; Labour's 2015 Agenda: Ed Miliband's preparations for government
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Labour's 2015 Agenda: Ed Miliband's preparations for government

VIEWS: 7 PAGES: 15

  • pg 1
									Labour’s 2015 agenda

Ed Miliband’s preparations for government

January 2014
                                                                                                                                                                1

Contents

1       Introduction .......................................................................................................... 2
2       From here to 2015: decision points for Labour ................................................ 3
3       Labour’s approach to public procurement ....................................................... 4
4       Key figures ........................................................................................................... 7
        4.1        Michael Dugher (Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office) ............................................ 7
        4.2        Chris Leslie (Shadow Chief Secretary) ......................................................................... 7
        4.3        Chi Onwurah (Junior shadow minister in the Cabinet Office team) ............................... 7
        4.4        Other key players ......................................................................................................... 8
5       The first 100 days ................................................................................................ 9
6       Labour’s political narrative on technology ..................................................... 10
7       Conclusion ......................................................................................................... 13




Labour’s 2015 agenda                                                                                 www.kable.co.uk / © The iD Factor Ltd / + 44 (0) 207 936 6997
                                                                                                                                                    2


1         Introduction
Pollsters ask the question “if the election were held tomorrow, how would you vote?” On that basis, Ed Miliband
looks to be headed to Downing Street: the collapse in Liberal Democrat support and rise of UKIP have combined to
give him a consistent lead over the Conservatives, and the electoral system currently favours Labour. However,
many commentators still do not see Labour as a “government-in-waiting”.

Ed Miliband came to power in part because he told the Labour Party it could win by not doing “politics as usual”.
On the economy and public services he has been at pains to say that Labour would do things differently to the
Conservative-led government. Activists and Members of Parliament have welcomed that differentiation and
demanded more “clear red water”, particularly in the form of easy to understand pledges, like Labour’s September
2013 promise to freeze energy bills.

However, Labour’s leaders also know that if the party differentiates itself too much, it could face problems. They
know that the Conservatives want to promote the idea that Labour would be a risk and that its promises are
unfunded and unworkable. They also know that on some issues like welfare reform, Europe and immigration,
differentiating themselves from the Conservatives could put off key sets of voters.

This is the balancing act that Ed Miliband is trying to achieve in his preparations for office: radical but not
dangerous, different to David Cameron and Tony Blair, but not a return to Michael Foot and Neil Kinnock.
Internally, he has to weigh the demands of MPs, activists and trade union general secretaries for differentiation
against his desire, and the desire of shadow ministers not to be left with policies that unravel in the election
campaign or prove impossible to implement in office. If Ed Miliband can do that - and he has been underestimated
before - the words that just form Labour press releases today could be government policy in 2015.




Labour’s 2015 agenda                                                                     www.kable.co.uk / © The iD Factor Ltd / + 44 (0) 207 936 6997
                                                                                                                                                     3


2         From here to 2015: decision points for Labour
While no longer a “blank sheet of paper”, Labour’s election policy platform is far from complete. There are
essentially three different policymaking processes for the party. Firstly, there is what Ed Miliband and his shadow
ministers announce between now and polling day. Here, the Labour leader has the greatest flexibility to time
announcements to make the maximum political and electoral impact. Key announcements are likely to be made
either shortly ahead of George Osborne’s 2014 Budget or at the pre-election party conference in September 2014.
While a few extras will be saved until the final weeks of the campaign, if Labour wants its offer to be noticed by the
voters, it will need to have made all its substantial policy announcements by the end of party conference week.

However, Ed Miliband does not have a free hand when it comes to Labour’s policymaking. Labour’s National
Policy Forum – composed largely of activists, councillors and representatives of the trade unions – can put a great
deal of pressure on a leader to accept specific policies. Party officials
								
To top