Docstoc

Presentation 1

Document Sample
Presentation 1 Powered By Docstoc
					Late and End of Life
Topics:
The Basics
Jamie Capasso, DO
Geriatric Fellow
UCI Program in Geriatrics
Topics Covered:
After this presentation students….
• Will have a brief historical perspective in end of life medicine
• Will have an introduction in techniques of discussion of end of 
  life topics with patients
• Will be comfortable with Decision-making ability; capacity vs. 
  competency
• Can differentiate between Advanced directives vs. Living will 
  vs. POLST 
• Be familiar with the terms Power of attorney vs. Surrogate 
  decision-maker
Topics Covered:
After this presentation, students….
• Will be familiar with Hospice: Philosophy, benefits offered, 
  common diagnoses and indicators
• Will have an introduction to Palliative Care
• Will know common myths and legality of Physician-assisted 
  suicide
1565- Physicians tending to a dying
patient
Historical Perspective…
• In 1835, Jacob Bigelow urged fellow members of the 
  Massachusetts Medical Society to withhold "therapies,” such 
  as cathartics and emetics, from hopelessly ill patients.
• In 1848, John Warren, the surgeon who performed the first 
  operation with ether anesthesia, urged that ether should be 
  used "in mitigating the agonies of death.“
• In 1953, John Bonica published the first textbook of pain 
  medicine, suggesting a change in how opioids could be used 
  for chronic pain. 
• During the same time period, Dr. Cicely Saunders began work 
  with terminal cancer patients and established the first hospice 
  at St. Christopher’s in London in 1967.
Historical Perspective
• Parallel developments were occurring in many countries, and 
  the first US hospice  was established in New Haven, CT in 1974. 
  From there, hospice grew exponentially.
• 1982 marked hospice being named as an entitlement by the 
  Federal Medicare program.

• 1991: Patient Self-Determination Act- Hospitals required to 
  inform patients of their rights including:
  • The right to accept or refuse treatment
  • The right to have an advanced directive
  • The right to facilitate their health care decisions
Topics Covered:
• Will have a brief historical perspective in end of life medicine
• Will have an introduction in techniques of discussion of end of 
  life topics with patients
• Will be comfortable with Decision-making ability; capacity vs. 
  competency
• Can differentiate between Advanced directives vs. Living will 
  vs. POLST 
• Be familiar with the terms Power of attorney vs. Surrogate 
  decision-maker
End of Life Discussion
   “Hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.”


 • Allow equal time for hoping and preparing
This facilitates discussion of a broad range of topics pertaining to 
future planning. 
 • Align patient and physician hopes
Hope is an important coping mechanism and gives patients and their 
families gratification.
End of Life Discussion
   “Hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.”



 • Encourage, but do not impose, the dual agenda of hoping and 
   preparing.
Don’t block/ignore such feelings as fear, anger, sadness or anxiety.
Unarticulated fears are correlated to increased anxiety and 
depression.
Name and discuss them.
 • Support the evolution of hope and preparation over time. 
Probe: If reluctant to discuss these matters, Why? 
 • Time your discussion early in the illness and revisit the 
   issues regularly.
 • Respond to emotions
Communication strategies such as acknowledgement, 
exploration, legitimation, and empathy.
Topics Covered:
• Will have a brief historical perspective in end of life medicine
• Will have an introduction in techniques of discussion of end of 
  life topics with patients
• Will be comfortable with Decision-making ability; capacity vs. 
  competency
• Can differentiate between Advanced directives vs. Living will 
  vs. POLST 
• Be familiar with the terms Power of attorney vs. Surrogate 
  decision-maker
Competence vs. Capacity
• Competence defines a legal status. A person is legally either 
  competent or incompetent, with no gray areas in between. An 
  adult is assumed to be competent unless he or she is 
  determined by a court to lack the ability to make the decisions 
  required for living safely, at which time the court deems that 
  person incompetent.
Competence vs. Capacity
• Decision-making capacity implies the ability to understand the 
  nature and consequences of different options, to make a 
  choice among those options, and to communicate that 
  choice. 
• Decision-making capacity is thus required in order to give 
  informed consent. When applied to medical decisions, this 
  requires that a person understand a diagnostic or therapeutic 
  intervention's significant benefits, risks, and alternatives
Topics Covered:
• Will have a brief historical perspective in end of life medicine
• Will have an introduction in techniques of discussion of end of 
  life topics with patients
• Will be comfortable with Decision-making ability; capacity vs. 
  competency
• Can differentiate between Advanced directives vs. Living will 
  vs. POLST 
• Be familiar with the terms Power of attorney vs. Surrogate 
  decision-maker
Advance Directives
Include three parts:
1. Living will AKA Health care directives: Legal document that 
     spells out which medical treatments/life sustaining 
     measures you do and do not want.
2. Medical Power of Attorney AKA Durable Power of Attorney 
     for Health Care: designates an individual (proxy) to make 
     medical decisions on your behalf if you are unable.
Advance Directives
3.    DNR or Code status designation
Advance Directives
• MPOA goes into effect only when a patient is deemed 
  incapacitated by illness.
• These documents do not require a lawyer- most only require 
  two witnesses or a notary signature depending on the state.
• Some do not transfer state to state; have a patient that 
  resides in two states complete two different forms. 
• Go to caringinfo.org for state-specific form
Advance Directives
• Some state’s  AD allows you to also designate a primary 
  physician.
• Medicare reimburses for one “Advanced care planning” visit 
  per 5 years, or additional visits when there is a major change 
  in condition.
• Ensure that the patient has a discussion with the appointed 
  proxy and physician regarding clear wishes for their future 
  treatment.
POLST
Physician orders for life-sustaining
treatment
• Turns treatment wishes of an individual into actionable medical 
  orders.
• Designed to be portable between facilities.
• Supplements the Advance Directive.
• Differs in that the POLST contains medical orders for current 
  treatment, whereas the AD contains instructions for future 
  treatments. 
• Adopted by 9 states so far, mostly on the east and west coasts. 
  There are 14 additional states developing programs.  
Hierarchy of Surrogates
 • Advance directives specified by the patient before (s)he 
    became incapacitated prevail, even over the contrary wishes 
    of guardians and other surrogate decision-maker.
Family members and friends take precedence next, usually in the 
following order:
 • Spouse
 • Adult children
 • Siblings
 • Other family members
 • Friend
 • Health care providers follow, in the absence of other decision-
    makers (not optimal)
We have a long way to go…..
• Less than 50 percent of the severely or terminally ill patients studied 
  had an advance directive in their medical record.
• Only 12 percent of patients with an advance directive had received 
  input from their physician in its development.
• Between 65 and 76 percent of physicians whose patients had an 
  advance directive were not aware that it existed.
• Advance directives helped make end-of-life decisions in less than 
  half of the cases where a directive existed.
• Advance directives usually were not applicable until the patient 
  became incapacitated and "absolutely, hopelessly ill."
• Providers and patient surrogates had difficulty knowing when to 
  stop treatment and often waited until the patient had crossed a 
  threshold over to actively dying before the advance directive was 
  invoked.
• Language in advance directives was usually too nonspecific and 
  general to provide clear instruction.
Topics covered….

• Students will be familiar with Hospice: Philosophy, benefits 
  offered, common diagnoses and indicators
• Will have an introduction to Palliative Care
• Will know the basics of Physician-assisted suicide
Question:
• An 86 y/o woman is hospitalized for symptoms of abdominal pain, 
  poor appetite, and progressive weight loss. Medical history of CAD 
  and DM. Her physical functioning has declined: She can only walk a 
  few steps and is dependent in all ADLs except feeding. 
• CT of the abdomen and chest strongly suggest metastatic pancreatic 
  cancer.  She has undergone many procedures and hospitalizations 
  and she doesn’t want anymore. 
• She and her daughter inquire about hospice. Which of the following 
  services is covered under the Medicare Hospice Benefit?
  •   A. Room and board in a long-term care facility
  •   B. Nursing care in a post acute-care nursing facility
  •   C. Hospital bed and bedside commode for home 
  •   D. Private-duty caregiver at home
  •   E. Medications for diabetes and CAD
• Patients with Medicare part A are eligible for the Medicare 
  hospice benefit if they have a terminal illness with a life 
  expectancy of 6 months or less. 
• The benefit covers a variety of services related to the terminal 
  diagnosis, including the provision of DME (hospital bed, 
  bedside commode.)
• It also covers home-health aides, homemaker services, 
  nursing visits, physician visits, social services, counseling, 
  physical therapy, occupational therapy.
• It covers medications for comfort and palliation, but not for 
  non-terminal conditions (the DM and CAD.)
Hospice
• In general, designed to shift the focus of care from curative to 
  comfort in a person nearing the end of life.
• Relies on physician assertion that if a patient follows the 
  normal course of their disease, their life span will be less than 
  6 months.
• Philosophy centered in multidisciplinary care, focusing on 
  maximizing the quality of life, not necessarily the quantity.
Team Members
       Physician
        Nurses
    Home health aid
     Social Worker
       Chaplain
      Volunteers
Common Hospice Diagnoses
              • Cancer: failed or 
                decline treatment
              • Heart failure: 
                frequent 
                hospitalizations, poor 
                symptom control on 
                max medicines
              • AIDS
              • Hepatic 
                failure/Cirrhosis
Common Hospice Diagnoses
              • COPD: O2 dependent
              • ESRD: decline dialysis
              • Dementia: immobile, 
                nonverbal, frequent 
                illnesses
              • Neurodegenerative 
                diseases
Topics covered….

• Students will be familiar with Hospice: Philosophy, benefits 
  offered, common diagnoses and indicators
• Students will have an introduction to Palliative Care
• Will know the basics of Physician-assisted suicide
Palliative Care
  • Focus on symptom management, can complement Hospice 
     care, but can also be used while pursuing curative treatments. 
  • Symptoms of: 
                             Pain
                             Dyspnea
                             Depression
                             Anxiety
                             Swelling
                             Nausea, GI distress
Palliative Care
  • Can use modalities such as:
                                    Medicines
                                    Counseling
                                    Acupuncture
                                    PT
                                    Procedures
                                    Pet therapy
Topics covered….

• Students will be familiar with Hospice: Philosophy, benefits 
  offered, common diagnoses and indicators
• Will have an introduction to Palliative Care
• Will know the basics of Physician-assisted suicide
Physician-assisted Suicide
• Only legal in Netherlands, Belgium,  and Switzerland. Oregon, 
  Montana, and Washington in the US have also legalized the 
  practice. 
• It consists of offering a patient a prescription, medication, 
  information, or other intervention with the understanding 
  that the patient intends to use them to commit suicide. 
• The term euthanasia is different: it implies active voluntary 
  euthanasia- this is when the physician actively intervenes to 
  end the life of a patient with their consent. 
• “Passive,” or “indirect“ euthanasia  refers to the practice of 
  removal of life-sustaining treatments such as ventilation or 
  artificial feeding.  These practices are not euthanasia, and 
  considered legal and ethical.
Physician Assisted Suicide
• Palliative care often involves the administration of powerful 
  drugs including narcotics and benzodiazepines. These drugs 
  may hasten death in some cases. The difference is intent: in 
  these cases, the intent is to alleviate symptoms, not to end life. 
• If a patient expresses a desire to seek PAS, start by having a 
  conversation to inquire what their motivation is. 
• Then, consider consultation with a palliative care specialist, or 
  conduct a comprehensive assessment of the patient’s physical, 
  psychological, social, and spiritual suffering. 
• Address these issues with a multidisciplinary approach. 
Questions?
References
• Hanks, Geoffrey W. C. Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine. 
  Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. Print.
• "Law for Older Americans." American Bar Association. Web. 
  05 Apr. 2011. 
  <http://www.americanbar.org/groups/public_education/reso
  urces/law_issues_for_consumers/patient_self_determination
  _act.html
• Kass-Bartelmes, Barbara L. "Advance Care Planning: 
  Preferences for Care at the End of Life. "Agency for Healthcare
  Research and Quality (AHRQ) Home. Web. 08 Apr. 2011. 
  <http://www.ahrq.gov/research/endliferia/endria.htm>
References
• "Frequently Asked Questions about Physicians Orders for Life-
  Sustaining Treatment Paradigm (POLST)." OHSU Home. Web. 
  08 Apr. 2011. http://www.ohsu.edu/polst/patients-
  families/faqs.htm
• Verdugo Hospice Care Center | Los Angeles. Web. 08 Apr. 2011. 
  http://www.verdugohospice.com/hospice_circle.php
• "Download Your State's Advance Directives - CARING 
  CONNECTIONS - NHPCO." Home - CARING CONNECTIONS -
  NHPCO. Web. 30 Apr. 2011. 
  http://www.caringinfo.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3289
References
• Applebaum P, Grisso T. Assessing patients' capacities to 
  consent to treatment, N Engl J Med 1988;319:1635-1638.
• "AMDA: Governance - Resolutions and Position Statements - 
  White Paper on Surrogate Decision-Making and Advance Care 
  Planning in Long-Term Care." American Medical Directors
  Association. Web. 14 Apr. 2011. 
  http://www.amda.com/governance/whitepapers/surrogate/i
  ndex.cfm
• Emmanuel, Ezekiel J. "Euthanasia and Physician Assisted 
  Suicide." Up to Date. 3 Jan. 2011. Web. 20 Apr. 2011
References
• Mas, Joan M. Communication. Illustration. 29 September 2007. 
  Online image. Flickr. 1 April 2011. 
  http://www.flickr.com/photos/dailypic/1459055735/
• Copyright (c) <a href='http://www.123rf.com'>123RF Stock 
  Photos</a> Image ID: 8058801
• Clip art courtesy of Microsoft

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:9
posted:2/23/2014
language:Unknown
pages:39