Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Lead Root Cause Failure analysis.pptx

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 17

									Lead Root Cause Failure analysis

      What was the final cause?
Oh was that the real root cause
  Find the Root Cause 
Not the Visual Root Cause
       Tracing a problem to its origins 

• Cause Analysis is a popular and often-used technique that helps 
    people answer the question of why the problem occurred in the 
    first place. Cause Analysis seeks to identify the origin of a problem. 
    It uses a specific set of steps, with associated tools, to find the 
    primary cause of the problem, so that you can: 
1. Determine what happened. 
2. Determine why it happened. 
3. Figure out what to do to reduce the likelihood that it will happen 
    again. 

*Cause Analysis assumes that systems and events are interrelated. An 
  action in one area triggers an action in  another, and another, and 
  so on. By tracing back these actions, you can discover where the 
  problem started and how it grew into the symptom you're now 
  facing. 
          Three to the Solution of One
• Physical root causes are the physical component that caused the failure event. These
are almost always present and are typically the overall physical reason the event occurred.
Traditional “Failure Analysis” is key to determining the physical root cause. Unfortunately, if
we only rely upon it, we will stop too early and implement a physical redesign because all we
know is what physically failed. 

• Human root causes are the last human actions that led to the failure event. These usually
are, but not always, present. Too often, organizations seek out the individual that did a
wrong action and stop there. This is counterproductive and will make people unsupportive
of Root Cause because it becomes a “witch-hunt.”

• Latent root causes are the reasons why decisions were made that resulted in the error.
There will usually be more than one latent root, and typically, if these did not exist, then the
human root likely would have been avoided. Examples are organizational systems and
processes that made the human think a certain way and make the improper action.
Eliminating latent root causes will eliminate the failure event, and should be the focus of the
investigation.
    You'll usually find three basic types 
                  of causes: 
                        Usually find three basic types of causes: 
1. Physical causes – Tangible, material items failed in some way (for example, a car's 
    brakes 
stopped working). 
2. Human causes – People did something wrong. or did not doing something that 
    was needed. 
Human causes typically lead to physical causes (for example, no one filled the brake 
    fluid, which 
led to the brakes failing). 
3. Organizational causes – A system, process, or policy that people use to make 
    decisions or do 
their work is faulty (for example, no one person was responsible for vehicle 
    maintenance, and 
everyone assumed someone else had filled the brake fluid). 
Cause Analysis looks at all three types of causes. It involves investigating the 
    patterns of negative effects, finding hidden flaws in the system, and discovering 
    specific actions that contributed to the problem. 
Stack, Rack and Rate your Findings
SPORADIC  YOUR DATA
Think the Magic Three
                   Count to Three
             Root Cause Analysis has five identifiable steps
Define the Problem 
• What do you see happening? 
• What are the specific symptoms? 
Collect Data 
• What proof do you have that the problem exists? 
• How long has the problem existed? 
• What is the impact of the problem? 
Identify Possible Causal Factors 
• What sequence of events leads to the problem? 
• What conditions allow the problem to occur? 
• What other problems surround the occurrence of the central 
   problem? 
          Did you Map the Cause
Determine the total impact of your problems
• Even a simple analysis can be eye-opening to the 
  people who deal with the problem on a regular basis.  
  Managers are sometimes unaware of the details that 
  those closest to the work view as common knowledge.  
  Realistically, the total value also includes the risk to 
  safety, customers and operations.
  The Cause Mapping method provides a disciplined 
  thought process for working through complex 
  problems.  The Cause Mapping method involves both 
  critical thinking and creative ideas.  Analyzing why an 
  issue occurred with objective facts and creative, 
  thoughtful insight leads to better solutions. 
                  Two Types
                 Sporadic or Chronic.
• Sporadic failure events often are one-time
  events that usually gain significant attention 
  because they usually involve significant, 
  unexpected, and severe consequences.
• Chronic events, unfortunately, are those that are
  accepted but may have significant cumulative 
  losses over a long period. Most failure events 
  that occur more than once should be considered 
  chronic.
Do it Like Spock  “Analysis” 
               Ask why 5 times
             Think about the power of WHY
•   The laboratory aide was cut by a dissection knife.
•   The knife was left by the sink.
•   The area was not cleared on the previous day.
•   Clearing is not a daily habit.
•   Standard operating procedures/documentation 
    for clearing do not exist.
Scale and Map the Events
      In doing your investigation
*  Always If possible, start in a “friendly 
   sandbox” surrounded with sponsors and peers 
   who understand there will be glitches, but will 
   accept these as the process is tuned. The root 
   cause is “the evil at the bottom” that sets in 
   motion the entire cause-and-effect chain 
   causing the problem(s).
  Remember at the End 
You always need a Solution

								
To top