Docstoc

Incident or accident both need investigating.pptx

Document Sample
Incident or accident both need investigating.pptx Powered By Docstoc
					 Incident/Accident They Both 
Need to Be Investigated at Work
    An incident refers to any event or chain of events with the 
    potential to lead to injury to humans, or damage or loss of 
                              property. 
   There is a need to investigate an incident to find out what is 
                        behind the incident.
            Incident or accident
• Though the terms “incident” and “accident” are often 
  used interchangeably in referring to reporting 
  procedures, a distinction should be made between the 
  two words. An accident is an unplanned event that 
  results in injury, harm or damage. An incident is an 
  event that had the potential to cause injury, harm or 
  damage. Incidents include accidents, as well as near 
  misses and dangerous occurrences. In this program, 
  the term “incident” refers to all possible occurrences, 
  including accidents, near miss incidents, environmental 
  releases . All incidents, even when seemingly minor, 
  should set in motion the facility’s reporting and 
  investigation procedures/protocols. 
    Prevention is the purpose of an 
            investigation.
An incident investigation should:
• determine what actually happened,
• determine the cause or causes of the incident,
• identify any unsafe conditions, acts or procedures,
• help management to identify practical corrective 
   actions,
• determines whether due diligence was observed,
• show the commitment of management that an 
   adequate investigation system is in place.
                         Near Miss / Hit

•   The term near miss - which may better be called near hit - describes an 
    incident that did not result in an actual loss but that had the potential to 
    do so. For example if an object is dropped from a crane but no one is hurt 
    then the incident is a near miss. Near misses, particularly those that could 
    have had high consequences, should be investigated thoroughly because 
    they are strong indicator of system failures. They are a free lesson learned. 
    In terms of fault tree analysis a near miss is an event in which one or more 
    of the inputs to an end was negative.
•   The following are examples of near misses: Process conditions go outside 
    safe operating limits, and are then returned to normal with no 
    consequences;
•   An emergency shut down system is unnecessarily activated;
•   A safeguard such as a relief valve or fire suppression system is called upon 
    to operate;
•   A hazardous chemical is released but does not affect workers in the area.
How do you define a serious incident?
Workplace Safety and Health considers an incident to be serious if it results in:
• death, or serious injury (as defined below),
• collapse or structural failure of a building, tower, crane, hoist, temporary 
    construction support system or excavation,
• an uncontrolled spill or escape of a toxic, corrosive or explosive substance
• explosion, fire or flooding.
Serious injuries are defined as:
• fracture of a major bone
• amputation
•  loss of sight
• internal hemorrhage
• third degree burns
• unconsciousness resulting from concussion, electrical contact, asphyxiation
• poisoning
• cuts requiring hospitalization or time off work
•  any injury resulting in paralysis
• any other injury likely to endanger life or cause permanent disability.
                    Potential Incident

     A potential incident creates the possibility of an event, but nothing 
     actually happens. The key difference between a near miss and a 
     potential incident is that, with a near miss, an event did take place 
     but the consequences were minor. With a potential incident 
     nothing happened at all. For example, if a worker drops a wrench 
     from an upper deck and it hits the floor three stories below but no 
     one is hurt then a near miss has taken place. If the same worker 
     holds the same wrench such that, were he to drop it, it would fall 
     to a lower deck, then he has created a potential incident. 
   Potential incidents can be classified as either unsafe acts or unsafe 
   conditions. The worker who holds the wrench such that it may fall 
   has committed an unsafe act. If he fails to secure the area 
   immediately below him with barricade tape then an unsafe 
   condition has been created. 
            It is very necessary
    Incident investigation is necessary to 
    determine why an incident took place, if it 
    was an isolated event, and what can be done 
    to prevent similar incidents in the future, as 
    well as to determine the root cause(s) .
    Incident investigation is crucial, as it provides 
    a feedback mechanism to assist in improving 
    existing incident mitigation systems. 
         UNDERLYING PRINCIPLES
• Incidents don’t just happened. They are 
  caused.
• Incidents can be prevented if causes are 
  eliminated
• Causes can be eliminated if all incidents are 
  investigated properly.
• Unless the causes are eliminated, the same 
  situation will reoccur.
         The 5 fingers of an incident
•   The Task: The actual work procedure being used at the time of the 
    incident. 
•   The Material/Equipment: Review the design of machinery, tools and 
    equipment and how they are used by the workers in terms of machine 
    guarding, emergency stop devices, lock-out, pinch points, design of 
    equipment for use by workers, body positions to work and demands such 
    as repetitive work. 
•   The Worker(s):Consider the factors that affect the worker(s) when 
    performing the task 
•   The Management: Management is legally responsible for the safety and 
    health of workers and therefore the role of management must always be 
    considered in an incident investigation. 
•   The Environment: The physical workplace environment as well as sudden 
    change to that environment are factors that need to be identified. Keep in 
    mind to assess the environmental factors at the time of the incident. 
  Do we really need to talk about this
Have you ever heard someone in your organization say: 
  "We have had exactly the same type of incident in 
  another part of our business…we are just not learning 
  from our mistakes"?
Analyzing Barrier Failure
• There are certain defense mechanisms managers set 
  up to prevent incidents from occurring. In the case of 
  the chemical plant, there are adequate safety 
  procedures in place to prevent chemical leaks, for 
  instance. The barrier analysis approach to incident 
  investigation goes into the reasons behind what went 
  wrong with the defense mechanisms in place.
                   Interviews

• Interviews of personnel working in the 
  operations involved in the incident is another 
  way to investigate. These people have firsthand 
  knowledge of the operations and can provide 
  input based on their perspective. Interviewers 
  have to be careful in interpreting the data they 
  obtain though. It could be subjective, rather than 
  objective. Also, personnel should not feel there 
  will be any retaliation in case they provide any 
  input critical of management.
     Bring out the Key Factors Analysis

      The investigation looks into all the key factors associated with an 
     incident. The investigation determines whether people, processes, 
     systems and equipment were in any way responsible for the 
     incident. Once the investigation establishes, for instance, a key 
     safety system was not functioning right, the investigation 
     determines what went wrong.
• Root Cause Analysis:  In the root cause analysis approach to 
     incident investigation, the investigator charts the incident and 
     charts the immediate factors just behind the incident that 
     contributed to it. For example, in the chemical plant, it could be 
     some particular safety procedure was omitted and this was the 
     immediate cause of the leak. There are also reasons behind why 
     the safety procedure was omitted. The investigator outlines the 
     other contributing factors in this way, until the chart arrives at the 
     root cause of the incident.
                 Yes I see tell me more
•   Such analyses are, of necessity, theoretical and speculative; there can be no 
    assurance that all plausible events have actually been identified. Indeed, it is more 
    than likely that some important failure mechanisms will be overlooked.
•   It is difficult to predict the true level of risk associated with each identified event 
    because estimated values of both consequence and likelihood are usually very 
    approximate. In particular, predictions as to what might happen are invariably 
    colored by the personal experiences of the persons carrying out the analysis. If a 
    person has witnessed a particular type of incident he or she is likely to assign it a 
    high value of happening again, and vice versa.
•   Most serious events have multiple causes, some of which appear to be totally 
    implausible or even weird ahead of time (which is why serious accidents so often 
    seem to come out of the blue). Even the best qualified hazards analysis team will 
    have trouble identifying such multiple-contingency events, and then persuading 
    others of the plausibility of such events.
•   It is very difficult to predict and quantify human error - yet most events involve 
    human error.
Some times you really have to listen
                Pick a technique
There are four types of root cause analysis. 
    Argument by analogy (story-telling);
    Barrier analysis;
    Categorization; and
    Systems analysis. 

• Each of these approaches can be of value - 
  to purposely exclude any of them, 
  particularly for commercial reasons, is short-
  sighted.
                                   The Team
       An effective incident investigation and analysis program generally contains two 
    major components: technical and human. The technical side of the investigation is 
    what most publications in this area focus on, particularly with regard to root cause 
    analysis. However, what does not always receive the same degree of attention is 
    the human aspect of incident investigation work. 
•   Technicians
    Most incidents involve front-line technicians (operators and maintenance workers), 
    some of whom may have been injured or emotionally shaken. Technicians often 
    may not understand what caused the incident, but they worry that they will be 
    blamed anyway. An effective investigator encourages these front-line technicians 
    to be open and candid - primarily by simply shutting up and letting then them talk. 
•   Mid-Level Managers
    Most investigations find that changes are needed at the facility's mid-level 
    management systems. Examples of such changes include an increased emphasis 
    on equipment inspection, upgraded operating procedures and more training for 
    the technicians. Mid-level managers, and will understand the demands that are 
    being placed on the organization by the investigation and its follow-up. 
•   Senior Managers
    Many investigators find that technicians are candid and open, and mid-level 
    managers are generally willing to honestly address the need for improvements to 
    the facility's systems. What these investigators sometimes find, however, is that 
    senior managers can be more resistant to the findings and implications of an 
    investigation. 
It may INVOLVE, not shall
Develop/Evaluate/Continual Improvement

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:18
posted:2/13/2014
language:English
pages:18
Terry Penney Terry Penney Manager Company Owner
About Safety has become one of the main vehicles by which industry measures your performance in all departments. Preventing incidents with the potential of causing injuries and ill health •Acting in a safe and responsible manner •Leading by example and promoting trust Having taught and lectured worldwide, I have promoted and welcomed intervention from others. Encouraging and stopping any unsafe activity or where control is being lost. Always getting managers and supervisors to accept responsibility for our actions and achieving continual improvement. And always at all costs complying with all applicable legal and other requirement