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Effective Meetings _Part 1_

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					Business English Effective Writing (Part I)

Effective Writing (Part I)
1. Types of correspondence       Letters : formal and informal E-mails Faxes Memos Minutes Reports

2. Formal business letters Define your purpose       Why am I writing this letter – what has led up to it? What do I hope to get out of it (my maximum aims)? What do I expect to get out of it (my realistic aims)? What is the best way to achieve this? What information do I need to provide? What arguments do I need to use?

3. How to write a formal business letter 1. Use block style - do not indent paragraphs. 2. Include the address of the person you are writing to at the top of the letter, below your company address. 3. After the address, double space and include date. 4. Double space & include the salutation. 5. State a reference reason for your letter. 6. Give the reason for writing. 7. Make any request you may have. 8. If there is to be further contact, refer to this contact. 9. Close the letter with a thank you. 10. Finish the letter with a salutation. 11. Include 4 spaces & type your full name and title. 12. Sign the letter between the salutation and the typed name and title

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Business English Effective Writing (Part I)

4. Tips for writing formal business letters 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Keep the letter brief and to the point Do not use contractions - write them out Keep a copy of correspondence for future reference 1st paragraph should introduce subject matter & state or imply purpose Body of letter : 1 or more paragraphs. Final paragraph should make your attitude clear! Achieve the right tone : not too casual, not too formal Adopt a clear & consistent layout

5. How to achieve the right tone       Avoid Jargon whenever possible. Use shorter sentences rather than longer ones. Avoid using the passive. Don’t let your feelings get the better of you. Don’t try to be too clever. Be clear and to the point, but don’t be too blunt.

6. Key elements of a formal business letter 1) Your address, telephone, fax, email (top centre right, no name, company) 2) Date e.g. 10th January, 2007 3) Destination name and address (name, job title, company name & address) 4) References (codes used to define a letter/subject) your correspondent's reference : 'Your ref: 01234' your own reference: 'My ref: 56789' or 'Our ref: 56789'. 5) Salutation e.g. Dear Mr Smith 6) Subject (the subject of your letter) not obligatory e.g. Re: Training course 7) Body (the letter itself, well-structured paragraphs) 8) Ending e.g. Yours sincerely 9) Your signature 10) Your name (first name & surname, e.g. James Bond)
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Business English Effective Writing (Part I)

11) (Your title) When using company headed paper, write your Job Title here 12) Enclosures e.g. 'Enc: 2' (for two documents). 7. Titles Mr Miss Mrs Ms Dr 8. Greetings     You don’t know the person’s name and title - Dear Sir or Madam, or To Whom It May Concern You know the person’s name - Dear Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms + surname You have met them or spoken to them by phone - Dear + first name Addressing whole departments/companies – Dear Sirs

9. Endings     You don’t know the person’s name and title – Yours faithfully, sign with initials & surname You know the person’s name – Yours sincerely, sign with first name & surname. You have met them or spoken to them by phone - Yours sincerely, sign with first name. Addressing whole departments – Yours faithfully

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Business English Effective Writing (Part I)

10. Formal business letter – Sample 31 Arlington Rd London NW3 52R Ms B Carter Project Director Excellence Multimedia Productions Excellence House 50 Greenhill Terrace London W2B 7RU 15 February 2007 Dear Ms Carter Thank you for your letter of 10 February. I apologize for not replying sooner but I have just returned from holiday. I would be delighted to act as consultant for the Slow Food programme in your new video project. The project sounds extremely interesting, and I will be very pleased to help you in any way I can. I am afraid I will not be able to meet you next week owing to prior commitments, but I will be available during the first week of March. I enclose a copy of my book A Taste of Italy, which I hope you will find useful. I look forward to meeting you and Eric next month. Yours sincerely Gabriella Ventura Gabriella Ventura

11. Language focus: Starting / making reference Following our phone conversation today… In reply to your fax received… Thank you for your letter of 28 July. Further to our telephone enquiry… With reference to your letter of… It was a pleasure meeting you… 12. Language focus: Explaining the reason for writing I am writing to enquire about/ inform you that/ confirm… I am pleased to confirm… This letter is to thank you…
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Business English Effective Writing (Part I)

13. Language focus: Requesting & Agreeing to requests We would appreciate it if you could… Would you please tell me… Would you kindly check the details.. Could you please send us… Please let us know… I would be delighted to… I would be pleased to attend the meeting. 14. Language focus: Giving good news I am pleased to inform you that your application has been approved. I am delighted to tell you that the order has been confirmed. 15. Language focus: Giving bad news I am afraid the trip has been delayed. Unfortunately the hotel is fully booked. I am sorry to inform you that your application has not been approved. We regret to inform you that the series you requested is no longer available. 16. Language focus: Enclosing documents I enclose a copy of my book. Please find enclosed airline tickets for Mr Johnson. 17. Language focus: Apologizing I am sorry about the mistake. I apologize for not replying sooner. Please accept our apologies for the misunderstanding. 18. Language focus: Ending & referring to future contact Please don't hesitate to contact us should you have any further queries. Please let me know if you require any further information. Please give our kind regards to Bob Hanson. I look forward to meeting you. Looking forward to seeing you soon. Thank your for your time and assistance.

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19. Abbreviations in formal business letters encs. = enclosure (documents are enclosed) pp = procurationem (you are signing on someone else's behalf) Re. = regarding 20. Dates  British English 31/12/00  American English 12/31/00  31 December 2000  December 31st, 2000 21. Run-on sentences 1 Run-on sentences are two or more sentences or independent clauses that have been joined together without a conjunction or without the correct punctuation. *You have an impressive background in sales even so we are unable to offer you a position at this time. *We have a limited quantity of these machines, send us your order as soon as possible. (comma-splice) When two independent clauses are connected by only a comma, they constitute a run-on sentence that is called a comma-splice. When you use a comma to connect two independent clauses, it must be accompanied by a little conjunction (and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so). You have an impressive background in sales. Even so, we are unable to offer you a position at this time. We have a limited quantity of these machines, so send us your order as soon as possible. 22. Run-on sentences 2 Run-on sentences happen typically under the following circumstances: When an independent clause gives an order or directive based on what was said in the prior independent clause: *Several of the participants are unable to attend due to other work commitments, we will be postponing the meeting. (Use period or semicolon.) Several of the participants are unable to attend due to other work commitments; we will be postponing the meeting.

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23. Run-on sentences 3 When two independent clauses are connected by a transitional expression (conjunctive adverb) such as however, moreover, nevertheless. *We have several other products which may interest you, however, we will send you a catalogue. (Use period or semicolon.) We have several other products which may interest you. However, we will send you a catalogue. 24. Run-on sentences 4 When the second of two independent clauses contains a pronoun that connects it to the first independent clause. *This computer doesn't make sense to me, it came without a manual. (replace the comma with a period) This computer doesn't make sense to me. It came without a manual.

25. American vs. British Spelling British -our (honour) -re (centre) -ogue (dialogue) -ence (defence) -ise 1 (recognise) American -or (honor) -er (center) -og (dialog) -ense (defense) -ize (recognize)

American English spelling sometimes does not double the consonant at the end of a word. E.g. travel, traveller, travelling (British)

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26. Faxes – Sample Fulton Chamber of Commerce Fax Transmission To From Date this page) Subject Terry Baptist, CEO James Baker 5 May 2006 1 Your letter, 2 May 2006 Fax no. +33 788 96960 Fax no. +44 1452 741589 No of Pages (including

Dear Mr Baptist Thank you for your letter of 2 May asking about the possibility of opening a factory for the manufacture of your products in Brighton. Let me answer some of your questions. 1 Employees Yes, Fulton has a large workforce of well-trained and hard-working possible employees available. 2 Infrastructure Road and rail links to the main cities in the UK, the airports and the ports are excellent. 3 Local tax In certain situations it is possible to arrange favourable tax conditions for start-up organisations. If you would like to discuss the possibilities further, please call my office to arrange a meeting for when you visit the UK. I look forward to hearing from you. Regards Tim Baker Tim Baker Chief Development Officer

27. Effective writing - Keys to success Remember the 3 C's!!!! Clear Concise Courteous
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