Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Safety Job Design vs Job Competency.pptx

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 17

									Job Design vs. Job Competency


    Safety Play a Huge Role in Both
   Critical Number One Question 
Have done a PRE-JOB HAZARD ASSESSMENT?
                               S.J.D.
Safety Job design refers to the way that a set of tasks, or an entire job, 
is organized. Job design helps to determine:
• what tasks are done,
• how the tasks are done,
• how many tasks are done, and
• in what order the tasks are done.
It takes into account all factors which affect the work, and organizes 
the content and tasks so that the whole job is less likely to be a risk to 
the employee. Safety Job design involves administrative areas such as:
• job rotation,
• job enlargement,
• task/machine pacing,
• work breaks, and
• working hours.
  Takes in account but not limited too
Safety Job design principles can address problems such as:
• work overload,
• work under load,
• repetitiveness,
• limited control over work,
• isolation,
• shiftwork, including Labor standards/DOT and NSC Hours of 
  Service Legislative Requirements
• delays in filling vacant positions,
• excessive working hours, and
• limited understanding of the whole job process.
 Why Do We Go Through the Trouble?
Good job design accommodates employees' mental and physical 
characteristics by paying attention to:
• muscular energy such as work/rest schedules or pace of work, and
• mental energy such as boring versus extremely difficult tasks.

Good job design:
• allows for employee input. Employees should have the option to vary 
  activities according to personal needs, work habits, and the circumstances 
  in the workplace.
• gives employees a sense of accomplishment.
• includes training so employees know what tasks to do and how to do 
  them properly.
• provides good work/rest schedules.
• allows for an adjustment period for physically demanding jobs.
• provides feedback to the employees about their performance.
• minimizes energy expenditure and force requirements.
• balances static and dynamic work.
                      Job design is an ongoing process.
        Engineering Controls must be 
                Applied First
Safe job design include:
• Job Enlargement: Job enlargement changes the jobs to include 
   more and/or different tasks. Job enlargement should add interest 
   to the work but may or may not give employees more responsibility.
• Job Rotation: Job rotation moves employees from one task to 
   another. It distributes the group tasks among a number of 
   employees.
• Job Enrichment: Job enrichment allows employees to assume more 
   responsibility, accountability, and independence when learning 
   new tasks or to allow for greater participation and new 
   opportunities.
• Work Design (Job Engineering): Work design allows employees to 
   see how the work methods, layout and handling procedures link 
   together as well as the interaction between people and machines.
Work Competency/Competent Workers
COMPETENT:

  having suitable or sufficient skill, knowledge, 
   experience, etc., for some purpose; properly 
   qualified.
                DEFINITION

  Means a person designated by the production-
  operator or independent contractor who has 
  the ability, training, knowledge, or experience 
  to provide training to workers in his or her 
  area of expertise.
                  DEFINITION

   One who is capable of identifying existing and 
   predictable hazards in the surroundings or working 
   conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or 
   dangerous to employees, and who has the 
   authorization to take prompt corrective measures to 
   eliminate them.
 QUALIFICATIONS OF THE COMPETENT 
             PERSON




KNOWLEDGE/SKILL/ABILITY/TRAINING/EXPERIENCE
          Can the Teams do the Job
Provide Training; always train up and stay current with industry needs
• Training in correct work procedures and equipment operation is 
   needed so that employees understand what is expected of them and 
   how to work safely. Training should be organized, consistent and 
   ongoing. It may occur in a classroom or on the job.
• Tasks should be coordinated so that they are balanced during the day 
   for the individual employee as well as balanced among a group of 
   employees. You may want to allow the employee some degree of 
   choice as to what types of mental tasks they want to do and when. 
   This choice will allow the employee to do tasks when best suited to 
   their 'alertness' patterns during the day. Some people may prefer 
   routine tasks in the morning (such as checklists or filling in forms) and 
   save tasks such as problem solving until the afternoon, or vice versa.
Look at the Start/Middle/End Goals
Do an assessment of current work practices. Is job design needed or 
feasible? Discuss the process with the employees and supervisors 
involved and be clear about the process, or any changes or training 
that will be involved.
Do a task analysis. Examine the job and determine exactly what the 
tasks are. Consider what equipment and workstation features are 
important for completing the tasks. Identify problem areas.
Design the safety job review. Identify the methods for doing the work, 
work/rest schedules, training requirements, equipment needed and 
workplace changes. Coordinate the different tasks so each one varies 
mental activities and body position. Be careful not to under or 
overload the job.
Implement the new job design gradually.  You may want to start on a 
small scale or with a pilot project. Train employees in the new 
procedures and use of equipment. Allow for an adjustment period and 
time to gain experience with the new job design.
               Re-evaluate job design on a continual basis.
                    Make any necessary adjustments.
         J.S.A. are a Great Start
A job safety analysis (JSA) is a procedure which 
helps integrate accepted safety and health 
principles and practices into a particular task or 
job operation. In a JSA, each basic step of the 
job is to identify potential hazards and to 
recommend the safest way to do the job. Other 
terms used to describe this procedure are job 
hazard analysis (JHA) and job hazard breakdown.
  Huge Benefit to Injury Reduction
• One of the methods used in this example is to observe a worker 
  actually perform the job. The major advantages of this method 
  include that it does not rely on individual memory and that the 
  process prompts recognition of hazards. For infrequently 
  performed or new jobs, observation may not be practical.
• One approach is to have a group of experienced workers and 
  supervisors complete the analysis through discussion. An 
  advantage of this method is that more people are involved in a 
  wider base of experience and promoting a more ready acceptance 
  of the resulting work procedure. Initial benefits from developing a 
  JSA will become clear in the preparation stage. The analysis process 
  may identify previously undetected hazards and increase the job 
  knowledge of those participating. 
           Acceptance of safe work procedures is promoted
          Four Simple Easy Steps
Four basic stages in conducting a JSA are:
1. selecting the job to be analyzed
2. breaking the job down into a sequence of steps
3. identifying potential hazards
4. determining preventive measures to overcome these 
   hazards

In the real world, all jobs should be subjected to a JSA. In 
some cases there are practical constraints posed by the 
amount of time and effort required to do a JSA. 
JSA will require revision whenever equipment, raw materials,
             processes, or the environment change.
        What is your True Priority?
JSA Risk Assessment include:
• Accident frequency and severity: jobs where accidents occur 
   frequently or where they occur infrequently but result in disabling 
   injuries.
• Potential for severe injuries or illnesses: the consequences of an 
   accident, hazardous condition, or exposure to harmful substance 
   are potentially severe.
• Newly established jobs: due to lack of experience in these jobs, 
   hazards may not be evident or anticipated.
• Modified jobs: new hazards may be associated with changes in job 
   procedures.
• Infrequently performed jobs: workers may be at greater risk when 
   undertaking non-routine jobs, and a JSA provides a means of 
   reviewing hazards.
   The Goal is Everyone Goes Home
Safety/Happy/and Ready for Tomorrow

								
To top