Docstoc

Rapid Tranquilisation and Patient Safety - HQIP.ppt

Document Sample
Rapid Tranquilisation and Patient Safety - HQIP.ppt Powered By Docstoc
					Rapid Tranquilisation and 
     Patient Safety
  Andy Cantrell, January 2013
                   Background
Rapid tranquilisation poses risks to both staff and patients. 
Injuries are common in restraint. Medication occasionally 
contributes to respiratory/cardiac arrest.

Ideally all aggression is de-escalated prior
to the need for rapid tranquilisation. This 
has been the focus of other projects.

Nevertheless there will always be a small proportion of 
acutely disturbed, often delusional patients who pose a risk 
to patients, staff and themselves without intervention. 

Driven by NICE Guidelines on Violence and Schizophrenia, 
NHSLA assessment and Serious Incidents, we undertook 
several years of quality improvement to make this safer…
Clinical Audit Cycle



         A



                HQIP
              Key Standards
• Attempt de-escalation prior to the need for rapid 
  tranquilisation
• Medication Prescribing Protocol – ‘4 steps of 
  Rapid Tranquilisation Process’ from the 
  Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines including 
  choice of drug, dosage and contra-indications
• Monitoring of patients’ physical observations 
  following rapid tranquilisation
• Debriefing with the patient
• Documentation of all the above
               Baseline, 2007
• Unreliable documentation of incidents in the 
  patient record (48%)
• Little documentation of attempting de-escalation 
  prior to rapid tranquilisation (10%)
• Common administration of Haloperidol during 
  rapid tranquilisation (16%)
• Where given, Haloperidol was usually above the 
  recommended dosage (74%)
• Physical observations were not recorded 
  following rapid tranquilisation
• Debriefing with the patient was not recorded
                   Fishbone analysis
                                                       Local teams
                          Guidelines                   sometimes lack
Aggression                lacking                      de-escalation/
                   Fear                                PSTS skills
  Drug                         Risk from RT
  interactions                 medications                 Emergency Team
      Delusions Not all physically                         likewise
                                       Restraint
         Fear   suited to restraint    carries risks                     Injury to 
                                                                         staff and 
                       Resus equipment                                   patients 
                       was not 100%                                      during RT
                       correct at start
  Not covered in                        Often local
  everybody’s       No formal record problems            Guidelines perceived
  mandatory         of observations                      as ‘out of touch’
  training
Improvement Work
         Improvement Work
• Physical observations 
  after rapid tranquilisation 
  included in the SLAM 
  Magnet Nursing 
  Competency Framework. 



• Modified Early Warning Scores cards include a 
  prompt on the front page to record observations 
  post-rapid tranquillisation.
        Improvement Work (contd.)
•   Audit summary findings and recommendations issued in trustwide e-
    news bulletin and e-mailed  to all consultants and ward managers to 
    be given to their teams (March 2010, December 2011).
•   Medication Incident and Error Bulletins produced by the Pharmacy 
    Department have highlighted serious incidents involving rapid 
    tranquilisation and reminders of the mandatory monitoring schedule 
    (e.g. April 2012).
•   A poster of the rapid tranquillisation guidelines has been produced 
    and sent to all wards in March 2011. Inpatient practice visits audit 
    data in May 2012 demonstrated 95% inpatient areas had this poster 
    displayed.
•   The SLaM rapid tranquillisation guidelines were reviewed and re-
    ratified in October 2011. Amendments to the guidelines included 
    advice on medication for children and older adults.
  Improvement Work (last of these)
• Systems have been introduced to scan paper medication 
  and observation charts into the electronic record system. 
  5 super scanners deployed. Administrators trained.  


• An alert and hyperlink have been added to the 
  DATIXweb incident reporting form where rapid 
  tranquilisation has been used. Encourages recording of 
  physical observations or refusals.
• A rapid-cycle audit project focused on improving physical 
  observations following rapid tranquillisation (due to start 
  in September 2012) 
Jim Reason’s Swiss Cheese Model
                                             HAZARDS
 Cheese = Barriers (good)




                            Holes = Failures (bad)
ACCIDENT
   Rapid Tranq. Cheese Model
 BARRIERS        De-escalation   HAZARDS
        Safe Prescribing
     PSTS restraint
Observations




ACCIDENT
   Rapid Tranq. Cheese Model
 BARRIERS                  De-escalation            HAZARDS
               Safe Prescribing

       PSTS restraint

Observations




                                            CT1 Training, RT
                                        Guidelines Poster
                                  Include RT in PSTS Training

ACCIDENT                   MEWS
   Rapid Tranq. Cheese Model
 BARRIERS                  De-escalation            HAZARDS
               Safe Prescribing

       PSTS restraint

Observations




                                            CT1 Training, RT
                                        Guidelines Poster
                                  Include RT in PSTS Training

ACCIDENT                   MEWS
                         MEWS RT Cover sheet
   Rapid Tranq. Cheese Model
 BARRIERS                  De-escalation            HAZARDS
               Safe Prescribing

       PSTS restraint

Observations




                                            CT1 Training, RT
                                        Guidelines Poster
                                  Include RT in PSTS Training

ACCIDENT                   MEWS
                         MEWS RT Cover sheet
Re-audit - successes
By the 2011 audit cycle:
• Documentation of rapid tranquilisation in the patient electronic notes 
   improved and this was sustained (48% in 2007, up to 96% in 2010, 100% in 
   2011)
• Documented attempts to de-escalate the patient prior to rapid tranquilisation 
   became more common (10% up to 66% in 2011)
• Use of Haloperidol dropped to a minimum (42% in Jan 2008 down to 3.6% 
   in 2011)
• Recorded debrief with the patient following rapid tranquillisation improved 
   (0% to 43% in 2007)

Not so good:
• Whilst recording of at least one set of observations following rapid 
   tranquilisation improved (0% in 2007 up to 25% in 2011), the requirement to 
   document physical observations at the frequency required (i.e. every 5-10 
   minutes for one hour and then half-hourly until the patient is ambulatory) 
   has not been met. This is now subject to a focused rapid-cycle audit project.
   Rapid-Cycle Audit - Observations
 • Cultural change through inclusion in project
 • Frequent observations. Hawthorn effect 
   becomes a real effect




                    ã NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement
Deming, 1994
                  4 Rs of Motivation
•   Responsibilities
     – Key but disciplinary in nature. Improving ownership by inclusion in 
       quality improvement project

•   Relationships
     – Team culture is a big factor in RT habits
     – Negative effect on patient relationship may accumulate
       from repeated observations?

•   Rewards
     – Reward to Trust in NHSLA insurance
     – No such rewards for individual clinicians. Just the knowledge they have 
       avoided the small possibility of physical collapse

•   Reasons
     – Clinicians not convinced of the value of observations
     – Need to clarify that risk assessing as unsafe is ok, but to record it
     – Need to convince clinicians policy writers are not ‘on another planet’
                                                           Michael Maccoby (2010)
                                Research Technology Management 53(4) 2010 pp. 60-61 
Productive Mental Health Ward




• Good use of ground-up Quality improvement
• Clinicians are learning and taking ownership
     Lessons for Patient Safety
• Best to avoid Rapid Tranquilisation. 
  Consider Relational Security à
• Staff safety = patient safety
• Models help you think
                                                      DoH
• The clinicians may think your policy writers are 
  living on another planet. Address this.
• Persevere, small improvements 
  get you there in the end…
• …If they don’t – change tactics!
       Thanks for listening




                     Anyone achieved 
Any questions?       rigorous post-RT  
                        observations?

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:2/25/2014
language:Unknown
pages:21