrative supervision of the senior operational member. The senior MTT member exercises
        operational and administrative control over the other MTT members. The Commandant, DLIELC,
        through the Nonresident Programs Division (DLIELC/LEN), maintains professional and technical
        control over the work of MTT members.
    d. Language Training Detachment (LTD)
        (1) Purpose: The purpose of the LTD is to assist in the operation or establishment of in-country ELTPs.
            LTDs are categorized into three types: instructional, advisory, and managerial.
        (2) Composition of the LTD: The LTD is composed of one or more DLIELC EFL/ESL professionals
            who have expertise in the particular skills required to accomplish the designated mission. The
            grades of LTD members range from GS-11 to GS-13 and are determined by such factors as the
            scope and complexity of the ELTP, the level of the host-county and US officials with whom the
            LTD members must deal, and the level of the personnel supervised.
        (3) Duration of an LTD: The principal difference between an operational MTT and an LTD is duration.
            While MTT members are assigned on temporary duty (TDY) status, LTD members are assigned on
            a permanent change of station (PCS) without permanent change of assignment (PCA) basis to the
            overseas location. PCS assignments are generally for a period of one to three years, depending on
            the mission requirements and the length-of-tour standards applicable to a given country. One-year
            tours are unaccompanied, and tours of more than one year are generally accompanied.
        (4) Controls Over Work: A designated SCO official exercises operational and administrative
            supervision over the senior LTD member. The senior LTD member exercises operational and
            administrative control over the other LTD members. The Commandant, DLIELC, through the
            Nonresident Programs Division (DLIELC/LEN), maintains professional and technical control over
            the work of the senior LTD member.
2. Requesting DLIELC Services
    a. Lead Time: DLIELC generally requires up to 60 days to deploy an MTT and up to 120 days to deploy
       an LTD.
    b. DLIELC MTTs and LTDs Funded under IMET: Anticipated MTTs or LTDs should be programmed
       into the Air Force IMET Standardized Training Listing (STL). Data sheets should be submitted to
       AFSAT, with information copies to DLIELC/LEN, in accordance with the JSCET. AFSAT prepares
       cost data for the deployment of MTTs and LTDs. Before DLIELC can deploy an LTD or an MTT, the
       requester must obtain the approval of the Combatant Command, DSCA, and AFSAT.
    c. DLIELC MTTs and LTDs Funded under FMS
        (1) New FMS Case: In order to establish an FMS case for the deployment of a DLIELC MTT or LTD,
            the requester must follow the procedures for accomplishing a Letter of Offer and Acceptance
            (LOAs). These procedures are detailed in DoD 5108.8, the Security Assistance Management
            Manual (SAMM).
        (2) Existing FMS Case: With host-country approval, the USG FMS case manager can fund DLIELC
            MTTs or LTDs from existing cases. The SCO or case manager should request Price and
            Availability estimates from AFSAT. The most convenient financial instrument to fund the LTD or
            MTT is a DD448, Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (MIPR).


DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                        49
                            -NOTES-




50   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
           Nonresident English Language Training Courses
  In-Country Workshop: Familiarization with the American Language Course,
  MASL IIN D307011
  Course Length: 2 weeks
  Entry Requirement: 80 ECL recommended
  A DLIELC Mobile Training Team (MTT) conducts this workshop for experienced instructors. The course
  is designed to familiarize participants with the ALC and provide them with experience teaching it. The
  course also emphasizes teaching techniques that maximize student participation. The required course
  materials are listed below and must be at the training site before the DLIELC MTT arrives.

  The minimum class size is six, and the maximum is 10.

       ALC Familiarization Workshop Starter Package

                            Item                                Price         Quantity        Subtotal

    Familiarization with the ALC (workshop booklet)             $15.00             11         $165.00
    780, Overview of the ALC (book)                             $10.00             11         $110.00
    Books 9, 19, 25 Instructor Texts                            $45.00      11 of each text   $495.00


                                                                                    1
    Books 9, 19, 25 Student Texts                               $30.00      11 of each text   $330.00
    Book 9 CBT CD Book Package                                 $500.00                        $500.00


                                                                                    1
    Book 19 Language Laboratory Activities                        $5.00            11          $55.00
    Book 19 Audio CD set                                        $80.00                         $80.00

                                               Total for 10 participants + one instructor $1,735.00




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                       51
 In-Country Workshop: Familiarization with the Nonintensive American Language Course,
 MASL IIN D307011
 Course Length: 2 weeks
 Entry Requirement: 80 ECL recommended
 A DLIELC Mobile Training Team (MTT) conducts this workshop for experienced instructors. The course
 is designed to give participants a thorough review of the components of the NALC and provides them
 with experience teaching it. The course also emphasizes teaching techniques that maximize student
 participation. The required course materials are listed below and must be at the training site before the
 DLIELC MTT arrives.

 The minimum class size is six, and the maximum is 10.

       NALC Familiarization Workshop Starter Package

                           Item                                 Price         Quantity           Subtotal

     Familiarization with the NALC (workshop booklet)            $15.00            11             $165.00
     NALC Volume 3 – Instructor Text, Student Text,             $90.00      11 of each text         $990.00
     Listening Skills Text, Homework Text
     NALC Volume 3 Audio CD set                                $160.00              1               $160.00
     NALC Volume 4 – Instructor Text, Student Text,             $90.00      11 of each text         $990.00
     Listening Skills Text, Homework Text
     NALC Volume 4 Audio CD set                                $160.00              1               $160.00
     NALC Volume 3 – Instructor Text, Student Text,             $90.00      11 of each text         $990.00
     Listening Skills Text, Homework Text
     NALC Volume 3 Audio CD set                                $160.00              1               $160.00

                                               Total for 10 participants + one instructor         $2,465.00
     Note: NALC Volumes 1 or 2 may be substituted for Volumes 3 and 4 in the Starter Package.




52                          DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
  In-Country Seminar: English Skills for Staff Officers in Multinational Operations (ESSO),
  MASL IIN D307011
  Course Length: 4 weeks
  Entry Requirement: 85 ECL recommended
  A DLIELC Mobile Training Team (MTT) conducts this newly-revised seminar for staff officers. The
  course is designed to enhance overall English language proficiency with a focus on oral and written
  communication skills needed for interaction in multinational settings. Language activities are planned
  around updated content relevant to today's military leaders.
  Topics include: Globalization and Military Partnerships in the 21st Century; Intercultural Factors in
  Multinational Operations; Command Structure and Leadership in Multinational Environments; NATO
  and Other Regional Alliances; Counterinsurgency; the United Nations, Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding;
  and Multinational Humanitarian Missions.
  Equipment necessary to implement the course: (1) DVD player or computer with DVD drive and
  appropriate screen, (2) classroom computer and projector for presenting PowerPoint, and (3) after-class
  Internet access for student research assignments. Laptops would also be useful for students in class, but
  are not essential. The required course materials are listed below and must be at the training site before the
  DLIELC MTT arrives.

  The minimum class size is six, and the maximum is 10.

       ESSO Seminar Starter Package

                              Item                                 Price         Quantity            Subtotal

    ESSO Instructor Text                                           $15.00              1                  $15.00
    ESSO Student Text                                              $30.00              11               $330.00
    DVD: “Topics in Multinational Operations”                     $500.00               1               $500.00

                                                  Total for 10 participants + one instructor            $845.00




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                              53
 In-Country Workshop: Teaching English for Specific Purposes (ESP) – Using the AMEC,
 MASL IIN D307011
 Course Length: 2 weeks
 Entry Requirement: 85 ECL recommended
 A DLIELC Mobile Training Team (MTT) conducts this workshop for experienced instructors. The course
 is designed to familiarize the participants with the issues that instructors face when teaching military
 language. The American Military English Course (AMEC) materials are used during the course to
 introduce participants to relevant teaching techniques, give them practice in presenting ESP materials, and
 acquaint them with basic military terminology. The required course materials are listed below and must
 be at the training site before the DLIELC MTT arrives.

 The minimum class size is six, and the maximum is 10.

       Teaching ESP Workshop Starter Package

                              Item                                 Price        Quantity          Subtotal

     Teaching ESP – Using the AMEC (workshop booklet)               $15.00            11              $165.00
     General Military Topics – Instructor Text,                     $50.00     11 of each text        $550.00
     Student Text
     General Military Topics – Audio CD set, DVD                  $120.00              1              $120.00
     Topics in Counterinsurgency – Instructor Text,                 $60.00     11 of each text        $660.00
     Student Text, Glossary
     Topics in Counterinsurgency – Audio CD set, DVD              $120.00              1              $120.00

                                                 Total for 10 participants + one instructor         $1,615.00
     Note: AMEC Army Topics Book 1 or Book 2, Air Force Topics, or Navy Topics may be
     substituted for Topics in Counterinsurgency depending on the needs of the country.




54                          DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
  In-Country Workshop: English Language Proficiency Testing, MASL IIN D307011
  Course Length: 2 weeks
  Entry Requirements: 1) 85 ECL recommended
                      2) OPI rating of 2+/2+
  A DLIELC Mobile Training Team (MTT) conducts this workshop for English language testing
  specialists. The course is designed to familiarize participants with the underlying principles and the
  practical techniques involved in creating, administering and evaluating criterion-referenced English
  language proficiency tests based on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) and/or North Atlantic
  Treaty Organization (NATO) Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 6001 Language Proficiency Levels.
  The testing of any, or all, of the four language skills — listening, speaking, reading and writing — may be
  included in the course objectives, depending upon the specific requirements. The instructor will provide
  materials for the course.
  Note: This workshop may also be conducted on the DLIELC resident campus, using
        MASL IIN D177003. To arrange for the resident workshop contact Resident Support
        at DLIELC.RSF-CPM@us.af.mil

  The minimum class size is six, and the maximum is 10.




                         For information on availability of nonresident courses
                                  and to arrange for an MTT, contact:
                                 Nonresident Programs Division (LEN)

                          COMM: (210) 671-3783              COMM FAX: (210) 671-5362
                            DSN: (312) 473-3783              DSN FAX: (312) 473-5362


                                            E-mail: LEN@us.af.mil




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                            55
                            LANGUAGE LABORATORY SYSTEMS
1. Guidance for Selection of Language Laboratory Systems
     This selection should be made in conjunction with an English language training survey performed by
     DLIELC. DLIELC personnel frequently note that language laboratories are poorly utilized, underutilized, or
     not utilized at all in English language training (ELT) sites abroad. In fact, proper utilization of language
     laboratories is the exception rather than the rule. A language laboratory is a useful adjunct to a fully
     operational ELT program rather than the foundation of the program. DLIELC Nonresident Programs
     Division must approve the purchase of an IMET-funded language laboratory.
     a. Operational Program: Before taking steps to purchase a language laboratory, the SCO should ensure
        that the laboratory will be used as an adjunct to a fully operational program. The characteristics of a
        fully operational ELT program are:
         (1) Regularly scheduled ELT classes.
         (2) Compulsory ELT class attendance.
         (3) ELT program accountability (i.e., the ELT program manager reports to a senior official on ELT
             matters).
         (4) A paid (i.e., not volunteer) ELT faculty.
         (5) An ELT syllabus which designates specific ELT materials for use in class.
         (6) ELT classrooms that have adequate lighting, heating, and ventilation.
         (7) A designated site in which the lab will be installed.
         (8) Technicians who can maintain and repair the lab.
2. Once a decision has been made to obtain a laboratory system, inquiries regarding the ordering of
   English Language Laboratory Systems should be addressed to Communications-Electronics Life Cycle
   Management Command (C-E LCMC) points of contact (POCs) listed on page 55, HOW TO OBTAIN
   ENGLISH LANGUAGE LABORATORY SYSTEMS.

3. Prior to programming English Language Laboratory Systems for IMET, FMS credit, or State Department
   pseudo cases, Defense Language Institute English Language Center (DLIELC), JBSA Lackland, TX must
   provide approval of countries’ requests to program English Language Laboratory Systems. Please contact
   the proper DLIELC overseas program manager or DLIELC Nonresident Programs Division. The DLIELC
   overseas program manager will provide guidance for programming English Language Program
   requirements,
                                  Email: LEN@us.af.mil
                                  Phone: COMM: (210) 671-3783
                                         DSN: (312) 473-3783
4. C-E LEMC through U.S. Army Security Cooperation Command (USASAC) is the provider of English
   Language Laboratory Systems and support/sustainment equipment. All the listed English Language
   Laboratory Systems and equipment meet or exceed training requirements established by DLIELC. The
   systems are as follows:
     a. Audio Active English Language Laboratory System (AALL). The AALL is a ‘turn-key’ language
        English Language Laboratory System (PC based instructor console and furniture included) with a
        two-year guarantee for hardware. The AALL has been redesigned yet still easy to learn and user
56                             DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
        friendly, a durable English Language Laboratory System which is available in 5, 10, 15, 20, 25
        and 30 position English Language Laboratory Systems. The instructor console contains an integrated
        tape player which can be used to convert analog tape to digital format to achieve and use for quick
        access to lessons. Two versions of the previous Audio Visual Kit (AV KIT) are offered. AVKIT1 is
        recommended for 5 and 10 student position systems. AVKIT2 is recommended for 15, 20, 25 and 30
        position systems. Both AVKIT systems consist of 1 each 20-inch television for the instructor console
        and 1 each multi-system DVD/VCR. AVKIT1 includes 1 each 32-inch LCD and stand for the
        classroom while AVKIT2 includes two each 32-inch LCD screens and 2 LCD stands for larger size
        classrooms. Both systems include all required cabling, and furniture (chairs are not included).
    b. Training Multimedia English Language Laboratory System (TMLL). The TMLL is a digital English
       Language Laboratory System containing application software programmed specifically for English
       language learning. The TMLL consists of: A Local Area Network (LAN), an instructor’s console
       (computer/mass storage device/8-port VPN router), student computer positions, headsets, and furniture
       for each position (chairs not included). Additional information can be accessed at the DLIELC Website
       http://www.dlielc.edu/overseas_programs/labor.html.
    c. Language Learning Resource Center (LLRC). The LLRC is a training aid for countries that are
       establishing English Language Resource Centers; the LLRC is conducive for independent learning.
       The LLRC is procured in increments of five positions only. It is configured as a Local Area Network
       (LAN) and may be utilized as a single user Personal Computer (PC) English Language Laboratory
       System. One PC is provided for each position ordered and one additional PC for the Resource Center
       Instructor position. The configuration promotes independent or group learning. The LLRC consists of a
       laser jet printer, 21” Multi-System TV, and a combination DVD-VCR. Furniture is not included in
       LLRC base prices. LLRC furniture may be selected from the LLRC accessories list (chairs not
       included). Additional information can be accessed at the DLIELC Website
       http://www.dlielc.edu/overseas_programs/labor.html.
    d. LLRC Accessories. LLRC accessories are optional for country to purchase. The LLRC Instructor
       Console (IC) is a 60-inch (150cm) desk. Student Console Furniture is procured in increments of five
       positions only. This is a 36-inch (90cm) student desk with side dividers and clear plexi-glass front
       panels (chairs are not included). The Modular Access Point is a router permitting the network to access
       the Internet (Internet access is a country responsibility). Additional information can be accessed at the
       DISAM International Training Management Website http://www.disam.dsca.mil/itm/.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                         57
      HOW TO OBTAIN ENGLISH LANGUAGE LABORATORY SYSTEMS
1. Select the size and type of English Language Laboratory System the country requires. Ensure the country
   can technologically support the type of English Language Laboratory System selected. Ensure the
   building/room in which the English Language Laboratory System will be installed has the necessary power
   and environmental protection (HVAC) required to support the English Language Laboratory System
   equipment/hardware. Consult the C-E LEMC POCs for additional information.
2. Program an English Language Laboratory System with Security Cooperation Training Field Activity
   (SATFA) as a dollar line (cost of the English Language Laboratory System) in your Army IMET program
   using the Military Articles Services List (MASL) Item Identification Number (IIN) TABLE obtainable
   from C-E LEMC. Inform SATFA what country’s requirement is. FOR EXAMPLE: “Country requires a
   10-position AALL”. The MASL IIN for English Language Laboratory Systems is dependent upon what you
   order. In the example above, the MASL IIN is “BAALL10” for the English Language Laboratory System.
   Check Training Management System (TMS) for other MASL IINs.
3. Program Packing, Crating, Handling, and Transportation (PCHT) using MASL IIN “B00PCHT”. PCHT is
   required to pack and ship the English Language Laboratory System to country. The PCHT cost varies by
   destination and the weight of the English Language Laboratory System or equipment programmed. The cost
   for PCHT must be provided by C-E LEMC POCs. Policy is to air ship English Language Laboratory
   Systems into country. If it is not possible to ship an English Language Laboratory System via air, the
   Security Cooperation Organization (SCO) must advise SATFA, USASAC and C-E LEMC of the preferred
   shipping method.
4. Program an English Language Laboratory System installation with SATFA. The installation should be
   programmed in the FY IMET program you expect the English Language Laboratory System to be installed
   in your country. Use MASL IIN B307010. Cost for an installation team depends upon the requirement.
   Currently, Tobyhanna Army Depot personnel and Dal Media Solutions contractor personnel are performing
   English Language Laboratory System installations. Although the exact cost will vary from country to
   country, an installation quote can be obtained from C-E LEMC POCs.


     US Army (CECOM LCMC) POCs for IMET Language Laboratories:
        Gloria Ferrell, Division Chief, (CECOM LCMC), Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD
                Commercial Phone: (443) 861-5741; DSN: 848-5741
                e-mail: gloria.d.ferrell.civ@mail.mil

        Michael Milillo, Programming Manager, (CECOM LCMC), Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD
               Commercial Phone: (443) 861-4418; DSN: 848-4418
               e-mail: michael.j.milillo.civ@mail.mil

        Nicholas Ciufo, Programming Manager, (CECOM LCMC), Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD
               Commercial Phone: (443) 861-4412; DSN: 848-4412
               e-mail: nicholas.p.ciufo.civ@mail.mil




58                          DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                                 PART IV




                        STUDENT INFORMATION




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14   59
                       -NOTES-




60   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
     SCO’S IN-COUNTRY STUDENT PRE-DEPARTURE BRIEFING
 - International Military Students (IMS) must provide their flight itineraries to the American Embassy so that
   they may be posted onto the Security Assistance Network Website (SANWEB) 15 days in advance of the
   report date. If arrival information is not on SANWEB, the IMS class start date will be at risk, base access
   will be denied, and transportation will not be made available by Defense Language Institute English
   Learning Center (DLIELC) personnel. Travel itineraries should be scheduled to allow extra time between
   flights at customs checkpoints and for any unforeseen flight delays so IMS will avoid missing connecting
   flights.

 - Travel plans for IMS arrivals to San Antonio International Airport will make every concerted effort to
   reflect arrival times no later than 1600 on any given weekday (Monday – Friday) with a drop dead time of
   no later than 1600, Wednesday, for those IMS scheduled to begin class the following Monday. IMS travel
   issues such as flight delays due to weather or mechanical issues will be dealt with on a case-by-case basis.
   IMS who miss flights due to negligence on their part will not be shown special treatment by DLIELC and
   will be referred for disciplinary action. Mandatory in-processing briefings begin promptly at 0800 on the
   Thursday prior to beginning class. Failure to arrive on time for the in-processing briefings may cause the
   IMS’ enrollment to be delayed to the next available class after the next mass in-processing which could be a
   delay of up to 10 calendar days. Disciplinary action will be recommended.

 - IMS will be scheduled to arrive on Monday when there is a United States (U.S.) holiday later in the week. In
   the event that Friday is a U.S. holiday, in-processing briefings begin promptly at 0730 on Wednesday. When
   Thursday is a U.S. holiday, in-processing begins promptly at 0730 on Wednesday. For exact arrival dates
   during holiday periods, reference the DLIELC Alternate Arrival Calendar Updates for CY memo.

 - IMS arriving more than 2 weeks before or 2 weeks after their report date listed on their ITO will need an
   ITO amendment which changes the report date or else Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA) Lackland Security
   Forces will not allow them base access. NO EXCEPTIONS TO THIS POLICY WILL BE MADE,
   REGARDLESS OF RANK OR STATURE IN HOME COUNTRY! This is per Security Forces and JSCET
   regulations and policies.

 - IMS must travel with an A-2 approved visa; NATO student must travel with a NATO-2 approved visa.

 - All IMS must have adequate funds upon arrival in the U.S.

   -- IMET living allowances must be supplemented by country. These IMS should be given an advance no
      greater than $500.00 to cover their initial expenses since they will not receive their first pay until the end
      of the month.

 - Additionally, all IMS, regardless of country of origin, FMS or IMET status, must have funds upon arrival in
   the U.S. for transportation from San Antonio International Airport to JBSA Lackland.

   -- DLIELC recommends at least $200.00 in cash upon arrival. Excessive amounts of cash, over $1000.00, are
      highly discouraged.

   -- IMS are strongly encouraged to keep all cash and credit cards on their person at all times during travel from
      home country to arrival at JBSA Lackland. IMS are also strongly encouraged to refrain from placing any
      cash or credit cards in checked or carry-on luggage.

 - IMS should pack personal essentials in carry-on baggage, including their medical forms (DD 2807 Parts 1
   and 2 and 2808), copies of their ITO, and one uniform in the event of delayed/lost baggage.



DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                                   61
- Per DSCA Policy 10-46, SAMM E Chap 10.12.2, DLIELC discourages students from bringing dependents
  and will not offer any dependent support. If an IMS is permitted to bring dependents via their ITO,
  dependents must be brought to the Pass/Id office to receive identification.

- JSCET requires inbound IMS to carry at least 15 copies of their ITO. JBSA Lackland Security Forces will
  deny base access to students who do not have a valid ITO. IMS possessing a pending ITO will not be
  granted access to the base. Additionally, planning ITOs are never valid substitutes for official ITOs and no
  exceptions to this policy will be made. IMS are encouraged to carry one copy of their ITO in each piece of
  luggage.

- Officer students must complete a DD Form 2339, IMS Information Sheet, prior to departure; completed
  forms will be needed during in-processing.

- Students will obtain and read the DLIELC Student Handbook prior to arrival; an electronic version of the
  handbook is available on the DLIELC Internet Web page: http://www.dlielc.edu .

- Students must adhere to flight schedules with no unplanned stopovers.

- The DLIELC Resident Support Flight (RSF) coordinates travel arrangements for fully IMET-funded
  students with the JBSA Randolph travel agent as authorized on the ITO; therefore, these students are not
  authorized to make their own travel arrangements.

- Once travel arrangements are made by the travel agent, IMS must not change schedules.

- IMS must retain all copies of travel receipts in order to process transportation claims with Finance at
  DLIELC, the IMSO at FOT, and the Embassy Security Cooperation Office (SCO).

- IMS who wish to take leave or travel throughout the U.S. outside the San Antonio area, must inform their
  Country Program Manager (CPM) who will then contact SCO and MILDEP. Approval must be obtained
  two weeks before making any such plans. Plans will be made and presented to the CPM at least two weeks
  before proposed travel. Any request within the two- week window will require approval from the
  Commandant of Troops.

 REPORTING AND IN-PROCESSING
- All inbound flight plans will make every attempt to have IMS arrive at San Antonio International Airport no
  later than 1600 on any given week day (Monday – Friday).

- Upon IMS arrival, students should call the DLIELC Operations Desk by using the DLIELC DIRECT DIAL
  phone (HOTLINE) located in both Terminals A and B. Arriving IMS will look for signs with the words
  “DLI” or “DLIELC”, along with the DLIELC symbol (on the front of this handbook) to direct them to the
  phones. DLIELC phones are located at the bottom of stairs/escalators leading towards the baggage claim
  area in Terminal A (there will be a bank of phones against the wall). There is also a phone located in the
  Terminal B baggage claim area near the United Airlines baggage claim office.

     -- Phone calls using the DLIELC phones are free.

     -- If not calling from the DLIELC phone, the DLIELC Operations Desk telephone numbers are
        210-671-2927, 210-671-2928, or 210-671-2929.

     -- Pick-up times are variable and can be lengthy; IMS are strongly encouraged to plan accordingly.

     -- IMS with the rank of 06 and below, who arrive before 2000 on Monday – Friday and 1800 Saturday and
        Sunday, will take the JBSA Lackland shuttle. The base shuttle schedule is available at the Airport USO.

62                                DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
   -- IMS with the rank of O-7 and above will be met by DLIELC Leadership and offered DLIELC
      transportation to DLIELC and Lodging. If IMS declines or is accompanied by dependents, they will be
      responsible for own arrangements for transportation to DLIELC for in-processing.

   -- IMS O-6 and below who arrive after shuttle bus hours are highly encouraged to take a taxi to JBSA
      Lackland.

   -- Students cannot sponsor a taxi onto the base and will need to call DLIELC Operations Desk at the numbers
      above for further assistance.

 - All DLIELC in-processing activities are mandatory.

 - IMS must attend all briefings; failure to do so will delay scheduled class entry 7 to 10 calendar days and
   result in disciplinary actions.

   -- IMS who cannot attend briefings due to legitimate travel delays must be cleared by RSF Section Chief to
      begin their in-processing later.

IMS DRIVING PRIVILEGES
 * EFFECTIVE 15 MAY 13: IMS Students who hail from a Non-NATO Country, do not possess an
   international driver license (with U.S. specified or NATO Country) and do not possess a driver
   license from home country, will be completely responsible for earning a driver license in the State of
   Texas.
   Military Training Managers will no longer sponsor IMS for driver licenses in Texas.

 - Driving at DLIELC, in the State of Texas or U.S. at large is a privilege, not an inherent right. Please be
   aware that not all students who matriculate to DLIELC will be permitted to earn a driver license, even if
   they meet the initial application criteria. Driver licenses are issued by the State of Texas, not DLIELC and
   denial may be for any number of reasons deemed by the State of Texas. Any denial by the State of Texas
   cannot and will not be challenged by anyone on DLIELC Staff.

   -- Students’ ITOs must indicate they are authorized to travel by Privately Owned Vehicle (POV) while at
      DLIELC and to any FOT.

   -- DLIELC has restricted parking areas on campus for faculty and staff only. Limited IMS parking is also
      available. Tickets will be issued to IMS who violate DLIELC parking policies.

   -- IMS will review the International Reciprocity in Driver Licensing in the Texas Administrative Code to
      determine if an international driving permit is required to drive.

 - All IMS are required to have a driver license or international driver license to legally drive in the U.S.
   Students can begin the process to obtain a Texas driver license if conditions labeled 4.5.1-4.5.2 are met.

   -- ITO orders must indicate that the IMS is in training in the U.S. for 12 months or more.

   -- ITO orders must indicate that the IMS is in training at DLIELC, JBSA Lackland, for six months or more.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                              63
     -- If the IMS meets the above requirements, then the Military Training Manager (MTM) may assist the
        student in filling out the required forms to obtain a Texas driver license or assist in finding the State of
        Texas website where the paperwork can be found.

        --- IMS will be advised that the background check is not guaranteed to grant approval by the State of
            Texas. IMS will be responsible for all administrative actions regarding this process. Receipt time
            typically is between six to eight weeks once the State of Texas receives the paperwork from the IMS.
            If the State of Texas denies permission for an IMS to obtain a license, there is no recourse that the
            MTM or anyone at DLIELC has to appeal on behalf of the IMS.

        --- It is solely the responsibility of the IMS to pursue earning a driver license. MTMs and Operations
             Information Reception Desk personnel will not provide transportation to IMS for the purpose of
             visiting the Texas Department of Public Safety or to any required or desired driving lessons taught
             commercially under any circumstance.

- IMS from Saudi Arabia are not authorized to drive in the U.S. with a Saudi Arabia driver license. They must
  bring with them or obtain an International Driver License or meet the above requirement to obtain a Texas
  driver license to legally drive in the U.S. See the Texas Administrative Code for more details.

- IMS from NATO countries with reciprocity with the State of Texas may be permitted to drive in the State of
  Texas with a translation letter. See the Texas Administrative Code for more details.

     -- IMS from NATO countries with reciprocity must have a driver license in their home country to qualify for a
        translation letter.

     -- Any IMS from a NATO country with reciprocity that does not possess a home country driver license will
        follow the same procedure that applies to Non-NATO country IMS.

- IMS are not permitted to legally rent or buy a car until all proper driving license requirements are met.

- IMS are highly encouraged to consult a MTM prior to purchasing any automobile or motorcycle. MTMs
  will advise the IMS but not specifically endorse any automobile or motorcycle dealership or private seller.

- IMS who buy a car while at DLIELC are required to register the vehicle in the State of Texas.

- All students who are authorized to drive must obtain automobile liability insurance in Texas which will be
  at IMS expense.

     -- IMS are highly encouraged to consult a MTM prior to purchasing any car insurance policy. MTMs will
        advise the IMS but not specifically endorse any specific insurance company or policy.

FIREARMS / WEAPONS
- IMS are not authorized to carry firearms or large knives over three inches while at DLIELC.

HOUSING
- Base dormitories are subject to space availability. IMS who cannot be lodged in these dormitories will be
  lodged off base at the Government Travel Rate.

- Cooking is not allowed with certain appliances while in quarters and students will be heavily fined for use
  of any appliances such as hot plates, frying pans or woks, small ovens, etc. Lodging provides microwaves
  and refrigerators for IMS utilization. The Amigo Inn is also available for IMS meals.


64                                  DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
 - SMOKING AND STORAGE OF SMOKING DEVICES ARE COMPLETELY PROHIBITED in quarters.
   IMS will be heavily fined for smoking in quarters and subject to disciplinary action.

 - IMS authorized to travel with families (listed as dependents on ITO) should arrive a minimum of one week
   earlier than normal to establish housing and transportation. Please note that IMS will not be released from
   attending mandatory in-processing to take care of these matters.

   -- Dependents, even if authorized on ITO, will not be permitted to reside on JBSA Lackland.

   -- IMS will be made aware that off-base housing is limited and can be expensive.

      --- Off-base apartments are usually unfurnished.

      --- Short-term lease apartments are very limited. Most leases require a 12-month contract.

      --- Rental furniture costs range from $150–$400 or more per month, in addition to basic apartment rental.

      --- Utilities such as water, electricity and cable TV are normally NOT included in apartment rent rates and
          cost $200-$500 per month combined.

MEDICAL
 - IMS must bring completed medical DD forms 2808 and 2807-1 in English for themselves and
   accompanying or joining dependents. DSCA authorizes an exception to policy for “fast track” countries.

 - If the ITO does not provide medical coverage for dependents, the IMS must provide medical insurance for
   dependents which is valid in the U.S. It must include pregnancy insurance for female dependents who are
   18 to 44 years of age.

   -- DLIELC staff will not counsel or in any way assist IMS on selecting insurance companies from which they
      must obtain medical insurance and/or pregnancy insurance for dependents.

 - There is no emergency medical care at JBSA Lackland. Medical emergencies are handled only at
   San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) at JBSA Fort Sam Houston or at local civilian hospitals.

 - DLIELC staff and the JBSA Lackland Urgent Care staff at Wilford Hall Medical Center do not offer off
   base medical referrals.

   -- In the event of an IMS medical emergency, IMS are required to call 9-1-1 from any telephone for
      immediate medical assistance.

 - IMS must fully understand their medical payment responsibilities for themselves and their authorized
   dependents prior to departure from country. DLIELC staff does not provide any information or assistance in
   interpreting medical agreements or in providing guidance to IMS from countries with no medical
   agreement.

 - IMS with authorized dependents need to make appointments for their dependents well after class hours.
   Students will be on unauthorized absence for missing class for dependent appointments.

 - IMS requiring Class 1, 2, or 3 medical examinations/physicals due to flight or other special FOT medical
   requirements should have flight/specialty physicals completed before arriving. IMS must have medical
   documents translated to English prior to arriving at DLIELC.



DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                                65
- IMS Dental care emergencies will follow the same procedures as medical emergencies stated above.

     -- Cleanings or cosmetic work on IMS teeth is not operationally categorized as a medical emergency.
     IMS seeking those services will be solely responsible for scheduling and making those appointments after
        school hours.

- IMS with routine medical issues or aliments will take the shuttle to Fort Sam Houston SAMMC for further
  evaluation.

- IMS with routine medical issues or aliments that require “sick call” visits will be responsible for making
  their way to base sick call facility.

- An ambulance will be called for any and all medical emergencies or non-routine medical issues.

CLASS ATTENDANCE
- IMS must attend ALL classes and report to all scheduled medical appointments, mandatory physical
  training, and mandatory meetings during training.

- Failure to attend classes, scheduled appointments, mandatory physical training, and mandatory meetings
  will result in disciplinary action.

- A Special Inquiry for Attendance will be held for IMS who have missed and/or been tardy for 15 class
  periods and/or scheduled appointments, mandatory physical training or meetings. The inquiry
  recommendation will typically be removal from training and return to homeland.

- IMS will not be required to attend classes on specified home country holidays or U.S. recognized holidays.
  See your Country Program Manager (CPM) upon arrival for your authorized holidays.

     -- DLIELC Staff are not authorized to change your home country authorized holiday(s).

- IMS should check regularly with the MTMs for any disciplinary point totals.

- In the event an IMS is presented with a disciplinary point letter, the IMS signature is not required. All letters
  will be filed with the MTMs in the IMS record.

- IMS are not authorized employment while attending DLIELC.

UNIFORMS
- IMS must have adequate number of uniforms. DLIELC recommends 3–4 sets at minimum.

- Authorized shoes must be included with uniform.

- Cold weather gear (warm coat) should be included for the October through March time frame. Weather in
  San Antonio ranges from extremes of 15°F (-10°C) to 110°F (44°C).

- IMS are expected to conform to military standards, which include proper wearing of the uniform, U.S.
  equivalent rank, DLIELC insignia, and name tag IAW DLIELC policies, as well as proper appearance
  (i.e., clean shaven, haircut, saluting, personal hygiene, etc.).

- IMS in uniform are required to wear covers (hats) outside of buildings, to include under enclosures.

- IMS are required to salute superior officers and return the salute of subordinates.

66                                DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
PHYSICAL TRAINING (PT)
 - PT standards are required for IMS reporting to certain FOT assignments, as indicated in block 12d of the
   ITO and the list which follow this Section of the SCO Handbook. DLIELC no longer has the resources to
   conduct or track students’ PT. However, students can continue to benefit from JBSA Lackland’s on-base
   facilities and engage in their own self-monitored PT.

 - PT standards are based on the U.S. Army physical fitness test, and include push-ups, sit-ups, and a two-mile
   run.

 - All other students are encouraged to participate in PT.

OUT-PROCESSING AND GRADUATION
 - All graduating IMS must attend a scheduled mandatory out-processing briefing.

 - All IMS must submit the out-processing checklist and transportation questionnaire to the Resident Support
   Flight (RSF) training technicians by Monday of their graduation week or they will not be awarded their
   graduation certificate.

 - Attendance at the DLIELC graduation ceremony is mandatory.

 - IMS who report late for the ceremony roll call will not be allowed to attend and will be required to attend a
   formal counseling with RSF Section Chief to receive their diploma.

 - IMS who are not authorized to absent themselves from the graduation ceremony by the DLIELC
   Commandant or the International Operations Squadron (IOS) Commander will not receive their graduation
   certificates without a formal counseling with RSF Section Chief.




DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                               67
                       FOLLOW-ON TRAINING (FOT) COURSES
                         REQUIRING PHYSICAL TRAINING
PT standards are required for IMS reporting to certain FOT assignments. However, DLIELC no longer
has the resources to conduct or track PT. Nevertheless, students can continue to benefit from JBSA
Lackland’s on-base facilities and engage in their own self-monitored PT. Students are highly encouraged to
participate in PT on their own to avoid issues at the next training location.
Ÿ For your situational awareness, the MASL list below indicates MASLs for which PT standards are
  required or advised by FOT. Bolded MASLs denote those FOTs which require students to meet PT
  standards. For all other listed MASLs, PT standards are advised.
Ÿ There are no DLIELC MASLs which require PT standards. DLIELC is an English language institute.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
                                                                                        SWIM       ADV
      MASL                                 COURSE TITLE
                                                                                         PT         PT
     D171003      SQUADRON OFFICERS SCHOOL (RESIDENT)
     D121002      WATER SURVIVAL, PARACHUTING                                              ü
     D121054      WATER SURVIVAL, NON-PARACHUTING                                          ü
     D121088      USAF UNDERWATER EGRESS TRAINING (UET) FLYING)                            ü


DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
                                                                                        SWIM        ADV
      MASL                                 COURSE TITLE
                                                                                         PT          PT
     B115008       AIR ASSAULT                                                                       ü
     B121179       PRE-RANGER                                                              ü         ü
     B121181       RANGER                                                                  ü         ü
     B121182       AIRBORNE                                                                          ü
     B121183       INFANTRY MORTAR LEADER                                                            ü
     B121240       CBRN BASIC OFFICER LEADER-BRANCH
     B121260       INFANTRY BASIC OFFICER LEADERSHIP                                       ü         ü
     B126619       PSYCHOLOGICAL OPERATIONS OFFICER                                                  ü
     B126620       MILITARY FREE FALL PARACHUTIST                                                    ü
     B126621       SPECIAL FORCES COMBAT DIVING SUPERVISOR                                 ü         ü
     B126623       SPECIAL FORCES COMBAT DIVER QUALIFICATION                               ü         ü
     B126625       MILITARY FREE FALL JUMPMASTER                                                     ü
     B126630       SPECIAL FORCES QUALIFICATION-ALLIED (WEAPONS                            ü         ü
     B126633       SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMBAT MEDIC                                                   ü
     B126634       SPECIAL FORCES QUALIFICATION-ALLIED (ENGINEER                           ü         ü
     B126636       SPECIAL FORCES QUALIFICATION-ALLIED (DET OFF)                           ü         ü
     B126641       SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMBAT MEDICAL SKILLS SUST                                     ü
     B173637       CIVIL AFFAIRS TRAINING                                                            ü
     B175211       HEALTHCARE SPECIALIST                                                             ü
     B175700       AMEDD
     B176021       SAPPER LEADER COURSE                                                              ü
     B179052       OCS                                                                               ü



68                          DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
                                                                                       SWIM   ADV
       MASL                                   COURSE TITLE
                                                                                        PT     PT
     B121043        MANEUVER SENIOR LEADER
     B121044        M-SLC (INFANTRY)
     B121046        M-SLC (CAVALRY SCOUT)
     B121186        JUMPMASTER
     B121195        MECHANIZED LEADER
     B121220        ADJUTANT GENERAL BASIC OFFICER LEADER
     B121225        ADA BASIC OFFICER LEADERS COURSE
     B121245        ENGINEER BOLC-BRANCH
     B121250        FA BASIC OFFICER LEADERS COURSE BRANCH
     B121255        FINANCIAL MGMT BASIC OFFICER LEADER
     B121270        MILITARY POLICE BASIC OFFICER LEADER-BRANCH
     B121275        ORDNANCE BASIC OFFICER LEADER-BRANCH
     B121280        QUARTERMASTER BASIC OFFICER LEADER-BRANCH
     B121290        TRANSPORTATION BASIC OFFICER LEADER-BRANCH
     B121829        DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURES (NON-US)
     B122190        FA CANNON CREWMEMBER
     B122195        FA CANNON SECTION CHIEF ALC
     B122200        FA PLATOON SERGEANT SLC
     B126001        INTERMEDIATE SEARCH (GWOT)
     B127053        RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY
     B129000        WARRIOR LEADERS COURSE                                                    ü
     B129907        INFANTRY ADVANCED LDAER                                                   ü
     B129908        WARRIOR LEADER                                                            ü
     B142301        FA WEAPONS MAINTENANCE
     B143306        ALLIED TRADES SPECIALIST ALC
     B143312        WHEELED VEH MECHANIC ALC
     B144581        CAVALRY SCOUT ADVANCED LEADER
     B152467        UNIT SUPPLY SPECIALIST SLC
     B152468        UNIT SUPPLY SPECIALIST ALC
     B153001        TRANSPORTATION DEPLOYMENT/DISTRIBUTION SLC
     B156532        FINANCIAL MGMT ADVANCED LEADERS
     B162519        HUMAN RESOURCES ADVANCED LEADERS
     B165521        HUMAN RESOURCES WOBC
     B169530        CHAPLAIN INITIAL MILITARY TRAINING
     B169536        CHAPLAIN BASIC OFFICER LEADER
     B171131        FA OFFICER ADVANCED PREPARATORY
     B171200        SERGEANTS MAJOR COURSE
     B171201        SERGEANTS MAJOR PRE-COURSE
     B171206        AMEDD CAPTAINS CAREER COURSE PH1
     B171207        AMEDD CAPTAINS CAREER COURSE PH2
     B171590        ADJUTANT CAPTAINS' CAREER
     B171603        ADA CAPTAINS CAREER COURSE
     B171604        CAPTAINS CAREERN PREPARATORY
     B171652        CHAPLAIN CAPTAINS’ CAREER



DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                69
                                                                                 SWIM        ADV
      MASL                          COURSE TITLE
                                                                                  PT          PT
     B171660   CBRNC CAPTAIN CAREER
     B171670   ENGINEER CAPTAIN CAREER COURSE
     B171680   FA CAPTAINS CAREER COURSE
     B171690   FINANCIAL MGMT CAPTIASNS' CAREER
     B171699   MCCC PREP                                                                      ü
     B171701   MANEUVER CAPTAINS CAREER                                                       ü
     B171740   MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATOR
     B171800   ARMY WAR COLLEGE RESIDENT CRS
     B171802   ADA ALC
     B171803   ADA SLC
     B171807   INTERNATIONAL FELLOWS ORIENTATION CRS
     B172597   MILITARY INTELLIGENCE BASIC OFFICER LEADERS
     B172599   MILITARY INTELLIGENCE CAPTAINS CAREER COURSE
     B173582   MILITARY POLICE INVESIGATOR
     B174004   HORIZONTAL CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER
     B174013   ENG BOLC-B INT'L STU PREP
     B174014   ENGINEER SINT'L STU PREP
     B174015   CHEM BOLC-B INT'L STU PREP
     B174016   CBRNC CCC INT'L STU PREP
     B174017   MP BOLC-B INT'L STU PREP
     B174018   MP CCC INT'L STU PREP
     B174097   TECHNICAL ENGINEER
     B174126   POWER-GENERATION EQUIPMENT REPAIRER ALC
     B175701   AMEDD BASIC OFFICER LDR COURSE
     B179020   DDE CRS - 1ST RESIDENT CRS
     B179021   DDE CRS - 2ND RESIDENT CRS
     B179025   SYSTEMS APPROACH TO TRAINING BASIC COURSE
     B179026   FA ARMY BASIC INSTRUCTOR COURSE
     B179027   SMALL GROUP INSTRUCTOR TRAINING COURSE
     B17902C   AWC DISTANCE EDUCATION COURSE
     B179535   PATRIOT OPERATOR & SYSTEM MECHANIC
     B179538   PATRIOT OPERATOR (ICC)
     B179953   DRILL SERGEANT SCHOOL
     B194092   MLRS SECTION CHIEF ALC
     B194102   MLRS PLATOON SERGEANT SLC
     B195193   PATRIOT MISSILE SYSTEM REPAIRER
     B229002   WARRIOR LEADERS COURSE                                                         ü
     B229021   WARRIOR LEADER COURSE (WLC)                                                    ü
     B366400   CBRN DISMOUNT RECON COURSE
     P127437   SHPBD CBR-D OPS/TRNG SPEC




70                   DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14
DEPARMENT OF THE NAVY
                                                                                       SWIM   ADV
      MASL                                    COURSE TITLE
                                                                                        PT     PT
     P121855       LIGHT ARMORED VEH LDR
     P122060       INTL EOD PHASE I
     P122238       BASIC MACHINE GUNNER
     P122240/1     BASIC MORTARMAN
     P122243       BASIC ASSAULTMAN
   * P123712       INTL EOD PHASE II NAVY
   * P124074       MARINES AWAITING RECON TRAINING (MART)
   * P124099       BASIC RECONNAISSANCE
   * P124108       MEU (SOC) SCOUT SWIMMER
   * P124111       BASIC SCOUT SWIMMER COURSE
   * P164007       OFFICER CANDIDATE SCHOOL
   * P171207       SNCO CAREER COURSE USMC
   * P171809       SERGEANTS COURSE (MLT III)
   * P171812       SNCO ADVANCED COURSE
   * P175002       RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT OF DIVING CASUALTIES
   * P175503       MEDICAL DEPARTMENT DIVING OFFICER
   * P175577       DIVING MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
   * P1790BS       USMC OBSERVER
   * P179278       EXPED TRNG FOR CHAPLAINS
   * P179279       EXPED TRNG RELIGIOUS PGM SP
  % P116011        MOUNTAIN SURVIVAL                                                          ü
  % P121017        COMBAT ENGR NCO CRS                                                        ü
  % P121018        BASIC COMBAT ENGINEER                                                      ü
  % P121029        SUMMER MOUNTAIN LEADERS CRS                                                ü
  % P121030        WINTER MOUNTAIN LEADERS CRS                                                ü
  % P121034/5      INFANTRY SQUAD LEADER                                                      ü
  % P121036/7      INFANTRY PLATOON SERGEANT                                                  ü
  % P121048        COMBAT ENGR NCO – CS MODULE                                                ü
  % P121802        COMBAT ENGR OFFICER USMC                                                   ü
  % P121834        COLD WEATHER SURVIVAL CRS                                                  ü
  % P121835        MOUNTAIN SURVIVAL COURSE                                                   ü
  % P124401        BOARDING TEAM MEMBER                                                       ü
  % P166801/2      DRILL INSTRUCTOR USMC                                                      ü
  % P166810        NON-LETHAL INDIVIDUAL WEAPONS INSTRUCTOR                                   ü
  % P173101        BOARDING OFFICER                                                           ü
  % P175228        COLD WEATHER MEDICINE                                                      ü
  % P175235        WILDERNESS MEDICINE COURSE                                                 ü
  & P117024        AVTRA AIRCREW CAND SCH                                               ü
  & P117402        INITIAL NAVAL AVIATION SURVIVAL TRAINING                             ü
  & P119301        AVTRA PRE-FLIGHT INDOC                                               ü
  & P119311        INTL BASIC AVIATION PREP                                             ü
  & P121008        INFANTRY OFFICER CRS USMC                                            ü
  & P122032        RESCUE SWIMMER ADV                                                   ü


DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14                71
                                                                                           SWIM       ADV
      MASL                                   COURSE TITLE
                                                                                            PT         PT
  & P122075        SAR RESCUE SHIP                                                            ü
  & P124301        UNWTR DEMOL/SEAL TRNG BASIC (BUD/S)                                        ü
  & P124302        UNWTR DEMOL/SEAL (BUD/S INDOC)                                             ü
  & P124303        PHYSICAL TRAINING INTL/SEAL                                                ü
  & P124801        ASSAULT AMPHIBIAN UNIT LEADER                                              ü
  & P129154        RESCUE SWIMMER SCHOOL - TACT                                               ü
  & P129491        SURFACE RESCUE SWIMMER C1                                                  ü
  & P141350        PERS/SURVIVAL OJT                                                          ü
  & P144001        ASSAULT AMPHIBIAN REPAIRMAN INTERMEDIATE                                   ü
  & P144002        ASSAULT AMPHIBIAN VEHICLE CREWMAN                                          ü
  & P144802        ASSAULT AMPHIBIAN VEHICLE OFF                                              ü
  & P144803        ASSAULT AMPHIBIAN REPAIRMAN BASIC                                          ü
  & P166009        MARTIAL ARTS INSTRUCTOR TRAINING COURSE                                    ü
  & P179003        INTERNATIONAL DIVING COURSE                                                ü
  & P179009        DIVING OFF DEEP SEA X-TRG                                                  ü
  & P179011        DIVER FIRST CLASS                                                          ü
  & P179016        DIVER SCUBA                                                                ü
  & P179101        DIVER SECOND CLASS                                                         ü
  & P179148        BASIC DIVING OFFICER                                                       ü
  & P179149        DIVING SALVAGE OFF                                                         ü
  & P179190        DIVER EXPLOSIVE ORD DISP                                                   ü
  & P179250        BASIC OFFICER CRS USMC                                                     ü
NOTES FOR NAVY PT:
• Bolded MASLs preceded by an asterisk (*) denote Basic PT is mandatory at the next training location.
• Bolded MASLs preceded by a percentage sign (%) denote Advance PT level W/O swim is mandatory at
  the next training location.
• Bolded MASLs preceded by an ampersand (&) denote PT level W/swim is mandatory at the next
  training location.

All other MASLs listed denote PT Advised at the next training location
PT is NOT provided at DLIELC. Students are highly encouraged to participate in PT on their own to avoid issues
at the next training location.




72                            DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations FY14

				
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